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* ClippedWingAngel: [[spoiler: Zigzagged with[=NiteMare=]. He has no magic, trap, or equip cards in his deck, meaning once you have a monster stronger than the strongest one he has, you'll have the duel won regardless of how badly you were getting beaten. On the other hand, he does has Blue-Eyes Ultimate Dragon in his deck, which can very quickly destroy your run if you can't draw the cards needed to overpower it or remove it from the field.]]

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* ClippedWingAngel: [[spoiler: Zigzagged with[=NiteMare=]. He with Nitemare. On the one hand, he has no magic, trap, or equip cards in his deck, meaning once you have a monster stronger than the strongest one he has, you'll have the duel won regardless of how badly you were getting beaten. On the other hand, he does has Blue-Eyes Ultimate Dragon in his deck, which can very quickly destroy your run if you can't draw the cards needed to overpower it or remove it from the field.]]


* ClippedWingAngel: [[spoiler:[=NiteMare=] has no magic, trap, or equip cards in his deck, meaning once you have a monster stronger than the strongest one he has, you'll have the duel won regardless of how badly you were getting beaten.]]

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* ClippedWingAngel: [[spoiler:[=NiteMare=] [[spoiler: Zigzagged with[=NiteMare=]. He has no magic, trap, or equip cards in his deck, meaning once you have a monster stronger than the strongest one he has, you'll have the duel won regardless of how badly you were getting beaten.beaten. On the other hand, he does has Blue-Eyes Ultimate Dragon in his deck, which can very quickly destroy your run if you can't draw the cards needed to overpower it or remove it from the field.]]


* DiscOneNuke: The Twin-Headed Thunder Dragon fusion. To create one, all that is required is any Dragon type monster and any Thunder type monster, with one of them having an attack of 1600 or higher. The Twin-Head has an attack of 2800 and is compatible with two field cards and many equip spells, making it easy to power up. With proper deck building around it, the Twin-Head can be reliably used to take on any monster outside of the Blue Eyes Ultimate Dragon, and carry the player to the end game.

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* DiscOneNuke: The Twin-Headed Thunder Dragon fusion. To create one, all that is required is any Dragon type monster and any Thunder type monster, with one of them having an attack of 1600 or higher. The Twin-Head has an attack of 2800 and is compatible with two field cards and many equip spells, making it easy to power up. With proper deck building around it, the Twin-Head can be reliably used to take on any monster outside of the Blue Eyes Ultimate Dragon, and carry the player to the end game.endgame.


** If you have a face-up monster on your side of the field while the AI has no monsters, they will always play a single monster card, regardless of the situation. This can be exploited to ensure your opponent does not fuse or equip their monsters, and prevents them from using magic/trap cards. The exception to this is the low mages, who will always use a magic card to change the field type to match their specialty first.

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** If you have a face-up monster on your side of the field while the AI has no monsters, they every duelist except the low mages will always play a single monster card, regardless of the situation.card. This can be exploited to ensure your opponent does not fuse or equip their monsters, and prevents them from using magic/trap cards. The exception to this is the low mages, who will always use a magic card to change the field type to match their specialty first.


* AdaptationalVillainy: This version of Priest Seto rivals Death-T era Kaiba in terms of villainy and pettiness. He serves as Heishin's right-hand man and was responsible for seizing all of Egypt, kidnapped Teana as a hostage to lure you into a deadly Shadow Game, was fine with the murders of the Prince's parents and prevented him from seeing his parents' bodies, and is descended from evil sorcerers and plans to renew a pact with [=DarkNite=] in order to rule the world. His stated reason for doing all this is because he's nobility ad deserves to rule.

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* AdaptationalVillainy: This version of Priest Seto rivals Death-T era Kaiba in terms of villainy and pettiness. He serves as Heishin's right-hand man and was responsible for seizing all of Egypt, kidnapped Teana as a hostage to lure you into a deadly Shadow Game, was fine with the murders of the Prince's parents and prevented him from seeing his parents' bodies, and is descended from evil sorcerers and plans to renew a pact with [=DarkNite=] in order to rule the world. His stated reason for doing all this is because he's nobility ad and deserves to rule.


* AdaptationalVillainy: This version of Priest Seto rivals Death-T era Kaiba in terms of villainy and pettiness. Among other things, he served as Heishin's right-hand man and was responsible for seizing all of Egypt, kidnapped Teana as a hostage to lure you into a deadly Shadow Game, was fine with the murders of the Prince's parents and enacted Heishin's order to seal the tombs, preventing the Prince from seeing his parents' bodies, and was descended from evil sorcerers and plans to renew a pact with [=DarkNite=] in order to rule the world. His stated reason for doing all this? He's of noble blood and you're not, therefore he deserves to rule.

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* AdaptationalVillainy: This version of Priest Seto rivals Death-T era Kaiba in terms of villainy and pettiness. Among other things, he served He serves as Heishin's right-hand man and was responsible for seizing all of Egypt, kidnapped Teana as a hostage to lure you into a deadly Shadow Game, was fine with the murders of the Prince's parents and enacted Heishin's order to seal the tombs, preventing the Prince prevented him from seeing his parents' bodies, and was is descended from evil sorcerers and plans to renew a pact with [=DarkNite=] in order to rule the world. His stated reason for doing all this? He's of noble blood and you're not, therefore he this is because he's nobility ad deserves to rule.



* AnimationBump: When attacking an opposing monster with your own, by pressing the square button, you can view a 3D battle sequence between the monsters. Most of the monsters have low quality models, but some of the more popular/noteworthy monsters have higher quality models. Compare the models of the [[http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-EvAQLdICses/UO7K1-SD5JI/AAAAAAAAAJg/3Ya9luTUPNo/s1600/Imagem1.png Blue-Eyes White Dragon]] and [[http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-4EUzNEoeqfU/UO7hsMNA3qI/AAAAAAAAAK0/kMzUivHZVXk/s1600/Imagem9.png Red-Eyes Black Dragon]] to the models of [[http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-XS8uqsmcCS4/UO7hcAnmKGI/AAAAAAAAAKs/1Il-I1dfvVY/s1600/Imagem8.png Tiger Axe]] and [[http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-1MJBIMU5urw/UO7vQRuUy-I/AAAAAAAAAMk/fo0wuiQnE_w/s1600/Imagem16.png Dragon Zombie]] for example.

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* AnimationBump: When attacking an opposing monster with your own, by pressing the square button, you can view a 3D battle sequence between the monsters. Most of the monsters have low quality models, but some of the more popular/noteworthy monsters have higher quality models. Compare the models of the [[http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-EvAQLdICses/UO7K1-SD5JI/AAAAAAAAAJg/3Ya9luTUPNo/s1600/Imagem1.png Blue-Eyes White Dragon]] and [[http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-4EUzNEoeqfU/UO7hsMNA3qI/AAAAAAAAAK0/kMzUivHZVXk/s1600/Imagem9.png Red-Eyes Black Dragon]] to the models of [[http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-XS8uqsmcCS4/UO7hcAnmKGI/AAAAAAAAAKs/1Il-I1dfvVY/s1600/Imagem8.png Tiger Axe]] and [[http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-1MJBIMU5urw/UO7vQRuUy-I/AAAAAAAAAMk/fo0wuiQnE_w/s1600/Imagem16.png Dragon Zombie]] for example.Zombie]].



