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''Sherlock Holmes in the 22nd Century'' is an animated television series. Produced by Creator/DiCEntertainment, it aired on Creator/FoxKids from September 1999 to July 2001 for a total of 26 episodes in two seasons. Hundreds of years after the [[Franchise/SherlockHolmes Great Detective]]'s time, [[InspectorLestrade Inspector Beth Lestrade]] of New London's Scotland Yard discovers that a {{mad scientist}} has created a clone of the infamous Professor James Moriarty from cells taken from his frozen corpse at Reichenbach Falls. Using the latest technology, she has the well-preserved body of Sherlock Holmes rejuvenated and reanimated to help her foil the plans of what they initially believe to simply be a Moriarty-obsessed madman.

to:

''Sherlock Holmes in the 22nd Century'' is an animated television series. Produced by Creator/DiCEntertainment, it aired on Creator/FoxKids from September 1999 to July 2001 for a total of 26 episodes in two seasons. Hundreds of years after the [[Franchise/SherlockHolmes Great Detective]]'s time, [[InspectorLestrade Inspector Beth Lestrade]] of New London's Scotland Yard discovers that a {{mad scientist}} MadScientist has created a clone of the infamous Professor James Moriarty from cells taken from his frozen corpse at Reichenbach Falls. Using the latest technology, she has the well-preserved body of Sherlock Holmes rejuvenated and reanimated to help her foil the plans of what they initially believe to simply be a Moriarty-obsessed madman.



Each episode was {{suggested by}} a story from the canon, though the extent of the resemblance varies widely: some stories are translated closely, simply transposing the characters to a new setting ("Silver Blaze" with asteroid racing craft, rather than racehorses) while others take little more than names and some concepts ("The Hounds of the Baskervilles" is about "werewolves" on a lunar colony). Most of the stories were, however, rewritten to make Moriarty the ultimate culprit (usually as {{the man behind the man}}).

to:

Each episode was {{suggested by}} SuggestedBy a story from the canon, though the extent of the resemblance varies widely: some stories are translated closely, simply transposing the characters to a new setting ("Silver Blaze" with asteroid racing craft, rather than racehorses) while others take little more than names and some concepts ("The Hounds of the Baskervilles" is about "werewolves" on a lunar colony). Most of the stories were, however, rewritten to make Moriarty the ultimate culprit (usually as {{the man behind the man}}).
TheManBehindTheMan).



* CloningBodyParts: In "The Engineer's Thumb", Moriarty's [[OrganTheft organ-legging]] turns out to be using cloned parts. Which are illegal due to {{clone degeneration}}.

to:

* CloningBodyParts: In "The Engineer's Thumb", Moriarty's [[OrganTheft organ-legging]] turns out to be using cloned parts. Which are illegal due to {{clone degeneration}}.CloneDegeneration.



** However, ''Lestrade''[='=]s idea to bring Holmes ''back to life'' to defeat a Moriarty-like {{big bad}} must take the UsefulNotes/AcademyAward for this trope.
* CutTheJuice: In "The Adventure of the Beryl Board", our heroes are attacked by robotic museum exhibits. The computer whiz of the week attempts to shut them with {{rapid fire typing}}, and fails. Then they suddenly stop; cut to Holmes, holding up a power cord and looking smug.

to:

** However, ''Lestrade''[='=]s idea to bring Holmes ''back to life'' to defeat a Moriarty-like {{big bad}} BigBad must take the UsefulNotes/AcademyAward for this trope.
* CutTheJuice: In "The Adventure of the Beryl Board", our heroes are attacked by robotic museum exhibits. The computer whiz of the week attempts to shut them with {{rapid fire typing}}, RapidFireTyping, and fails. Then they suddenly stop; cut to Holmes, holding up a power cord and looking smug.



* GettingCrapPastTheRadar: The {{unusual euphemism}} "zed" replaces several different swear words throughout the show. Older audiences understand the various contexts of the word.

to:

* GettingCrapPastTheRadar: The {{unusual euphemism}} UnusualEuphemism}} "zed" replaces several different swear words throughout the show. Older audiences understand the various contexts of the word.



