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ViolenceIsTheOnlyOption: The amount of times diplomacy has been attempted as the first answer to a situation, let alone ''succeeded'', can be counted by your hands. Well, unless you count Tevoran's audacious calls for the enemy forces to surrender, which is always refuted.

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* ViolenceIsTheOnlyOption: The amount of times diplomacy has been attempted as the first answer to a situation, let alone ''succeeded'', can be counted by your hands. Well, unless you count Tevoran's audacious calls for the enemy forces to surrender, which is always refuted.

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* DenOfIniquity: Played with several times throughout the series:
** Tevoran ''tries'' to set up his hideout as one of these, with his scheme to set up a "male escort service", but it fails abjectly. By the time the story starts, him and his gang are [[ReducedToRatburgers to poor to even indulge in petty crime]].
** Zofia's fortress is described as such in-game, and while she does operate a smuggling racket from it and is implied to have a lot of "psychotic bondage gear" in her bedroom, more of her fortress is dedicated to her arsenal and [[GadgeteerGenius insane mechanical contraptions]] than debauchery.
** Finally played completely straight with the brothel in Episode 11. The area's leitmotif is even titled "Den of Iniquity".

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* AdamSmithHatesYourGuts: Somehow manages to combine with KarlMarxHatesYourGuts. All prices for consumables and gear are fixed, but shops will only buy them for half as much as they sell them, making every purchase a sunken cost you'll never fully recover. However, prices ''do'' go up over time as vendors sell higher quality and exponentially more expensive gear at the exclusion of cheaper options. By the end of Chapter 3 you'll be shelling out the winnings of seven battles just for one piece of armor.
** Deconstructed in that, as a gang of mercenary looters, you can bypass the shops altogether in favor of pilfering the dead.

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* ArtificialStupidity: One of the most broad examples is that the enemy AI has never figured out how to throw corpses or shove you off a ledge- two ''incredibly'' useful tactics you can use against them. They also don't make near as efficient use of their action points as you can. This really allows you to swing the aggressive edge to your side, even in fights where you're hopelessly outnumbered.
** And then in Chapter 3 you start gaining actual allies in big fights, but watching them battle is...painful. The Tiervan guards in 13-4, for example: it's not simply that they have trouble hitting anything in combat, no, half the time, ''they forget to even attack''. During the siege of Vorona, you're graced with allies such as a streetwalker who may well attempt to seduce ''a gun turret'' and a fat shopkeeper who runs into a line of soldiers with no weapons or armor.

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* BreatherEpisode: Episode 7-1 and 7-2, the fights against the [[BareFistedMonk Hillmen]], are widely considered to be this. They come directly after two of the toughest (up to that point) battles in the game, both of which have you outnumbered and/or surrounded by ranged enemies. The Hillmen, despite their strength, are lightly armored and permanently locked in to attacks of one space away, making them easy to deal with.
** To a lesser extent, Episode 12-1. The Niendans aren't anything to sneeze at, but again, numbers are on your side and Oleg is the least threatening mini-boss in the series.


** "Stun" (enemy's can't attack) is brutally powerful, but has a few drawbacks: almost all bosses are immune to it, attacks that inflict it tend to be very expensive, and it makes enemies affected by it run away.
** Many of the most brutal bosses can be locked down by Zofia's "Lewd Glance" power. It doesn't inflict any damage, it just keeps them from attacking and causes them to wander towards you mindlessly.

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** "Stun" (enemy's (enemies can't attack) is brutally powerful, but has a few drawbacks: almost all bosses are immune to it, attacks that inflict it tend to be very expensive, and it makes enemies affected by it run away.
** Many of the most brutal devastating bosses can be locked down by Zofia's "Lewd Glance" power. It doesn't inflict any damage, it just keeps them from attacking and causes them to [[DistractedByTheSexy wander towards you mindlessly.]]

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* AchillesHeel: Many of the enemy classes (and a few of yours) have inbuilt exploitable weaknesses that you can use to your advantage.
** Spearmen cannot spear anything in the square directly in front of them, making it possible to surround them and completely disable their attacks. It works best if you back them into a corner.
** All melee oriented enemies can be absolutely crippled by the often overlooked "slow" status effect. It cuts an enemy's attack points in half, which for all intents and purposes means ''they cannot move and attack on the same turn.'' Meaning as long as no one is in range of their attacks at the start of the turn, they can't do any damage. [[note]] For this reason it's much less effective against ranged characters [[/note]] Very few enemies are immune to it, and it has the added advantage of not causing them to run away like "stun" does.
** "Stun" (enemy's can't attack) is brutally powerful, but has a few drawbacks: almost all bosses are immune to it, attacks that inflict it tend to be very expensive, and it makes enemies affected by it run away.
** Many of the most brutal bosses can be locked down by Zofia's "Lewd Glance" power. It doesn't inflict any damage, it just keeps them from attacking and causes them to wander towards you mindlessly.
*** Immunity to this power is [[ContractualBossImmunity becoming more common with certain bosses in Chapter 3.]]

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* SchizoTech: Although being set vaguely in a late medieval setting (the game lists the year as 1427, though what this means in the Valelands is anyone's guess), the game nonetheless features technology that wouldn't come about until much later, including trains, phonographs, mechanized gun turrets and flamethrowers.


* EliteMook: a lot of enemies have recolours of them that serve as this, boasting higher stats and often an extra skill or two.

