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* FlatCharacter: None of the characters in this comic could be said to be developed or characterized much beyond exactly what is needed to make the (also minimalist) story work. But this isn't a bad thing, giving how minimalist the comic is- no text or dialogue appears in the comic whatsoever, and it's more about looking at pretty scenery and art than anything else. Giving anybody very much characterization would have either required the addition of text, or removed the focus from the visuals.


* BrownBagMask: In Chapter 3, the knight recruits an unpopular stage magician who wears a paper bag over their head, and expresses emotions through crude facial expressions drawn on the bag with marker.

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* BrownBagMask: In Chapter 3, the knight recruits an unpopular stage magician who wears a paper bag over their head, and [[ExpressiveMask expresses emotions through crude facial expressions drawn on the bag with marker.marker]].


* AmbiguouslyEvil: The koalas, [[spoiler:at first]]. The bunny and dino are visibly creeped out by them when passing through their lands, and they all wear opaque glasses that shine in the darkness. One of the koalas stalks the bunny and dino with a sack on their back and snoops on the fortune teller's vision of the temple, implying that they were going to attempt to steal [[spoiler:the rabbit spirit or possibly other]] treasure in the temple. [[spoiler:But when the rabbit spirit's temple starts collapsing, they quickly have a change of heart as they help the bunny and dino escape with the rabbit spirit and join them instead. This koala, at least, remains in DarkIsNotEvil territory for the rest of the story.]]

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* AmbiguouslyEvil: The koalas, [[spoiler:at first]]. The bunny and dino are visibly creeped out by them when passing through their lands, and they all wear [[ScaryShinyGlasses opaque glasses that shine in the darkness.darkness]]. One of the koalas stalks the bunny and dino with a sack on their back and snoops on the fortune teller's vision of the temple, implying that they were going to attempt to steal [[spoiler:the rabbit spirit or possibly other]] treasure in the temple. [[spoiler:But when the rabbit spirit's temple starts collapsing, they quickly have a change of heart as they help the bunny and dino escape with the rabbit spirit and join them instead. This koala, at least, remains in DarkIsNotEvil territory for the rest of the story.]]


* AmbiguousSituation: The comic does not have a very urgent feel to it, ruling out the possibility that the journey was about finding a way to restore the village. So, why is [[spoiler:the bunny]] so far from home, anyway? How did the bunny and the dino end up together in the first place? Did the bunny set out to search for the rabbit spirit, or did they just happen upon it? [[spoiler:Who, or what was the bunny's parent reaching for? And if the second-to-last page really is supposed to be read as the dino being some kind of rabbit deity/prophet in disguise, then how much did it know about what was going on?]]

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* AmbiguousSituation: The comic does not have a very urgent feel to it, ruling out the possibility that the journey was about finding a way to restore the village. So, why is [[spoiler:the bunny]] so far from home, anyway? How did the bunny and the dino end up together in the first place? Did the bunny set out to search for the rabbit spirit, or did they just happen upon it? [[spoiler:Who, Who, or what was the [[spoiler:the bunny's parent parent]] reaching for? And if the second-to-last page really is supposed to be read as the [[spoiler:the dino being some kind of rabbit deity/prophet in disguise, disguise]], then how much did it they know about what was going on?]]on?



* CerebusSyndrome: The first eight pages of the story (of a total of 31) barely show the reader anything about the plot to come- it just appears to be the bunny and dino enjoying the scenery in some unspoiled wilderness. There are exactly two hints in those eight pages, but the significance of only one of them gets made clear anytime soon.
* ChekhovsGun: [[spoiler:The rabbit statue]] hints towards many things later in the story. Since the comic is mainly just pretty art of pretty, unspoiled landscapes before and a good while after this, the simple depiction of [[spoiler:a man-made (rabbit-made?) object]] against yet more pretty landscapes is subtle enough that a first-time reader might not think anything of it, let alone realize it's a ChekhovsGun except in hindsight.

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* CerebusSyndrome: The first eight pages of the story (of a total of 31) barely show the reader anything about the plot to come- it just appears to be the bunny and dino enjoying the scenery in some unspoiled wilderness. There are exactly two plot-relevant hints in those eight pages, but the significance of only one of them gets made clear anytime soon.
* ChekhovsGun: [[spoiler:The rabbit The [[spoiler:rabbit statue]] hints towards many things later in the story. Since the comic is mainly just pretty art of pretty, unspoiled landscapes before and a good while after this, the simple depiction of [[spoiler:a man-made (rabbit-made?) object]] against yet more pretty landscapes is subtle enough that a first-time reader might not think anything of it, let alone realize it's a ChekhovsGun except in hindsight.


