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* SequelDifficultySpike: The difficulty levels of the first three Super Famicom games are all roughly the same; the fourth suddenly turns things up to near NintendoHard levels at points.


* SequelDifficultySpike: The difficulty levels of the first three Super Famicom games are all roughly the same; the fourth suddenly turns things up to near NintendoHard levels at points.



* StalkedByTheBell

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%% * StalkedByTheBell


Cultural barriers, mostly. One of ''Ganbare Goemon'''s biggest draws - aside from the vibrant graphics, superb music, and great gameplay - is its bizarre brand of [[WidgetSeries uniquely Japanese humor]] that makes translation difficult. Within you'll find many oddities such as time-traveling transvestite nuns, bunny-obssessed shoguns, and suicidal sportsmen. There's also a great deal of anachronistic elements (such as [[InstantAwesomeJustAddMecha giant robots]]) that really have no place in Edo-period Japan. It's all so absurd that you'll just have to experience it for yourself.

to:

Cultural barriers, mostly. One of ''Ganbare Goemon'''s biggest draws - aside from the vibrant graphics, superb music, and great gameplay - is its bizarre brand of [[WidgetSeries uniquely Japanese humor]] that makes translation difficult. Within you'll find many oddities such as time-traveling transvestite nuns, bunny-obssessed shoguns, and suicidal sportsmen. There's also a great deal of anachronistic elements (such as [[InstantAwesomeJustAddMecha giant robots]]) that really have no place in Edo-period Japan. It's all so absurd that you'll just have to experience it for yourself.


* ADayInTheLimelight: ''Chikyū Kyūshutsu Sakusen'' is a rare occasion in which Omitsu takes an active role in the plot instead of being a cheerleader or kidnapping victim. Website/NicoNicoDouga commenter reactions were a mixture of confusion and annoyance.

to:

* ADayInTheLimelight: ''Chikyū Kyūshutsu Sakusen'' is a rare occasion in which Omitsu takes an active role in the plot instead of being a cheerleader or kidnapping victim. Website/NicoNicoDouga commenter reactions were a mixture of confusion and annoyance.


** ''Ganbare Goemon: Mononoke Dōchū - Tobidase Nabe Bugyō!'' (1999, UsefulNotes/{{G|ameBoyColor}}BC): Links with ''Mononoke Sugoroku''. Made to capitalize on the Pokémon success.

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** ''Ganbare Goemon: Mononoke Dōchū - Tobidase Nabe Bugyō!'' (1999, UsefulNotes/{{G|ameBoyColor}}BC): Links with ''Mononoke Sugoroku''. Made to capitalize on the Pokémon Pokémon's success.


* The UsefulNotes/{{Nintendo 64}} games, notable for being localized more accurately:

to:

* The UsefulNotes/{{Nintendo 64}} games, notable for being localized more accurately:where the series was most active in the west:


** There were three more Super Famicom offerings: the second was considerably easier than the first, and the third was similar in many aspects to ''[[VideoGame/ZeldaIITheAdventureOfLink Zelda II]]'', although with the best side-scrolling sections in the entire series. Both of them introduced Mode-7 mecha boss battles, after the castles' bosses. These starred the famous [[HumongousMecha Goemon Impact]]. The fourth one is the one with the best level-design, graphics and situations, although it is NintendoHard.

to:

** There were three more Super Famicom offerings: the second was considerably easier than the first, and the third was similar in many aspects to ''[[VideoGame/ZeldaIITheAdventureOfLink Zelda II]]'', although with the best side-scrolling sections in the entire series. Both of them introduced Mode-7 mecha boss battles, after the castles' bosses. These starred the famous [[HumongousMecha Goemon Impact]]. The fourth one is the one with the best level-design, graphics and situations, although it is NintendoHard.



* Another puzzler spin-off, with prerendered graphics, starring Ebisumaru, has been released as ''Soreyuke Ebisumaru: Karakuri Meiro'' (1996, [[UsefulNotes/SuperNintendoEntertainmentSystem SFC]]), with FakeDifficulty due to awful isometric perspective controls.

to:

* Another puzzler spin-off, with prerendered graphics, starring Ebisumaru, has been released as ''Soreyuke Ebisumaru: Karakuri Meiro'' (1996, [[UsefulNotes/SuperNintendoEntertainmentSystem SFC]]), with FakeDifficulty due to awful isometric perspective controls.SFC]]).