** If you have a face-up monster on your side of the field while the AI has no monsters, they will always play a single monster card, regardless of the situation. This can be exploited to ensure your opponent does not fuse or equip their monsters, and prevents them from using magic/trap cards. The exception to this is the low mages, who will always use a magic card to change the field type to match their specialty, even they will be left with no monsters to defend themselves.
** The AI will never put a monster of 3000 or higher base attack in defense mode. On the inverse, some monsters that have much higher defense than attack will never be attacked with, even if attacking would win the duel.

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** If you have a face-up monster on your side of the field while the AI has no monsters, they will always play a single monster card, regardless of the situation. This can be exploited to ensure your opponent does not fuse or equip their monsters, and prevents them from using magic/trap cards. The exception to this is the low mages, who will always use a magic card to change the field type to match their specialty, even they will be left with no monsters to defend themselves.
specialty first.
** The AI will never put a monster of 3000 or higher base attack in defense mode. On the inverse, mode, and some monsters that have much higher defense than attack will never be attacked with, even if attacking would win the duel.attack you.



** Ritual cards can be used to summon very powerful monsters you otherwise wouldn't have access to without cheating, with an extravagant animation for the summoning process. However, each ritual card requires three specific monsters on your field to work, and most of these required monsters are too weak to keep alive long enough without significant assistance.

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** Ritual cards can be used to summon very powerful monsters you otherwise wouldn't have access to without cheating, with an extravagant animation for the summoning process. However, each ritual card requires three specific monsters on your field to work, and most of these the required monsters are too weak to keep alive long enough without significant assistance.



** Magic cards that only destroy a single type of monster are too specialized to be consistently useful, besides when against a few opponents whose strongest monsters are of the same type.
* TheBattleDidntCount: Heishin will continue to duel you into submission if you manage to beat him at the start of the game, or on a New Game Plus.
* BigNo: The final boss lets out one that ''fills two text boxes''.
* BossGame: What Forbidden Memories essentially is.

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** Magic cards that only destroy a single type of monster are too specialized to be consistently useful, besides when against a few opponents whose strongest monsters are of the same type.
* TheBattleDidntCount: Heishin will continue to duel you into submission if you manage to beat him at the start of the game, or on a New Game Plus.
game.
* BigNo: The final boss lets out one that ''fills fills two text boxes''.
boxes with Os.
* BossGame: What Forbidden Memories essentially is.Since you normally get a Game Over for losing even once, the entire game is this.



* BonusBoss: Several opponents in the game are completely optional to duel, who defeating won't give you anything additional other than another opponent to duel in Free Duel.

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* BonusBoss: Several opponents in the game are completely optional to duel, who defeating won't give you anything additional other than another opponent to duel in Free Duel.duel.



** Seto 2, who you can duel if you traverse the labyrinth to rescue Teana after defeating 2 mages, but before defeating all the high mages (if you do this after defeating them, you go to the end game instead). This bonus boss is notable as it allows you to skip dueling the Labyrinth Mage in the final boss rush.

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** Seto 2, who you can duel if you traverse the labyrinth to rescue Teana after defeating 2 mages, but before defeating all the high mages of them (if you do this after defeating them, you go to the end game instead). This bonus boss is notable as it allows you to skip dueling the Labyrinth Mage in the final boss rush.



* ClippedWingAngel: [[spoiler:[=NiteMare=] has no magic, trap, or equip cards in his deck, meaning once you have a monster stronger than the strongest one he has, you'll have the duel won regardless of how badly you were getting beaten.]]



** If you attempt an S-Tec on Heishin (either version), he can have multiples of each Exodia piece in his deck to ensure an instant win.
** The computer will swap cards during their turn for another card in their deck that is most beneficial to them. This results in the AI's deck nearly always effectively being top-loaded with the strongest monsters they have, and will usually have a useful magic card if their field isn't empty.

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** If you attempt an S-Tec on Heishin (either version), Heishin, he can have multiples of each Exodia piece in his deck to ensure an instant win.
** The computer will swap cards during their turn for another card in their deck that is most beneficial to them. This results in the AI's deck nearly always effectively being top-loaded with the strongest monsters they have, and will usually have a useful magic card if their field isn't empty.



* CrutchCharacter: Pretty much all the fusions besides the [[DiscOneNuke Twin-Headed Thunder Dragon]] and [[InfinityPlusOneSword Meteor Black Dragon]] are useful early on, peter out in mid-game, and are wastes of deck space by the end game.
* DamselInDistress: After you beat two of the high mages, Heishin has Teana kidnapped and brought to his shrine. When you choose to go rescue her is up to you, though waiting until after you beat all the high mages will make the endgame slightly more difficult and make Seto 2 lost until your next playthrough.

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* CrutchCharacter: Pretty much Almost all of the fusions besides the [[DiscOneNuke Twin-Headed Thunder Dragon]] and [[InfinityPlusOneSword Meteor Black Dragon]] are useful early on, peter out in mid-game, and are wastes of deck space by the end game.
* DamselInDistress: After you beat two of the high mages, Heishin has Teana kidnapped and brought to his shrine. When you choose to go rescue her is up to you, though waiting until after you beat all the high mages will make the endgame slightly more difficult and make Seto 2 lost until your next playthrough.



* DifficultySpike: The early game starts out easy, with you being presented with opponents that all can be defeated reliably without any grinding, outside [[HopelessBossFight Heishin]]. Then comes Kaiba's tournament in the present, where each of your opponents rapidly get stronger and more difficult. And the game [[NintendoHard never lets up from here on out]]. The BossRush in the endgame has six or seven straight duels with no save point. With monsters like Blue-Eyes Ultimate Dragon and traps like Widespread Ruin likely to screw you over no matter how good your deck is, this part of the game can easily be considered RNG Hell.
* DiscOneFinalBoss: Seto Kaiba is the final opponent in his tournament and thus the final opponent in the present arc. He's the first opponent you have to beat that has a high chance of using a monster with 3000 attack, and he has his own unique battle music.
* DiscOneNuke: The Twin-Headed Thunder Dragon fusion. To create one, all that is required is any Dragon type monster and any Thunder type monster, with one of them having an attack of 1600 or higher. The Twin-Head has an attack of 2800 and is compatible with two field cards, as well as compatible with a variety of equip cards, making it easy to power up. With proper deck building around it, the Twin-Head can be reliably used to take on any monster outside of the Blue Eyes Ultimate Dragon, and carry the player to the end game.
* DistressedDude: [[spoiler:After you beat Seto for the final time to stop him from taking the Millennium Items to resurrect [=DarkNite=], Heishin takes Seto hostage by holding a knife to his throat, in demand for the items.]]
* DittoFighter: In Free Duel, there's an opponent named Duel Master K that's available from the start, and is never seen in the campaign mode. His deck is a copy of the player's deck. Generally seen as being there to teach players the possible fusions and combinations in their deck, as his card drops are terrible beyond early game standards.
* DummiedOut: The original Japanese release of the game was compatible with the Pocket Station, with features that allowed players to obtain cards that otherwise could never be won from dueling. Since the Pocket Station was never released outside Japan, international releases of the game had the Pocket Station compatibility and features removed. This rendered the cards that can not be won from dueling to be unobtainable in international releases of the game without using a cheat device.
* EarlyBirdBoss: Weevil Underwood is the second opponent the player faces in Kaiba's tournament, as well as the third mandatory opponent. While the player could coast through the early game and [[WarmupBoss Rex Raptor]] with their starter deck, Weevil is a step up from Rex, and unless the player has a solid grasp on fusions and did some grinding to improve their deck, they are likely to get stomped by him. Once the player learns how to play and to adequately grind, Weevil will fall easily, though having provided a [[NintendoHard taste on what is to come]].

