Follow TV Tropes

Following

History VideoGame / NetHack

Go To



** Not all of it is ''accurate'' Japanese, mind. "Shito" is probably just a misspelling of "shōtō"[[note]]小刀; used in ''[=NetHack=]'' for knife, actually means a short sword[[/note]], but no one seems to know what word the devs were going for with "gunyoki".
*** It seems that "gunyoki" is a word [mostly] [[http://rec.games.roguelike.nethack.narkive.com/KM04loFL/etymology-of-the-word-gunyoki made up by the developers]].

to:

** Not all of it is ''accurate'' Japanese, mind. "Shito" is probably just a misspelling of "shōtō"[[note]]小刀; used in ''[=NetHack=]'' for knife, actually means a short sword[[/note]], but no one seems to know what word the devs were going for with "gunyoki".
*** It seems that "gunyoki" is a word [mostly]
[[http://rec.games.roguelike.nethack.narkive.com/KM04loFL/etymology-of-the-word-gunyoki made up by the developers]]."gunyoki"]].


The advantage of ''[=NetHack=]'''s focus on items is that it reduces the impact of luck. By carefully hoarding your resources, (almost) nothing is inescapably fatal. The downside of ''[=NetHack=]'''s focus on items is that it reduces the impact of luck. Once you've learned some effective tactics, multiple victories can start to feel similar, or even repetitive.

to:

The advantage of ''[=NetHack=]'''s ''[=NetHack=]''`s focus on items is that it reduces the impact of luck. By carefully hoarding your resources, (almost) nothing is inescapably fatal. The downside of ''[=NetHack=]'''s focus on items is that it reduces the impact of luck. Once you've learned some effective tactics, multiple victories can start to feel similar, or even repetitive.


''[=NetHack=]'' has been described as a puzzle game hiding inside a roguelike's skin. Whereas the archetypal ''VideoGame/{{Angband}}'' or ''VideoGame/DungeonCrawl'' hero is a KnightInShiningArmor who slays countless evil creatures and ([[MagikarpPower eventually]]) becomes powerful like unto God, the archetypal ''[=NetHack=]'' hero is a cunning trickster (or...''hacker'') who [[CombatPragmatist sets traps, fights in unconventional ways]] and [[TryingToCatchMeFightingDirty never,]] ''[[TryingToCatchMeFightingDirty ever]]'' [[TryingToCatchMeFightingDirty plays fair]]. After the very first few levels, [[LevelGrinding killing monsters for XP]] becomes unprofitable (or even disadvantageous). Instead, power comes from [[KleptomaniacHero your ever expanding collection of items]] which can be wielded, worn, thrown, rubbed, dipped, engraved, snapped, pointed, combined, cast, eaten, read, or applied, singly or in [[DevelopersForesight combination]].

The advantage of ''[=NetHack=]''`s focus on items is that it reduces the impact of luck. By carefully hoarding your resources, (almost) nothing is inescapably fatal. The downside of ''[=NetHack=]'''s focus on items is that it reduces the impact of luck. Once you've learned some effective tactics, multiple playthroughs can start to feel similar, or even repetitive.

to:

''[=NetHack=]'' has been described as a puzzle game hiding inside a roguelike's skin. Whereas the archetypal ''VideoGame/{{Angband}}'' or ''VideoGame/DungeonCrawl'' hero is a KnightInShiningArmor who slays countless evil creatures and ([[MagikarpPower eventually]]) becomes powerful like unto God, the archetypal ''[=NetHack=]'' hero is a cunning trickster (or...''hacker'') who [[CombatPragmatist sets traps, fights in unconventional ways]] ways and [[TryingToCatchMeFightingDirty never,]] ''[[TryingToCatchMeFightingDirty ever]]'' [[TryingToCatchMeFightingDirty never, ''ever'' plays fair]].fair. After the very first few levels, [[LevelGrinding killing monsters for XP]] becomes unprofitable (or even disadvantageous). Instead, power comes from [[KleptomaniacHero your ever expanding collection of items]] which can be wielded, worn, thrown, rubbed, dipped, engraved, snapped, pointed, combined, cast, eaten, read, or applied, singly or in [[DevelopersForesight combination]].

