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* VectorGame: A trademark of Atari that began with VideoGame/LunarLander in 1979. The game is in black and white, but uses a color overlay; green for the onscreen action, and red for the radar and scoring.

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* VectorGame: A trademark of Atari that began with VideoGame/LunarLander ''VideoGame/LunarLander'' in 1979. The game is in black and white, but uses a color overlay; green for the onscreen action, and red for the radar and scoring.


%% ZeroContextExample entries are not allowed on wiki pages. All such entries have been commented out. Add context to the entries before uncommenting them.

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%% ZeroContextExample Administrivia/ZeroContextExample entries are not allowed on wiki pages. All such entries have been commented out. Add context to the entries before uncommenting them.


''Battlezone'', released by Creator/{{Atari}} in 1980, was the first popular video game to feature 3D graphics, a technological breakthrough [[UsefulNotes/TheGoldenAgeOfVideoGames at a time]] when simple 2D games like ''SpaceInvaders'' were the norm. The player controls a tank, in first-person perspective, on a mechanized battlefield against enemy forces equipped with tanks and guided missiles. It is the direct ancestor of every FirstPersonShooter, and the US Army even commissioned a customized variant (''The Bradley Trainer'') to train its tank troops. Surviving cabinets of the game are still very popular with collectors today.

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''Battlezone'', released by Creator/{{Atari}} in 1980, was the first popular video game to feature 3D graphics, a technological breakthrough [[UsefulNotes/TheGoldenAgeOfVideoGames at a time]] when simple 2D games like ''SpaceInvaders'' ''VideoGame/SpaceInvaders'' were the norm. The player controls a tank, in first-person perspective, on a mechanized battlefield against enemy forces equipped with tanks and guided missiles. It is the direct ancestor of every FirstPersonShooter, and the US Army even commissioned a customized variant (''The Bradley Trainer'') to train its tank troops. Surviving cabinets of the game are still very popular with collectors today.


''Battlezone'', released by Creator/{{Atari}} in 1980, was the first popular video game to feature 3D graphics, a technological breakthrough [[TheGoldenAgeOfVideoGames at a time]] when simple 2D games like ''SpaceInvaders'' were the norm. The player controls a tank, in first-person perspective, on a mechanized battlefield against enemy forces equipped with tanks and guided missiles. It is the direct ancestor of every FirstPersonShooter, and the US Army even commissioned a customized variant (''The Bradley Trainer'') to train its tank troops. Surviving cabinets of the game are still very popular with collectors today.

to:

''Battlezone'', released by Creator/{{Atari}} in 1980, was the first popular video game to feature 3D graphics, a technological breakthrough [[TheGoldenAgeOfVideoGames [[UsefulNotes/TheGoldenAgeOfVideoGames at a time]] when simple 2D games like ''SpaceInvaders'' were the norm. The player controls a tank, in first-person perspective, on a mechanized battlefield against enemy forces equipped with tanks and guided missiles. It is the direct ancestor of every FirstPersonShooter, and the US Army even commissioned a customized variant (''The Bradley Trainer'') to train its tank troops. Surviving cabinets of the game are still very popular with collectors today.


* AntiIdling: An ObviousRulePatch added in after arcade owners complained about players taking too long because they were exploring instead of fighting -- if you go too long without firing your cannon, a missile spawns in.


Added DiffLines:

* ObviousRulePatch: Added after arcade owners complained about players taking too long because they were exploring instead of fighting -- if you go too long without firing your cannon, a missile spawns in.

Added DiffLines:

* AntiIdling: An ObviousRulePatch added in after arcade owners complained about players taking too long because they were exploring instead of fighting -- if you go too long without firing your cannon, a missile spawns in.


* ChekhovsVolcano: {{Enforced|Trope}}. The volcano within the game originally was not going to erupt, but Ed Rotberg (the programmer of the game) was pestered by his coworker Owen Rubin to make it active. After Ed suggested rhetorically that Owen write the code himself, it was found lying on Ed's desk the next day.

to:

* ChekhovsVolcano: {{Enforced|Trope}}. The volcano within the game was originally was not going to erupt, but Ed Rotberg (the programmer of the game) was pestered by his coworker Owen Rubin to make into making it active. After Ed finally suggested rhetorically that Owen write the code himself, it was found lying on Ed's desk the next day.


* ChekhovsVolcano: {{Enforced|Trope}}. The volcano within the game originally was not supposed to erupt, but Ed Rotberg (the programmer of the game) was pestered by his coworker Owen Rubin to make it active. After Ed suggested rhetorically that Owen write the code himself, it was found lying on Ed's desk the next day.

to:

* ChekhovsVolcano: {{Enforced|Trope}}. The volcano within the game originally was not supposed going to erupt, but Ed Rotberg (the programmer of the game) was pestered by his coworker Owen Rubin to make it active. After Ed suggested rhetorically that Owen write the code himself, it was found lying on Ed's desk the next day.


