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** One thing that stands out immediately is that you are a centurion commanding an entire legion. Historically the highest-ranked centurions would only lead a cohort (1/10th of a legion).


* AntiCavalry: Not present in the game and the player usually learns it the painful way because enemies with huge cavalry are a very hard nut to crack.

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* AntiCavalry: Not present in the game and the player usually learns it the painful way because enemies with huge cavalry armies are a very hard nut to crack.



* BreakMeter: Courage: Fierce, Good, Weak, and Panicked. Some enemies are easier since their maximum morale is lower.

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* BreakMeter: Courage: Fierce, Good, Weak, Panicky, and Panicked. Some enemies are easier since their maximum Every Roman legion or enemy army has a morale rating dependent on the province it originated from (though Roman drill will eventually raise the morale of subpar legions). As a unit takes casualties, and especially if their general is lower.killed, its morale will drop. Once it reaches Panicked, the unit will cease fighting and attempt to flee the battlefield.



* CombatByChampion: The fleet battles are represented by the two flagships fighting. The trope is subverted, since winning the flagship battle can still cause the rest of your ships to be destroyed.

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* CombatByChampion: The fleet battles are represented by the two flagships fighting. The trope is subverted, since winning the flagship battle can is not guaranteed to win the fleet battle, as a fleet that lost its admiral will still cause win if it vastly outmatches the rest of your ships to be destroyed.enemy.



* {{Conscription}}: Legions are levied and reinforced locally, raising or strengthening one lowers the manpower of their current region and their initial courage depends on that of the habitants of the province where they are raised, it reaches the maximum eventually, thanks likely to some offscreen {{BootCampEpisode}}s going on.

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* {{Conscription}}: Legions are levied and reinforced locally, raising or strengthening one lowers the manpower of their current region and their initial courage depends on that of the habitants of the province where they are raised, it reaches the maximum eventually, thanks likely to some offscreen {{BootCampEpisode}}s going on.



** The death of a general is followed by the general retreat of a significant part of his army. If the units aren't very brave to begin with then it overlaps with KeystoneArmy.

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** The death of a general is followed by the general retreat of a significant part of his army. If the units aren't very brave to begin with then it overlaps with KeystoneArmy. It is even worse if it happens to the player, since he will no longer be able to control his units precisely.



* EasyCommunication: A notable aversion, during battles you can only change the orders of the units who are within the leader's range of voice (and each leader has a different one.)

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* DivideAndConquer: While Carthage will never ally with Rome, it is possible to sway Carthage's colonies and dependencies (Hispania, Sicilia and Sardinia).
* EasyCommunication: A notable aversion, during battles Played with. Orders reach units instantly and they will always obey unless they're Panicked. However, you can only change the orders of the units who are within the leader's range of voice (and each leader has a different one.)



* NintendoHard: The highest two difficulty levels are like this. The problem is, much of the difficulty is FakeDifficulty. For example: the spawning of enemy marauding armies is mostly random. This means that, on any given turn, an army from Carthage can appear, or a much weaker army from Armenia, or no army at all. It is extremely difficult to win chariot races without resorting to bribes/cheating simply because your opponents move faster than you, even if you have the same type of chariot. The number of ships in enemy fleets is randomized, too, meaning that you can simply reload until you get better odds.

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* NintendoHard: The highest two difficulty levels are like this. The problem is, much Much of the difficulty is FakeDifficulty.FakeDifficulty, though. For example: the spawning of enemy marauding armies is mostly random. This means that, on any given turn, an army from Carthage can appear, or a much weaker army from Armenia, or no army at all. It is extremely difficult to win chariot races without resorting to bribes/cheating simply because your opponents move faster than you, even if you have the same type of chariot. The number of ships in enemy fleets is randomized, too, meaning that you can simply reload until you get better odds.



* WarElephants: Carthage's signature troops. Hispania and some african people field them too.

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* WarElephants: Carthage's signature troops. Hispania and some african people from Africa and the Middle East field them too.


''Centurion: Defender of Rome'' is a TurnBasedStrategy video game with [[RealTimeStrategy real-time battle sequences]], designed by Kellyn Beck and Bits of Magic and published by ElectronicArts. Originally released on the DOS platform for the PC in 1990, the game was later ported to the UsefulNotes/{{Amiga}} and the UsefulNotes/SegaGenesis in 1991. Centurion shares much of the concept and feel with Beck's earlier game ''VideoGame/DefenderOfTheCrown'' (1987) and might be regarded as its SpiritualSuccessor. In turn, the ''VideoGame/TotalWar'' Series borrows a lot of concepts from both games.