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* EliteMook: a lot of enemies have recolours [[PaletteSwap recolours]] of them that serve as this, boasting higher stats and often an extra skill or two.



* HoldTheLine: Battle 7-4 is a defense map where you must survive for 11 turns. Despite this, it's still possible to inflict a TotalPartyKill on the enemy.

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* HoldTheLine: Battle 7-4 is a defense map where you must survive for 11 turns. Despite this, it's still possible to inflict a TotalPartyKill on the enemy. In fact, you're encouraged to, lest you miss out on some valuable skill points and items.



** By the end of Chapter 3, the serial escalation has led to Tevoran Company [[spoiler: basically single-handedly dismantling the most powerful empire in the world. ''And we're not done yet''.]]

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** By the end of Chapter 3, the serial escalation has led to Tevoran and Company [[spoiler: basically single-handedly dismantling the most powerful empire in the world. ''And we're not done yet''.]]



--> '''Ivan:''' God knows I tried to use one of those things. "White Bolt! Holy Storm! Light Cheroot!" None of it worked worth a damn!\\

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--> '''Ivan:''' God knows I tried to use one of those things. "White Bolt! Holy Storm! [[MundaneUtility Light Cheroot!" Cheroot]]!" None of it worked worth a damn!\\


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ViolenceIsTheOnlyOption: The amount of times diplomacy has been attempted as the first answer to a situation, let alone ''succeeded'', can be counted by your hands. Well, unless you count Tevoran's audacious calls for the enemy forces to surrender, which is always refuted.

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* SerialEscalation: Episode 1 is a good example of this. Ivan starts out simply trying to sell some tobacco to the local thugs. That turns into a holdup, which turns into a back alley brawl, which turns into a full-on gang war that leaves at least over a dozen people dead. And this becomes a running theme in the series.
** By the end of Chapter 3, the serial escalation has led to Tevoran Company [[spoiler: basically single-handedly dismantling the most powerful empire in the world. ''And we're not done yet''.]]


* HamToHamCombat: Seems to be a growing theme anytime Tevoran gets into a verbal sparring match with one of the over-the-top bosses the gang faces (which is now about once per episode). Notable confrontations include those with Boris Beleyav,The Redshields, Lubomir the Prison Warden, the Sewer Shaman, Gilbrecht Van Arkanad, and Jedmesz Luziret, but special mention goes to Lord Leithar, whose over-the-top melodramatic rhetoric managed to wow ''Tevoran''.



** Episode Fourteen: [[spoiler:Oskar is corrupted beyond salvation, and he and Rudolf must be killed off by Tevoran and Co. Duriken reveals that Aizu is the reincarnation of Ecthain, and Aizu overcomes his brainwashing and teleports the party away before blowing half of Vorona to hell.]]

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** Episode Fourteen: [[spoiler:Oskar is corrupted beyond salvation, and he and Rudolf must be killed off by Tevoran and Co. Duriken reveals that Aizu is the reincarnation of Ecthain, and Aizu overcomes his brainwashing and teleports the party away before blowing half of Vorona to hell.]]]]
* WorldOfHam: The population of the Valelands is rife with over-the-top lunacy that seemingly pervades every stripe and strata of society. On the "heroic" side, the biggest hams include Tevoran, Oksana, Vadim, and Zofia, while as far as villains go, Boris Beleyav, Father Otis, The Redshields, The Warden, King Oskar, Prince Rudolf, the Sewer Shaman, Gilbrecht Van Arkanad, Jedmesz, and Lord Leithar all easily fit the bill (it'd honestly be simpler to list the enemies who ''weren't'' hams). And let's not forget Volebor, either, leader of a literal ''nation'' of large hams...


** '''Casimir''' -- ''The Smart Guy'': A drug-dealing [[ScienceHero science anti-hero]], who's brews his own chemical cocktails to grant the team a myriad of status boosts.

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** '''Casimir''' -- ''The Smart Guy'': A drug-dealing [[ScienceHero science anti-hero]], who's who brews his own chemical cocktails to grant the team a myriad of status boosts.


** Note that these are likely based on the real-world Polish currency "zlotys".



** Note that these are likely based on the real-world Polish currency "zlotys".


* DeathIsDramatic: Inverted, and given this show's dark humor, justifiably so. Mooks die in droves, and the [[DeathMontage Endless List of Ways to Die]] in this game runs the gamut from arrows and bullets to [[spoiler:Zofia's Helldrill]]. From Chapter 2, [[spoiler:main characters begin dying as well]], and the fact that [[spoiler:Vadim dies suddenly ''in a cutscene'']] avoids the audience's expectation, and is actually a bit of a shock the first time given the suddenness of it all. At least you can reclaim their items and skill points afterwards.

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* DeathIsDramatic: Inverted, and given this show's game's dark humor, justifiably so. Mooks die in droves, and the [[DeathMontage Endless List of Ways to Die]] in this game runs the gamut from arrows and bullets to [[spoiler:Zofia's Helldrill]]. From Chapter 2, [[spoiler:main characters begin dying as well]], and the fact that [[spoiler:Vadim dies suddenly ''in a cutscene'']] avoids the audience's expectation, and is actually a bit of a shock the first time given the suddenness of it all. At least you can reclaim their items and skill points afterwards.

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* SoLongAndThanksForAllTheGear: Generally averted. Whenever someone leaves the party for an extended period of time, they return their items to the party inventory and any skill points you spent on them are automatically refunded.

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