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!!This game !!The series features examples of:


* ''VideoGame/AnimalCrossingNewHorizons'' / ''Atsumare Dōbutsu no Mori'' ("Gather! Animal Forest") / ''Moyeobwayo Dongmul-Ui Sup'' / ''Jíhé la! Dòngwù sēnyǒu huì'' [[/index]] (UsefulNotes/NintendoSwitch; 2020) This installment makes even more changes to the gameplay mechanics than New Leaf. Players start on a deserted island, and explore and gather resources to build tools and furniture, and eventually develop their own little community. Design-wise, the entire main street aspect is removed and players are expected to slowly add new shops to the island and grow the settlement until it becomes a city itself. Transport is changed to an airport, which allows access to other players' islands and randomly-generated "mystery islands". Character and landscape customization has been greatly expanded upon; the player's look can be changed at any time with mirrors and wardrobes, and the island's landscape can be further modified to the player's liking as the game progresses.

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* ''VideoGame/AnimalCrossingNewHorizons'' / ''Atsumare Dōbutsu no Mori'' ("Gather! Animal Forest") / ''Moyeobwayo Dongmul-Ui Sup'' / ''Jíhé la! Dòngwù sēnyǒu huì'' [[/index]] (UsefulNotes/NintendoSwitch; 2020) This installment makes even more changes to the gameplay mechanics than New Leaf. Players start on a deserted island, and explore and gather resources to build tools and furniture, and eventually develop their own little community. Design-wise, the entire main street aspect is removed and players are expected to slowly add new shops to the island and grow the settlement until it becomes a city itself. Transport is changed to an airport, which allows access to other players' islands and randomly-generated random procedurally-generated "mystery islands". Character and landscape customization has been greatly expanded upon; the player's look can be changed at any time with mirrors and wardrobes, and the island's landscape can be further modified to the player's liking as the game progresses.


** Fruit wasn't stackable in the beginning. If you had a lot of fruit trees, this meant a lot of trips back and forth to the store. Thankfully, the ability to stack fruit (one stack holds nine) was made possible in later games, cutting the number of trips down considerably.

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** Fruit wasn't stackable in the beginning. If you had a lot of fruit trees, this meant a lot of trips back and forth to the store. Thankfully, the ability to stack fruit (one stack holds nine) nine, ten in ''New Horizons'') was made possible in later games, cutting the number of trips down considerably.


* AmericanKirbyIsHardcore: The original English installment seemed to be skewing for a teenage/young adult demographic rather than the intended "all-ages" demographic. It manifests mostly in the "edginess" of the dialogue, with the villagers using verbose vocabularies and occasionally making adult jokes (for example, Tom Nook telling you "feel free to browse, but try not to [[https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/carouse carouse!]]"). They also treat the player more harshly than later games, at least before you build up your friendship with them, and they're very prone to snap and get mad at you. That's not even getting into [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YaOeX76DzK0&t=1m the English commercials]], which parody MTV's ''Series/TheRealWorld''.

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* AmericanKirbyIsHardcore: The original English installment seemed to be skewing for a teenage/young adult demographic rather than the intended "all-ages" all-ages demographic. It manifests mostly in the "edginess" of the dialogue, with the villagers using verbose vocabularies and occasionally making adult jokes (for example, Tom Nook telling you "feel free to browse, but try not to [[https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/carouse carouse!]]"). They also treat the player more harshly than later games, harshly, at least before you build up your friendship with them, and they're very much more prone to snap and get mad at you.you than the Japanese version (and later games, which skew closer to the Japanese text). That's not even getting into [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YaOeX76DzK0&t=1m the English commercials]], which parody MTV's ''Series/TheRealWorld''.



** In all versions, ''The Resettis''. They pop up and berate you if you don't properly save and quit the game, and it just gets longer and longer each time you do so. They'll even make you type out an apology letter, and at one point they'll even joke about ''deleting'' your game save. Inevitably, annoying rumors online complete with badly edited videos popped up after this prank by the Resettis was discovered.

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** In all versions, ''The ''the Resettis''. They pop up and berate you if you don't properly save and quit the game, and it just gets longer and longer each time you do so. They'll even make you type out an apology letter, and at one point they'll even joke about ''deleting'' your game save. Inevitably, annoying rumors online complete with badly edited videos popped up after this prank by the Resettis was discovered.



* {{Constellations}}: In ''Wild World'' and ''City Folk'', players were allowed to create and name their own constellations via Celeste's part of the museum. At a certain date (at nighttime) they're visible in the sky. Sadly, this mechanic is removed in ''New Leaf''. Instead, Celeste runs a museum shop/'D.I.Y. exhibits' after upgrading to the museum's 2nd floor.

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* {{Constellations}}: In ''Wild World'' and ''City Folk'', players were allowed to create and name their own constellations via Celeste's part of the museum. At a certain date (at nighttime) they're visible in the sky. Sadly, this mechanic is removed in ''New Leaf''. Instead, Celeste runs a museum shop/'D.I.Y. exhibits' after upgrading to the museum's 2nd floor.



* DemotedToExtra: Several of the constant characters in ''New Leaf''. Sable and Blathers have both been largely decharacterized. Mr. Resetti is entirely optional, because Nintendo acknowledged that Resetti scared and upset many younger players. Tortimer used to be the mayor in previous games, but since ''New Leaf'' gives that role to the player, he's retired to the Island and hosts tours there. Even Tom Nook could be seen as this. In previous games, he ran the general store and unless his shop was closed, chances are if you played the game, you would be seeing him. In ''New Leaf'', while he still features at the start of the game, he now runs a home improvement store and house upgrades are optional for the first time; it's possible after paying your first mortgage to never have to see him again.