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* DifficultySpike: The early game starts out easy, easy with you being presented with opponents that all can be defeated reliably without any grinding, outside [[HopelessBossFight Heishin]]. Then comes the exceptions of Heishin and Villager 2. Kaiba's tournament in the present, where present has each of your opponents rapidly get stronger and more difficult. And the game [[NintendoHard never lets up from here on out]]. The BossRush in the endgame has six or seven straight duels with no save point. With monsters like Blue-Eyes Ultimate Dragon point, and traps like Widespread Ruin likely to screw you over no matter how good your deck is, this part of the game can easily be considered RNG Hell.
every duelist has powerful monsters, spells, and traps.
* DiscOneFinalBoss: Seto Kaiba is the final opponent in his tournament and thus the final opponent in the present arc. He's the first opponent you have to beat that has a high chance of using a monster with 3000 attack, and he has his own unique battle music.
* DiscOneNuke: The Twin-Headed Thunder Dragon fusion. To create one, all that is required is any Dragon type monster and any Thunder type monster, with one of them having an attack of 1600 or higher. The Twin-Head has an attack of 2800 and is compatible with two field cards, as well as compatible with a variety of cards and many equip cards, spells, making it easy to power up. With proper deck building around it, the Twin-Head can be reliably used to take on any monster outside of the Blue Eyes Ultimate Dragon, and carry the player to the end game.
* DistressedDude: [[spoiler:After you beat Seto for the final time to stop him from taking the Millennium Items to resurrect [=DarkNite=], Heishin takes Seto hostage by holding a knife to his throat, throat in demand for the items.Items.]]
* DittoFighter: In Free Duel, there's an opponent named Duel Master K that's available from the start, and is never seen in the campaign mode. His deck is a copy of the player's deck. Generally seen as being there to teach players the possible fusions and combinations in their deck, as his card drops are terrible beyond early game standards.
deck.
* DummiedOut: The original Japanese release of the game was compatible with the Pocket Station, with features that allowed players to obtain cards that otherwise could never be won from dueling. Since the Pocket Station was never released outside Japan, international International releases of the game had the Pocket Station compatibility and features removed. This rendered the removed, rendering said cards that can not be won from dueling to be unobtainable in international releases of the game without using a cheat device.
cheating.
* EarlyBirdBoss: Weevil Underwood is the second opponent the player faces in Kaiba's tournament, as well as the third mandatory opponent. While the player could coast through the early game and [[WarmupBoss Rex Raptor]] with their starter deck, Weevil is Weevil's basic monsters are a step up from Rex, as are his fusions, and unless his duel teaches the player has a solid grasp on fusions and did some about grinding to improve their deck, they are likely to get stomped by him. Once the player learns how to play and to adequately grind, Weevil will fall easily, though having provided a [[NintendoHard taste on what is to come]].basic fusion.



** No tributing is needed to summon any monster card, fusions don't require a magic card to fuse and most fusions have general requirements rather than specific monsters, only one card can be played on the field at a time, you draw until you have five cards in your hand and you cannot skip a turn without playing a card, and there are several monsters that are ritual monsters in the game that aren't ritual monsters in the card game.
** Storywise, Seto is a far different character, and the sealing of the Pharaoh happens completely differently than what later became canon. Also since this was made before the official appearances of Ishizu and Marik, Ishizu becomes Isis and is more antagonistic and fierce than in canon. Marik doesn't appear at all, with the Millennium Rod being given to Kaiba.
** The cards in the game will also be this to non-Japanese players, as many of the cards were really early cards released in the OCG that didn't get released outside Japan until many years later, or were never released at all. Even the game's famed Meteor Black Dragon didn't get officially released outside Japan until 2012, 12 years after the game's Japanese release and 10 years after its localization.
* ElementalRockPaperScissors: Each monster can be given one of two alignments available to it, with each alignment being strong against one other alignment, while being weak to another. When a monster fights a monster with an alignment its strong against, it'll temporarily gain 500 attack and defense points for that battle. The alignments go Sun (Light) -> Moon (Fiend) -> Venus (Dreams) -> Mercury (Shadow) -> Sun, and Mars (Fire) -> Jupiter (Forest) -> Saturn (Wind) -> Uranus (Earth) -> Pluto (Thunder) -> Neptune (Water) -> Mars.

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** No tributing is needed to summon any monster card, fusions don't require a magic card to fuse and most fusions have general requirements rather than specific monsters, only one card can be played on the field at a time, you draw until you have five cards in your hand and you cannot skip a turn without playing a card, and there are several monsters that are ritual monsters in the game that aren't ritual monsters in the card game.
** Storywise, Seto is a far different character, and the sealing of the Pharaoh happens completely differently than what later became canon. Also since Since this was made before the official appearances of Ishizu and Marik, Ishizu becomes Isis and is more antagonistic and fierce than in canon. canon, Marik doesn't appear at all, with and the Millennium Rod being given belongs to Kaiba.
** The cards in the game will also be this to non-Japanese players, as many Many of the in-game cards were are really early cards released in the OCG that didn't get released outside Japan until many years later, or were never released at all. Even the The game's famed Meteor Black Dragon didn't get officially released outside Japan until 2012, 12 years after the game's Japanese release and 10 years after its localization.
* ElementalRockPaperScissors: Each monster can be given one of two alignments available to it, with each alignment being strong against one other alignment, while being and weak to another. When a monster fights a monster with an alignment its it's strong against, it'll temporarily gain 500 attack and defense points for that battle. The alignments go Sun (Light) -> Moon (Fiend) -> Venus (Dreams) -> Mercury (Shadow) -> Sun, and Mars (Fire) -> Jupiter (Forest) -> Saturn (Wind) -> Uranus (Earth) -> Pluto (Thunder) -> Neptune (Water) -> Mars.



* FinalBossPreview: What the HopelessBossFight against the game's BigBad Heishin in the beginning of the game essentially is, showing you the kind of deck strength you're going to have to overcome at the end to beat the game.
* FlavorText: Every card has one, including what would become Effect Monsters in the real life card game, Fusion Monsters, Ritual Monsters, and even Spells and Traps.
* ForcedLevelGrinding: Once you're in the present in Kaiba's tournament, if you don't take advantage of Free Duel to get new cards to strengthen your deck, don't expect to get far past [[WarmupBoss Rex Raptor]] without significant luck, as your starter deck will be far too underpowered to do much against the quickly escalating opponents. Grinding can be alleviated a bit though, through [[SaveScumming Start Scumming]] to get a better starter deck, Start Scumming with a second file to get cards to trade over to the first file, and by knowing which opponents to grind against. However, even with all of this getting a good enough deck to get through the rest of the game can take a ''very'' long time, as the drop rates for the most powerful cards are ''abysmal'', making it very plausible that you'll need to duel certain opponents ''over a hundred times'' before you get the cards you need.