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''Centurion: Defender of Rome'' is a TurnBasedStrategy video game with [[RealTimeStrategy real-time battle sequences]], designed by Kellyn Beck and Bits of Magic and published by ElectronicArts.Creator/ElectronicArts. Originally released on the DOS platform for the PC in 1990, the game was later ported to the UsefulNotes/{{Amiga}} and the UsefulNotes/SegaGenesis in 1991. Centurion shares much of the concept and feel with Beck's earlier game ''VideoGame/DefenderOfTheCrown'' (1987) and might be regarded as its SpiritualSuccessor. In turn, the ''VideoGame/TotalWar'' Series borrows a lot of concepts from both games.


* AncientRome: An amalgam of TheRomanRepublic and TheRomanEmpire.

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* AncientRome: An amalgam of TheRomanRepublic UsefulNotes/TheRomanRepublic and TheRomanEmpire.UsefulNotes/TheRomanEmpire.


* GameOver: ''[[TheGloryThatWasRome Sic transit gloria mundi, the Roman Empire has fallen]].''

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* GameOver: ''[[TheGloryThatWasRome ''[[UsefulNotes/TheGloryThatWasRome Sic transit gloria mundi, the Roman Empire has fallen]].''



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The game begins in AncientRome in the year 275 BC, placing the player in the sandals of a centurion in the Roman army, at first leading a single legion. The player's ultimate goal is to become a Caesar through a mix of successful military conquests and internal politics of BreadAndCircuses

The bulk of the game involves turn-based strategic planning and management on the world map and the real-time battles (with on-demand pauses to give orders to formations) against various enemies of the Roman Empire, such as the Celts, Carthaginians and Parthians. Centurion also features other "side-show" activities, such as gladiatorial combat (the player's duties involve financing the ludi events), chariot racing in the Circus Maximus, and naval battles. There is also some diplomacy (it is even possible to seduce the queen Cleopatra after forming an alliance with Egypt).

to:

The game begins in AncientRome in the year 275 BC, placing the player in the sandals of a centurion in the Roman army, at first leading a single legion. The player's ultimate goal is to become a Caesar through a mix of successful military conquests and internal politics of BreadAndCircuses

BreadAndCircuses.

The bulk of the game involves turn-based strategic planning and management on the world map and the real-time battles (with on-demand pauses to give orders to formations) formations - i.e. RealTimeWithPause) against various enemies of the Roman Empire, such as the Celts, Carthaginians and Parthians. Centurion also features other "side-show" activities, such as gladiatorial combat (the player's duties involve financing the ludi events), chariot racing in the Circus Maximus, and naval battles. There is also some diplomacy (it is even possible to seduce the queen Cleopatra after forming an alliance with Egypt).


''Centurion: Defender of Rome'' is a TurnBasedStrategy video game with [[RealTimeStrategy real-time battle sequences]], designed by Kellyn Beck and Bits of Magic and published by ElectronicArts. Originally released on the DOS platform for the PC in 1990, the game was later ported to the UsefulNotes/{{Amiga}} and the UsefulNotes/SegaGenesis in 1991. Centurion shares much of the concept and feel with Beck's earlier game ''VideoGame/DefenderOfTheCrown'' (1987) and might be regarded as its SpiritualSuccessor. In turn, the TotalWar Series borrows a lot of concepts from both games.

to:

''Centurion: Defender of Rome'' is a TurnBasedStrategy video game with [[RealTimeStrategy real-time battle sequences]], designed by Kellyn Beck and Bits of Magic and published by ElectronicArts. Originally released on the DOS platform for the PC in 1990, the game was later ported to the UsefulNotes/{{Amiga}} and the UsefulNotes/SegaGenesis in 1991. Centurion shares much of the concept and feel with Beck's earlier game ''VideoGame/DefenderOfTheCrown'' (1987) and might be regarded as its SpiritualSuccessor. In turn, the TotalWar ''VideoGame/TotalWar'' Series borrows a lot of concepts from both games.



* SpiritualSuccessor: To ''VideoGame/DefenderOfTheCrown'', from the same creator. The ''TotalWar'' series could be considered this to ''Centurion'', since they share a lot of concepts and gameplay.

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* SpiritualSuccessor: To ''VideoGame/DefenderOfTheCrown'', from the same creator. The ''TotalWar'' ''VideoGame/TotalWar'' series could be considered this to ''Centurion'', since they share a lot of concepts and gameplay.


