Follow TV Tropes

Following

History WebVideo / CounterMonkey

Go To


Added DiffLines:

* AnAesop: At its core, "Shadowrun: The Code" is basically a lecture on TheGoldenRule (which Noah calls [[TitleDrop "The Code"]]). He explains this using baseball as a metaphor: If a batter hits a home run and then smugly watches it go over the fence before running the bases, he's just blatantly disrespected the pitcher, and should understand that the pitcher is going to nail one of his teammates with a fastball as payback for him being a prick. Likewise, the main story is about a ''Shadowrun'' game that went off the rails because the players acted like violent sociopaths for no good reason, turning what should have been a routine robbery into a needless bloodbath. As payback, Noah sicced a nigh-unwinnable boss encounter on the players when they tried to escape, killing several of them and (one hopes) teaching the players a valuable lesson in the process.

Added DiffLines:

** In "Roll for Initiative, Jesus!", he notes that the Bible-themed RPG doesn't stat out Jesus, presumably for this reason. On the other hand, when someone asks "Are there stats for Satan?", Spoony declares "Let's go get that red motherfucker!" and goes to the book's index to search; unfortunately, he wasn't statted either so the charge ends there.


* TheMoralSubstitute: "Roll for Initiative, Jesus!" has Spoony examining a Christian-themed UsefulNotes/D20System game.

to:

* TheMoralSubstitute: "Roll for Initiative, Jesus!" has Spoony examining a Christian-themed UsefulNotes/D20System game. He notes that it largely sticks to Old Testament figures like Moses and avoids statting up Jesus, presumably because, as he jokes, the average adventuring party [[LordBritishPostulate would try their luck at killing him just to see if they could]].


* TheMoralSubstitute: "Roll for Initiative, Jesus!" has Spoony examining a Christian-themed TabletopGame/D20System game.

to:

* TheMoralSubstitute: "Roll for Initiative, Jesus!" has Spoony examining a Christian-themed TabletopGame/D20System UsefulNotes/D20System game.


* LaserGuidedKarma: Vegan Steve ends up dying by pulling the Void card from the Deck of Many Things, an item he obtained by completely screwing the party over. Note that he drew it as his last card ''[[TooDumbToLive out of 11]]'', after his first ten cards were beneficial, ''and'' the tenth card allowed him to escape his furious teammembers. It couldn't be more laser-guided than that.

to:

* LaserGuidedKarma: Vegan Steve ends up dying by pulling the Void card from the Deck of Many Things, an item he obtained by completely screwing the party over. Note that there are only twenty-two cards in the deck, half of them good and half bad, and he drew it the Void as his last card ''[[TooDumbToLive out of 11]]'', after his first ten cards were beneficial, ''and'' the tenth card allowed him to escape his furious teammembers. It couldn't be more laser-guided than that.


Counter Monkey is a WebVideo series hosted by [[WebVideo/TheSpoonyExperiment Noah Antwiler, also known as The Spoony One]]. In this series, Spoony recounts various [[Funny/CounterMonkey amusing]] and [[Awesome/CounterMonkey awesome]] stories from his TabletopGame days, as well as offering helpful tips and tricks for other [[GameMaster GMs]]. Also featured recordings of regular weekly TabletopGame/{{Pathfinder}} sessions played over Skype, based on the Kingmaker adventure path and starring many of the same players from [[WebVideo/SpoonysCampaign his other campaign]].

to:

Counter Monkey is was a WebVideo series hosted by [[WebVideo/TheSpoonyExperiment Noah Antwiler, also known as The Spoony One]]. In this series, Spoony recounts various [[Funny/CounterMonkey amusing]] and [[Awesome/CounterMonkey awesome]] stories from his TabletopGame days, as well as offering helpful tips and tricks for other [[GameMaster GMs]]. Also featured recordings of regular weekly TabletopGame/{{Pathfinder}} sessions played over Skype, based on the Kingmaker adventure path and starring many of the same players from [[WebVideo/SpoonysCampaign his other campaign]].