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* DemotedToExtra: Several of the constant characters in ''New Leaf''. Sable and Blathers have both been largely decharacterized. Mr. Resetti is entirely optional, because Nintendo acknowledged that Resetti scared and upset many younger players. Tortimer used to be the mayor in previous games, but since ''New Leaf'' gives that role to the player, he's retired to the Island and hosts tours there. Even Tom Nook could be seen as this. In previous games, he ran the general store and unless his shop was closed, chances are if you played the game, you would be seeing him. In ''New Leaf'', while he still features at the start of the game, he now runs a home improvement store and house upgrades are optional for the first time; it's possible after paying your first mortgage to never have to see him again. A few of these, but not all, returned to the forefront in ''New Horizons''.



* DialogueTree: Albeit a very simple one. Lampshaded during the celebration after you complete a PWP in ''New Leaf'', when Isabelle announces "And now for an incredibly short speech from our very own mayor!"

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* DialogueTree: Albeit a very simple one.ones. Lampshaded during the celebration after you complete a PWP in ''New Leaf'', when Isabelle announces "And now for an incredibly short speech from our very own mayor!"



* DitzySecretary: Isabelle is clumsy and forgetful but is the player's (The Mayor) secretary.

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* DitzySecretary: Isabelle is clumsy and forgetful forgetful, but is she's the player's (The Mayor) mayor's faithful secretary.



** In ''New Leaf'', the fact that Katrina and Crazy Redd will show up on random days each week, and that they sometimes won't show up for the week at all. It adds this trope to achieving HundredPercentCompletion in the museum art exhibits and getting Main Street fully populated.

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** In ''New Leaf'', the fact that Katrina Katrina, Gracie, and Crazy Redd will show up on random days each week, and that they sometimes won't show up for the week at all. It adds this trope to achieving HundredPercentCompletion in the museum art exhibits and exhibits, upgrading the Nookling store, getting Main Street fully populated.



** In ''e+'' onwards, one can also catch an octopus -- and yet a rare few potential neighbors are also octopi. There is also the birdcage item... which comes with a little songbird inside. To add to that is how one duck neighbor, at least in ''Wild World'', actually has one of these birdcages in his house to start out with.

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** In ''e+'' onwards, one can also catch an octopus -- and yet a rare few potential neighbors are also octopi. ''New Leaf'' even introduced Zucker, an octopus based on takoyaki (a dish made from fried octopus). There is also the birdcage item... which comes with a little songbird inside. To add to that is how one duck neighbor, at least in ''Wild World'', actually has one of these birdcages in his house to start out with.



** ''New Leaf'' gives us hamster villagers, and there has been an item of the same name ever since the first generation.
** ''New Leaf'' also introduced Tucker, a villager who is obviously based on the woolly mammoth. Yet, mammoth fossils can be collected since the first game.
** ''New Leaf'' introduced two new "fish" that can be caught: Tadpoles and soft-shelled turtles. Being juvenile frogs, tadpoles add an extra layer of creepiness to the same scenarios that frogs are already subject to. As for turtles, Tortimer is an old tortoise NPC that has been in all games except ''Animal Forest'', and depending on your localization Kapp'n and his family might all be classified as turtles. In some island tours, which are hosted by Tortimer and are on the island Kapp'n apparently lives on, you can even catch turtles for fun and profit.

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** ''New Leaf'' gives us hamster villagers, and there has been an item of the same name ever since the first generation. \n** ''New Leaf'' It also introduced Tucker, a villager who is obviously based on the woolly mammoth. Yet, mammoth fossils can be collected (a collectable fossil since the first game.
** ''New Leaf'' introduced
game), and two new "fish" that can be caught: Tadpoles tadpoles and soft-shelled turtles. Being juvenile frogs, tadpoles add an extra layer of creepiness to the same scenarios that frogs are already subject to. As for turtles, Tortimer is an old tortoise NPC that has been in all games except ''Animal Forest'', and depending on your localization Kapp'n and his family might all be classified as turtles. In some island tours, which are hosted by Tortimer and are on the island Kapp'n apparently lives on, you can even catch turtles for fun and profit.



** As of ''City Folk'', a yellow bird perches on the bulletin board when there are messages you haven't read. In ''New Leaf'', it reappears and is replaced by an owl at night. These birds also appear around town.

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** As of ''City Folk'', a yellow bird perches on the bulletin board when there are messages you haven't read. In ''New Leaf'', it reappears and is replaced by an owl (the same species as the anthropomorphic Blathers and Celeste) at night. These birds also appear around town.



** Villagers default houses occasionally reference their species. One duck villager frequently has water-themed houses, with his house in the first game literally just being a pool and sprinklers.

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** Villagers Villagers' default houses occasionally reference their species. One duck villager frequently has water-themed houses, with his house in the first game literally just being a pool and sprinklers.



** There are a handful of K.K. airchecks you can only get by request. Most of them don't follow the "K.K. ____" format, so you would have to have seen a walkthrough to even know they existed. ''New Leaf'' remedies this by having the request-only airchecks being sold occasionally at the Nookling stores upon enough upgrades. Also sometimes the villagers will tip off the request-only ones to you.