''Centurion: Defender of Rome'' is a TurnBasedStrategy video game with [[RealTimeStrategy real-time battle sequences]], designed by Kellyn Beck and Bits of Magic and published by ElectronicArts. Originally released on the DOS platform for the PC in 1990, the game was later ported to the {{Amiga}} and the SegaGenesis in 1991. Centurion shares much of the concept and feel with Beck's earlier game ''VideoGame/DefenderOfTheCrown'' (1987) and might be regarded as its SpiritualSuccessor. In turn, the TotalWar Series borrows a lot of concepts from both games.

to:

''Centurion: Defender of Rome'' is a TurnBasedStrategy video game with [[RealTimeStrategy real-time battle sequences]], designed by Kellyn Beck and Bits of Magic and published by ElectronicArts. Originally released on the DOS platform for the PC in 1990, the game was later ported to the {{Amiga}} UsefulNotes/{{Amiga}} and the SegaGenesis UsefulNotes/SegaGenesis in 1991. Centurion shares much of the concept and feel with Beck's earlier game ''VideoGame/DefenderOfTheCrown'' (1987) and might be regarded as its SpiritualSuccessor. In turn, the TotalWar Series borrows a lot of concepts from both games.


* DialogueTree: Each nation has a dialogue tree, where there is only one path that can get the option to assign tribute. Access to the tree is limited by player's rank, number of nations conquered, or for any other reason.

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* DialogueTree: Each nation has a dialogue tree, where there is only one path that can get the option to assign tribute. Access to the tree is limited by player's rank, number of nations conquered, or for any other reason. For example, some nations respect strength, and will not ally with you if your army is smaller than theirs. Others are the exact opposite - they will distrust you if you bring a huge army to their doorstep.

Added DiffLines:

* DialogueTree: Each nation has a dialogue tree, where there is only one path that can get the option to assign tribute. Access to the tree is limited by player's rank, number of nations conquered, or for any other reason.


* ChariotRace: One of the mini-games

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* ChariotRace: One of the mini-gamesmini-games, required to advance your rank. You can pick a chariot weight, place a bet on winning, and engage in skulduggery.



** The death of a general is followed by the general retreat of a significant part of his army. If the units aren not very brave to begin with then it overlaps with KeystoneArmy.

to:

** The death of a general is followed by the general retreat of a significant part of his army. If the units aren not aren't very brave to begin with then it overlaps with KeystoneArmy.



* PasswordSave: The Genesis version uses a 24-character password. The password doesn't contain information about legions, which are redeployed upon load.



** You, the game spans decades and centuries but you are an inmortal Roman magistrate, with a better rank as time passes and you progress.

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** You, the game spans decades and centuries but you are an inmortal immortal Roman magistrate, with a better rank as time passes and you progress.



* ScrewThisImOuttaHere: Panicked units make a 180 degree turn and leave the battlefield. A lot of units panick when their leader is killed so massive routs are common.

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* ScrewThisImOuttaHere: Panicked units make a 180 degree turn and leave the battlefield. A lot of units panick panic when their leader is killed so massive routs are common.



** Plundering an occupated nation makes its romanization progress slower and makes other free nations reluctant to sign an alliance with you.

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** Plundering an occupated occupied nation makes its romanization progress slower and makes other free nations reluctant to sign an alliance with you.



** Sentencing a brave gladiator to death is received poorly by the people, they get more entertained and appeassed with a fair pardon.

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** Sentencing a brave gladiator to death is received poorly by the people, they get more entertained and appeassed appeased with a fair pardon.





* ShoutOut: The chariot races to ''Film/BenHur'' and there are some to ''Film/{{Cleopatra}}'' (she looks exactly like ElizabethTaylor) and to ''Film/{{Spartacus}}'', among many others concerning classical antiquity.

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* ShoutOut: The chariot races to ''Film/BenHur'' and there are some to ''Film/{{Cleopatra}}'' (she looks exactly like ElizabethTaylor) Creator/ElizabethTaylor) and to ''Film/{{Spartacus}}'', among many others concerning classical antiquity.


* ArchEnemy: [[PunicWars Carthage]] and Partia never ally with Rome. Lampshaded by their leaders.

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* ArchEnemy: [[PunicWars [[UsefulNotes/PunicWars Carthage]] and Partia never ally with Rome. Lampshaded by their leaders.


* AnachronismStew[=/=]PopularHistory: The in-game historical date is only a turn counter; the game mixes elements and leaders separated by centuries such as Hannibal and Cleopatra.

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* AnachronismStew[=/=]PopularHistory: The in-game historical date is only a turn counter; the game mixes elements and leaders separated by centuries such as Hannibal Darius the Great, Hannibal, and Cleopatra.


* BarbarianTribe: Many of the conquerable nations.

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* BarbarianTribe: Many of the conquerable nations. They have different unit graphics and battle music than the "civilized" nations.
* BeardOfBarbarism: Played straight - barbarian infantry has big, unkempt beards, and so do all but one or two of the barbarian leaders (e.g. the leader of Dalmatia has a neatly-trimmed beard).

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