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* FinalBossPreview: What the The HopelessBossFight against the game's BigBad Heishin in the beginning of the game essentially is, showing shows you the kind of deck strength you're going to have to overcome at the end in order to beat the game.
* FlavorText: Every card has one, flavor text, including what would become Effect Monsters in the real life card game, Fusion Monsters, Ritual Monsters, and even Spells and Traps.
* ForcedLevelGrinding: Once you're in the present in Kaiba's tournament, if you don't take advantage of Free Duel to get new cards to strengthen your deck, don't expect to get far past [[WarmupBoss Rex Raptor]] without significant luck, as your starter deck will be far too underpowered to do much against the quickly escalating opponents. Grinding can be alleviated a bit though, through [[SaveScumming Start Scumming]] to get a better starter deck, Start Scumming with a second file to get trading cards to trade over to the first file, between different files, and by knowing which opponents to grind against. However, against, but even with all of this getting a good enough deck to get through the rest of the game then it can take a ''very'' long time, as the drop rates for the most powerful cards are ''abysmal'', making it very plausible that you'll need to duel certain opponents ''over a hundred times'' ''hundreds'' of duels before you get the cards you need.



** The exact monsters required for each ritual card. While the description of each ritual card typically gives you a hint on what is required, these hints are vague, and often don't cover all three monsters needed to complete the ritual; some ritual cards don't even give you any hints on any of the required monsters at all.
** The possible fusions in the game. Most are simple enough to reasonably figure out on your own through some trial and error, and the fusions requiring specific monsters are intuitive, can be learned from following the anime and playing the card game, or watching what the computer fuses. Fusions requiring magic cards on the other hand, are extremely obtuse.
** S-Tec-ing in theory means using a lot of magic and trap cards, but in practice it means forcing opponents to fuse until they deck out, which is an automatic S-Tec. This is especially true for [[TheAllSeeingAI Pegasus]], who gives out some of the best magic and traps in the game but cannot be bluffed into fusing.
** The correct path to traverse the labyrinth when rescuing Teana, which is [[spoiler: right, right, left, right]]. While it isn't too complicated for one to reasonably figure out on their own, there's no indication that going the wrong path brings you back to the beginning.
** The Teana capture quest in general and subsequent Seto 2 duel. It happens after you beat two high mages, but you're not informed it happens unless you go back to the dueling ground before defeating all the high mages. Additionally, if you beat all the high mages before saving Teana, going through this quest will advance straight to the endgame instead of the Seto 2 duel, leaving Seto 2 [[PermanentlyMissableContent lost permanently]] for Free Duel on that file until you beat it and start a NewGamePlus.
** When you beat the game, you're given a password at the end of the credits. You're given no information on what this password does, and it does not work if you try inputting it into the game. It's a password for its sequel, ''VideoGame/YuGiOhTheDuelistsOfTheRoses''.

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** The exact monsters required for each ritual card. While the description of each ritual card typically gives you a hint on what is cards are required, these hints are vague, and often don't cover all three monsters needed to complete the ritual; some ritual. Some ritual cards don't even give you any hints on any of the required monsters at all.
** The possible Basic monster fusions in the game. Most are simple enough to reasonably figure out on your own through some trial and error, and the fusions requiring specific monsters are intuitive, can be learned from following the anime and playing the card game, or watching what the computer fuses. Fusions requiring magic cards on the other hand, are extremely obtuse.
** S-Tec-ing in theory means using a lot of magic and trap cards, but in practice it means forcing opponents to fuse until they deck out, which is an automatic S-Tec. This is especially true for painful when dueling [[TheAllSeeingAI Pegasus]], who gives out some of the best magic and traps in the game but cannot be bluffed into fusing.
** The correct path to traverse the labyrinth when rescuing Teana, which is [[spoiler: right, right, left, right]]. While it isn't too complicated for one to reasonably figure out on their own, out, there's no indication that going taking the wrong path brings you back to the beginning.
** The Teana capture quest in general and subsequent Seto 2 duel. It happens after you beat two high mages, but you're not informed told about it happens unless you go back to the dueling ground before defeating all the high mages. Additionally, if ground. If you beat all the high mages before saving Teana, going through this quest will advance straight to the endgame instead of the Seto 2 duel, 2, leaving Seto 2 him [[PermanentlyMissableContent lost permanently]] for Free Duel on that file until you beat it the game and start a NewGamePlus.
** When you beat the game, you're given a password at the end of the credits. You're given no information on what this password does, and it does not work if you try inputting it into the game. It's a password for its this game's sequel, ''VideoGame/YuGiOhTheDuelistsOfTheRoses''.



* HelloInsertNameHere: Although you are the Pharaoh, this was made before his name was revealed in canon.
* HopelessBossFight: The first time you duel Heishin, where he'll be using endgame-caliber cards with monsters that possess near or over 3000 attack, while you still have your starter deck and other earlygame cards with stats in the hundreds or a bit over 1000 at most. If you defeat him, he'll rematch you until you lose. This is also the only duel in Campaign that you are allowed to lose.

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* HelloInsertNameHere: Although you are the Pharaoh, this was made before his You can name was revealed the Prince whatever you want.
* HeroicMime: The Prince doesn't say a word, and when communicating to Yugi
in canon.
the present, Yugi speaks for him.
* HopelessBossFight: The first time you duel Heishin, where he'll be using endgame-caliber cards with monsters that possess near or over 3000 attack, while you still have your starter deck and other earlygame cards with stats in the hundreds or a bit over 1000 at most.attack. If you defeat him, he'll rematch you until you lose. This is also the only duel in Campaign that you are allowed to lose.



** Subverted with the Teana capture quest. Depending on whether you've defeated all the high mages or not, Seto either captured Teana to guide you to Heishin's Dark Shrine and the endgame (if you did) or to challenge you for the puzzle and simultaneously test your skill (if you didn't).
* ImpossibleItemDrop: The Meadow Mage, seemingly just another low-level mook before a high mage, inexplicably gives you the best card drops out of anyone in the game. The only way people have beaten the game is by grinding against him (and Pegasus) for cards.

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** Subverted with the Teana capture quest. Depending on whether you've defeated all the high mages or not, Seto either captured Teana to guide you to Heishin's Dark Shrine and the endgame (if you did) or to challenge you for the puzzle and simultaneously test your skill (if you didn't).
* ImpossibleItemDrop: The Meadow Mage, seemingly just another low-level mook before a high mage, inexplicably gives you the best card drops out of anyone in the game. The only way people have beaten the game is by grinding against Dueling him (and Pegasus) is almost a requirement for cards.success.



