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* AchievementMockery: ''New Horizons'' gives you a stamp for Nook Miles (an achievement, essentially) the first time you drop a balloon's present in the water, getting stung by wasps, getting by stung by wasps ''again'' while wounded, and getting stung or bitten by a scorpion or tarantula.

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* AchievementMockery: ''New Horizons'' gives you a stamp for Nook Miles (an achievement, essentially) the first time you drop a balloon's present in the water, getting get stung by wasps, getting get by stung by wasps ''again'' while wounded, and getting stung or bitten get stung/bitten by a scorpion or tarantula.


** The original ''Doubutsu no Mori'' on the [=N64=] required players to set the clock when playing the game for the first time, since the system didn't have a built-in clock. Since the cart's RTC was battery-powered, this also meant that if the battery died, the game would not be able to keep time anymore. Starting with the [=GameCube=], every installment syncs with its respective system's in-game clock.

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** The original ''Doubutsu no Mori'' on the [=N64=] required players to set the clock when playing the game for the first time, since the system didn't have a built-in clock. Since the cart's RTC was battery-powered, this also meant that if the battery died, the game would not be able to keep time anymore. Starting with the [=GameCube=], every installment syncs with its respective system's in-game built-in clock.


** The original ''Doubutsu no Mori'' on the [=N64=] required players to set the clock when playing the game for the first time, since the system didn't have a built-in clock. Since the cart's RTC was battery-powered, this also meant that if the battery died, the game would not be able to keep time anymore.
** Blathers, the Mable Sisters, and Tortimer were not introduced until the Gamecube iteration of the series. Similarly, features tied to them were not available: there were no seasonal gifts that players could earn from the mayor, clothing could only be purchased at Tom Nook's shop, there was no way to make your own clothing, and there was no museum in the town (only a Faraway Museum for identifying fossils, which could still be used as decorations).
** The [=N64=] iteration had a unique rotary-dial system for inputting characters. Later games would use a more standard keyboard.
** The [=N64=] original, as well as the first Gamecube iteration in Japan, had only a small handful of Japanese holidays. Additional holidays, such as "[[YouMeanXmas Toy Day]]" and Halloween, were added in the North American and European releases, then retroactively added in the UpdatedRerelease ''Doubutsu no Mori [=e+=]''. Other holidays were changed, such as the Shinto-style Bell Shrine being replaced with a fountain for New Year's.

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** The original ''Doubutsu no Mori'' on the [=N64=] required players to set the clock when playing the game for the first time, since the system didn't have a built-in clock. Since the cart's RTC was battery-powered, this also meant that if the battery died, the game would not be able to keep time anymore.
anymore. Starting with the [=GameCube=], every installment syncs with its respective system's in-game clock.
** Blathers, the Mable Able Sisters, and Tortimer were not introduced until the Gamecube iteration [=GameCube=] iterations of the series. Similarly, features tied to them were not available: there were no seasonal gifts that players could earn from the mayor, clothing could only be purchased at Tom Nook's shop, shop (which would still be the case until ''Wild World'' gave this role to the Ables), there was no way to make your own clothing, and there was no museum in the town (only a Faraway Museum for identifying fossils, which could still be used as decorations).
** The [=N64=] iteration original Japanese iterations had a unique rotary-dial system for inputting characters. Later games would use The English version used a more standard keyboard.
keyboard, which came to Japan starting with ''Wild World''.
** The [=N64=] original, as well as the first Gamecube [=GameCube=] iteration in Japan, had only a small handful of Japanese holidays. Additional holidays, such as "[[YouMeanXmas Toy Day]]" and Halloween, were added in the North American and European releases, then retroactively added to the Japanese version in the UpdatedRerelease ''Doubutsu no Mori [=e+=]''. Other holidays were changed, such as the Shinto-style Bell Shrine being replaced with a wishing fountain for New Year's.



** Emulations of NES games were a popular feature in earlier games, but would be retired after the Gamecube iteration with the advent of the Wii's Virtual Console.
** Earlier games separated a town's acres with a distinct scrolling that would occur when crossing over from acre into another. Later games would feature seamless transitions between acres.
** The first games took placed from an overhead perspective, while later games adopted a unique visual perspective for the world that would make the game appear to take place on a cylinder.

