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''Telepath Tactics'' is the fourth entry in the TelepathRPG series. It is markedly different from its predecessors, using a brand-new engine that adds much more depth to battles and ditches the old top-down vector graphics (a long-standing complaint about the series) in favor of more standard pixel graphics. It also departs from its WesternRPG roots; it is instead a more focused TacticalRPG, with a very linear plotline and minimal free exploration segments. The primary focus of the game is, in fact, on competitive multiplayer; the single-player campaign was not even part of its original conception, and was added midway through development.

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''Telepath Tactics'' is the fourth entry in the TelepathRPG VideoGame/TelepathRPG series. It is markedly different from its predecessors, using a brand-new engine that adds much more depth to battles and ditches the old top-down vector graphics (a long-standing complaint about the series) in favor of more standard pixel graphics. It also departs from its WesternRPG roots; it is instead a more focused TacticalRPG, with a very linear plotline and minimal free exploration segments. The primary focus of the game is, in fact, on competitive multiplayer; the single-player campaign was not even part of its original conception, and was added midway through development.


* LaughingMad: Archos, as part of his LastWords.

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* LaughingMad: Archos, as part of during his LastWords.


* BonusBoss: Fera. Similarly to General D'Kah in ''[[TelepathRPGServantsOfGod Servants of God]]'', you are expected to run from her, as she's far too strong for an appropriately-leveled party to take on at that point in the campaign.

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* BonusBoss: Fera. Similarly to General D'Kah in ''[[TelepathRPGServantsOfGod ''[[VideoGame/TelepathRPGServantsOfGod Servants of God]]'', you are expected to run from her, as she's far too strong for an appropriately-leveled party to take on at that point in the campaign.


* TheDevTeamThinksOfEverything: One notable aversion: defeating [[BonusBoss Fera]] in the outer wall battle will get her to say a special message and retreat. However, if you beat her in the ''foyer'' battle (which is virtually impossible), she ''won't'' say any LastWords, and will even drop her InfinityPlusOneSword.

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* TheDevTeamThinksOfEverything: One notable aversion: defeating DevelopersForesight: Defeating [[BonusBoss Fera]] in the outer wall battle will get her to say a special message and retreat. However, if you beat her in the ''foyer'' battle (which is virtually impossible), she ''won't'' say any LastWords, and will even drop her InfinityPlusOneSword.



* DualBoss: Sort of. The final battle of the campaign pits you against both BigBad Tarion and TheDragon Pathos, but you don't fight them at the same time; instead, Pathos is part of the front line while Tarion hides in the back.



* DualBoss: Sort of. The final battle of the campaign pits you against both BigBad Tarion and TheDragon Pathos, but you don't fight them at the same time; instead, Pathos is part of the front line while Tarion hides in the back.


* LostForever: Everything, since you can never return to previous missions. Recruitable characters are probably the most notable -- especially in normal mode, where they can [[FinalDeath die permanently]].


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* PermanentlyMissableContent: Everything, since you can never return to previous missions. Recruitable characters are probably the most notable -- especially in normal mode, where they can [[FinalDeath die permanently]].


'''elepath Tactics'' is the fourth entry in the TelepathRPG series. It is markedly different from its predecessors, using a brand-new engine that adds much more depth to battles and ditches the old top-down vector graphics (a long-standing complaint about the series) in favor of more standard pixel graphics. It also departs from its WesternRPG roots; it is instead a more focused TacticalRPG, with a very linear plotline and minimal free exploration segments. The primary focus of the game is, in fact, on competitive multiplayer; the single-player campaign was not even part of its original conception, and was added midway through development.

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'''elepath ''Telepath Tactics'' is the fourth entry in the TelepathRPG series. It is markedly different from its predecessors, using a brand-new engine that adds much more depth to battles and ditches the old top-down vector graphics (a long-standing complaint about the series) in favor of more standard pixel graphics. It also departs from its WesternRPG roots; it is instead a more focused TacticalRPG, with a very linear plotline and minimal free exploration segments. The primary focus of the game is, in fact, on competitive multiplayer; the single-player campaign was not even part of its original conception, and was added midway through development.


'''Telepath Tactics''' is the fourth entry in the TelepathRPG series. It is markedly different from its predecessors, using a brand-new engine that adds much more depth to battles and ditches the old top-down vector graphics (a long-standing complaint about the series) in favor of more standard pixel graphics. It also departs from its WesternRPG roots; it is instead a more focused TacticalRPG, with a very linear plotline and minimal free exploration segments. The primary focus of the game is, in fact, on competitive multiplayer; the single-player campaign was not even part of its original conception, and was added midway through development.

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'''Telepath Tactics''' '''elepath Tactics'' is the fourth entry in the TelepathRPG series. It is markedly different from its predecessors, using a brand-new engine that adds much more depth to battles and ditches the old top-down vector graphics (a long-standing complaint about the series) in favor of more standard pixel graphics. It also departs from its WesternRPG roots; it is instead a more focused TacticalRPG, with a very linear plotline and minimal free exploration segments. The primary focus of the game is, in fact, on competitive multiplayer; the single-player campaign was not even part of its original conception, and was added midway through development.