** For equip cards, there's Megamorph. Not only is it able to power up any monster in the game, but it strengthens their attack and defense by 1000 points. Having at least one in your deck is usually considered ''mandatory'' for beating the game, as the endgame opponents' cards are simply too strong to be beaten by anything else without multiple equips.
* InfinityPlusOneElement: Dragons are the game's most powerful monsters on average, having high attack and a variety of alignments. They additionally have better fusion capabilities than every other type. This means dragons will be extremely valuable right from the beginning, and will be the player's main attacking force throughout the game. Their few downsides are a lack of equipment variety and a weakness to Dragon Capture Jar.

to:

** For equip cards, there's Megamorph. Not only Megamorph is it able to power up any monster in the game, but it strengthens their monster's attack and defense by 1000 points. Having at least one in your deck is usually considered ''mandatory'' for beating the game, as the endgame opponents' cards are simply too strong to be beaten by anything else without multiple equips.
* InfinityPlusOneElement: Dragons are the game's most powerful monsters on average, having high attack and a variety of alignments. They additionally alignments, and have better fusion capabilities than every other type.capabilities. This means dragons will be extremely valuable right from the beginning, and will be the player's main attacking force throughout the game. Their few downsides are a lack of equipment variety and a weakness to Dragon Capture Jar.



** A player having all five pieces of Exodia in their hand. It is impossible to win this way without cheating, since Exodia's legs cannot be won and cost 999,999 starchips each. A few of the opponents have access to all the Exodia pieces, but it is extremely rare for them to use all of them and get them all in their hand to win this way.

to:

** A player having all five pieces of Exodia in their hand. It is impossible to win this way without cheating, since Exodia's legs cannot be won and cost 999,999 starchips each. A few of the opponents have access to all the Exodia pieces, but it is extremely rare for them to use all of them and get them all in their hand to win this way.



* LastLousyPoint: There are several obscure cards in the game that are not that useful, but have incredibly low drop rates, and are usually obtainable from only a single specific opponent that you won't duel often because of their poor/mediocre card drops. Unless you have the original Japanese version and a Pocket Station, there are many other cards that you cannot legitimately obtain.

to:

* LastLousyPoint: There are several obscure cards in the game that are not that useful, but have incredibly low drop rates, rates and are usually obtainable from only a single specific opponent that you won't duel often because of their poor/mediocre card drops.opponent. Unless you have the original Japanese version and a Pocket Station, there are many other cards that you cannot legitimately obtain.



* MedievalStasis: Obviously not with technology, but the modern-day tournament uses exactly the same cards as in Ancient Egypt, meaning that in-universe Duel Monsters has not changed in ''3000 years''.

to:

* MedievalStasis: Obviously not with technology, but the The modern-day tournament uses exactly the same cards and rules as in Ancient Egypt, meaning that in-universe Duel Monsters has not changed in ''3000 years''.



* NewGamePlus: When you clear campaign mode, you can start the story over with an endgame deck. If you missed any of the optional opponents your first time through, this will also allow you to reduel them in Campaign and thus unlock them for Free Duel.

to:

* NewGamePlus: When you clear campaign mode, you can start the story over with an endgame deck. If you missed any of the optional opponents your first time through, this will also allow you to reduel can duel them in Campaign Mode and thus unlock them for Free Duel.



** ClippedWingAngel: [[spoiler:As [=NiteMare=], he has no magic, trap, or equip cards in his deck, meaning once you have a monster stronger than the strongest one he has, you'll have the duel won regardless of how badly you were getting beaten.]]



* OrcusOnHisThrone: While Heishin was very proactive in the beginning of the game conquering Egypt, gathering the Millennium Items, and overthrowing the Pharaoh, he becomes this once you return to the past, leaving the Prince alone to beat all the high mages and recollect the Millennium items at his leisure. Even when Heishin comes in direct confrontation with the Prince after he traverses the labyrinth to save Teana, he just returns to his shrine and leaves Seto to deal with the Prince.
* PeninsulaOfPowerLeveling: The Low Meadow Mage is the game's most notorious example, dropping many especially powerful cards at shockingly high rates, including the Meteor Black Dragon as previously covered. Almost everyone who beat the game did so after some really extensive grinding against him.

to:

* OrcusOnHisThrone: While Heishin was very proactive in the beginning of the game conquering Egypt, gathering the Millennium Items, and overthrowing the Pharaoh, he becomes this game, once you return to the past, leaving he leaves the Prince alone to beat all the high mages and recollect the Millennium items Items at his leisure. Even when Heishin comes in direct confrontation with the Prince after he traverses the labyrinth to save Teana, he just returns to his shrine and leaves Seto to deal with the Prince.
leisure.
* PeninsulaOfPowerLeveling: PeninsulaOfPowerLeveling:
**
The Low Meadow Mage is the game's most notorious example, dropping tough to beat early on but drops many especially powerful cards at shockingly high rates, including the Meteor Black Dragon as previously covered.Dragon. Almost everyone who beat the game did so after some really extensive grinding against him.



** Pegasus when S-Tecing him; during S/A Tec ranked duels, he drops Widespread Ruin, [[InfinityMinusOneSword Bright Castle]], and most importantly, [[InfinityPlusOneSword Megamorph]]. He additionally drops the latter two at a higher rate than anyone else, especially Megamorph.
* PowerUpLetdown: While Metalzoa has 400 more ATK points than Zoa does, Zoa has Mercury, which is one of the most important Guardian Stars in the game and allows it to defeat the Blue-Eyes Ultimate Dragon with three levels' worth of equips, one of only three obtainable monsters that can do so. Metalzoa, on the other hand, loses Mercury in exchange for Mars, which is much less useful. Zoa also gets an advantage with the Yami field, which endgame opponents use exclusively.

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** Pegasus when While S-Tecing him; during S/A Tec ranked duels, Pegasus is very difficult, he drops Widespread Ruin, [[InfinityMinusOneSword Bright Castle]], and most importantly, [[InfinityPlusOneSword Megamorph]]. He additionally drops the latter two at a higher rate than anyone else, especially Megamorph.
Megamorph]].
* PowerUpLetdown: While Metalzoa has 400 more ATK points than Zoa does, Zoa has Zoa's alignment is Mercury, which is one of the most important Guardian Stars in the game and allows it to defeat the Blue-Eyes Ultimate Dragon with three levels' worth of equips, one of only three obtainable monsters that can do so. Metalzoa, on the other hand, proper equip spells. Metalzoa loses Mercury in exchange for Mars, which is much less useful. Zoa also gets an a stat advantage with the Yami field, which endgame opponents use exclusively.



* RandomDrop: Every time you win a duel, you are given one card, from the drop list of the opponent you defeated. What you did in the duel will decide which cards you can get, with getting a S/A Pow rating giving you access to getting the strongest monster cards the opponent can drop, S/A Tec rating giving you access to getting the strongest magic cards the opponent can drop, and getting anything else will give you access to a mix of cards that are less effective overall.
* RareRandomDrop: Some cards have ridiculously low drop rates in the game and only drop from one or two opponents. Unless you're particularly lucky, you will have to duel the opponent who drops them hundreds or even over a thousand times just to get a single copy of the card.