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** There are a handful of K.K. airchecks you can only get by request. Most of them don't follow the "K.K. ____" format, so you would have to have seen a walkthrough to even know they existed. ''New Leaf'' remedies this by having the request-only airchecks being sold occasionally at the Nookling stores upon enough upgrades. Also sometimes upgrades, and in ''New Horizons'', interacting with a radio will tell you what song is currently playing (allowing you to potentially learn the request-only ones). The villagers will also occasionally tip off the request-only ones to you.



* HitodamaLight: In the [=GameCube=] game, when wandering the town between 12 and 4 AM you can sometimes be disturbed by an unknown presence whispering, which reveals itself to be a ghost named Wisp if you walk in his direction (or tells you you're walking the wrong way if you're walking away from him). He explains his dire situation: He needs to retrieve five hitodama, which slowly float around the town. If you don't, his master (whose name changes every time) will be very displeased. If you collect them for him before 4 AM, he will perform a favor for you, one of which is simultaneously plucking every weed in town for you. This was dropped in Wisp's later appearances; in ''City Folk'' he instead behaves more like a genie (with his headgear changed to match this) and requires you to find his missing lamp, or else he is stuck in town for the night, while ''Welcome amiibo'' (in which he reprises his genie role) has the wishes he grants come in the form of summoning characters from amiibo cards or figures, as Leif already provides a weed-pulling service in ''New Leaf''.

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* HitodamaLight: In the [=GameCube=] game, when wandering the town between 12 and 4 AM you can sometimes be disturbed by an unknown presence whispering, which reveals itself to be a ghost named Wisp if you walk in his direction (or tells you you're walking the wrong way if you're walking away from him). He explains his dire situation: He needs to retrieve five hitodama, which slowly float around the town. If you don't, his master (whose name changes every time) will be very displeased. If you collect them for him before 4 AM, he will perform a favor for you, one of which is simultaneously plucking every weed in town for you. This was dropped in Wisp's later appearances; in ''City Folk'' he instead behaves more like a genie (with his headgear changed to match this) and requires you to find his missing lamp, or else he is stuck in town for the night, while ''Welcome amiibo'' (in which he reprises his genie role) has the wishes he grants come in the form of summoning characters from amiibo cards or figures, as Leif already provides a weed-pulling service in ''New Leaf''. ''New Horizons'' returns to his original role, though the hitodama are now actual pieces of his spirit.



** Resetti yells at you until he's blue in the face if you don't save your game, but, as his brother Don tells you he only does it "because he cares". His full depth is exposed in ''New Leaf'': The first time you quit without saving, you find out that [[spoiler:the Reset Surveillance Center's been closed and he's been ''put out of a job'']]. He's obviously very distraught, and you can't see him again until you manually install a Reset Surveillance Center using your mayoral power.
** Phyllis comes off as an aloof, grumpy Jerkass at first and, if you talk to her at the right moment, you discover she's just like that due to being overworked and that deep down she's a very caring person, especially towards her sister Pelly. In ''New Leaf'' dialogue with her in the cafe reveals that if you had become mayor much earlier, work would have been much easier for her and she wouldn't be such a grump.

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** Resetti yells at you until he's blue in the face if you don't save your game, but, as his brother Don tells you he only does it "because he cares". His full depth is exposed in ''New Leaf'': The first time you quit without saving, you find out that [[spoiler:the Reset Surveillance Center's been closed and he's been ''put out of a job'']]. He's obviously very distraught, and you can't see him again until you manually install a Reset Surveillance Center using your mayoral power.
power. When you do so, he even comes out to thank you!
** Phyllis comes off as an aloof, grumpy Jerkass at first and, first, but if you talk to her at the right moment, you discover she's just like that due to being overworked and that deep down she's a very caring person, especially towards her sister Pelly. In ''New Leaf'' dialogue with her in the cafe reveals that if you had become mayor much earlier, work would have been much easier for her and she wouldn't be such a grump.



** In ''New Horizons'', you're moving to a deserted island, so the tutorial naturally progresses as you try to make the island more habitable, establish infrastructure, forage fruit and materials, and so on.



* LeaningOnTheFourthWall: Starting up the ''New Leaf'' after the "Welcome amiibo" update has you run into Isabelle on the train home. She asks if you've been away on Vacation, which is a knowing wink to players returning to the game after years to see the update.
* {{Leitmotif}}:

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* LeaningOnTheFourthWall: Starting up the ''New Leaf'' after the "Welcome amiibo" update has you run into Isabelle on the train home. She asks if you've been away on Vacation, vacation, which is a knowing wink to players returning to the game after years to see the update.
* {{Leitmotif}}: {{Leitmotif}}:
** Each game has a ThemeAndVariationsSoundtrack that uses the main title theme as a leitmotif.



** The Nookling stores in ''New Leaf'' all have a leitmotif.

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** The Tom Nook stores in older games and Nookling stores in ''New Leaf'' all have a their own leitmotif.



* LighterAndSofter: Compared to the original, characters are much nicer in the newer games. Villagers used to make cruel remarks and force you to play "games" or buy items from them for a random amount of bells (often the exact amount you have on you) and give you junk in return. Aside from them, the snowmen went from outright hostile towards you if you mess up assembling them to forgiving of your mistake, Rover initially being passive aggressive if you refuse to let him sit across from you in the train after he comments about drooling on you, and Phyllis' snark was toned down from being passive aggressive to comments about closing the door when you leave.

