Follow TV Tropes

Following

History VideoGame / EarthboundBeginnings

Go To


Added DiffLines:

* InterfaceSpoiler: After Lloyd and Ana join you, you'll notice that your status window during a battle will be barely touching the feet of the enemy sprites. The first and only hint that all four main characters can't be together at the same time.

Added DiffLines:

* ChestMonster: Checking certain objects will get you drawn into a battle.

Added DiffLines:

* WolfInSheepsClothing: Talking to certain [=NPC=]s will get you drawn into a battle.


* HeroicAlbino: Lloyd, who, despite being a kid, has white hair. It is also noteworthy to mention that albinism is linked to poor eyesight, and Lloyd wears glasses. It's possible that Lloyd is leucistic, as albinos are intolerant to the ultraviolet radiation of sunlight.



to:

* TheEighties: Produced, released, and set in this decade.



* YearX: Averted with the Japanese version (both the Famicom release and the Gameboy Advance port Mother 1+2), which explicitly takes place in 1988. Played straight in the English [=eShop=] release, which gives the year as "198X."

to:

* YearX: Averted with the Japanese version (both the Famicom release and the Gameboy Advance port Mother 1+2), which explicitly states that the game takes place in 1988. Played straight in the English [=eShop=] release, which gives the year as "198X."" The in-game text in the English version, meanwhile, states that it's set 80 years after "the early 1900's," which would imply that the game takes place between 1980 and 1983.


The game is a 1989 UsefulNotes/{{Famicom}} EasternRPG, the first installment of the ''VideoGame/{{Mother}}'' trilogy, and the predecessor to the significantly more famous ''VideoGame/EarthBound'' and ''VideoGame/Mother3''. Set in the year 1988 ([[YearX or "198X" in the eShop description]]), the story follows Ninten, a normal American boy. He's got a workaholic dad, a loving mom, twin kid sisters, and a pet dog. Everything is pretty normal and everyone is happy, up until the day [[EverythingTryingToKillYou his desk lamp suddenly attacks him]], another lamp attacks one of his sisters and a doll starts attacking his other sister. Calling his dad after settling this, Ninten learns that psychic powers run in the family, and to learn more about it he has to get his great-grandfather's diary and discover what happened many years ago, including what happened to his great-grandmother Maria. Meanwhile, other strange phenomena are happening across the country, and it soon becomes apparent that an alien force is at work. Just what connection does Ninten's family have with the alien invasion?

to:

The game is a 1989 UsefulNotes/{{Famicom}} EasternRPG, the first installment of the ''VideoGame/{{Mother}}'' trilogy, and the predecessor to the significantly more famous (outside of Japan, at least) ''VideoGame/EarthBound'' and ''VideoGame/Mother3''. Set in the year 1988 ([[YearX or "198X" in the eShop description]]), the story follows Ninten, a normal American boy. He's got a workaholic dad, a loving mom, twin kid sisters, and a pet dog. Everything is pretty normal and everyone is happy, up until the day [[EverythingTryingToKillYou his desk lamp suddenly attacks him]], another lamp attacks one of his sisters and a doll starts attacking his other sister. Calling his dad after settling this, Ninten learns that psychic powers run in the family, and to learn more about it he has to get his great-grandfather's diary and discover what happened many years ago, including what happened to his great-grandmother Maria. Meanwhile, other strange phenomena are happening across the country, and it soon becomes apparent that an alien force is at work. Just what connection does Ninten's family have with the alien invasion?


The game is a 1989 UsefulNotes/{{Famicom}} EasternRPG, the first installment of the ''VideoGame/{{Mother}}'' trilogy, and the predecessor to the significantly more famous ''VideoGame/EarthBound'' and VideoGame/Mother3''. Set in the year 1988 ([[YearX or "198X" in the eShop description]]), the story follows Ninten, a normal American boy. He's got a workaholic dad, a loving mom, twin kid sisters, and a pet dog. Everything is pretty normal and everyone is happy, up until the day [[EverythingTryingToKillYou his desk lamp suddenly attacks him]], another lamp attacks one of his sisters and a doll starts attacking his other sister. Calling his dad after settling this, Ninten learns that psychic powers run in the family, and to learn more about it he has to get his great-grandfather's diary and discover what happened many years ago, including what happened to his great-grandmother Maria. Meanwhile, other strange phenomena are happening across the country, and it soon becomes apparent that an alien force is at work. Just what connection does Ninten's family have with the alien invasion?