* GoodIsNotNice: Lestrade can indeed be a {{fair cop}}, but she can also be a downright scary one. Consider: she is the only Yarder we ever see overseeing someone in the cryptnosis chair, and her method of handling arrested people leaves something to be desired.

to:

* GoodIsNotNice: Lestrade can indeed be a {{fair cop}}, FairCop, but she can also be a downright scary one. Consider: she is the only Yarder we ever see overseeing someone in the cryptnosis chair, and her method of handling arrested people leaves something to be desired.



* {{Recycled IN SPACE}}: In this case, Recycled [[RecycledINSPACE IN THE FUTURE]].

to:

* {{Recycled IN SPACE}}: RecycledInSpace: In this case, Recycled [[RecycledINSPACE IN THE FUTURE]].


* BadassLongcoat:
** Holmes ''and'' Moriarty.

to:

* BadassLongcoat:
**
BadassLongcoat: Holmes ''and'' Moriarty.



* BorrowedBiometricBypass:
** In "The Adventure of the Mazarin Chip", Moriarty kidnaps the Prime Minister so he can use him to unlock various biometric safeguards protecting the nation's security (this being the kind of show it is, he drags the whole PM around instead of just taking the bits he needs).

to:

* BorrowedBiometricBypass:
**
BorrowedBiometricBypass: In "The Adventure of the Mazarin Chip", Moriarty kidnaps the Prime Minister so he can use him to unlock various biometric safeguards protecting the nation's security (this being the kind of show it is, he drags the whole PM around instead of just taking the bits he needs).



* BritainIsOnlyLondon:
** In a Sherlock Holmes adaptation, what else would you expect?

to:

* BritainIsOnlyLondon:
**
BritainIsOnlyLondon: In a Sherlock Holmes adaptation, what else would you expect?



* CatchPhrase:
** All the Holmes standards plus some others. "Eyes and brains!"

to:

* CatchPhrase:
**
CatchPhrase: All the Holmes standards plus some others. "Eyes and brains!"



* CharacterDevelopment:
** Holmes and Lestrade demonstrate considerable character development in the show, Holmes throughout the first three episodes, and Lestrade throughout the series, regarding her relationships with Holmes and the Irregulars.

to:

* CharacterDevelopment:
**
CharacterDevelopment: Holmes and Lestrade demonstrate considerable character development in the show, Holmes throughout the first three episodes, and Lestrade throughout the series, regarding her relationships with Holmes and the Irregulars.



* ChristmasEpisode:
** A retake of "The Blue Carbuncle," with amusing results.

to:

* ChristmasEpisode:
**
ChristmasEpisode: A retake of "The Blue Carbuncle," with amusing results.



* CrazyEnoughToWork:
** Holmes's plans, as is fitting, tend to be this.

to:

* CrazyEnoughToWork:
**
CrazyEnoughToWork: Holmes's plans, as is fitting, tend to be this.



* DoAndroidsDream:
** Curiously ignored after the second episode, considering that Watson is a compudroid with the ''real'' Watson's [[ArchiveBinge journals uploaded into him]].

to:

* DoAndroidsDream:
**
DoAndroidsDream: Curiously ignored after the second episode, considering that Watson is a compudroid with the ''real'' Watson's [[ArchiveBinge journals uploaded into him]].


* BadassLongcoat: Holmes ''and'' Moriarty.

to:

* BadassLongcoat: BadassLongcoat:
**
Holmes ''and'' Moriarty.



* BorrowedBiometricBypass: In "The Adventure of the Mazarin Chip", Moriarty kidnaps the Prime Minister so he can use him to unlock various biometric safeguards protecting the nation's security (this being the kind of show it is, he drags the whole PM around instead of just taking the bits he needs).

to:

* BorrowedBiometricBypass: BorrowedBiometricBypass:
**
In "The Adventure of the Mazarin Chip", Moriarty kidnaps the Prime Minister so he can use him to unlock various biometric safeguards protecting the nation's security (this being the kind of show it is, he drags the whole PM around instead of just taking the bits he needs).