** ''Ganbare Goemon: Kuro Fune-tō no Nazo'' (1997, UsefulNotes/{{G|ameBoy}}B): a mediocre Zelda clone released as ''Mystical Ninja Starring Goemon'' (1998, UsefulNotes/{{G|ameBoy}}B) in the west.

to:

** ''Ganbare Goemon: Kuro Fune-tō no Nazo'' (1997, UsefulNotes/{{G|ameBoy}}B): a mediocre Zelda clone released as ''Mystical Ninja Starring Goemon'' (1998, UsefulNotes/{{G|ameBoy}}B) in the west.



** ''Ganbare Goemon: Mononoke Dōchū - Tobidase Nabe Bugyō!'' (1999, UsefulNotes/{{G|ameBoyColor}}BC): Links with ''Mononoke Sugoroku''. Tries to capitalize on the Pokémon success.
** ''Ganbare Goemon: Seikūshi Dainamaittsu Arawaru!!'' (2000, UsefulNotes/{{G|ameBoyColor}}BC), the best UsefulNotes/GameBoyColor entry in the series: it plays like a port of Goemon 2 SFC.
* The UsefulNotes/PlayStation opuses were not met with nearly as much success as the N64 games.
** ''Ganbare Goemon: Uchū Kaizoku Akogingu'' (1996, UsefulNotes/{{P|layStation}}S1): a 2D sidescroller, inspired from Goemon 3 SFC. It ditches long-time [=PCs=] Yae and Sasuke for two ReplacementScrappy old men.
** ''Ganbare Goemon: Kuru Nara Koi! Ayashige Ikka no Kuroi Kage'' (1998, UsefulNotes/{{P|layStation}}S1): a full 3D game. Hit the PolygonCeiling pretty hard, and is widely considered the worst console Goemon game, save for its Goemon Impact sequences.
** ''Ganbare Goemon: Ōedo Daikaiten'' (2001, UsefulNotes/{{PS1}}): where the series went back to its 2D roots, with a 2.5D sidescroller, inspired from (and bordering on ripping off) Goemon 2 SFC.
** ''Goemon Shin Sedai Shūmei!'' (2001, UsefulNotes/{{P|layStation}}S1): A spinoff with a futuristic setting and a new cast, with a young spiky-haired Goemon. Fans didn't appreciate. It was ported (with many cuts) to the GBA as ''Goemon New Age Shutsudō!'' (2002, UsefulNotes/{{G|ameBoyAdvance}}BA).

to:

** ''Ganbare Goemon: Mononoke Dōchū - Tobidase Nabe Bugyō!'' (1999, UsefulNotes/{{G|ameBoyColor}}BC): Links with ''Mononoke Sugoroku''. Tries Made to capitalize on the Pokémon success.
** ''Ganbare Goemon: Seikūshi Dainamaittsu Arawaru!!'' (2000, UsefulNotes/{{G|ameBoyColor}}BC), the best UsefulNotes/GameBoyColor entry in the series: it plays like a port of Goemon 2 SFC.
UsefulNotes/{{G|ameBoyColor}}BC).
* The UsefulNotes/PlayStation opuses were not met with aren't nearly as much success well known as the N64 games.
** ''Ganbare Goemon: Uchū Kaizoku Akogingu'' (1996, UsefulNotes/{{P|layStation}}S1): a 2D sidescroller, inspired from Goemon 3 SFC. It ditches long-time [=PCs=] Yae and Sasuke for two ReplacementScrappy old men.
** ''Ganbare Goemon: Kuru Nara Koi! Ayashige Ikka no Kuroi Kage'' (1998, UsefulNotes/{{P|layStation}}S1): a full 3D game. Hit the PolygonCeiling pretty hard, and is widely considered the worst console Goemon game, save for its Goemon Impact sequences.
game.
** ''Ganbare Goemon: Ōedo Daikaiten'' (2001, UsefulNotes/{{PS1}}): where the series went back to its 2D roots, with a 2.5D sidescroller, sidescroller inspired from (and bordering on ripping off) by the second SNES Goemon 2 SFC.
game.
** ''Goemon Shin Sedai Shūmei!'' (2001, UsefulNotes/{{P|layStation}}S1): A spinoff with a futuristic setting and a new cast, with a young spiky-haired Goemon. Fans didn't appreciate. It was ported (with many cuts) to the GBA as ''Goemon New Age Shutsudō!'' (2002, UsefulNotes/{{G|ameBoyAdvance}}BA).