The advantage of ''[=NetHack=]''`s ''[=NetHack=]'''s focus on items is that it reduces the impact of luck. By carefully hoarding your resources, (almost) nothing is inescapably fatal. The downside of ''[=NetHack=]'''s focus on items is that it reduces the impact of luck. Once you've learned some effective tactics, multiple playthroughs victories can start to feel similar, or even repetitive.


* ArbitrarySkepticism: Invoked by players doing Atheist conduct--never pray or otherwise interact with gods--despite the goal of the game being to retrieve an amulet for your god [[spoiler:and become a demigod yourself]]. This gets particularly confusing when you are playing as an Atheist priest, a class centered around religious themes.

to:

* ArbitrarySkepticism: Invoked by players doing Atheist conduct--never conduct -- never pray or otherwise interact with gods--despite gods -- despite the goal of the game being to retrieve an amulet for your god [[spoiler:and become a demigod yourself]]. This gets particularly confusing when you are playing as an Atheist priest, a class centered around religious themes.



* ArtisticLicenseBiology: The game's concept of "nutrition" is probably the wackiest thing of all; unless you find a Ring of Slow Digestion, you'll need to eat the equivalent of ''dozens of dragon corpses'' to complete the game without starving--even if you're a ''gnome''--but drinking is entirely optional and NobodyPoops. Specific tropes:

to:

* ArtisticLicenseBiology: The game's concept of "nutrition" is probably the wackiest thing of all; unless you find a Ring of Slow Digestion, you'll need to eat the equivalent of ''dozens of dragon corpses'' to complete the game without starving--even starving -- even if you're a ''gnome''--but ''gnome'' but drinking is entirely optional and NobodyPoops. Specific tropes:



** MisplacedVegetation: Minetown--a cave, inside a dungeon--sometimes has trees. (Although their positioning would indicate they were deliberately planted there as decor.)

to:

** MisplacedVegetation: Minetown--a Minetown a cave, inside a dungeon--sometimes dungeon sometimes has trees. (Although their positioning would indicate they were deliberately planted there as decor.)



* BasiliskAndCockatrice: Cockatrices appear here. If you hear the cockatrice's hiss or are touched by a living cockatrice there's a chance that you'll slowing start [[TakenForGranite turning to stone]]; this can be cancelled by [[spoiler:eating a lizard corpse or eating/drinking something acid]]. Touching a cockatrice (living or dead) with your bare skin will ''[[OneHitKill instantly]]'' turn you to stone. Gloved characters can take advantage of this by picking up a cockatrice corpse [[ImprovisedWeapon and using it to bash monsters]] (in which case ''[=NetHack=]'' players will call it a [[FanNickname "rubber chicken"]]). But keep in mind that gloved monsters can ''also'' pick up a cockatrice corpse and use it against you.

to:

* BasiliskAndCockatrice: Cockatrices appear here. If you hear the cockatrice's hiss or are touched by a living cockatrice cockatrice, there's a chance that you'll slowing slowly start [[TakenForGranite turning to stone]]; this can be cancelled by [[spoiler:eating a lizard corpse or eating/drinking something acid]]. Touching a cockatrice (living or dead) with your bare skin will ''[[OneHitKill instantly]]'' turn you to stone. Gloved characters can take advantage of this by picking up a cockatrice corpse [[ImprovisedWeapon and using it to bash monsters]] (in which case ''[=NetHack=]'' players will call it a [[FanNickname "rubber chicken"]]). But keep in mind that gloved monsters can ''also'' pick up a cockatrice corpse and use it against you.

Added DiffLines:

*** It seems that "gunyoki" is a word [mostly] [[http://rec.games.roguelike.nethack.narkive.com/KM04loFL/etymology-of-the-word-gunyoki made up by the developers]].


