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* PunnyName: Oh so many of them. There are whole web pages which list them.
** One example is the zone "Estate of Unrest" (State of unrest).

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* PunnyName: Oh so many of them. There are whole web pages which list them. \n** One example is the zone "Estate of Unrest" (State of unrest).


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* ScorpionPeople: The Scorpikis are the half-scorpion half-Iksar creations of the ancient Iksar sorcerer emperor, Venril Sathir. In the centuries after his death, the Skorpikis have made the lands surrounding his tomb their home. While they are largely hostile to everyone in ''Everquest'', players can build up faction with tribes of Skopikis in ''VideoGame/EverQuestII''.

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* SuppressedHistory: The history of Norrath is highly detailed and was recorded by numerous races over countless millennia. Shortly after Humans came about, the great Combine Empire had rose up and nearly united all the races across Norrath in peace. An assassination attempt is what caused the Empire to ultimately fall, and the remnants moved up to the invisible moon, Luclin, just to remain safe from would-be attackers. Over the course of one night, all history of the Combine Empire's existence was lost, as was the knowledge of the magical arts known as Geomancy. This time period is appropriately known as the Lost Age.

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Many comics poke fun at the MMORPG scene but http://www.gucomics.com/ got their start from it. And although Webcomic/TheNoob pokes fun at other [=MMORPGs=], you better believe that ''[=EverQuest=]'' is its primo target.


* ExpansionPack: Many many of these. They churn them out so often. As of March 2016, there are 22 total.

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* ExpansionPack: Many many of these. They churn them out so often. As of March 2016, January 2018, there are 22 24 total.


Many comics poke fun at the MMORPG scene but http://www.gucomics.com/ got their start from it. And although Webcomic/TheNoob pokes fun at other [=MMORPGs=], you better believe that ''[=EverQuest=]'' is its primo target.


** Many mobs are set immune to certain spells for no reason except to screw over the player. Certain named melee mobs, for example are made immune to being immobilized or slowed down, just so they can run up and beat down caster classes, interrupting all their spells. Certain areas have enemies that are not only immune to changes in their movement speed, but also have extremely high magic resistance, just so they can run away from you and train the entire dungeon on you, and you are nearly powerless to stop them unless you are insanely overleveled for the zone. Named monsters tended to be [[DemonicSpiders MUCH more powerful then their level would suggest]] (no [[WorldOfWarcraft elite mob tag here]]), defeating solo players even when you were far enough above their level that you would get almost no experience. And this is just the tip of the iceberg.

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** Many mobs are set immune to certain spells for no reason except to screw over the player. Certain named melee mobs, for example are made immune to being immobilized or slowed down, just so they can run up and beat down caster classes, interrupting all their spells. Certain areas have enemies that are not only immune to changes in their movement speed, but also have extremely high magic resistance, just so they can run away from you and train the entire dungeon on you, and you are nearly powerless to stop them unless you are insanely overleveled for the zone. Named monsters tended to be [[DemonicSpiders MUCH more powerful then their level would suggest]] (no [[WorldOfWarcraft [[VideoGame/WorldOfWarcraft elite mob tag here]]), defeating solo players even when you were far enough above their level that you would get almost no experience. And this is just the tip of the iceberg.

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* HumanSubspecies: There are 4 playable human races: The base line human, the burly barbarians, the scholarly erudites, and the dragon touched drakkin. The drakkin are further divided into 6 sub-races based on their dragon heritage, which affects both their appearance and what type of damage is inflicted by their breath weapon.


** The pantheon has a bit of gray morality as well. The gods of positive attributes like growth and love are often seen as good, both by NPCs and players, while gods of negative attributes like fear and disease are seen as evil. However, during an anniversary event where players had a chance to perform tasks for each god some of the evil gods gave their version of the story. The god of disease may be a literal plague on the world, but without him beast populations would be out of control. The god of war is often seen as a god of violence and slaughter, but he's just as much a god of strength and honor. The god of fear may be a source of terror and dread, but without fear to give them pause people end up putting themselves in unnecessary danger.