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* LighterAndSofter: Compared to the original, characters are much nicer in the newer games. Villagers used to make cruel remarks and force you to play "games" or buy items from them for a random amount of bells (often the exact amount you have on you) and give you junk in return. Aside from them, the snowmen went from outright hostile towards you if you mess up assembling them to forgiving of your mistake, Rover initially being passive aggressive if you refuse to let him sit across from you in the train after he comments about drooling on you, and Phyllis' snark was toned down from being passive aggressive passive-aggressive to comments about closing the door when you leave.just being stressed.



** The entire series is this when compared to Nintendo's other franchises like Mario and Zelda, which tend to be grand adventures or action-packed romps.

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** The entire series is this when compared to Nintendo's other franchises like Mario ''Mario'' and Zelda, ''Zelda'', which tend to be grand adventures or action-packed romps.



* MoonRabbit: Ruby, known as Luna in the Japanese version, has a moon-themed house with a mochi pestle.

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* MoonRabbit: MoonRabbit:
**
Ruby, known as Luna in the Japanese version, has a moon-themed house with a mochi pestle.pestle.
** There's also Mira, a rabbit whose house is themed to a space station, and her catchphrase in the Japanese version is "the moon". Her appearance and name reference Sailor Venus from ''Franchise/SailorMoon'', with her species being a nod to Sailor Moon herself, Usagi Tsukino.



** A few "new" K.K. Slider songs in each game after the first were sort of in the previous installment -- K.K. Slider would sing "Forest Life," "To the Edge," or "My Place" in the original game if a non-existent song was requested, while in ''Wild World'' they became "official" songs that this time would only play if they were either requested or K.K. Slider is asked to pick the song and could be taken home this time, while different songs replaced those three for when a fake song is requested. The songs in question in ''Wild World'' are "Stale Cupcakes," "Spring Blossoms," and "Wandering," which became "official" songs in ''City Folk''/''Let's Go to the City'' and ''only'' play when requested much like how "Two Days Ago," "I Love You," and "K.K. Song" had to be obtained in the original. Oddly enough, that game ended up having only two truly new K.K. Slider songs -- "K.K. House" and "K.K. Sonata."
** A few of K.K. Slider's songs are also derived from the background music of older games; "Forest Life" is based on the recurring theme from the first generation, while "Spring Blossoms" comes from the Cherry Blossom Festival theme from the Japanese versions of the original. ''New Leaf'' introduces "Animal City" (the city theme from ''City Folk'') as one of his "fake" songs, and ''New Leaf'' does the same with ''Wild World''[='=]s title theme.

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** A few "new" tradition for each game is to have the "fake" songs that K.K. Slider plays when requesting an invalid title become genuine hidden songs in each game after the first were sort of in the previous later games. The [=GameCube=] installment -- had "Forest Life", "My Place", and "To the Edge", which became real songs in ''Wild World''; ''Wild World'' had "Spring Blossoms", "Stale Cupcakes", and "Wandering", which became real songs in ''City Folk''; ''City Folk'' had "Hypno K.K. Slider would sing "Forest Life," "To the Edge," or "My Place" in the original game if a non-existent song was requested, while in ''Wild World'' they became "official" songs that this time would only play if they were either requested or K.", "K.K. Slider is asked to pick the song and could be taken home this time, while different songs replaced those three for when a fake song is requested. The songs in question in ''Wild World'' are "Stale Cupcakes," "Spring Blossoms," and "Wandering," which became "official" songs in ''City Folk''/''Let's Go to the City'' and ''only'' play when requested much like how "Two Days Ago," "I Love You," Island", and "K.K. Song" had to be obtained Stroll", which became real songs in the original. Oddly enough, that game ''New Leaf''[[note]]oddly, it ended up only having only two truly new "true" K.K. Slider songs -- songs, "K.K. House" and "K.K. Sonata."
Sonata"[[/note]]; and ''New Leaf'' had "Animal City", "Drivin'", and "Farewell", which became real songs in ''New Horizons''.
** A few of K.K. Slider's songs are also derived from the background music of older games; "Forest Life" is based on the recurring theme from the first generation, while "Spring Blossoms" comes from the Cherry Blossom Festival theme from the Japanese versions of the original. ''New Leaf'' introduces "Animal City" (the city theme from ''City Folk'') as one of his "fake" songs, and ''New Leaf'' Horizons'' does the same with ''Wild World''[='=]s title theme.



** Owning both ''Pocket Camp'' and ''New Horizons'' gives you the option to purchase a number of items themed around ''Pocket Camp'' from Nook Shopping in ''New Horizons''. You also get some Leaf Tickets in ''Pocket Camp''.



** This trope is {{Downplayed|Trope}} in ''City Folk'', where the player has to change clothes BehindTheBlack for Jingle to give the player multiple presents. It's eventually {{Subverted|Trope}} when Jingle realizes the player has been getting multiple presents by doing this.

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** This trope is {{Downplayed|Trope}} in the original game and ''City Folk'', where the player has to change clothes BehindTheBlack for Jingle to give the player multiple presents. It's eventually {{Subverted|Trope}} when Jingle realizes the player has been getting multiple presents by doing this.



* PiggyBank: You get one from the bank after depositing enough bells in the ABD.