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* RandomDrop: Every time you win a duel, you are given one card, a card from the drop list of the opponent you defeated. What you did in the duel will decide which cards you can get, with getting Getting a S/A Pow rating giving can get you access to getting the strongest monster cards the opponent can drop, while S/A Tec rating giving can get you access to getting the strongest magic cards the opponent can drop, and getting anything else will give you access to a mix of cards that are less effective overall.
drop.
* RareRandomDrop: Some cards have ridiculously low drop rates in the game and only drop from one or two opponents. Unless you're particularly lucky, you will have to duel the opponent who drops them hundreds or even over a thousand times just to get a single copy of the card.



* TheUnfought: In the present day tournament arc, Joey enters the tournament alongside you and remarks about his desire to duel you in the finals of it. Throughout various points of the arc, Joey and Tea mention how he is still alive in the tournament, all the way up to the semi-finals, building up to him being an opponent. Kaiba is your opponent in the finals instead, having presumably [[KilledOffscreen defeated Joey on the other side of the semi-finals]], after which Joey is never seen nor mentioned again without you ever dueling him. Tea and Ryou Bakura in the present day are also never dueled despite you dueling their past and Yami counterparts respectively, though neither had the buildup Joey had.
* UselessUsefulSpell: The majority of the magic and trap cards in the game have effects that are of situational usefulness, or are just not useful enough to spend a turn using in lieu of playing a monster card.

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* TheUnfought: In the present day tournament arc, Joey enters the tournament alongside you and remarks about his desire wants to duel you in the finals of it. Throughout various points of the arc, Joey and Tea mention how he is still alive in the tournament, all the way up to the semi-finals, building up to him being an opponent.finals. Kaiba is your opponent in the finals instead, having presumably [[KilledOffscreen defeated Joey on the other side of the semi-finals]], after which Joey is never seen nor mentioned again without you ever dueling him. Tea and Ryou Bakura in the present day are also never dueled despite you dueling their past and Yami counterparts respectively, counterparts, though neither had the buildup Joey had.
* UselessUsefulSpell: The majority of the magic and trap cards in the game have situationally useful effects that are of situational usefulness, or are just not useful enough to spend a turn using in lieu of playing a monster card.use at all.



* WakeUpCallBoss: Pegasus, who is the seventh opponent in Kaiba's tournament, dueled in the quarterfinals. He is a significant step up from prior opponents, with powerful magic/trap cards, good equips, monsters with 2000+ attack, and the capability to create powerful fusions. He is also the only opponent not in the endgame to be able to see your facedown cards, and if the player is unlucky, he may even play a Meteor Black Dragon. He is likely to be the first serious roadblock in a player's progress, and if it hasn't been done already, will drive it in to the player that grinding is an absolute necessity in this game, as well as knowing what you're doing when playing.
* WarmupBoss: Rex Raptor, who is the first opponent you duel in Kaiba's tournament, and the second mandatory duel overall (the first being [[HopelessBossFight Heishin]]). His cards are even weaker than some of the people you dueled in the early game, and he can be reliably defeated with an unmodified starter deck. Considering the difficulty spike that occurs after him, new players can expect to play him a lot in free duel as they learn the game and gain new cards (especially if they skipped the early game).

to:

* WakeUpCallBoss: Pegasus, who is the seventh opponent in Kaiba's tournament, dueled in the quarterfinals. He Pegasus is a significant step up from prior opponents, with powerful magic/trap cards, good equips, monsters with 2000+ attack, and the capability to create powerful fusions. He is also the only opponent not in the endgame to be able to see your facedown cards, and if the player is unlucky, he may even play a Meteor Black Dragon. He is likely to be the first serious roadblock in a player's progress, progress and if it hasn't been done already, will drive it in to the player that grinding and proepr strategy is an absolute necessity in this game, as well as knowing what you're doing when playing.
necessity.
* WarmupBoss: Rex Raptor, who is the first opponent you duel in Kaiba's tournament, and the second mandatory duel overall (the first being [[HopelessBossFight Heishin]]). His cards are even weaker than some of the people you dueled in the early game, and he can be reliably defeated with an unmodified starter deck. Considering the difficulty spike that occurs after him, new players can expect to play him a lot in free duel as they learn the game and gain new cards (especially if they skipped the early game).


* ButThouMust: There are a few instances where you're given a choice on what action to take in a confrontation, but the game requires you to pick a specific option to progress the story. Not choosing it will result in a character prodding you to pick the required choice until you do it. Averted with the initial choice to sneak out and enjoy the festival, as you can just give up when Simon catches you and skip the first act of the game.
* ChangingGameplayPriorities: Early on, the game favors just doing basic fusions, as they'll be a lot stronger than the monsters you'll have for the early game and are strong enough to destroy the opposing monsters you'll usually be dealing with in the early to mid game. As the game progresses, you'll start focusing more on fusing for the Twin-headed Thunder Dragon and its support, as it's far more powerful than anything else you'll be able to play for a long time and it can single-handily beat many opponents. By the end game, you'll move away from fusion and rely on the Meteor Black Dragon and other powerful individual monsters with heavy equip and magic support.

to:

* ButThouMust: There are a few instances where you're given a choice on what action to take in a confrontation, but the game requires you to pick a specific option to progress the story. Not choosing it will result in a character prodding you to pick the required choice until you do it.it, or the game progressing the same regardless of which choice you pick. Averted with the initial choice to sneak out and enjoy the festival, as you can just give up when Simon catches you and skip the first act of the game.
* ChangingGameplayPriorities: Early on, the game favors just doing basic fusions, as they'll be a lot stronger than the monsters you'll have for the early game and are strong enough to destroy the opposing monsters you'll usually be dealing with in the early to mid game. As the game progresses, you'll start focusing more on fusing for the Twin-headed Thunder Dragon and its support, as it's far more powerful than anything else you'll be able to play for a long time and it can single-handily beat many opponents. opponents, while the other fusions become increasingly outclassed. By the end game, you'll move away from fusion and rely on the Meteor Black Dragon and other powerful individual monsters with heavy equip and magic support.support, as fusion will be too luck-based and require too much hand space in duels where you're going to only have a couple turns to draw the cards you need to win, while the Twin-Head is no longer outclassing everything to merit filling precious deck space up with Thunder fusion fodder that is useless at this point on its own.



* OrcusOnHisThrone: While Heishin was very proactive in the beginning of the game conquering Egypt, gathering the Millennium Items, and overthrowing the Pharaoh, he becomes this once you return to the past, leaving the Prince alone to beat all the high mages and recollect the Millennium items at his leisure. Even when Heishin comes in direct confrontation with the Prince after he traverses the labyrinth to save Teana, he just returns to his shrine and leaves Seto to deal with the Prince.

to:

* OrcusOnHisThrone: While Heishin was very proactive in the beginning of the game conquering Egypt, gathering the Millennium Items, and overthrowing the Pharaoh, he becomes this once you return to the past, leaving the Prince alone to beat all the high mages and recollect the Millennium items at his leisure. Even when Heishin comes in direct confrontation with the Prince after he traverses the labyrinth to save Teana, he just returns to his shrine and leaves Seto to deal with the Prince. [[spoiler:This ended up being a ploy by Heishin as he was aware of Seto's treachery but still needed Seto as only those of Seto's lineage could open up the passage to [=DarkNite=]'s tomb, as well as the Prince's Millennium Puzzle to summon [=DarkNite=], thus he turned a blind eye to Seto's and the Prince's endeavors and staged his defeat so that he could follow them to the Forbidden Ruins and ambush them there after Seto opened [=DarkNite=]'s tomb with all the Millennium Items present.]]