Spoony originally wanted to publish it in a book, but it later morphed into a blog (which can be found [[http://countermonkeybook.blogspot.com/ here]], it also has [[http://countermonkey.com/ a WordPress site]]) and eventually into a video series hosted on The Spoony Experiment along with his other reviews. Spoony has also mentioned hosting a weekly podcast or still trying to publish the stories, but these have not yet materialized.

to:

Spoony originally wanted to publish it in a book, but it later morphed into a blog (which can be found [[http://countermonkeybook.blogspot.com/ here]], it also has [[http://countermonkey.com/ a WordPress site]]) and eventually into a video series hosted on The Spoony Experiment along with his other reviews. Spoony has also mentioned hosting a weekly podcast or still trying to publish the stories, but these have not yet materialized.
materialized. Much like Spoony's other content, the show has effectively dropped off the face of the earth due to Noah's apathy and medical issues.

Added DiffLines:

* TheRolePlayer: Spoony is unabashedly this kind of gamer, wanting to immerse himself in the story.


* KillerGameMaster: Spoony laments that most of his sessions end with his players dying gruesomely. This is chalked up more to bad luck than evil intent, though Spoony has admitted that he's a "harsh" DM generally. However, this is due to him wanting the players to overcome a genuine challenge so they feel a sense of accomplishment for it. A few stories tell of Spoony bending the rules a bit to help out the party if they get incredibly unlucky and the campaign would otherwise derail ("Botchmania", "Vegan Steve & The Djinni of Jengai Fomogo"), because he ''wants'' them to win; he's just not going to make it easy.

to:

* KillerGameMaster: Spoony laments that most of his sessions end with his players dying gruesomely. This is chalked up more to bad luck than evil intent, though Spoony has admitted that he's a "harsh" DM generally. However, this is due to him wanting the players to overcome a genuine challenge so they feel a sense of accomplishment for it. A In a few stories tell of Spoony bending the rules a bit averted this by actively trying to help out the party if players when they get incredibly unlucky and the campaign would otherwise derail ("Botchmania", "Vegan were getting screwed either by atrociously bad luck ("Botchamania") or by one player going OffTheRails ("Vegan Steve & The Djinni of Jengai Fomogo"), because he ''wants'' them to win; he's just not going to make it easy.Fomogo").


** In "Know Your Role", he says while flipping through an old-school tabletop RPG guide for a [=WWF=] game, he expected to hate it at a glance. Once he began reading the book though he began appreciating the originality and effort put into it, such as mechanics to keep track of a wrestler's reputation in the crowd and how it affects their performance, and how a manager could influence a match. He decided that while he would never play it, it is a pretty cool system as far as approximating a wrestling match in tabletop goes.

to:

** In "Know Your Role", he says while flipping through an old-school tabletop RPG guide for a [=WWF=] game, he expected to hate it at a glance. Once he began reading the book though he began appreciating the originality and effort put into it, such including a map of the arena and a table to show how long it would take wrestlers to travel between two points (such as coming to interfere with a match or save a partner from attack), how managers can influence a match even after it has ended, and mechanics to keep track of a wrestler's reputation in with the crowd and how it affects influences their performance, performance. Wrestlers can also film promos, and how a manager could influence a match. if their popularity is great enough, sign commercials and television deals[[note]]the manual also notes that players are encouraged to actually act out their performances[[/note]], allowing players having to manage their careers and not abstracting the business down to fights in the ring. He decided that while he would never play it, it is a pretty cool system as far as approximating a wrestling match in tabletop goes.and allowing players to roleplay as a wrestler.

Added DiffLines:

** In "Let's Split Up", he asks rogues what their plan is when, inevitably, they botch their stealth roll while trying to sneak into a place. The answer should ''not'' be "stand up and fight", because you're alone and will probably die. Have some sort of trick or strategy to get away.