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* PiggyBank: You get one from the bank after depositing enough bells in the ABD. Interacting with it lets you insert bells one at a time, which is good for shaving off uneven numbers (though once you do this, you can't get them back).



** Oddly enough, Champ remains the only villager not from any version of the original game to get entirely cut, as he debuted in ''Wild World'' and returned in ''City Folk'', but got cut in ''New Leaf'' and has not returned in either ''Happy Home Designer'' nor the ''Welcome amiibo'' update.

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** Oddly enough, Champ remains is the only villager not from any version of introduced past the original game to get entirely cut, as who got cut; he debuted in ''Wild World'' and returned in ''City Folk'', but got cut in ''New Leaf'' and has not returned in either ''Happy Home Designer'' nor appeared since. Some speculate it may be because he's the ''Welcome amiibo'' update.same character as Porter, who first appeared in the original game and was PutOnABus until ''New Leaf'' (coinciding with when Champ was cut).



** The title screen shows a generic player character doing an activity in the town.

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** The original game's title screen shows a generic player character doing an activity in the town.



* RealTimeWeaponChange: ''City Folk'' and ''New Leaf'' allows you to quickly change tools with the left and right button on the Control Pad thanks to alternative methods of controlling the character's motion (the former owing to the nub on the nukchuk and/or the Wii's point-and-click interface, the latter owing to the presence of an additional analog nub on a 3DS). Previous versions required you to go into the items screen to change tools.

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* RealTimeWeaponChange: ''City Folk'' and ''New Leaf'' allows you to quickly change tools with the left and right button on the Control Pad thanks to alternative methods of controlling the character's motion (the former owing to the nub on the nukchuk nunchuk and/or the Wii's point-and-click interface, the latter owing to the presence of an additional analog nub on a 3DS). Previous versions required you to go into the items screen to change tools.



* ReverseCerebusSyndrome: The series has lost a bit of its edge over the years. In the earlier games, several villagers were mean or even outright insulting, which has mostly been done away with; most characters in ''New Leaf'' are [[JerkWithAHeartOfGold abrasive at worst]]. ''New Leaf'' does imply the passage of time since the earlier games, so CharacterDevelopment may be a possibility.

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* ReverseCerebusSyndrome: The series has lost a bit of its edge over the years. In the earlier games, several villagers were mean or even outright insulting, which has mostly been done away with; most characters in ''New Leaf'' are [[JerkWithAHeartOfGold abrasive at worst]]. Note that most of its "edge" was [[AmericanKirbyIsHardcore added during localization]]. ''New Leaf'' does imply the passage of time since the earlier games, so CharacterDevelopment may also be a possibility.



* SaveGameLimits: Technically, you're never supposed to have more than one save file, to facilitate the SocializationBonus inherent in the game's concept. In actuality this has become more stringent owing to the technical aspects of saving on each system -- in the original game you could have as many towns as you had memory cards that could fit them; in ''Wild World'', there are no memory cards so you have to get another copy of the game in order to have multiple towns (and need two DS systems to have the towns interact); ''City Folk'' saves directly to the system and doesn't allow you to copy the file to the memory card, so you'd have to get a separate Wii (or a Wii and a Wii U) to have more towns in the same house.

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* SaveGameLimits: Technically, you're never supposed to have more than one save file, to facilitate the SocializationBonus inherent in the game's concept. In actuality this has become more stringent owing to the technical aspects of saving on each system -- in the original game you could have as many towns as you had memory cards that could fit them; in ''Wild World'', World'' and ''New Leaf'', there are no memory cards so you have to get another copy of the game in order to have multiple towns (and need two DS systems to have the towns interact); ''City Folk'' saves and ''New Horizons'' save directly to the system and doesn't don't allow you to copy the file to the memory card, an SD card (or cloud save, for ''New Horizons'') so you'd have to get a separate Wii (or a Wii and a Wii U) console to have more towns in the same house.



** In ''New Leaf'', Mr. Resetti was made an optional feature, resetting the game the first time will prompt him to appear and suggest the Reset Center as a Public Works Project (so you actually need to do this once to get it).

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** In ''New Leaf'', Mr. Resetti was made an optional feature, resetting the game the first time will prompt him to appear and suggest the Reset Center as a Public Works Project (so you actually need to do this once to get it). ''New Horizons'' outright {{autosave}}s, so Resetti's role has been switched to rescue helicopter operator (he resets your position if you get stuck).



* SlidingScaleOfAnimalCast: Type 4, animal cast with human protagonist; the PlayerCharacter(s) is/are the only human(s) in the games.

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* SlidingScaleOfAnimalCast: Type 4, animal cast with human protagonist; the PlayerCharacter(s) is/are {{Player Character}}s are the only human(s) humans in the games.



** The language the characters speak is called Animalese. In the English versions of ''City Folk'' and ''New Leaf'', the characters read the text in speech bubbles one letter at a time, which is sped up and slightly garbled. This is because unlike Japanese, where each kana glyph neatly maps to a syllabic sound (such as "da", "o", "ke", or "tsu"), languages written using the Latin alphabet (including and ''especially'' English) require letter sequences to be analyzed and matched to a specific sound, taking extra computational power in the process.

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** The language the characters speak is called Animalese. In the English versions of ''City Folk'' and ''New Leaf'', the characters read the text in speech bubbles one letter at a time, which is sped up and slightly garbled. This is because unlike Japanese, where each kana glyph neatly maps to a syllabic sound (such as "da", "o", "ke", or "tsu"), languages written using the Latin alphabet (including and ''especially'' English) use phonemes and thus require letter sequences to be analyzed and matched mapped to a specific sound, sounds, taking extra computational power in the process.