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** Emulations of NES games were a popular feature in earlier games, but would be retired after the Gamecube [=GameCube=] iteration with the advent of the Wii's Virtual Console.
** Earlier games separated a town's acres with a distinct scrolling that would occur when crossing over from acre into another. Later games would feature seamless transitions between acres.
acres, though they are still counted internally.
** The first games took placed from an overhead perspective, while later games adopted a ''Wild World'' coined the unique visual "rolling log" perspective for the world that would make has become a trademark of the game appear series. ''New Horizons'' has the option to take place on a cylinder.use the original overhead perspective as an alternate viewpoint, however.


[[caption-width-right:350:Population: growing![[note]]Pictured from left: [[HairTriggerTemper Mr. Resetti]], [[ThePollyanna Pelly]], [[HelloInsertNameHere Rover]], [[PlayerCharacter Male Villager]], [[SeriesMascot Isabelle]], [[PlayerCharacter Female Villager]], [[WanderingMinstel K.K. Slider]], [[WhyDidItHaveToBeSnakes Blathers]], [[UsefulNotes/{{Capitalism}} Tom Nook]]]]

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[[caption-width-right:350:Population: growing![[note]]Pictured from left: [[HairTriggerTemper Mr. Resetti]], [[ThePollyanna Pelly]], [[HelloInsertNameHere Rover]], [[PlayerCharacter Male Villager]], [[SeriesMascot Isabelle]], [[PlayerCharacter Female Villager]], [[WanderingMinstel [[WanderingMinstrel K.K. Slider]], [[WhyDidItHaveToBeSnakes Blathers]], [[UsefulNotes/{{Capitalism}} Tom Nook]]]]


[[caption-width-right:350:Population: growing!]]

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[[caption-width-right:350:Population: growing!]] growing![[note]]Pictured from left: [[HairTriggerTemper Mr. Resetti]], [[ThePollyanna Pelly]], [[HelloInsertNameHere Rover]], [[PlayerCharacter Male Villager]], [[SeriesMascot Isabelle]], [[PlayerCharacter Female Villager]], [[WanderingMinstel K.K. Slider]], [[WhyDidItHaveToBeSnakes Blathers]], [[UsefulNotes/{{Capitalism}} Tom Nook]]]]

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* EarlyInstallmentWeirdness: A lot of features that have become mainstays of the series weren't introduced until later games, while other features from earlier games would be retired as the series progressed. For instance:
** The original ''Doubutsu no Mori'' on the [=N64=] required players to set the clock when playing the game for the first time, since the system didn't have a built-in clock. Since the cart's RTC was battery-powered, this also meant that if the battery died, the game would not be able to keep time anymore.
** Blathers, the Mable Sisters, and Tortimer were not introduced until the Gamecube iteration of the series. Similarly, features tied to them were not available: there were no seasonal gifts that players could earn from the mayor, clothing could only be purchased at Tom Nook's shop, there was no way to make your own clothing, and there was no museum in the town (only a Faraway Museum for identifying fossils, which could still be used as decorations).
** The [=N64=] iteration had a unique rotary-dial system for inputting characters. Later games would use a more standard keyboard.
** The [=N64=] original, as well as the first Gamecube iteration in Japan, had only a small handful of Japanese holidays. Additional holidays, such as "[[YouMeanXmas Toy Day]]" and Halloween, were added in the North American and European releases, then retroactively added in the UpdatedRerelease ''Doubutsu no Mori [=e+=]''. Other holidays were changed, such as the Shinto-style Bell Shrine being replaced with a fountain for New Year's.
** CharacterCustomization was highly limited in earlier games, with the player's appearance being dictated by a questionnaire at the start of the game. Later games would include more options for players to alter their appearance, with ''New Horizons'' eventually allowing players to dictate their appearance using an in-depth customization system at the very beginning, as well as allowing players to alter their appearance with certain furniture later.
** Emulations of NES games were a popular feature in earlier games, but would be retired after the Gamecube iteration with the advent of the Wii's Virtual Console.
** Earlier games separated a town's acres with a distinct scrolling that would occur when crossing over from acre into another. Later games would feature seamless transitions between acres.
** The first games took placed from an overhead perspective, while later games adopted a unique visual perspective for the world that would make the game appear to take place on a cylinder.


* ''Dōbutsu no Mori'' (lit. "Animal Forest") (UsefulNotes/Nintendo64; Japan 2001)

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* ''Dōbutsu no Mori'' (lit. "Animal Forest") (UsefulNotes/Nintendo64; Japan 2001)2001) Was originally planned for the [=64DD=], a Nintendo 64 console add-on that played discs and which had an internal clock, but development moved to the base console following the [=64DD's=] commercial failure. The cartridge included a battery-powered internal real time clock, a unique feature among [=N64=] games.


