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* YouAreNumberSix: The player is usually identified by the narrator as Tester #17.

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* YouAreNumberSix: The player is usually identified by the narrator as Tester #17.#17.
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* BlamingTheRailroadedPlayerCharacter: While the player can choose to follow instructions some of the time, the very first series of puzzles are impossible to succeed at due to the narrator being too busy with a phone call to explain them. The player is then blamed for ruining everything and kicked out of the game, until the narrator realizes he may have been acting a tad too harshly. Unlike most games with this trope, however, the overall narrative isn't on the side of the [[JerkAss narrator.]]

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* BlamingTheRailroadedPlayerCharacter: BlamedForBeingRailroaded: While the player can choose to follow instructions some of the time, the very first series of puzzles are impossible to succeed at due to the narrator being too busy with a phone call to explain them. The player is then blamed for ruining everything and kicked out of the game, until the narrator realizes he may have been acting a tad too harshly. Unlike most games with this trope, however, the overall narrative isn't on the side of the [[JerkAss narrator.]]

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* BilingualBonus: Played with. After failing the sixth pack, the narrator may pull this snark:
--> '''Narrator:''' Yeah, you learned nothing. Sprechen Sie English, por favor?

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* CompanionCube: The photos in the second album on the narrator's phone heavily implies he's obsessed with cups, to the point where he dated, married, and started a family with one of them.


* VillainRespect: Very occasionally, your wrongdoing can get some legitimate respect from the creator. A notable example is when cutting a pizza, citting it in a way that produces 11 pieces with 4 straight cuts.

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* VillainRespect: Very occasionally, your wrongdoing can get some legitimate respect from the creator. A notable example is when cutting a pizza, citting cutting it in a way that produces 11 pieces with 4 straight cuts.


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* WorthyOpponent: The creator, later on in the game, seems to enjoy seeing how the player is capable of creatively failing between his anger at failure toward simple tasks. [[spoiler:He also treats the player slightly more amicably if you play the game after beating it, after his plan to leave the country failed.]]

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* MinigameGame: Each "pack" contains various minigame-like situations that the player can choose to screw up or not.

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* PokeThePoodle: To fail a puzzle, the player has to do things like choosing Comic Sans as a font, stepping on cracks, or letting a phone charge up to 99.9%.

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* BlandNameProduct: In one puzzle, you have to make a sandwich with the creator's [[BlandNameProduct "Favorite Chocolate Cream."]] Low-res pixel graphics or no, the jar that's used is pretty blatantly a jar of [[https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/81UZhEqdlJL._SY450_.jpg Nutella.]]

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* HoistByHisOwnPetard: [[spoiler:The narrator implemented the D.U.C.K. to curtail the player's bad solutions, but because it's so buggy it winds up learning from the player's bad behavior and starts preventing ''good'' solutions instead, becoming an even bigger menace to the narrator.]]


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* OminousVisualGlitch: [[spoiler:The first sign that using the D.U.C.K. might have been a bad idea is when the screen starts to glitch heavily during it's loading sequence. Similar distortions also appear on the screen whenever the duck modifies something within the game's code or shifts control away from the narrator.]]


* ShoutOut: One of the results of winning the walking game is a MontyPython gag.

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* ShoutOut: One of the results of winning the walking game is a MontyPython Creator/MontyPython gag.

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* ActuallyPrettyFunny: If you can somehow balance a Christmas Tree upside down on its tip in the last pick, you get an achievement, the creator accepts it as a correct answer, and actually permits himself a laugh at the silliness.


* {{Defictionalization}}: [[spoiler: During the game, D.U.C.K. connects to the internet to upload examples of "wrong" solutions and store them on a web page. [[http://duckabase.com/ And here it is]].]]

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* VillainRespect: Very occasionally, your wrongdoing can get some legitimate respect from the creator. A notable example is when cutting a pizza, citting it in a way that produces 11 pieces with 4 straight cuts.
-->"Whoa, 11 Pieces! I'm not even mad, that's amazing!" Failure text: '''MAXIMUM EFFORT'''


* BlamingTheRailroadedPlayerCharacter: While the player can choose to follow instructions some of the time, the very first series of puzzles are impossible to succeed at due to the narrator being too busy with a phone call to explain them. The player is then blamed for ruining everything and kicked out of the game, until the narrator realizes he may have been acting a tad too harshly.

to:

* BlamingTheRailroadedPlayerCharacter: While the player can choose to follow instructions some of the time, the very first series of puzzles are impossible to succeed at due to the narrator being too busy with a phone call to explain them. The player is then blamed for ruining everything and kicked out of the game, until the narrator realizes he may have been acting a tad too harshly. Unlike most games with this trope, however, the overall narrative isn't on the side of the [[JerkAss narrator.]]


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* JerkAss: The developer is an extreme control freak who won't allow you to do anything fun if he has his way.

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