** Zipper T. Bunny? A cynical, bitter grouch in a bunny suit who ''really'' hates his job and how "perky" he has to act. Apparently, it's Phyllis the pelican in that suit; talk to her at the Roost after the Bunny Day and she talks about how much she hates the costume she's forced to wear.

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** Zipper T. Bunny? A cynical, bitter grouch in a bunny suit who ''really'' hates his job and how "perky" he has to act. Apparently, it's Phyllis the pelican in that suit; talk to her at the Roost after the Bunny Day and she talks about how much she hates the costume she's forced to wear.



* StockDinosaurs: The fossils you can dig up are, for the most part, all stock dinosaurs. Each of the big "dinosaur groups" is represented, with a few ice age prehistoric animals thrown in. Perhaps the most unusual or offbeat animal is the ''Dimetrodon''--a sail-backed creature that, while lizardlike in appearance, is actually more closely related to ''mammals'' than dinosaurs (although it still counts for being the best-known of the synapsids). ''New Leaf'', however, somewhat averts this with ''Megacerops''.

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* StockDinosaurs: The fossils you can dig up are, for the most part, all stock dinosaurs. Each of the big "dinosaur groups" is represented, with a few ice age prehistoric animals thrown in. Perhaps the most unusual or offbeat animal is the ''Dimetrodon''--a sail-backed creature that, while lizardlike in appearance, is actually more closely related to ''mammals'' than dinosaurs (although it still counts for being the best-known of the synapsids). ''New Leaf'', however, Leaf'' somewhat averts this with ''Megacerops''.by introducing more fossils not based on dinosaurs, like ''Megacerops'' and ''Archelon'', as well as ''Megaloceros'' in ''New Horizons''.



** [[AscendedMeme Used in-universe]] in ''New Leaf''. If a player time travels too much, the villagers will mention rumors of you being a time traveller.

to:

** [[AscendedMeme Used in-universe]] in ''New Leaf''. If a player time travels too much, the villagers will mention rumors of you being a time traveller.traveler.



* VirtualPaperDoll: In the original, you can buy both pre-made clothes and design your own clothing patterns. In ''Wild World'', you can change your hairstyle and hat, while masks and other accessories were added into the mix. ''City Folk'' made it so you could change your shoes, and wear a Mii's face as a mask. In ''New Leaf'', clothing was separated into tops, bottoms, dresses, socks, and shoes; additionally, it's no longer gender-locked, allowing males to wear skirts and dresses and females to wear shirts and pants.

to:

* VirtualPaperDoll: In the original, you can buy both pre-made clothes and design your own clothing patterns. In ''Wild World'', you can change your hairstyle and hat, while masks and other accessories were added into the mix. ''City Folk'' made it so you could change your shoes, and wear a Mii's face as a mask. In ''New Leaf'', clothing was separated into tops, bottoms, dresses, socks, and shoes; additionally, it's no longer gender-locked, allowing males to wear skirts and dresses and females to wear shirts and pants. ''New Horizons'' goes even further by allowing the player to freely customize their character's face and skintone, and no distinction is made between genders (now referred to as "style", which can be changed at any time).



** ''New Horizons'' builds off of ''New Leaf''[='=]s Animalese, with a somewhat softer tone.



* WholesomeCrossdresser: This becomes more possible in each game, and is equally available for any gender. From the beginning, some clothing items (such as the Sailor Uniform) that seem to be made for one gender have been openly available, though for most of the series the clothes would be altered based on the character's gender (boys would always wear clothes as shirts, girls would always wear them as dresses). ''Wild World'' and all games released afterward allow you to unlock the ability to have either gender's haircuts after you get your hair cut enough times, ''City Folk'' adds the ability to wear either gender's shoes, and the 3DS game simply makes skirts, dresses, pants, shirts, and shoes different kinds of items rather than altering clothing based on gender. So it's possible to start a game as one gender and eventually work your way to the point where the only way to tell the character's true gender is to look at their face (which may not help, since some faces are gender-neutral, and are able to be covered up), or the color of their ID card (PinkGirlBlueBoy, naturally). They even facilitate it by altering the character's running style based on their clothes--if a boy is wearing a dress, they'll still do a GirlyRun.

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* WholesomeCrossdresser: This becomes more possible in each game, and is equally available for any gender. From the beginning, some clothing items (such as the Sailor Uniform) that seem to be made for one gender have been openly available, though for most of the series the clothes would be altered based on the character's gender (boys would always wear clothes as shirts, girls would always wear them as dresses). ''Wild World'' and all games released afterward allow you to unlock the ability to have either gender's haircuts after you get your hair cut enough times, ''City Folk'' adds the ability to wear either gender's shoes, and the 3DS game simply makes skirts, dresses, pants, shirts, and shoes different kinds of items rather than altering clothing based on gender. So it's possible to start a game as one gender and eventually work your way to the point where the only way to tell the character's true gender is to look at their face (which may not help, since some faces are gender-neutral, and are able to be covered up), or the color of their ID card (PinkGirlBlueBoy, naturally). They even facilitate it by altering the character's running style based on their clothes--if a boy is wearing a dress, they'll still do a GirlyRun. By ''New Horizons'', it's no longer "crossdressing" so much as it is PurelyAestheticGender, since all clothing and dialogue is gender-neutral and the player's actual gender can be changed whenever.