* BritainIsOnlyLondon: In a Sherlock Holmes adaptation, what else would you expect?

to:

* BritainIsOnlyLondon: BritainIsOnlyLondon:
**
In a Sherlock Holmes adaptation, what else would you expect?



* CatchPhrase: All the Holmes standards plus some others. "Eyes and brains!"

to:

* CatchPhrase: CatchPhrase:
**
All the Holmes standards plus some others. "Eyes and brains!"



* CharacterDevelopment: Holmes and Lestrade demonstrate considerable character development in the show, Holmes throughout the first three episodes, and Lestrade throughout the series, regarding her relationships with Holmes and the Irregulars.

to:

* CharacterDevelopment: CharacterDevelopment:
**
Holmes and Lestrade demonstrate considerable character development in the show, Holmes throughout the first three episodes, and Lestrade throughout the series, regarding her relationships with Holmes and the Irregulars.



* ChristmasEpisode: A retake of "The Blue Carbuncle," with amusing results.

to:

* ChristmasEpisode: ChristmasEpisode:
**
A retake of "The Blue Carbuncle," with amusing results.



* CrazyEnoughToWork: Holmes's plans, as is fitting, tend to be this.

to:

* CrazyEnoughToWork: CrazyEnoughToWork:
**
Holmes's plans, as is fitting, tend to be this.



* DoAndroidsDream: Curiously ignored after the second episode, considering that Watson is a compudroid with the ''real'' Watson's [[ArchiveBinge journals uploaded into him]].

to:

* DoAndroidsDream: DoAndroidsDream:
**
Curiously ignored after the second episode, considering that Watson is a compudroid with the ''real'' Watson's [[ArchiveBinge journals uploaded into him]].


* AmbiguouslyHuman: Martin Fenwick. Just ''look'' at him.

to:

* AmbiguouslyHuman: Martin Fenwick. Just ''look'' at [[http://statici.behindthevoiceactors.com/behindthevoiceactors/_img/chars/fenwick-sherlock-holmes-in-the-22nd-century-19.4.jpg him.]]

Added DiffLines:

* AdaptationalHeroism: Downplayed with Grimesby Roylott [[spoiler:while he is still the culprit of a case, his actions are more noble and he cares for his daughter's future]].


* RecycledPremise: An episode of ''WesternAnimation/{{Bravestarr}}'' used the same idea of Sherlock Holmes being frozen in ice after his duel to the death with Moriarty, and them both being revived in the far future.

to:

* RecycledPremise: An episode of ''WesternAnimation/{{Bravestarr}}'' used the same idea of Sherlock Holmes being frozen ending up in ice the future after his duel to the death with Moriarty, and them both being revived in the far future.Moriarty.

Added DiffLines:

* RecycledPremise: An episode of ''WesternAnimation/{{Bravestarr}}'' used the same idea of Sherlock Holmes being frozen in ice after his duel to the death with Moriarty, and them both being revived in the far future.


''Sherlock Holmes in the 22nd Century'' is an animated television series. Produced by Creator/DiCEntertainment, it aired on Creator/{{FOX}} from September 1999 to July 2001 for a total of 26 episodes in two seasons. Hundreds of years after the [[Franchise/SherlockHolmes Great Detective]]'s time, [[InspectorLestrade Inspector Beth Lestrade]] of New London's Scotland Yard discovers that a {{mad scientist}} has created a clone of the infamous Professor James Moriarty from cells taken from his frozen corpse at Reichenbach Falls. Using the latest technology, she has the well-preserved body of Sherlock Holmes rejuvenated and reanimated to help her foil the plans of what they initially believe to simply be a Moriarty-obsessed madman.

to:

''Sherlock Holmes in the 22nd Century'' is an animated television series. Produced by Creator/DiCEntertainment, it aired on Creator/{{FOX}} Creator/FoxKids from September 1999 to July 2001 for a total of 26 episodes in two seasons. Hundreds of years after the [[Franchise/SherlockHolmes Great Detective]]'s time, [[InspectorLestrade Inspector Beth Lestrade]] of New London's Scotland Yard discovers that a {{mad scientist}} has created a clone of the infamous Professor James Moriarty from cells taken from his frozen corpse at Reichenbach Falls. Using the latest technology, she has the well-preserved body of Sherlock Holmes rejuvenated and reanimated to help her foil the plans of what they initially believe to simply be a Moriarty-obsessed madman.