** Gracie. ShesAManInJapan. Saharah also gets a gender change from being male in Japan (where he is known as Roland), but the character itself is pretty androgynous, the change may simply be a result of Saharah's long camel eyelashes.

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** Gracie. ShesAManInJapan. Because ShesAManInJapan, her snooty, fashionista attitude makes her come off as a flamboyant man in the Japanese dialogue.
** Similarly,
Saharah also gets a gender change from being male in Japan (where he is known as Roland), but the character itself is pretty androgynous, the change may simply be a result of Saharah's long camel eyelashes.


* AchievementMockery: ''New Horizons'' gives you a stamp for Nook Miles (an achievement, essentially) the first time you drop a balloon's present in the water.

to:

* AchievementMockery: ''New Horizons'' gives you a stamp for Nook Miles (an achievement, essentially) the first time you drop a balloon's present in the water.water, getting stung by wasps, getting by stung by wasps ''again'' while wounded, and getting stung or bitten by a scorpion or tarantula.

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* AchievementSystem: The Nook Miles system in ''New Horizons''. You can earn milestone stamps for doing various things the first time, or a number of times, and these milestones unlock titles that can be used on your passport.

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* AchievementMockery: ''New Horizons'' gives you a stamp for Nook Miles (an achievement, essentially) the first time you drop a balloon's present in the water.


** A tradition for each game is to have the "fake" songs that K.K. plays when requesting an invalid title become genuine hidden songs in later games. The [=GameCube=] installment had "Forest Life", "My Place", and "To the Edge", which became real songs in ''Wild World''; ''Wild World'' had "Spring Blossoms", "Stale Cupcakes", and "Wandering", which became real songs in ''City Folk''; ''City Folk'' had "Hypno K.K.", "K.K. Island", and "K.K. Stroll", which became real songs in ''New Leaf''[[note]]oddly, it ended up only having two "true" K.K. songs, "K.K. House" and "K.K. Sonata"[[/note]]; and ''New Leaf'' had "Animal City", "Drivin'", and "Farewell", which became real songs in ''New Horizons''.

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** A tradition for each game is to have the "fake" songs that K.K. plays when requesting an invalid title become genuine hidden songs in later games. The [=GameCube=] installment had "Forest Life", "My Place", and "To the Edge", which became real songs in ''Wild World''; ''Wild World'' had "Spring Blossoms", "Stale Cupcakes", and "Wandering", which became real songs in ''City Folk''; ''City Folk'' had "Hypno K.K.", "K.K. Island", and "K.K. Stroll", which became real songs in ''New Leaf''[[note]]oddly, it ''City Folk'' ended up only having two "true" truly new K.K. songs, "K.K. House" and "K.K. Sonata"[[/note]]; and ''New Leaf'' had "Animal City", "Drivin'", and "Farewell", which became real songs in ''New Horizons''.

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* MissionPackSequel: Most of the earlier games were this to each other. The first generation mostly consisted of iterated versions of the original N64 game—though only one of these was released outside of Japan—while it became more apparent overseas with ''Wild World'' to ''City Folk'' (which is essentially just a Wii port of ''Wild World'' with most of the traveling characters moved to the city). As the developers realized this was a common complaint for the franchise, ''New Leaf'' shook up the series formula considerably, and ''New Horizons'' deviated even further.


** The "bees" that occasionally chase after you when you knock over their nest are actually [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Japanese_giant_hornet Japanese giant hornets]]. Their nests resemble the typical football-shaped hornet's nests rather than the lotus pod-shaped wasp's nests seen in the game. The confusion likely stems from the Japanese word ''hachi'', which is an encompassing term for bees, hornets, and wasps. Also, on the Harvest Festival, Franklin might require honey for a recipe which you apparently obtain from the "bee" nests, all the more jarring since the game also features actual honeybees, which do not swarm after you. This was corrected in ''New Horizons'', where the bees were renamed wasps.

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** The "bees" that occasionally chase after you when you knock over their nest are actually [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Japanese_giant_hornet Japanese giant hornets]]. Their nests resemble the typical football-shaped hornet's nests rather than the lotus pod-shaped wasp's nests seen in the game. The confusion likely stems from the Japanese word ''hachi'', which is an encompassing term for bees, hornets, and wasps. Also, on the Harvest Festival, Franklin might require honey for a recipe which you apparently obtain from the "bee" nests, all the more jarring since the game also features actual honeybees, which do not swarm after you. This was corrected in ''New Horizons'', where the bees were renamed wasps.wasps and the species changed from Japanese Giant Hornets to the Common Wasp.


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!!This game !!The series features examples of:

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