*** In the same video, he brings up times when gameplay and story do not get along. As an example, say a level 20 fighter wakes up in bed with an assassin holding a knife to their throat. In game terms, the player doesn't care, that knife does 1d4 damage and their fighter has 300 hit points. In story terms, the assassin has a dagger to his throat and there is no way a knife to the throat is not going to be fatal.

to:

*** In the same video, he brings up times when gameplay and story do not get along. As an example, say a level 20 fighter wakes up in bed with an assassin holding a knife to their throat. In game terms, the player doesn't care, that knife does 1d4 damage and their fighter has 300 hit points. In story terms, the assassin has a dagger to his throat and there is no way a knife to the throat is not going to be fatal. Similarly in the ''Thieves World'' game, Tempus Thales took a flask of acid to the face; Tempus is a PhysicalGod and in gameplay terms an acid flash is barely ScratchDamage to him, but in story terms, he just got doused in the face with acid, and there's no good way to take that.

Added DiffLines:

* DrawAggro: If a character is LawfulStupid, and calls enemies out directly, Spoony says to just let this happen, so the other players have an opportunity to sneak around while the first player is drawing attention.


* AlternateContinuity: He recommends doing this for any adventure set in an established continuity, such as comic books or television shows, because the DM will be able to freely change whatever aspects of the setting they wish. This solves several problems, mainly players familiar with the work calling out the DM on fudging facts about the setting, and the DM can counter players trying to be GenreSavvy by using their knowledge of the work to influence their decisions when their characters don't know what the player knows. He notes in a game about ''Babylon 5'' that it didn't happen often, but if a player tried to use their knowledge of the show to influence decisions, he would turn it WrongGenreSavvy by going against their expectations.

to:

* AlternateContinuity: He recommends doing this for any adventure set in an established continuity, such as comic books or television shows, because the DM will be able to freely change whatever aspects of the setting they wish. This solves several problems, mainly players familiar with the work calling out the DM on fudging facts about the setting, and the DM can counter players trying to be GenreSavvy by using their knowledge of the work to influence their decisions when their characters don't know what the player knows. He notes in a game about ''Babylon 5'' ''Series/BabylonFive'' that it didn't happen often, but if a player tried to use their knowledge of the show to influence decisions, he would turn it WrongGenreSavvy by going against their expectations.


** The "Botchamania" video features an entire ''Spycraft'' party whose attempts to board a train resulted in two team members dying thanks to their rolling several {{Critical Failure}}s in succession. And this was even with Spoony trying to help them out by fudging things in their favor, giving them extra chances to succeed, etc.

to:

** The "Botchamania" video features an entire ''Spycraft'' ''TabletopGame/{{Spycraft}}'' party whose attempts to board a train resulted in two team members dying thanks to their rolling several {{Critical Failure}}s in succession. And this was even with Spoony trying to help them out by fudging things in their favor, giving them extra chances to succeed, etc.


** Spoony really emphasizes the horror of the [[HollywoodAcid acid grenades]] the ''ThievesWorld'' wizard would make.

to:

** Spoony really emphasizes the horror of the [[HollywoodAcid acid grenades]] the ''ThievesWorld'' ''Literature/ThievesWorld'' wizard would make.



* WoundThatWillNotHeal: In the ''ThievesWorld'' campaign, Tempus Thales would normally shrug off and regenerate the FacialHorror he received at the hands of the players, but because his patron goddess considers this lucky shot by a nobody a humiliating insult, she revokes his regenerative capabilities until he gets revenge. Cue [[RoaringRampageOfRevenge Roaring Rampage]].

to:

* WoundThatWillNotHeal: In the ''ThievesWorld'' ''Literature/ThievesWorld'' campaign, Tempus Thales would normally shrug off and regenerate the FacialHorror he received at the hands of the players, but because his patron goddess considers this lucky shot by a nobody a humiliating insult, she revokes his regenerative capabilities until he gets revenge. Cue [[RoaringRampageOfRevenge Roaring Rampage]].

Showing 15 edit(s) of 481

Top

How well does it match the trope?

Example of:

/

Media sources:

/

Report