** Villager 2 always talks about how obsessed he is with collecting rare cards and how he will give you one if you beat him. While his deck and card drops are a bit better than what the other early game opponents have, he won't give you anything that is particularly rare nor powerful.

to:

** Villager 2 always talks about how obsessed he is with collecting rare cards and how he will give you one if you beat him. While his deck and card drops are a bit better than what the other early game opponents have, he won't give doesn't have nor gives you anything that is particularly rare nor powerful.powerful. Additionally he says you'll have to give him one of your cards if he beats you, but losing to him in Campaign just results in a game over as usual without losing any of your cards.


* InfinityPlusOneElement: Dragons are the game's most powerful monsters on average, having high attack and a variety of alignments. They additionally have better fusion capabilities than every other type. This means dragons will be extremely valuable right from the beginning, and will be the player's main attacking force throughout the game. Their few downsides are a lack of equipment variety and a weakness to Dragon Capture Jar.

to:

* InfinityPlusOneElement: Dragons are the game's most powerful monsters on average, having high attack and a variety of alignments. They additionally have better the best general fusion capabilities than every other type.of any type, with several general fusions that result in 2000+ attack monsters and being able to fuse into the aforementioned Twin-Headed Thunder Dragon. This means dragons will be extremely valuable right from the beginning, and will be the player's main attacking force throughout the game. Their few only real downsides are Dragons with over 2300 base attack having a lack of equipment variety (usually only being compatible with Dragon Treasure and the universal equips) and a weakness to Dragon Capture Jar.


* FinalBossPreview: What the HopelessBossFight against the game's BigBad Heishin in the beginning of the game essentially is, showing you the kind of deck strength you're going to have to overcome at the end to beat the game.
* FlavorText: Every card has one, including what would become Effect Monsters in the real life card game, Fusion Monsters, Ritual Monsters, and even Spells and Traps.
* ForcedLevelGrinding: Once you're in the present in Kaiba's tournament, if you don't take advantage of Free Duel to get new cards to strengthen your deck, don't expect to get far past [[WarmupBoss Rex Raptor]] without significant luck, as your starter deck will be far too underpowered to do much against the quickly escalating opponents. Grinding can be alleviated a bit though, through [[SaveScumming Start Scumming]] to get a better starter deck, Start Scumming with a second file to get cards to trade over to the first file, and by knowing which opponents to grind against. However, even with all of this getting a good enough deck to get through the rest of the game can take a ''very'' long time, as the drop rates for the most powerful cards are ''abysmal'', making it very plausible that you'll need to duel certain opponents ''over a hundred times'' before you get the cards you need.
* GameMod: There's an active modding scene for the game with several mods available. The most basic mods make all the unobtainable cards winnable at extremely rare drop rates while leaving the rest of the game untouched. Some other mods make these cards more reasonable to obtain while also substantially altering the opponents' drop lists, altering opponents' decks to be more faithful/fitting and more difficult, and may have some other tweaks like changing the starchip cost for each card and adding rarity colors to cards' names to indicate their rarity. Then there are mods that make more radical changes and try to be new games altogether, such as changing the opponents to new characters and altering the story, replacing many to most of the cards in the game with new ones, changing the existing fusions and adding new ones to the game, and even adding monster effects into the game, while also tending to significantly ramp up the difficulty if you thought the original wasn't hard enough. There's also a modding tool available to make it easy for anyone to mod certain aspects of the game and a randomizer available.
* GameplayAndStoryIntegration: When you fight Seto for the second time he acknowledges the card drop system when you beat him, telling you to "keep the card" and Teana. Villager 2 additionally acknowledges it by saying he'll give you a card if you beat him and you'll give him one of yours if he beats you (though if he wins you just get a game over as usual instead of actually giving him a card).
* GameplayAndStorySegregation: Villager 2 always talks about how obsessed he is with collecting rare cards and how he will give you one if you beat him, however while his deck and card drops are a bit better than what the other early game opponents have, he doesn't have nor give you anything that is particularly rare nor powerful.

to:

* FinalBossPreview: What the The HopelessBossFight against the game's BigBad Heishin in the beginning of the game essentially is, showing shows you the kind of deck strength you're going to have to overcome at the end to beat the game.
* FlavorText: Every card has one, a basic description, including what would become Effect Monsters in the real life card game, Fusion Monsters, Ritual Monsters, and even Spells and Traps.
* ForcedLevelGrinding: Once you're in the present in Kaiba's tournament, if you don't take advantage of Free Duel to get new cards to strengthen your deck, don't expect to get far past [[WarmupBoss Rex Raptor]] without significant luck, as your starter deck will be far too underpowered to do much against the quickly escalating opponents. Grinding can be alleviated a bit though, through [[SaveScumming Start Scumming]] to get a better starter deck, Start Scumming with a second file to get cards to trade over to the first file, and by knowing which opponents to grind against. However, even with all of this getting Getting a good enough deck to get through the rest of the game can take a ''very'' long time, as the drop rates for the most powerful cards are ''abysmal'', making it very plausible that you'll need to duel certain opponents ''over a hundred times'' in Free Duel before you get the cards you need.
* GameMod: There's an active modding scene for the game with several mods available. The most basic mods make all the unobtainable cards winnable at extremely rare drop rates while leaving the rest of the game untouched. Some other mods make these cards more reasonable to obtain while also substantially altering the opponents' drop lists, altering opponents' decks to be more faithful/fitting and more difficult, and may have some other tweaks like changing the starchip cost for each card and adding rarity colors to cards' names to indicate their rarity. Then there are mods that make more radical changes and try to be new games altogether, such as changing the opponents to new characters and altering the story, replacing many to most of the cards in the game with new ones, changing the existing fusions and adding new ones to the game, and even adding monster effects into the game, while also tending to significantly ramp up the difficulty if you thought the original wasn't hard enough. There's also a modding tool available to make it easy for anyone to mod certain aspects of the game and a randomizer available.
* GameplayAndStoryIntegration: When you fight Seto for the second time he acknowledges the card drop system when you beat him, telling you to "keep the card" and Teana. Villager 2 additionally also acknowledges it by saying he'll give you a card if you beat him and you'll give him one of yours if he beats you (though if he wins you just get a game over as usual instead of actually giving him a card).
you.
* GameplayAndStorySegregation: GameplayAndStorySegregation:
**
Villager 2 always talks about how obsessed he is with collecting rare cards and how he will give you one if you beat him, however while him. While his deck and card drops are a bit better than what the other early game opponents have, he doesn't have nor won't give you anything that is particularly rare nor powerful.


* EverythingIsTryingToKillYou: Lose one duel in story mode, even against your friends, and it's game over. The only exception is the HopelessBossFight against Heishin.

to:

* EverythingIsTryingToKillYou: Lose one duel in story Campaign mode, even against your friends, friends in what are supposed to be friendly duels, and it's game over. The only exception time you can lose in Campaign without getting a game over is in the HopelessBossFight against Heishin.