* WindmillScenery: When donating 1000000 Bells to the City Hall in ''City Folk'', the player can choose to build a decorative windmill on the town's peninsula (if they don't chose the [[LighthousePoint lighthouse]] instead). The windmill returns in ''New Leaf'' as a Public Works Project.

to:

* WindmillScenery: When donating 1000000 1,000,000 Bells to the City Hall in ''City Folk'', the player can choose to build a decorative windmill on the town's peninsula (if they don't chose the [[LighthousePoint lighthouse]] instead). The windmill returns in ''New Leaf'' as a Public Works Project.



** Laughing? Frowning? Waving your hand? You'd have to learn these emotions through Dr. Shrunk. In ''Wild World'' and ''City Folk'' you could only have four of them at a time and would have to forget one if you want another. Fortunately, you get to keep all of them in ''New Leaf'' onwards, with the last one you unlock being Dr. Shrunk's trademark dance.

to:

** Laughing? Frowning? Waving your hand? You'd have to learn these emotions through Dr. Shrunk. In ''Wild World'' and ''City Folk'' you could only have four of them at a time and would have to forget one if you want another. Fortunately, you get to keep all of them in ''New Leaf'' onwards, with the last one you unlock being Dr. Shrunk's trademark dance. In ''New Horizons'', you learn them randomly from villagers instead, though you get a basic set of "starting" emotions the first time you do.

Added DiffLines:

** Owning both ''Pocket Camp'' and ''New Horizons'' gives you the option to purchase a number of items themed around ''Pocket Camp'' from Nook Shopping in ''New Horizons''. You also get some Leaf Tickets in ''Pocket Camp''.


* AmericanKirbyIsHardcore: The original English installment seemed to be skewing for a teenage/young adult demographic rather than the intended "all-ages" demographic. It manifest more in the "edginess" of the dialogue, with the villagers using verbose vocabularies and occasionally making adult jokes (for example, Tom Nook telling you "feel free to browse, but try not to [[https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/carouse carouse!]]"). They also treat the player more harshly than later games, at least before you build up your friendship with them, and they're very prone to snap and get mad at you. That's not even getting into [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YaOeX76DzK0&t=1m the English commercials]], which parody MTV's ''Series/TheRealWorld''.

to:

* AmericanKirbyIsHardcore: The original English installment seemed to be skewing for a teenage/young adult demographic rather than the intended "all-ages" demographic. It manifest more manifests mostly in the "edginess" of the dialogue, with the villagers using verbose vocabularies and occasionally making adult jokes (for example, Tom Nook telling you "feel free to browse, but try not to [[https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/carouse carouse!]]"). They also treat the player more harshly than later games, at least before you build up your friendship with them, and they're very prone to snap and get mad at you. That's not even getting into [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YaOeX76DzK0&t=1m the English commercials]], which parody MTV's ''Series/TheRealWorld''.

Added DiffLines:

* AmericanKirbyIsHardcore: The original English installment seemed to be skewing for a teenage/young adult demographic rather than the intended "all-ages" demographic. It manifest more in the "edginess" of the dialogue, with the villagers using verbose vocabularies and occasionally making adult jokes (for example, Tom Nook telling you "feel free to browse, but try not to [[https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/carouse carouse!]]"). They also treat the player more harshly than later games, at least before you build up your friendship with them, and they're very prone to snap and get mad at you. That's not even getting into [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YaOeX76DzK0&t=1m the English commercials]], which parody MTV's ''Series/TheRealWorld''.


* ''VideoGame/AnimalCrossingNewHorizons'' / ''Atsumare Dōbutsu no Mori'' ("Gather! Animal Forest") / ''Moyeobwayo Dongmul-Ui Sup'' / ''Jíhé la! Dòngwù sēnyǒu huì'' [[/index]] (UsefulNotes/NintendoSwitch; 2020) This instalment makes even more changes to the gameplay mechanics than New Leaf. Players start on a deserted island, and explore and gather resources to build tools and furniture, and eventually develop their own little community. Design-wise, the entire main street aspect is removed and players are expected to slowly add new shops to the island and grow the settlement until it becomes a city itself. Transport is changed to an airport. The stalk market that was last seen in ''Wild World'' makes a return, with Joan Sow's granddaughter taking up the mantle. The ability to visit other islands are now accessed from the airport. Larger tress can even be moved by the player!

to:

* ''VideoGame/AnimalCrossingNewHorizons'' / ''Atsumare Dōbutsu no Mori'' ("Gather! Animal Forest") / ''Moyeobwayo Dongmul-Ui Sup'' / ''Jíhé la! Dòngwù sēnyǒu huì'' [[/index]] (UsefulNotes/NintendoSwitch; 2020) This instalment installment makes even more changes to the gameplay mechanics than New Leaf. Players start on a deserted island, and explore and gather resources to build tools and furniture, and eventually develop their own little community. Design-wise, the entire main street aspect is removed and players are expected to slowly add new shops to the island and grow the settlement until it becomes a city itself. Transport is changed to an airport. The stalk market that was last seen in ''Wild World'' makes a return, with Joan Sow's granddaughter taking up the mantle. The ability airport, which allows access to visit other players' islands are now accessed from and randomly-generated "mystery islands". Character and landscape customization has been greatly expanded upon; the airport. Larger tress player's look can even be moved by changed at any time with mirrors and wardrobes, and the player!island's landscape can be further modified to the player's liking as the game progresses.