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** The pantheon has a bit of gray morality as well. The gods of positive attributes like growth and love are often seen as good, both by NPCs in the game world and by players, while gods of negative attributes like fear and disease are seen as evil. However, during an anniversary event where players had a chance to perform tasks for each god some of the evil gods gave their version of the story. The god of disease may be a literal plague on the world, but without him beast populations would be out of control. The god of war is often seen as a god of violence and slaughter, but he's just as much a god of strength and honor. The god of fear may be a source of terror and dread, but without fear to give them pause people end up putting themselves in unnecessary danger.

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** At first glance it's easy to assume that the warlike giants are the bad guys and the friendly dwarves are the good guys. (All players are welcome in the dwarf city upon arrival, but only worshippers of Rallos Zek are welcome in the city of the giants.) However, a closer look reveals that things are more complicated. Many citizens of both cities are weary of the perennial war and would rather have peace, but are forced to fight by power hungry rulers. The dwarf monarch even goes so far as to send assassins (in the form of players doing a certain quest line) to kill "traitors" who are mostly political enemies, dissidents, or those who advocate making peace with the giants.
** The pantheon has a bit of gray morality as well. The gods of positive attributes like growth and love are often seen as good, both by NPCs and players, while gods of negative attributes like fear and disease are seen as evil. However, during an anniversary event where players had a chance to perform tasks for each god some of the evil gods gave their version of the story. The god of disease may be a literal plague on the world, but without him beast populations would be out of control. The god of war is often seen as a god of violence and slaughter, but he's just as much a god of strength and honor. The god of fear may be a source of terror and dread, but without fear to give them pause people end up putting themselves in unnecessary danger.

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** The three major cities of Velious qualify somewhat. While the dwarf and dragon factions are not directly connected, some quest text hints that they like each other no better than they like the giants.
** Another example is found in the Omens of War expansion. While a handful of native dragorn are eventually willing to accept Norrathians as allies, far more of them see them as just more invaders and react to their arrival with hostility, leading to a three way war between Norrathians, Muramites, and loyalist dragorn.


Many comics poke fun at the MMORPG scene but http://www.gucomics.com/ got their start from it. And although TheNoob pokes fun at other [=MMORPGs=], you better believe that ''[=EverQuest=]'' is its primo target.

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Many comics poke fun at the MMORPG scene but http://www.gucomics.com/ got their start from it. And although TheNoob Webcomic/TheNoob pokes fun at other [=MMORPGs=], you better believe that ''[=EverQuest=]'' is its primo target.


* MeleeATrois: The [[OurDragonsAreDifferent Ring Of Scale]] [[OurVampiresAreDifferent Mayong Mistmoore]] and [[TheLastOfTheseIsNotLikeTheLikeTheOthers League Of Antonican Bards]] are all mutual enemies. The reason for this is never explained.

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* MeleeATrois: The [[OurDragonsAreDifferent Ring Of Scale]] [[OurVampiresAreDifferent Mayong Mistmoore]] and [[TheLastOfTheseIsNotLikeTheLikeTheOthers [[TheLastOfTheseIsNotLikeTheOthers League Of Antonican Bards]] are all mutual enemies. The reason for this is never explained.

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* MeleeATrois: The [[OurDragonsAreDifferent Ring Of Scale]] [[OurVampiresAreDifferent Mayong Mistmoore]] and [[TheLastOfTheseIsNotLikeTheLikeTheOthers League Of Antonican Bards]] are all mutual enemies. The reason for this is never explained.


