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*** Seymour blows up Audrey II because Orin had more fun imagining them inflicting pain on each other than if Audrey II just won. Audrey doesn't get swallowed so she can marry Seymour, to represent how she cut off from Orin even in the afterlife. The couple literally moves into a picture out of ''Better Homes and Gardens'' magazine instead of a real suburb to reflect how Audrey deluded herself into thinking her dream came true, as mentioned above. Now if only someone could explain how Orin knew about works like ''Litreature/HarryPotter'' and ''VideoGame/LogicalJourneyOfTheZoombinis''.

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*** Seymour blows up Audrey II because Orin had more fun imagining them inflicting pain on each other than if Audrey II just won. Audrey doesn't get swallowed so she can marry Seymour, to represent how she cut off from Orin even in the afterlife. The couple literally moves into a picture out of ''Better Homes and Gardens'' magazine instead of a real suburb to reflect how Audrey deluded herself into thinking her dream came true, as mentioned above. Now if only someone could explain how Orin knew about works like ''Litreature/HarryPotter'' ''Literature/HarryPotter'' and ''VideoGame/LogicalJourneyOfTheZoombinis''.


* Or Audrey II is a very early scout for the ''{{Species}}'' race, and the originals just do not like what they see down here.

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* Or Audrey II is a very early scout for the ''{{Species}}'' ''Film/{{Species}}'' race, and the originals just do not like what they see down here.


[[WMG: The chorus girls in the movie are some of the Muses from Disney's ''Disney/{{Hercules}}]]

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[[WMG: The chorus girls in the movie are some of the Muses from Disney's ''Disney/{{Hercules}}]]''WesternAnimation/{{Hercules}}'']]

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[[WMG: Alternatively, the FocusGroupEnding is what actually happens and it is the original ending that is Audrey IIís hallucination.]]
In fact, it is having this fantasy as it is reborn as the tiny sprout at the end. [[RoaringRampageOfRevenge When they find out what actually happened they probably wonít be very happy...]]




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\n[[WMG: The plants never got past New York City, and was covered up by both the muggle and wizarding governments. Professor Sprout (The Herbology teacher from Harry Potter) was a witness, and still remembers the event.]]
Strange plants (even from space, like Audrey II) would certainly fit in the Harry Potter universe. The plants might not have won against the MACUSA (The United States Ministry of Magic), and magic in general. One of the lines in "Don't Feed the Plants" is "If we fight it we've still got a chance." Maybe the wizards fought it. We also know from the first chapter of Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince that wizarding and muggle governments work together. If Voldemort was important enough to work with the muggle governments, then the man-eating plants trying to kill everyone certainly would be. Plus, why wouldn't Professor Sprout be there? Little Shop takes place in the 1960's, so Sprout would be in her 20's or 30's. They would want an up and coming plant expert to help with this. How do they keep the average citizens from finding out? Aurors do a Men In Black style mind-wipe, and make them think they died in certain other fatal accidents.



[[WMG: If or when another movie musical comes out, the endings will be reversed.]

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[[WMG: If or when another movie musical comes out, the endings will be reversed.]]]



[[WMG: The chorus girls in the movie are some of the Muses from Disney's Hercules]]
In Greek mythology, there were nine Muses. The five shown in Hercules are: Calliope (epic poetry), Clio (history), Melpomene (tragedy), Terpsichore (dance), and Thalia (comedy). There are only three in Little Shop of Horrors, being Melpomene, Terpsichore, and Thalia, as they are the ones most appropriate for the story.

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[[WMG: The chorus girls in the movie are some of the Muses from Disney's Hercules]]
''Disney/{{Hercules}}]]
In Greek mythology, there were nine Muses. The five shown in Hercules are: Calliope (epic poetry), Clio (history), Melpomene (tragedy), Terpsichore (dance), and Thalia (comedy). There are only three in Little Shop of Horrors, being Melpomene, Terpsichore, and Thalia, as they are the ones most appropriate for the story.
story. "Crystal, Ronette and Chiffon" are just names they assume to fit in with the locals.