** The red dragon... might be male? ''Legend of Legendary Mighty Knight'' ends with the red dragon and a black dragon getting together. Both dragons are drawn with eyelashes- the red only with lower lashes, and the black with upper lashes, but then the red dragon puts on a bowtie and a flower, making the black dragon blush and swoon.

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** [[ZigZaggingTrope The red dragon... might be male? male?]] ''Legend of Legendary Mighty Knight'' ends with the red dragon and a black dragon getting together. Both dragons are drawn with eyelashes- the red only with lower lashes, and the black with upper lashes, but then the red dragon puts on a bowtie and a flower, making the black dragon blush and swoon.


* ''[[https://fifteenminds.tumblr.com/tagged/Gemini/chrono Gemini]]'' (August 19th, 2019 - Present): When a magenta-furred rabbit alien is forced to flee the destruction of their planet, they encounter a young child and explore the galaxy together.

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* ''[[https://fifteenminds.tumblr.com/tagged/Gemini/chrono Gemini]]'' (August 19th, 2019 - Present): When a magenta-furred rabbit alien is forced to flee the destruction of their planet, they encounter a young child and explore the galaxy together.
try to figure out what comes next.


** From ''Blue Moon Blossom'', we have the fortune teller. All of the other animals depicted have very clear real-world animal inspirations, if they're not simply cartoony versions of real groups of animals outright, but the fortune teller appears to be some kind of abstract blob creature with at least one arm. Their upper face is completely obscured by a stereotypical fortune teller's decorated shawl, and it has a distinctly human-like nose, in a setting where there's no humans to be seen and everyone else either has no noses or teeny cartoony noses.

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** From ''Blue Moon Blossom'', we have the fortune teller. All of the other animals depicted have very clear real-world animal inspirations, if they're not simply cartoony versions of real groups of animals outright, but the fortune teller appears to be some kind of abstract blob creature with at least one arm.arm, assuming that the star-patterned, violet-blue-green gradient-colored thing is in fact their body and not, say, a robe. Their upper face is completely obscured by a stereotypical fortune teller's decorated shawl, and it has a distinctly human-like nose, in a setting where there's no humans to be seen and everyone else either has no noses or teeny cartoony noses.



* NonStandardCharacterDesign: The fortune teller stands out for being based on a BlobMonster rather than any real-world animals/animal groups (even stylized ones), being colored with a grainy violet-blue-green gradient instead of a single flat color, and having a star pattern apparently right on their body.

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* NonStandardCharacterDesign: The fortune teller stands out for being based on a BlobMonster rather than any real-world animals/animal groups (even stylized ones), being colored with a grainy violet-blue-green gradient instead of a single flat color, and having a star pattern apparently right on their body. And that's assuming that that's actually their body and not, say, a cloak, which would make them the only one wearing a full set of clothing other than possibly the bunny [[spoiler:and their parent]]. Again, assuming the bunny's actually wearing a garment and doesn't actually have red fur.


* GooGooGodlike: The child is half the magenta rabbit's height and for all intents and purposes is regarded as a small child, but when faced with a monster, they have no trouble throwing it off, much to the magenta rabbit's shock. A page later, they start ''levitating'', snatch a bird out of the air, and try to eat it.

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* GooGooGodlike: The child is half the magenta rabbit's height and for all intents and purposes is regarded as a small child, but when faced with a monster, monster larger than either of them, they have no trouble lifting it into the air and throwing it off, much to the magenta rabbit's shock. A page later, they start ''levitating'', snatch a bird out of the air, and try to eat it.


* BeautifulVoid: The worlds that ''Blue Moon Blossom'' and ''Gemini'' take place in- a slightly fantastical, Earthlike world, and a galaxy, respectively -are drawn in a simple, minimally-shaded, unlined style that draws attention to the colors in the scenery and animals. A lot of different animals and aliens are depicted over the course of the comic in contexts that don't portray them as characters, but only a handful of particular individuals could even be considered characters. The comics in general do not depict text or name their characters in- or out of universe. ''Blue Moon Blossom'' in particular takes its minimalist cast even further than most examples of this trope by only minimally characterizing the ones we could count as characters.



* BeautifulVoid: The world this comic takes place in is drawn in a simple, minimally-shaded, unlined style that draws attention to the colors in the scenery and animals. A lot of different animals are depicted over the course of the comic in contexts that don't portray them as characters, but only a handful of particular individuals could even be considered characters. ''Blue Moon Blossom'' takes its minimalist cast even further than most examples of this trope by not even naming any of the characters in or out-of-universe, in addition to the general lack of text, and only minimally characterizing the ones we could count as characters.