** ''Ganbare Goemon: Neo Momoyama Bakufu no Odori'' (1997, UsefulNotes/{{N|intendo64}}64), released overseas as ''Mystical Ninja Starring Goemon'' (1998, UsefulNotes/{{N|intendo64}}64). A full-3D platformer, yet more successful than its [=PS1=] counterpart.
** ''Ganbare Goemon Derodero Dōchū Obake Tenko Mori'' (1998. UsefulNotes/{{N|intendo64}}64), Released in American as ''Goemon's Great Adventure'', and in Europe as ''Mystical Ninja Starring Goemon 2'' (1998, UsefulNotes/{{N|intendo64}}64): a 2.5 sidescroller. A highlight of the series.
** ''Goemon Mononoke Sugoroku'' (1999, UsefulNotes/{{N|intendo64}}64): A Japan-only spin-off board game, with Mons elements. Links with ''Mononoke Dōchū''.

to:

** ''Ganbare Goemon: Neo Momoyama Bakufu no Odori'' (1997, UsefulNotes/{{N|intendo64}}64), released overseas as ''Mystical Ninja Starring Goemon'' (1998, UsefulNotes/{{N|intendo64}}64). A full-3D platformer, yet more successful than its [=PS1=] counterpart.
platformer.
** ''Ganbare Goemon Derodero Dōchū Obake Tenko Mori'' (1998. UsefulNotes/{{N|intendo64}}64), Released in American as ''Goemon's Great Adventure'', and in Europe as ''Mystical Ninja Starring Goemon 2'' (1998, UsefulNotes/{{N|intendo64}}64): a 2.5 sidescroller. A highlight of the series.
sidescroller.
** ''Goemon Mononoke Sugoroku'' (1999, UsefulNotes/{{N|intendo64}}64): A Japan-only spin-off board game, with Mons Mon elements. Links with ''Mononoke Dōchū''.



* ''Ganbare Goemon: Tōkai Dōchū - Ōedo Tengu-ri Kaeshi no Maki'' (2005, UsefulNotes/{{N|intendoDS}}DS): Marks the return of the series to its former glory, with a gameplay similar to the first N64 with better controls. Upon being linked to the GBA port of the two first SNES games, it unlocks various cameos from earlier games [=NPCs=].

to:

* ''Ganbare Goemon: Tōkai Dōchū - Ōedo Tengu-ri Kaeshi no Maki'' (2005, UsefulNotes/{{N|intendoDS}}DS): Marks the Marked a return of the series to its former glory, series, with a gameplay similar to the first N64 with better controls.game. Upon being linked to the GBA port of the two first SNES games, it unlocks various cameos from earlier games [=NPCs=].


* GettingCrapPastTheRadar: A fair amount. Because of ValuesDissonance, many censors don't realize that there's anything that might be objectionable to Westerners. For example, the conspicuous genitalia of Tanukis are left intact.
** Despite the game being somewhat censored on Western importation, the English version of ''Goemon's Great Adventure'' does contain the word, "damn."
** The instruction manual for the English version of ''Legend of the Mystical Ninja'' contains this description of the Memory mini-game: "You really have to concentrate in this camp." Yep -- somehow Nintendo's censors missed a concentration camp joke right in the middle of a kid's game.

to:

%% * GettingCrapPastTheRadar: A fair amount. Because of ValuesDissonance, many censors don't realize that there's anything that might be objectionable GettingCrapPastThe Radar: Due to Westerners. For example, the conspicuous genitalia of Tanukis overwhelming and persistent misuse, GCPTR is on-page examples only until 01 June 2021. If you are left intact.
** Despite the game being somewhat censored on Western importation, the English version of ''Goemon's Great Adventure'' does contain the word, "damn."
** The instruction manual for the English version of ''Legend of the Mystical Ninja'' contains
reading this description of the Memory mini-game: "You really have to concentrate in this camp." Yep -- somehow Nintendo's censors missed a concentration camp joke right in the middle of a kid's game.future, please check the trope page to make sure your example fits the current definition.


** There were three more Super Famicom offerings: the second had a case of SequelDifficultyDrop, and the third was similar in many aspects to ''[[VideoGame/ZeldaIITheAdventureOfLink Zelda II]]'', although with the best side-scrolling sections in the entire series. Both of them introduced Mode-7 mecha boss battles, after the castles' bosses. These starred the famous [[HumongousMecha Goemon Impact]]. The fourth one is the one with the best level-design, graphics and situations, although it is NintendoHard.

to:

** There were three more Super Famicom offerings: the second had a case of SequelDifficultyDrop, was considerably easier than the first, and the third was similar in many aspects to ''[[VideoGame/ZeldaIITheAdventureOfLink Zelda II]]'', although with the best side-scrolling sections in the entire series. Both of them introduced Mode-7 mecha boss battles, after the castles' bosses. These starred the famous [[HumongousMecha Goemon Impact]]. The fourth one is the one with the best level-design, graphics and situations, although it is NintendoHard.