to:

The game is a 1989 UsefulNotes/{{Famicom}} EasternRPG, the first installment of the ''VideoGame/{{Mother}}'' trilogy, and the predecessor to the significantly more famous ''VideoGame/EarthBound'' and VideoGame/Mother3''.''VideoGame/Mother3''. Set in the year 1988 ([[YearX or "198X" in the eShop description]]), the story follows Ninten, a normal American boy. He's got a workaholic dad, a loving mom, twin kid sisters, and a pet dog. Everything is pretty normal and everyone is happy, up until the day [[EverythingTryingToKillYou his desk lamp suddenly attacks him]], another lamp attacks one of his sisters and a doll starts attacking his other sister. Calling his dad after settling this, Ninten learns that psychic powers run in the family, and to learn more about it he has to get his great-grandfather's diary and discover what happened many years ago, including what happened to his great-grandmother Maria. Meanwhile, other strange phenomena are happening across the country, and it soon becomes apparent that an alien force is at work. Just what connection does Ninten's family have with the alien invasion?


** [=PSI=] in ''[=EarthBound=] Beginnings'' is rather strange compared to the latter two games. For starters, it has the highest count of PSI moves unique to it in the entire series (Telepathy, 4th-D Slip, Super Healing, Quick Up, PSI-Block, Darkness, Power Shield, and Shield-Off). The Healing series each cure a single specific status ailment, rather than curing all status ailments from a progressively-larger list. There are also some [=PSI=] moves with different names from their appearances in later games; Brain Cyclone is better known to most fans of the series as Brainshock Ω, and generally-speaking, PSI abilities that have only two power levels are ranked as α and β, rather than α and Ω as in later games. The [=PK=] Thunder series in general had having the tightest damage range as its distinguishing feature instead of attacking multiple times randomly with a good chance of missing. There's also the fact that Offense [=PSI=] moves did not have a constant effect sans power level across all their stages; [=PK=] Freeze γ reduces the target to critical [=HP=], [=PK=] Beam γ and [=PK=] Fire Ω attempt to annihilate one enemy or all enemies, respectively, and [=PK=] Freeze Ω, [=PK=] Beam Ω, and [=PK=] Thunder γ all target all enemies instead of one. Oh, and [[MissingSecret [=PK=] Thunder Ω just doesn't exist at all.]]

to:

** [=PSI=] in ''[=EarthBound=] Beginnings'' is rather strange compared to the latter two games. For starters, it has the highest count of PSI moves unique to it in the entire series (Telepathy, 4th-D Slip, Super Healing, Quick Up, PSI-Block, Darkness, Power Shield, and Shield-Off). The Healing series each cure a single specific status ailment, rather than curing all status ailments from a progressively-larger list. There are also some [=PSI=] moves with different names from their appearances in later games; Brain Cyclone is better known to most fans of the series as Brainshock Ω, and generally-speaking, PSI abilities that have only two power levels are ranked as α and β, rather than α and Ω as in later games. The [=PK=] Thunder series in general had having the tightest damage range as its distinguishing feature instead of attacking multiple times randomly with a good chance of missing. There's also the fact that Offense [=PSI=] moves did not have a constant effect sans power level across all their stages; [=PK=] Freeze γ [[HPToOne reduces the target to critical [=HP=], HP]], [=PK=] Beam γ and [=PK=] Fire Ω [[OneHitKill attempt to instantly annihilate one enemy or all enemies, enemies]], respectively, and [=PK=] Freeze Ω, [=PK=] Beam Ω, and [=PK=] Thunder γ all target all enemies instead of one. Oh, and [[MissingSecret [=PK=] Thunder Ω just doesn't exist at all.]]


* DungeonCrawling: Duncan Factory is an annoying large version of this that you are required to go in to continue the plot, although if you're lucky enough to find the right room you can find a second Franklin Badge.

to:

* DungeonCrawling: Duncan Duncan's Factory is an annoying large version of this that you are required to go in to continue the plot, although if you're lucky persistent (or lucky) enough to find the right room rooms, you can find a second Franklin Badge.Badge. The factory also contains the Super Spray, an unlimited-use item that can be used to OneHitKill ''all'' bug-like enemies in battle without fail. It's more helpful than it sounds, considering the game's arthropod foes tend to be [[DemonicSpiders Demonic (sometimes literal) Spiders]].