[[caption-width-right:300:Not half as {{Badass}} [[CoversAlwaysLie as this picture makes it look]].]]

to:

[[caption-width-right:300:Not half as {{Badass}} Badass [[CoversAlwaysLie as this picture makes it look]].]]

Added DiffLines:

* BeastAndBeauty: The basic plot of both "The Crooked Man" and "The Creeping Man." The latter bears an additional resemblance to [[Disney/BeautyAndTheBeast the Disney film]] due to the presence of [[spoiler: a rival suitor seeking to ruin the beast and beauty's relationship]].


* ArtisticLicensePharmacology: In "The Red Headed League," Holmes and Watson notice a foul smell on some paintings, which is attributed to benzodiazepine, described as "a powerful sedative." In reality, benzodiazepines are a class of medications, including Xanax and Valium, not a single medication, and their main purpose is to treat anxiety, though some are used for the very short-term treatment of insomnia. Moreover, they are odorless.
** They are also administered orally (as pills) or intravenously (as liquid), not by inhalation, meaning that [[spoiler: Moriarty's plan to sedate an entire crowd using benzos embedded in the paint is completely beyond science]].
** Besides, it's unlikely they'd still be in use in the 22nd century: in reality, benzodiazepines quickly rendered barbiturates obsolete, so it's incredible to think that benzos haven't similarly been made obsolete in the space of a hundred years, especially considering their high potential for abuse.

to:

* ArtisticLicensePharmacology: In "The Red Headed League," Holmes and Watson notice a foul smell on some paintings, which is attributed to benzodiazepine, described as "a powerful sedative." In reality, benzodiazepines are a class of medications, including Xanax and Valium, not a single medication, and their main purpose is to treat anxiety, though some are used for the very short-term treatment of insomnia. Moreover, they are odorless.
**
odorless. They are also administered orally (as pills) or intravenously (as liquid), not by inhalation, meaning that [[spoiler: Moriarty's plan to sedate an entire crowd using benzos embedded in the paint is completely beyond science]].
** Besides, it's unlikely they'd still be in use in the 22nd century: in reality, benzodiazepines quickly rendered barbiturates obsolete, so it's incredible to think that benzos haven't similarly been made obsolete in the space of a hundred years, especially considering their high potential for abuse.
science]].

Added DiffLines:

* ArtisticLicensePharmacology: In "The Red Headed League," Holmes and Watson notice a foul smell on some paintings, which is attributed to benzodiazepine, described as "a powerful sedative." In reality, benzodiazepines are a class of medications, including Xanax and Valium, not a single medication, and their main purpose is to treat anxiety, though some are used for the very short-term treatment of insomnia. Moreover, they are odorless.
** They are also administered orally (as pills) or intravenously (as liquid), not by inhalation, meaning that [[spoiler: Moriarty's plan to sedate an entire crowd using benzos embedded in the paint is completely beyond science]].
** Besides, it's unlikely they'd still be in use in the 22nd century: in reality, benzodiazepines quickly rendered barbiturates obsolete, so it's incredible to think that benzos haven't similarly been made obsolete in the space of a hundred years, especially considering their high potential for abuse.


* BlondesAreEvil: Subverted with [[spoiler: Heather Trenton]], who had no idea what she was really doing.
** Played with in "The Beryl Board".


** However, ''Lestrade''[='=]s idea to bring Holmes ''back to life'' to defeat a Moriarty-like {{big bad}} must take the AcademyAward for this trope.

to:

** However, ''Lestrade''[='=]s idea to bring Holmes ''back to life'' to defeat a Moriarty-like {{big bad}} must take the AcademyAward UsefulNotes/AcademyAward for this trope.

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