* ChekhovsVolcano: {{Enforced|Trope}}. The volcano within the game originally was not supposed to erupt, but Ed Rotberg (the programer of the game) was pestered by his coworker Owen Rubin to make it active. After Ed suggested rhetorically that Owen write the code himself, it was found lying on Ed's desk the next day.

to:

* ChekhovsVolcano: {{Enforced|Trope}}. The volcano within the game originally was not supposed to erupt, but Ed Rotberg (the programer programmer of the game) was pestered by his coworker Owen Rubin to make it active. After Ed suggested rhetorically that Owen write the code himself, it was found lying on Ed's desk the next day.


* ChekhovsVolcano: {{Enforced|Trope}}. The volcano within the game originally was not supposed to explode, but Ed Rotberg (the programer of the game) was pestered by his coworker Owen Rubin to make it active. After Ed suggested rhetorically that Owen write the code himself, it was found lying on Ed's desk the next day.

to:

* ChekhovsVolcano: {{Enforced|Trope}}. The volcano within the game originally was not supposed to explode, erupt, but Ed Rotberg (the programer of the game) was pestered by his coworker Owen Rubin to make it active. After Ed suggested rhetorically that Owen write the code himself, it was found lying on Ed's desk the next day.


* ChekhovsVolcano: {{Enforced|Trope}}. The volcano within the game originally was not supposed to explode, but Ed Rotberg (the creator of the game) was pestered by his coworker Owen Rubin to make it active. After Ed suggested rhetorically that Owen write the code himself, it was found lying on Ed's desk the next day.

to:

* ChekhovsVolcano: {{Enforced|Trope}}. The volcano within the game originally was not supposed to explode, but Ed Rotberg (the creator programer of the game) was pestered by his coworker Owen Rubin to make it active. After Ed suggested rhetorically that Owen write the code himself, it was found lying on Ed's desk the next day.

Added DiffLines:

* ChekhovsVolcano: {{Enforced|Trope}}. The volcano within the game originally was not supposed to explode, but Ed Rotberg (the creator of the game) was pestered by his coworker Owen Rubin to make it active. After Ed suggested rhetorically that Owen write the code himself, it was found lying on Ed's desk the next day.


* VectorGame: A trademark of Atari that began with VideoGame/LunarLander in 1979. Along with VideoGame/{{Tempest}}, this was the first one they developed in color.

to:

* VectorGame: A trademark of Atari that began with VideoGame/LunarLander in 1979. Along with VideoGame/{{Tempest}}, this was The game is in black and white, but uses a color overlay; green for the first one they developed in color.onscreen action, and red for the radar and scoring.


''Battlezone'', released by Creator/{{Atari}} in 1980, was the first popular video game to feature 3D graphics, a technological breakthrough [[TheGoldenAgeOfVideoGames at a time]] when simple 2D games like ''SpaceInvaders'' were the norm. The player controls a tank, in first-person perspective, on a mechanized battlefield against enemy forces equipped with tanks and guided missiles. It is the direct ancestor of every FirstPersonShooter, and the US Army even commissioned a customized variant (''The Bradley Trainer'') to train its tank troops. Surviving consoles of the game are still very popular with collectors today.

to:

''Battlezone'', released by Creator/{{Atari}} in 1980, was the first popular video game to feature 3D graphics, a technological breakthrough [[TheGoldenAgeOfVideoGames at a time]] when simple 2D games like ''SpaceInvaders'' were the norm. The player controls a tank, in first-person perspective, on a mechanized battlefield against enemy forces equipped with tanks and guided missiles. It is the direct ancestor of every FirstPersonShooter, and the US Army even commissioned a customized variant (''The Bradley Trainer'') to train its tank troops. Surviving consoles cabinets of the game are still very popular with collectors today.


%%* EverythingTryingToKillYou
%%* FirstPersonShooter
%%* OneBulletAtATime
%%* OneHitPointWonder

to:

%%* EverythingTryingToKillYou
%%* FirstPersonShooter
%%* OneBulletAtATime
%%* OneHitPointWonder
* EverythingTryingToKillYou: Other than the UFO, all the other tanks are trying to destroy you.
* FirstPersonShooter: This game is considered to be the UrExample. In fact, the original standard upright arcade cabinet has the player look into a "targeting scope" in order to actually see the game[[note]]However, there were also side windows to let other people see the game as well.[[/note]], although there were other cabinets, including the cabaret version, that let the player see the game normally.
* OneBulletAtATime: Every time you fire, the crosshair flashes. When it stops, you can fire again.
* OneHitPointWonder: If you get hit by one bullet, you lose a life, as with most Golden Age arcade games.



%%* VectorGame

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%%* VectorGame* VectorGame: A trademark of Atari that began with VideoGame/LunarLander in 1979. Along with VideoGame/{{Tempest}}, this was the first one they developed in color.

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