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[[WMG: In the original ending, Audrey isn't dead when Audrey II eats her.]]
The Sominex she took earlier kicks in belatedly and puts her to sleep. She just assumes she's dying, Seymour believes her, and then he feeds her to the plant without bothering to check her pulse or breathing. If only he [[ATragedyOfImpulsiveness hadn't been so hasty]], they could have had the happy theatrical ending. This explains why, in the stage version, she lives on as a singing flower that sprouts from Audrey II in the finale. (Although this wouldn't explain why Orin also sings as a flower in the end, when he was not only dead, but dismembered when the plant ate him.)



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[[WMG: It was Patrick Martin who put the plant in Seymour and Audrey's garden in the theatrical ending.]]
In the original ending, Martin had already taken at least one sample cutting from the plant as a proof of concept. Perhaps he had done the same thing in the theatrical version, and simply neglected to bring it with him like he did in the original ending. After hearing about the plant's "unfortunate" destruction, Martin decided to give the sample cutting to Seymour, as a consolation present and/or a means to bring his marketing plan to fruition.


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[[WMG: The chorus girls in the movie are some of the Muses from Disney's Hercules]]
In Greek mythology, there were nine Muses. The five shown in Hercules are: Calliope (epic poetry), Clio (history), Melpomene (tragedy), Terpsichore (dance), and Thalia (comedy). There are only three in Little Shop of Horrors, being Melpomene, Terpsichore, and Thalia, as they are the ones most appropriate for the story.

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[[WMG: If or when another movie musical comes out, the endings will be reversed.]
The original, darker ending will be the default ending while the FocusGroupEnding will be the alternate ending.


I'll admit, I like the story as a campy musical. But I also really like the story as a Greek tragedy with a point about ill-gotten gains. But the reasons cited for the film failing are the actors and the finality of film death, even though it seems more a case of showing more that film can show, namely, Audrey's fantasy and the end of the world. Showing the ideal future she wants in "Somewhere That's Green" gives us more connection to her ideas and dreams, and caricatured though it is, it undermines the comedic element to her aspirations and makes it feel more real and makes her death too sad. Just talking about it to listeners allows us to laugh at the lyrics more and makes it seem less concrete or doable for her anyway. And the end, where we see the collapse of the world in thorough, merciless detail, conversely shows way too much, making the discussed fate too much of a brutal reality rather than a cautionary twist like in the play, where it's discussed while the first Audrey II is laughing. Turning it into a fully-realized sequence goes too far for the kind of story it's emulating, but a warning at the end about the massive consequences gets the point across and feels satisfying. While perhaps Seymour could have been a bit less innocent in his portrayal, it's really the tools of film that give us too much to connect to that makes the intended ending way too dark.

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I'll admit, I like the story as a campy musical. But I also really like the story as a Greek tragedy with a point about ill-gotten gains. But the reasons cited for the film failing are the actors and the finality of film death, even though it seems more a case of showing more that film can show, namely, Audrey's fantasy and the end of the world. Showing the ideal future she wants in "Somewhere That's Green" gives us more connection to her ideas and dreams, and caricatured though it is, it undermines the comedic element to her aspirations and makes it feel more real and makes her death too sad. Just talking about it to listeners allows us to laugh at the lyrics more and makes it seem less concrete or doable for her anyway. And the end, where we see the collapse of the world in thorough, merciless detail, conversely shows way too much, making the discussed fate too much of a brutal reality rather than a cautionary twist like in the play, where it's discussed while the first Audrey II is laughing. Turning it into a fully-realized sequence goes too far for the kind of story it's emulating, but a warning at the end about the massive consequences gets the point across and feels satisfying. While perhaps Seymour could have been a bit less innocent in his portrayal, it's really the tools of film that give us too much to connect to that makes make the intended ending way too dark.