* SilenceIsGolden: The stories of Fifteen Minds are all completely wordless webcomics. No written language is ever depicted in the comics, whether in the art or as dialogue, narration, or sounds, save for occasional out-of-universe "THE END" or title/chapter panels. The closest ''Legend'' gets to this is when the dragon explains its backstory through pictures within speech bubbles. This design choice deliberately leaves a lot of the stories' circumstances up to interpretation, keeps the focus on the art and events, and (perhaps unintentionally) makes the comics practically immune to language barriers. The artist doesn't generally say much at all about their comics, either.
** Oddly enough, despite ''Gemini'' also not writing out any dialogue, the rabbit-alien protagonist is definitely depicted speaking to contrast against their deuteragonist, making that work a subversion.

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* SilenceIsGolden: The stories of Fifteen Minds are all completely wordless webcomics. No written language is ever depicted in the comics, whether in the art or as dialogue, narration, or sounds, save for occasional out-of-universe "THE END" or title/chapter panels. The closest ''Legend'' gets to this is when the dragon explains its backstory through pictures within speech bubbles. This design choice deliberately leaves a lot of the stories' circumstances up to interpretation, keeps the focus on the art and events, and (perhaps unintentionally) makes the comics practically immune to language barriers. The artist doesn't generally say much at all about their comics, either.
** Oddly enough, despite ''Gemini'' also
either. ''Blue Moon Blossom'' is notable for not writing out any dialogue, even implying the rabbit-alien protagonist is definitely depicted speaking to contrast against their deuteragonist, making existence of written language or that work a subversion.dialogue happens. Later comics all imply dialogue somehow, but go no further.


** Oddly enough, the bunny and [[spoiler:their parent]] from ''Blue Moon Blossom'' are the only characters who seem to be wearing any kind of clothing, assuming that they're actually wearing cloaks with pockets for their ears and don't actually have colored fur, of course. (And by that extent, the fortune teller, assuming they're actually wearing a robe or something and don't actually have a star pattern on their body.) The other animals seen are {{Accessory Wearing Cartoon Animal}}s at most, and stick to wearing just accessories or protective gear, like an apron.

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** Oddly enough, the bunny and [[spoiler:their parent]] from ''Blue Moon Blossom'' are the only characters who seem to be wearing any kind of clothing, full outfits, assuming that they're actually wearing cloaks with pockets for their ears and don't actually have colored fur, of course. (And by that extent, the fortune teller, assuming they're actually wearing a robe or something and don't actually have a star pattern on their body.) The other animals seen are {{Accessory Wearing Cartoon Animal}}s at most, and stick to wearing just accessories or protective gear, like an apron.


* TheQuietOne: Why does this matter in a comic that depicts no dialogue at all? The magenta rabbit is ''implied'' to be speaking when they berate the gray rabbit, showing that speech does occur in this setting. The child is never implied to speak, in contrast to the magenta rabbit.

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* TheQuietOne: Why does this matter in a comic that depicts no dialogue at all? The magenta rabbit is ''implied'' to be speaking when they berate the gray rabbit, child, showing that speech does occur in this setting. The child is never implied to speak, in contrast to the magenta rabbit.


* AmazingTechnicolorWildlife: The protagonist is a bipedal rabbit-alien with magenta-colored fur and seafoam-green sclerae and mucous membranes, suggesting interesting things about their blood chemistry. The child has pale gray fur and light blue eyes.

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* AmazingTechnicolorWildlife: The protagonist is a bipedal rabbit-alien with magenta-colored fur and seafoam-green sclerae eyes and mucous membranes, suggesting interesting things about their blood chemistry. The child has pale gray fur and light blue eyes.



* TechnicolorEyes: The protagonist has seafoam-green sclerae combined with BeadyBlackEyes.

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* TechnicolorEyes: The protagonist has either seafoam-green sclerae combined with BeadyBlackEyes.or seafoam-green irises that fill their entire visible eye, or [[MonochromaticEyes both]], like many nonhuman animals.

Added DiffLines:

* TechnicolorEyes: The protagonist has seafoam-green sclerae combined with BeadyBlackEyes.


* TheTeaser: None of the stories so far have begun with the title. ''Legend of Legendary Mighty Knight'' got a title card on the second page, but in ''Blue Moon Blossom''[='s=] case, the title was only revealed in the Tumblr tags.

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* TheTeaser: None of the stories so far have begun with the title. ''Legend of Legendary Mighty Knight'' got a title card on the second page, but in ''Blue Moon Blossom''[='s=] case, the title was only revealed in the Tumblr tags. ''Gemini'' got a title card on the first page, but it was at the ''end'' of the page, after watching the protagonist crying as they escape their planet blowing up.


Added DiffLines:

* ApocalypseHow: ApocalypseHow/ClassX; the comic opens with the protagonist escaping as their planet [[EarthShatteringKaboom explodes]].

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