* ContinuingIsPainful: EQ used to have one of the nastiest, if not ''the single nastiest'', continue penalties in all of gaming[[note]]Dying meant the character returning to its "bind point" completely naked. No weapons, no armor, no food, no water, no money. You could not get any of those items back unless you returned to your corpse (sometimes having to run, without equipment, across an entire ''continent'' filled with things trying to kill you again) to loot it before it--and all your stuff--rotted away. Each death was accompanied by a reduction in total experience earned, with the specific penalty being tied to the amount of experience required to complete the character's ''previous'' level. Loss of experience meant that a character could lose levels--woe unto the caster who had just leveled-up and scribed a new spell. Some of this penalty could be mitigated by a resurrection spell being cast on your corpse (you ported directly to your corpse for looting, and some exp restored), but nothing replaced the lost experience entirely. Also, if you happened to die while on-route to your original corpse, you lost more exp, and are re-transported back to your bind point. Players sometimes being stuck for hours or ''days'' trying to retrieve a corpse and all their stuff were ''everyday occurrences''.[[/note]]. However, ever since SOE took over from Verant, the penalty has gotten steadily less painful, with the exp loss reduced and corpse runs fully done away with. See DeathIsASlapOnTheWrist below.

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* ContinuingIsPainful: EQ used to have one of the nastiest, if not ''the single nastiest'', continue penalties in all of gaming[[note]]Dying meant the character returning to its "bind point" completely naked. No weapons, no armor, no food, no water, no money. You could not get any of those items back unless you returned to your corpse (sometimes having to run, without equipment, across an entire ''continent'' filled with things trying to kill you again) to loot it before it--and all your stuff--rotted away. Each death was accompanied by a reduction in total experience earned, with the specific penalty being tied to the amount of experience required to complete the character's ''previous'' level. level -- so if you had just advanced from one of the now-extinct "Hell Levels" that had XP requirements exponentially larger than levels before or after them, then your XP penalty could entail losing over ''half a level'', constituting potentially a loss of days worth of gameplay. Loss of experience meant that a character could also lose levels--woe unto the caster who had just leveled-up and scribed a new spell.spell, but now can't cast it to help themselves recover. Some of this penalty could be mitigated by a resurrection spell being cast on your corpse (you ported directly to your corpse for looting, and some exp restored), but nothing replaced the lost experience entirely. Also, if you happened to die while on-route en route to your original corpse, you lost more exp, and are were re-transported back to your bind point.point and had to restart the process. Players sometimes being stuck for hours or ''days'' trying to retrieve a corpse and all their stuff were ''everyday occurrences''.[[/note]]. However, ever since SOE took over from Verant, the penalty has gotten steadily less painful, with the exp loss reduced and corpse runs fully done away with. See DeathIsASlapOnTheWrist below.


* KillEnemiesToOpen: A variation. The insanely powerful but mostly insane prismatic dragon known as Kerafyrm was put to sleep by Veeshan, the God of Dragons for his crimes against dragonkind. The catch was that four dragons had to spend the rest of eternity as warders to ensure that the spell keeping him asleep was never broken. Players had to kill all four warders in order to wake him up... but the first few guilds in the game to do so quickly found out that waking him up was a bad thing. Kerafyrm would rampage out of the tomb, go over to the city of Skyshrine and go on a rampage there, and then go on a rampage in the Temple of Veeshan before finally leaving for good. This happened once and ONLY once per server. [[LostForever The Warders, who contained exceptionally powerful loot, were dead for good.]]

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* KillEnemiesToOpen: A variation. The insanely powerful but mostly insane prismatic dragon known as Kerafyrm was put to sleep by Veeshan, the God of Dragons for his crimes against dragonkind. The catch was that four dragons had to spend the rest of eternity as warders to ensure that the spell keeping him asleep was never broken. Players had to kill all four warders in order to wake him up... but the first few guilds in the game to do so quickly found out that waking him up was a bad thing. Kerafyrm would rampage out of the tomb, go over to the city of Skyshrine and go on a rampage there, and then go on a rampage in the Temple of Veeshan before finally leaving for good. This happened once and ONLY once per server. [[LostForever [[TemporaryOnlineContent The Warders, who contained exceptionally powerful loot, were dead for good.]]

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