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[[WMG: The reason the original film ending failed was due to a rare case of ShowDontTell backfiring.]]
I'll admit, I like the story as a campy musical. But I also really like the story as a Greek tragedy with a point about ill-gotten gains. But the reasons cited for the film failing are the actors and the finality of film death, even though it seems more a case of showing more that film can show, namely, Audrey's fantasy and the end of the world. Showing the ideal future she wants in "Somewhere That's Green" gives us more connection to her ideas and dreams, and caricatured though it is, it undermines the comedic element to her aspirations and makes it feel more real and makes her death too sad. Just talking about it to listeners allows us to laugh at the lyrics more and makes it seem less concrete or doable for her anyway. And the end, where we see the collapse of the world in thorough, merciless detail, conversely shows way too much, making the discussed fate too much of a brutal reality rather than a cautionary twist like in the play, where it's discussed while the first Audrey II is laughing. Turning it into a fully-realized sequence goes too far for the kind of story it's emulating, but a warning at the end about the massive consequences gets the point across and feels satisfying. While perhaps Seymour could have been a bit less innocent in his portrayal, it's really the tools of film that give us too much to connect to that makes the intended ending way too dark.


[[WMG: No one in the movie is a TimeLord...]]

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[[WMG: No one in the movie is a TimeLord...JustForFun/TimeLord...]]

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[[WMG: The Theatrical Ending exists within {{Franchise/Ghostbusters}} continuity.]]
Audrey II's ghost lives in the Castle in ''VideoGame/Ghostbusters1990'', and, energy-spewing abilities notwithstanding, seems to be at the power level of "Mean Green Mother From Outer Space." It's even heavily implied to have eaten Arthur!


** Well, maybe the reason why Audrey II was attached to Seymour was because of the fact that it "raised" him. When Seymour tried to touch it with his injured finger after discovering it making "kissing sounds", it literally tried to bite it off. And then we see later in the "Some Fun Now" number, a more mature Audrey II is feeding off of Seymour's blood by sucking on it from his fingers instead of trying to bite it off. It feed off his blood for a long period of time. Essentially, Seymour was it's parent, which is why it didn't try to eat him (especially in the theatrical cut where it didn't even attempt to do so in the final face-off). Despite it's big size and it's attitude, it appeared to appreciated Seymour for raising it (hence the "And I wanna thank you!" comment just before the start of the "Big Green Mother From Outer Space" number). The relationship Seymour and Audrey II had wasn't a romantic one. It was a parent and a child, and Audrey II attacked Audrey because it not only provided a food source, but it was also removing the source of it's parental abandonment. Kinda puts things in perspective a bit: a man and his plant kid.

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** Well, maybe the reason why Audrey II was attached to Seymour was because of the fact that it "raised" him. When Seymour tried to touch it with his injured finger after discovering it making "kissing sounds", it literally tried to bite it off. off. And then we see later in the "Some Fun Now" number, a more mature Audrey II is feeding off of Seymour's blood by sucking on it from his fingers instead of trying to bite it off. off. It feed off his blood for a long period of time. time. Essentially, Seymour was it's parent, which is why it didn't try to eat him (especially in the theatrical cut where it didn't even attempt to do so in the final face-off). face-off). Despite it's big size and it's attitude, it appeared to appreciated Seymour for raising it (hence the "And I wanna thank you!" comment just before the start of the "Big Green Mother From Outer Space" number). number). The relationship Seymour and Audrey II had wasn't a romantic one. one. It was a parent and a child, and Audrey II attacked Audrey because it not only provided a food source, but it was also removing the source of it's parental abandonment. abandonment. Kinda puts things in perspective a bit: a man and his plant kid.
kid. Also, this perspective also answers a lot of Audrey II's behavior (such as how it's demands for food comes off like a toddler demanding to be fed).

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