* ChangingGameplayPriorities: Early on, the game favors basic fusions. As the game progresses, you'll start focusing more on fusing for the Twin-headed Thunder Dragon and its support. By the end game, you'll move away from fusion and rely on the Meteor Black Dragon and other powerful individual monsters with heavy equip and magic support.

to:

* ChangingGameplayPriorities: Early on, the game favors just doing basic fusions. fusions, as they'll be a lot stronger than the monsters you'll have for the early game and are strong enough to destroy the opposing monsters you'll usually be dealing with in the early to mid game. As the game progresses, you'll start focusing more on fusing for the Twin-headed Thunder Dragon and its support.support, as it's far more powerful than anything else you'll be able to play for a long time and it can single-handily beat many opponents. By the end game, you'll move away from fusion and rely on the Meteor Black Dragon and other powerful individual monsters with heavy equip and magic support.



* CrutchCharacter: Pretty much all the fusions besides the [[DiscOneNuke Twin-Headed Thunder Dragon]] and [[InfinityPlusOneSword Meteor Black Dragon]], where they can easily win you duels early on, peter out in mid-game, and are wastes of deck space by the end game.

to:

* CrutchCharacter: Pretty much all the fusions besides the [[DiscOneNuke Twin-Headed Thunder Dragon]] and [[InfinityPlusOneSword Meteor Black Dragon]], where they can easily win you duels early on, but then peter out in mid-game, and are wastes of deck space by the end game.



** In a lesser example, one can buy Jirai Gumo, a monster with 2200 attack, for only 80 starchips (due to its 100 defense that matters little), which you can have enough to buy in as little as after winning 16 duels. While not quite endgame-caliber on its own, it is extremely powerful for the early game and can single-handily win you duels up until the later half of Kaiba's tournament, while its great variety in its equipment compability makes it easy to powerup and a great asset against the later opponents, and it's going to be a very long time until you get enough cards better than it to make it no longer useful enough for a deck slot.



* GameMod: There's an active modding scene for the game with several mods available. The most basic mods make all the unobtainable cards winnable at extremely rare drop rates while leaving the rest of the game untouched. Some other mods make these cards more reasonable to obtain while also substantially altering the opponents' drop lists, altering opponents' decks to be more faithful/fitting and more difficult, and may have some other tweaks like changing the starchip cost for each card and adding rarity colors to cards' names to indicate their rarity. Then there are mods that make more radical changes and try to be new games altogether, such as changing the opponents to new characters and altering the story, replacing many to most of the cards in the game with new ones, changing the existing fusions and adding new ones to the game, and even adding monster effects into the game, while also tending to significantly ramp up the difficulty if you thought the original wasn't hard enough. There's also a modding tool available to make it easy for anyone to mod the game and a randomizer available.

to:

* GameMod: There's an active modding scene for the game with several mods available. The most basic mods make all the unobtainable cards winnable at extremely rare drop rates while leaving the rest of the game untouched. Some other mods make these cards more reasonable to obtain while also substantially altering the opponents' drop lists, altering opponents' decks to be more faithful/fitting and more difficult, and may have some other tweaks like changing the starchip cost for each card and adding rarity colors to cards' names to indicate their rarity. Then there are mods that make more radical changes and try to be new games altogether, such as changing the opponents to new characters and altering the story, replacing many to most of the cards in the game with new ones, changing the existing fusions and adding new ones to the game, and even adding monster effects into the game, while also tending to significantly ramp up the difficulty if you thought the original wasn't hard enough. There's also a modding tool available to make it easy for anyone to mod certain aspects of the game and a randomizer available.available.
* GameplayAndStoryIntegration: When you fight Seto for the second time he acknowledges the card drop system when you beat him, telling you to "keep the card" and Teana. Villager 2 additionally acknowledges it by saying he'll give you a card if you beat him and you'll give him one of yours if he beats you (though if he wins you just get a game over as usual instead of actually giving him a card).
* GameplayAndStorySegregation: Villager 2 always talks about how obsessed he is with collecting rare cards and how he will give you one if you beat him, however while his deck and card drops are a bit better than what the other early game opponents have, he doesn't have nor give you anything that is particularly rare nor powerful.
** The card description for the Illusionist Faceless Mage claims it's a "very rare card", yet several opponents drop it without needing to get a S/A-POW rank and at drop rates that makes it pretty common to get.

Added DiffLines:

* HeroicMime: The Prince does not talk at all in the game and other characters will talk for him. This is averted however when you play Yugi for the present day tournament, who does have some spoken lines during this arc, and in a cutscene where Yugi meets the Prince, he even does all the talking.


** If you attempt an S-Tec on Heishin (either version), he can have multiples of each Exodia piece in his deck to ensure an instant win.

to:

** If you attempt an S-Tec a duel goes on Heishin (either version), long against either version of Heishin, he can have multiples of each Exodia piece in his deck to ensure an instant win.win. Simon Muran also has access to each Exodia piece, but since he only has a 1/2048 chance of using a copy of each piece, he is realistically never going to ever have them all in his deck.



** What determines your duel rank, at its most basic winning quickly with brute force gets you a higher POW rank and winning through utilizing a bunch of magic and traps gets you a higher TEC rank, but there are a lot of things that go into determing the rank and getting a S/A-TEC rank was especially difficult for players to figure out without making the opponent deck out (which takes a while to do and requires exploiting the AI into doing more card combining than you while avoiding combining from your hand due to the lack of cards to make the opponent burn through their deck). Eventually someone got the Japanese guide and from it was able to [[https://www.neoseeker.com/forums/3085/t2018541-calculating-duel-rank/ post what exactly determines your rank]], which players have been able to use to get easier and more efficient S/A-TECs.

to:

** What determines your duel rank, at its most basic winning quickly with brute force gets you a higher POW rank and winning through utilizing a bunch of magic and traps gets you a higher TEC rank, but there are a lot of things that go into determing the rank and getting a S/A-TEC rank was especially difficult for players to figure out without making the opponent deck out (which takes a while to do and requires exploiting the AI into doing more card combining than you while avoiding combining from your hand due to the lack of cards to make the opponent burn through their deck). Eventually someone got the Japanese guide and from it was able to [[https://www.neoseeker.com/forums/3085/t2018541-calculating-duel-rank/ post what exactly determines your rank]], which players have been able to use to get easier and more efficient S/A-TECs.S/A-TEC ranks.



** A player having all five pieces of Exodia in their hand. It is impossible for the player to win this way without cheating, since Exodia's legs cannot be won and cost 999,999 starchips each. A few of the opponents have access to all the Exodia pieces, but it is extremely rare for them to use all of them and get them all in their hand to win this way.

to:

** A player having all five pieces of Exodia in their hand. It is impossible for the player to win this way without cheating, since Exodia's legs cannot be won and cost 999,999 starchips each. A few of the opponents have Heishin has access to all the Exodia pieces, but it is extremely rare for them him to use all of them and get them all in their his hand to win this way.way. Simon Muran also has access to them all, but his chances of using a copy of each is so infinitesimally small he is practically never going to have them all and get them all in his hand.

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