* DevelopersForesight: You cannot name anyone Nancy, Kelly, or Juana (or any of those enemies' Japanese names in ''Mother''). For that matter, you can't use the names of any named NPCs for your party members, either, nor the BigBad's name. ''[=EarthBound Beginnings=]'' will not let you violate the OneSteveLimit.

to:

* DevelopersForesight: You cannot name anyone Nancy, Kelly, or Juana (or any of those enemies' Japanese names in ''Mother''). For that matter, you can't use the names of any named NPCs [=NPC=]s for your party members, either, nor the BigBad's name. ''[=EarthBound Beginnings=]'' will not let you violate the OneSteveLimit.


* DevelopersForesight: You cannot name anyone Nancy, Kelly, or Juana (or any of those enemies' Japanese names in ''Mother'').

to:

* DevelopersForesight: You cannot name anyone Nancy, Kelly, or Juana (or any of those enemies' Japanese names in ''Mother''). For that matter, you can't use the names of any named NPCs for your party members, either, nor the BigBad's name. ''[=EarthBound Beginnings=]'' will not let you violate the OneSteveLimit.


* BratsWithSlingshots: An obtainable (and very weak) weapon early in the game. This is recommended to equip on Pippi.

to:

* BratsWithSlingshots: An obtainable (and very weak) weapon early in the game. This The only character who's likely to get much use out of it is recommended Pippi, since it's the only weapon in the entire game that she can equip.[[note]]Technically, she's also able to equip on Pippi.Boomerangs, but none of those are obtainable during her brief stint as a party member.[[/note]]


* MugglesDoItBetter: In both instances where you're forced to fight the giant, alien created R robots, they're {{Hopeless Boss Fight}}s if you attempt to take them on normally… However, they're surprisingly weak to [[TankGoodness tanks]].

to:

* MugglesDoItBetter: In both instances where you're forced to fight the giant, alien created R alien-made R7030-series robots, they're {{Hopeless Boss Fight}}s if you attempt to take them on normally… However, they're surprisingly weak to [[TankGoodness tanks]].


* AllThereInTheManual: Very little about the characters' backstories and personalities is stated in-game, but the supplementary guidebook ''Encyclopedia MOTHER'' contains a good deal of additional information about Ninten, Lloyd, Ana, and Teddy that you could never find out just by playing the game. Naturally, [[NoExportForYou the book itself is only available in Japanese]], but was [[FanTranslation translated into English by a fan,]] who made it available to read [[http://kenisu.webs.com/motherencyclopedia.htm here]]. It's notable that because of this guidebook, the main characters of this game are much more fleshed out than the main characters of the rest of the series, even VideoGame/Mother3.

to:

* AllThereInTheManual: Very little about the characters' backstories and personalities is stated in-game, but the supplementary guidebook ''Encyclopedia MOTHER'' contains a good deal of additional information about Ninten, Lloyd, Ana, and Teddy that you could never find out just by playing the game. Naturally, [[NoExportForYou the book itself is only available in Japanese]], but was [[FanTranslation translated into English by a fan,]] who made it available to read [[http://kenisu.webs.com/motherencyclopedia.htm here]]. It's notable that because of this guidebook, the main characters of this game are much rather more fleshed out than the main characters of the rest of the series, even VideoGame/Mother3.some of VideoGame/Mother3's main cast.
** There's also the game's actual manual, which reveals the name of Ninten's mother (Carol), as well as the fact that the game's "Force" stat [[ShoutOut is supposed to represent a character's attunement to]] ''[[TheForce the]]'' [[TheForce Force]]. As in, from ''[[Franchise/StarWars Star Wars]]''.


* MetalSlime: Red Snakes, pretty uncommon and always try to run away from battles but sometimes drops Magic Coins that can be equipped to increase your defnse.

to:

* MetalSlime: Red Snakes, which are pretty uncommon and always try to frequently run away from battles but sometimes drops battle. If you manage to defeat them, though, they give a hefty chunk of experience, and may drop Magic Coins that can be equipped to increase your defnse.Coins.

Showing 15 edit(s) of 328

Top

How well does it match the trope?

Example of:

/

Media sources:

/

Report