The single-player campaign, titled ''The Vengeance of Emma Strider'', details the story of two sisters who were enslaved by a shadowling mining company, but managed to escape when they were still young. [[RaisedByNatives They are taken in by a lissit tribe]], and when they grow to adulthood, they resolve to return to the mines, free the slaves, and rescue their father, who they left behind in their first exodus. While the plot itself lacks the depth of [[VideoGame/TelepathRPGServantsOfGod its predecessor]], it is notable for having [[GirlsNeedRoleModels a female-dominated cast]] and an anti-imperialist narrative with a personal focus, two features that are uncommon in most {{Tactical RPG}}s.

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The single-player campaign, titled ''The Vengeance of Emma Strider'', details the story of two sisters who were enslaved by a shadowling mining company, but managed to escape when they were still young. [[RaisedByNatives They are taken in by a lissit tribe]], and when they grow to adulthood, they resolve to return to the mines, free the slaves, and rescue their father, who they left behind in their first exodus. While the plot itself lacks the depth of [[VideoGame/TelepathRPGServantsOfGod its predecessor]], it is notable for having [[GirlsNeedRoleModels a female-dominated cast]] cast and an anti-imperialist narrative with a personal focus, two features that are uncommon in most {{Tactical RPG}}s.



* GirlsNeedRoleModels: [[http://sinisterdesign.net/why-im-using-female-lead-characters/ The developer cites this as one of the reasons for the campaign's female-centric cast,]] though he generally went the route of lots of {{Rounded Character}}s rather than a single perfect role model.

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[[quoteright:350:http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/telepathtacticsscreen.png]]

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* SoloCharacterRun: Almost; a SelfImposedChallenge using only [[RequiredPartyMember the Strider sisters]] [[http://sinisterdesign.net/forum/index.php?topic=1591.0 has been attempted.]]

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* SiblingTeam: Emma and Sabrina. Gavrielle and Farasat are a BrotherSisterTeam, but unusually for the trope, they actually don't work very well together, as they're both [[GlassCannon fragile ranged attackers]] who need a tough fighter to protect them.

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* FingerTenting: Tarion does this in his CharacterPortrait, though it's hard to tell until [[EvilIsNotWellLit you see him in proper lighting]].

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* CantDropTheHero: Emma and Sabrina can never be dumped in the reserve, and [[WeCannotGoOnWithoutYou it's game over if either one dies]].


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* RequiredPartyMember: Teresa and Phoebe have to be included in the party in the crypt SideQuest, as does Silithis Predat in Rescuing Sarn Kamina. (In the later case, [[WeCannotGoOnWithoutYou it's also an automatic game over if she dies]].)

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* ArbitraryHeadcountLimit: The number of units you can deploy (and the positions you can place them in) is determined by the map. In the campaign, you are usually limited to 8 characters, though the final battle allows 12. There are two exceptions to this: the "defend the camp" battle, where every unit you've recruited is deployed automatically, and the fortress outer wall battle, where Teresa and Phoebe are automatically deployed in addition to your usual 8.


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* CoolOldLady: Scarlet Etolie, a retired mantis knight. She still has a strong sense of duty and honor -- [[KnightTemplar at times too strong]] -- and is one of your toughest and most reliable party members despite her gray hair.


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* FingerGun: Pathos does this in her CharacterPortrait, though only with one hand.


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* HorseOfADifferentColor: Giant mantises take the place of horses, probably as a nod to the archipelago's more tropical climate. Scarlet says she's had hers since she first joined the army, which implies they have roughly human lifespans.


* LeftHanging: Igor Bloodbeard and his bandits are the major antagonists of the first arc, but he's never confronted directly, and his forces end up vanishing from the plot rather abruptly with no proper resolution. Fera does show up in the epilogue, however, so this may be an intentional SequelHook.



* WhatHappenedToTheMouse:
** Igor Bloodbeard and his bandits are the major antagonists of the first arc, but he's never confronted directly, and his forces end up vanishing from the plot rather abruptly with no proper resolution. Fera does show up in the epilogue, however, so this may be an intentional SequelHook.
** Doran, Edwin, and [[spoiler:Gunther]] don't get epilogue scenes. Neither does Siripent, though one can presume that he followed Sarn.
** In addition, certain characters only get epilogue scenes that are paired with another character; if that character is dead, they can end up without a proper resolution.

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* WhatHappenedToTheMouse:
** Igor Bloodbeard and his bandits are the major antagonists of the first arc, but he's never confronted directly, and his forces end up vanishing from the plot rather abruptly with no proper resolution. Fera does show up in the epilogue, however, so this may be an intentional SequelHook.
**
WhatHappenedToTheMouse: Doran, Edwin, and [[spoiler:Gunther]] don't get epilogue scenes. Neither does Siripent, though one can presume that he followed Sarn.
**
Sarn. In addition, certain characters only get epilogue scenes that are paired with another character; if that character is dead, they can end up without a proper resolution.

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