* CommonplaceRare: Two of the most useful items in the game are: a [[PunnyName magic marker]] and a can of grease. Both are disgustingly uncommon. [[labelnote:*]]The ''most'' useful item in the game is easily a Wand of Wishing. Which you will then use to [[MundaneUtility wish for grease and magic markers]].[[/labelnote]] Grease is mostly valuable because it is rare--its effects are important but mostly supersedable (armor can be made permanently damageproof and there's a cloak and a bag that are effectively permanently greased. You'll still have to avoid melee with mind flayers). Magic markers, however, let you write powerful and valuable magic scrolls on junk parchment (and are used up in the process), making them quite desirable.

to:

* CommonplaceRare: Two of the most useful items in the game are: a [[PunnyName magic marker]] and a can of grease. Both are disgustingly uncommon. [[labelnote:*]]The [[note]]The ''most'' useful item in the game is easily a Wand of Wishing. Which you will then use to [[MundaneUtility wish for grease and magic markers]].[[/labelnote]] [[/note]] Grease is mostly valuable because it is rare--its effects are important but mostly supersedable (armor can be made permanently damageproof and there's a cloak and a bag that are effectively permanently greased. You'll still have to avoid melee with mind flayers). Magic markers, however, let you write powerful and valuable magic scrolls on junk parchment (and are used up in the process), making them quite desirable.


** There are quite a few things that aren't directly capped, allowing them to go as high as [[PowersOfTwoMinusOne 2^8-1, 2^16-1, 2^31-1, or possibly even 2^63-1]] depending on the size of the variable they're stored in.

to:

** There are quite a few things that aren't directly capped, allowing them to go as high as [[PowersOfTwoMinusOne [[UsefulNotes/PowersOfTwoMinusOne 2^8-1, 2^16-1, 2^31-1, or possibly even 2^63-1]] depending on the size of the variable they're stored in.

Added DiffLines:

* LocationThemeNaming: Shopkeepers are named after real-world towns from various countries, depending on the type of shop: Russian towns for potion shops, Irish towns for scroll/spellbook shops, Turkish towns for armor shops, Welsh towns for wand shops, Nordic towns for ring shops, Indonesian towns for food shops, French towns for weapon shops, and Surinamese towns for general stores.


* DownerEnding: Since NetHack 3.6.0, [[spoiler:it is possible to offer the Amulet of Yendor to Moloch (using an altar in Moloch's Sanctum). As a result, he triumphs over your god and [[YouHaveOutlivedYourUsefulness kills you]] for your trouble.]]

to:

* DownerEnding: Since NetHack [=NetHack=] 3.6.0, [[spoiler:it is possible to offer the Amulet of Yendor to Moloch (using an altar in Moloch's Sanctum). As a result, he triumphs over your god and [[YouHaveOutlivedYourUsefulness kills you]] for your trouble.]]


*** [[Anime/{{Domo}} Domo-kun]]

to:

*** [[Anime/{{Domo}} [[Anime/DomoTV Domo-kun]]

Added DiffLines:

* DownerEnding: Since NetHack 3.6.0, [[spoiler:it is possible to offer the Amulet of Yendor to Moloch (using an altar in Moloch's Sanctum). As a result, he triumphs over your god and [[YouHaveOutlivedYourUsefulness kills you]] for your trouble.]]

Added DiffLines:

* MundaneUtility: Magic lamps contain djinn, a.k.a. [[GenieInABottle genies]]. Many players will delay or forego releasing the genie because keeping it trapped in the lamp makes it produce light indefinitely, without needing to refuel with oil like a non-magic lamp. Oil can be hard to come by, and many sections of the dungeon, especially the Gnomish Mines, are pitch-dark.


''[=NetHack=]'' has been described as a puzzle game hiding inside a roguelike's skin. Whereas the archetypal ''VideoGame/{{Angband}}'' or ''VideoGame/DungeonCrawl'' hero is a KnightInShiningArmor who slays countless evil creatures and ([[MagikarpPower eventually]]) becomes powerful like unto God, the archetypal ''[=NetHack=]'' hero is a cunning trickster (or...''hacker'') who [[CombatPragmatist sets traps, fights in unconventional ways]] and [[TryingToCatchMeFightingDirty never,]] ''[[TryingToCatchMeFightingDirty ever]]'' [[TryingToCatchMeFightingDirty plays fair]]. After the very first few levels, [[LevelGrinding killing monsters for XP]] becomes unprofitable (or even disadvantageous). Instead, power comes from [[KleptomaniacHero your ever expanding collection of items]] which can be wielded, worn, thrown, rubbed, dipped, engraved, snapped, pointed, combined, cast, eaten, read, or applied, singly or in [[TheDevTeamThinksOfEverything combination]].

to:

''[=NetHack=]'' has been described as a puzzle game hiding inside a roguelike's skin. Whereas the archetypal ''VideoGame/{{Angband}}'' or ''VideoGame/DungeonCrawl'' hero is a KnightInShiningArmor who slays countless evil creatures and ([[MagikarpPower eventually]]) becomes powerful like unto God, the archetypal ''[=NetHack=]'' hero is a cunning trickster (or...''hacker'') who [[CombatPragmatist sets traps, fights in unconventional ways]] and [[TryingToCatchMeFightingDirty never,]] ''[[TryingToCatchMeFightingDirty ever]]'' [[TryingToCatchMeFightingDirty plays fair]]. After the very first few levels, [[LevelGrinding killing monsters for XP]] becomes unprofitable (or even disadvantageous). Instead, power comes from [[KleptomaniacHero your ever expanding collection of items]] which can be wielded, worn, thrown, rubbed, dipped, engraved, snapped, pointed, combined, cast, eaten, read, or applied, singly or in [[TheDevTeamThinksOfEverything [[DevelopersForesight combination]].



* TheDevTeamThinksOfEverything: The {{Trope Namer|s}}. It even has its [[TheDevTeamThinksOfEverything/NetHack own page]].
** See also the [[http://nethack.org/v343/bugs.html bugs list]], for things the Dev Team [[AvertedTrope didn't think of]].
*** Becomes funny when you realize that most every bug listed seems to be a case of TheDevTeamThinksOfEverything. You can't rub a touchstone on gold? Why bother in the first place?
*** Another one might be: Lit potion may survive hero dying from splattered oil burning on the floor. Who the heck noticed that?
*** Also: Sunsword does not work as expected against shades. You aren't running into shades until you are well on your way to Ascending and someone actually took the time to figure that out.
*** A few do seem to be genuine mistakes, such as "candles are fireproof"... how in the world did that happen?

to:

* TheDevTeamThinksOfEverything: DevelopersForesight: The former {{Trope Namer|s}}. It even has its [[TheDevTeamThinksOfEverything/NetHack [[DevelopersForesight/NetHack own page]].
**
page]]. See also the [[http://nethack.org/v343/bugs.html bugs list]], for things the Dev Team [[AvertedTrope didn't think of]].
*** Becomes funny when you realize that most every bug listed seems to be a case of TheDevTeamThinksOfEverything. You can't rub a touchstone on gold? Why bother in the first place?
*** Another one might be: Lit potion may survive hero dying from splattered oil burning on the floor. Who the heck noticed that?
*** Also: Sunsword does not work as expected against shades. You aren't running into shades until you are well on your way to Ascending and someone actually took the time to figure that out.
*** A few do seem to be genuine mistakes, such as "candles are fireproof"... how in the world did that happen?
of]].



* EasterEgg: "You pick up the trapper's tongue. But it's kind of slimy, so you put it back down."
** "That would be an interesting topological exercise." [[spoiler:Put a bag inside itself.]]
** Too many to list. Most actually overlap with TheDevTeamThinksOfEverything in that the player is trying to do something strange, but the game gives an appropriate response instead of simply giving a generic you-can't-do-this response.

to:

* EasterEgg: "You pick up the trapper's tongue. But it's kind of slimy, so you put it back down."
** "That would be an interesting topological exercise." [[spoiler:Put a bag inside itself.]]
**
Too many to list. Most actually overlap with TheDevTeamThinksOfEverything DevelopersForesight in that the player is trying to do something strange, but the game gives an appropriate response instead of simply giving a generic you-can't-do-this response.



* LordBritishPostulate: The Riders in the Astral Plane can be killed, but revive themselves in short order; they're supposed to harass you into ascending (or dying) instead of hanging around on the final level indefinitely. You can't get rid of their corpses in any of the usual ways--eating them is fatal, trying to shove them in a tin can makes them revive instantly, etc. But there ''are'' a few bizarre ways to kill them permanently, such as filling every square on the level with monsters so they have nowhere to spawn ([[TheDevTeamThinksOfEverything giving the message "You feel less hassled;"]] once their corpses rot away they will be gone for good).

to:

* LordBritishPostulate: The Riders in the Astral Plane can be killed, but revive themselves in short order; they're supposed to harass you into ascending (or dying) instead of hanging around on the final level indefinitely. You can't get rid of their corpses in any of the usual ways--eating them is fatal, trying to shove them in a tin can makes them revive instantly, etc. But there ''are'' a few bizarre ways to kill them permanently, such as filling every square on the level with monsters so they have nowhere to spawn ([[TheDevTeamThinksOfEverything ([[DevelopersForesight giving the message "You feel less hassled;"]] once their corpses rot away they will be gone for good).