** Notably, this is after the first game in the 16-bit titles, ''Yuki-hime Kyūshutsu Emaki'', tossed you into towns where EverythingIsTryingToKillYou and you have to beat up entire villages for money and to ''survive''. The sudden change of rules in the second game is [[LampshadeHanging lampshaded]] by having an early house NPC specifically try to warn you not to attack people randomly - [[ShmuckBait after someone may have triggered the guards because they were used to the first game.]]

to:

** Notably, this is after the first game in the 16-bit titles, ''Yuki-hime Kyūshutsu Emaki'', tossed you into towns where EverythingIsTryingToKillYou and you have to beat up entire villages for money and to ''survive''. The sudden change of rules in the second game is [[LampshadeHanging lampshaded]] by having an early house NPC specifically try to warn you not to attack people randomly - [[ShmuckBait [[DamnYouMuscleMemory after someone may have triggered the guards because they were used to the first game.]]


* {{Takarazuka}}: The Peach Mountain Shoguns from ''Mystical Ninja Starring Goemon'' are a nod to this. [[PlotCoupon The four Miracle Items]] are based on four of the five troupes - [[StarShapedCoupon the last]] referencing their outer space origins. Also, the henchmen are modeled after ''otokoyaku'', making them men dressed as women who dress as men but still behave in an effeminate manner. Try wrapping your brain around that one!


** The geisha shows from ''Legend of the Mystica Ninja'' were too risque for Nintendo of America's content policy at the time, and were thus removed from the English version.

to:

** The geisha striptease shows from ''Legend of the Mystica Mystical Ninja'' were too risque for Nintendo of America's content policy at the time, and were thus removed from the English version.

Added DiffLines:

** The geisha shows from ''Legend of the Mystica Ninja'' were too risque for Nintendo of America's content policy at the time, and were thus removed from the English version.


** ''Mystical Ninja Starring Goemon'' also features multiple characters referring to one of the main villains, a flamboyant crossdresser, by the anti-LGBT slur "okama" (roughly equivalent to "faggot" or "tranny" in both meaning and connotation, depending on the context). The English localization addresses this by either replacing the term with a more neutral substitute (e.g. "weirdo") or just avoiding it entirely. "Okama" in general has been [[https://legendsoflocalization.com/okama-in-game-translation/ a hugely contentious issue]] for localizers due to its homophobic nature, and Japanese society itself gradually shifted away from using it so casually, to the point of re-releases of older games excising the term entirely (though it still crops up here and there in modern media).

to:

** ''Mystical Ninja Starring Goemon'' also features multiple characters referring to one of the main villains, a flamboyant crossdresser, by the anti-LGBT slur "okama" (roughly equivalent to "faggot" or "tranny" in both meaning and connotation, depending on the context). The English localization addresses this by either replacing the term with a more neutral substitute (e.g. "weirdo") or just avoiding it entirely. "Okama" in general has been [[https://legendsoflocalization.com/okama-in-game-translation/ a hugely contentious issue]] for localizers due to its homophobic homophobic/transphobic nature, and Japanese society itself gradually shifted away from using it so casually, to the point of re-releases of older games excising the term entirely (though it still crops up here and there in modern media).


* {{Bowdlerise}}: References to Wise Man's perversions were censored in ''Mystical Ninja Starring Goemon'' and ''Goemon's Great Adventure'', such as pornographic books being changed to car magazines.

to:

* {{Bowdlerise}}: {{Bowdlerise}}:
**
References to Wise Man's perversions were censored in ''Mystical Ninja Starring Goemon'' and ''Goemon's Great Adventure'', such as pornographic books being changed to car magazines.magazines.
** ''Mystical Ninja Starring Goemon'' also features multiple characters referring to one of the main villains, a flamboyant crossdresser, by the anti-LGBT slur "okama" (roughly equivalent to "faggot" or "tranny" in both meaning and connotation, depending on the context). The English localization addresses this by either replacing the term with a more neutral substitute (e.g. "weirdo") or just avoiding it entirely. "Okama" in general has been [[https://legendsoflocalization.com/okama-in-game-translation/ a hugely contentious issue]] for localizers due to its homophobic nature, and Japanese society itself gradually shifted away from using it so casually, to the point of re-releases of older games excising the term entirely (though it still crops up here and there in modern media).

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