* MailerDaemon: A literal one; it delivers messages from other users on the system.
** The daemon normally appears and disappears within one turn without giving a chance for the player to interact with it. However, a CrazyPrepared player [[LordBritishPostulate can kill it]], [[TheDevTeamThinksOfEverything preventing further messages from being delivered]]; to do this, the player needs to [[spoiler:stone-to-flesh a statue of a mail daemon, which is not something that occurs naturally but needs to be wished for, and to be prepared to kill the resulting daemon in one turn as it otherwise disappears with a cry of "I'm late!"]].

to:

* MailerDaemon: A literal one; it delivers messages from other users on the system.
**
system. The daemon normally appears and disappears within one turn without giving a chance for the player to interact with it. However, a CrazyPrepared player [[LordBritishPostulate can kill it]], [[TheDevTeamThinksOfEverything preventing further messages from being delivered]]; delivered; to do this, the player needs to [[spoiler:stone-to-flesh a statue of a mail daemon, which is not something that occurs naturally but needs to be wished for, and to be prepared to kill the resulting daemon in one turn as it otherwise disappears with a cry of "I'm late!"]].



* RetGone: A scroll of genocide not only kills all monsters of a given type, it removes them from reality. If you genocide cockatrice and you were holding a cockatrice in your hand and three of their eggs in your backpack, they'll all vanish. If you had a tin filled with red dragon meat and you genocide red dragons, that tin mysteriously becomes empty. And you'll find yourself unable to polymorph into one now, even if you had already done so before. Also, if you genocide your own race/role while polymorphed, the game will say "you feel empty inside". Try to turn back and you will die. If you quit before dying, the game will read "[[TheDevTeamThinksOfEverything quit while already on Charon's boat.]]"

to:

* RetGone: A scroll of genocide not only kills all monsters of a given type, it removes them from reality. If you genocide cockatrice and you were holding a cockatrice in your hand and three of their eggs in your backpack, they'll all vanish. If you had a tin filled with red dragon meat and you genocide red dragons, that tin mysteriously becomes empty. And you'll find yourself unable to polymorph into one now, even if you had already done so before. Also, if you genocide your own race/role while polymorphed, the game will say "you feel empty inside". Try to turn back and you will die. If you quit before dying, the game will read "[[TheDevTeamThinksOfEverything quit "quit while already on Charon's boat.]]""



* ''VideoGame/{{Rogue}}'': ''[=NetHack=]'''s predecessor.


* DangerousForbiddenTechnique: Wielding a "rubber chicken" (cockatrice corpse) allows you to [[TakenForGranite insta-petrify]] almost any enemy--even high-level demon lords. But as you might imagine, it's extremely easy to [[HoistByHisOwnPetard petrify yourself with it by mistake.]]

to:

* DangerousForbiddenTechnique: In the form of risky strategies to win and/or kill monsters.
**
Wielding a "rubber chicken" (cockatrice corpse) allows you to [[TakenForGranite insta-petrify]] almost any enemy--even high-level demon lords. But as you might imagine, it's extremely easy to [[HoistByHisOwnPetard petrify yourself with it by mistake.]]]] [[spoiler:The biggest danger is falling--down the stairs, into a pit trap, etc.--while wielding the corpse. This can mostly be avoided by wearing a ring of levitation whenever the corpse is equipped, but you have to watch out for [[{{Pun}} sinks]].]]
** The "digging for victory" strategy, where you get a pickaxe and some wands of digging and attempt to burrow straight down to the castle. From there, you can [[TheGuardsMustBeCrazy exploit the stupidity of the castle's inhabitants]] to kill most of them with the drawbridge, and get a wand of wishing as a DiscOneNuke. Most of the time, though, this tactic will just get you killed by an enemy that's way out of your league.

Showing 15 edit(s) of 286

Top