-->"And your reward... Is clothes!"

to:

-->"And your reward... Is is clothes!"



** f you're trying to catch bees in ''New Leaf'', the swarm will ''freeze in place'' when you open your inventory. This eliminates the rush to equip your net, allowing you to focus on the timing of your swing.

to:

** f If you're trying to catch bees in ''New Leaf'', the swarm will ''freeze in place'' when you open your inventory. This eliminates the rush to equip your net, allowing you to focus on the timing of your swing.



** If an animal wants you to deliver a package to another animal who is asleep, s/he'll say to wait until said animal wakes up, saving you the trouble of going to the animal's house and finding out for yourself.

to:

** If an animal wants you to deliver a package to another animal who is asleep, s/he'll they'll say to wait until said animal wakes up, saving you the trouble of going to the animal's house and finding out for yourself.



** Phyllis, who works at either Town Hall or the Post Office depending on the game, is a complete jerk who is crass, rude, and loudly complains about having to do her job when you come in.
** Played with at the Able Sisters tailor shop with Sable, who is quite rude and quiet to you when you first come in. If you keep coming in to use their shop and keep talking to her however she'll slowly warm up to you, begin sharing intimate details about her life, and eventually become more friendly than her sister, revealing that she's just incredibly [[ShrinkingViolet shy rather]] than apathetic.

to:

** Phyllis, who works at either Town Hall or the Post Office depending on the game, is a complete jerk who is crass, rude, and loudly complains about having to do her job when you come in.
in. It's less that she's rude by nature (she's very protective of her sister, Pelly) and more that she's stressed out since she works the graveyard shift. She's a bit softer when you meet her during her off hours at the Roost.
** Played with at the Able Sisters tailor shop with Sable, who is quite rude dismissive and quiet to you when you first come in. If you keep coming in to use their shop and keep talking to her however every day, however, she'll slowly warm up to you, begin sharing intimate details about her life, and eventually become more friendly than her sister, revealing that she's just incredibly [[ShrinkingViolet shy rather]] incredibly shy]] rather than apathetic.



* ArbitraryHeadcountLimit: No more than four humans and 15 (GCN), 8 (DS), or 10 (Wii/3DS) animal neighbors per town, not counting the permanent residents such as Tom Nook et al. ''New Leaf'' allows 9 residents initially, then, with the addition of the campsite, by visiting friends' towns, or scanning an amiibo (as of the update), a 10th can be obtained.

to:

* ArbitraryHeadcountLimit: No more than four humans and 15 (GCN), 8 (DS), or 10 (Wii/3DS) (Wii onward) animal neighbors per town, not counting the permanent residents such as Tom Nook et al. ''New Leaf'' allows 9 residents initially, then, with the addition of the campsite, by visiting friends' towns, or scanning an amiibo (as of the update), a 10th can be obtained.



* ArtEvolution: So far, there have been two major changes to the series' art style: ''Wild World'' added the now-famous "rolling log effect", and ''New Leaf'' features redone, slightly less SuperDeformed character models and a more "painterly" look to villagers and the outdoors. Over time the games have also changed villagers general designs, such as pigs having floppier ears.

to:

* ArtEvolution: So far, there have been two major changes to the series' art style: ''Wild World'' added the now-famous "rolling log effect", and ''New Leaf'' features redone, slightly less SuperDeformed character models and a more "painterly" look to villagers and the outdoors. Over time the games have also changed villagers villagers' general designs, such as pigs having floppier ears.



** With the player characters, ''Wild World'' and ''City Folk'' play this trope straight, as you can actually see the other players in their beds. In the other games, it's merely implied. Though s/he can overplay this trope by being asleep for weeks, months, or even years, or never wake up ever again.

to:

** With the player characters, ''Wild World'' and ''City Folk'' play this trope straight, as you can actually see the other players in their beds. In the other games, it's merely implied. Though s/he they can overplay this trope by being asleep for weeks, months, or even years, or never wake up ever again.



* {{Balloonacy}}: There are presents attached to balloons that float in the sky, appearing every ten minutes. In earlier games you had to hope they landed in a tree for you, but later games let you They contained exclusively balloon-themed furniture and items until the ''Welcome amiibo'' update threw in randomized regular furniture into the mix as well.

to:

* {{Balloonacy}}: There are presents attached to balloons that float in the sky, appearing every ten minutes. In earlier games you had to hope they landed in a tree for you, but later games let you They contained exclusively balloon-themed nab 'em with slingshots. What they contain varies depending on the game; in ''Wild World'' it's Nintendo furniture, and in ''New Leaf'' it's balloon furniture and items until (though the ''Welcome amiibo'' update threw in randomized adds regular furniture into to the mix as well.once the full balloon set is collected).



** The Island in ''New Leaf'' doesn't allow saving. It's understandable for the ''Club Tortimer'' online version, not so much for going there alone.

to:

** The Island in ''New Leaf'' doesn't allow saving. It's understandable for the ''Club Tortimer'' Club Tortimer online version, not so much for going there alone.



** Also in ''New Leaf'', NPC neighbor Champ, a monkey, is absent, although the reason for this isn't clear -- the ''Animal Crossing Wiki'' thinks it's because Champ and Porter are one and the same in the Japanese localization of the game, and Champ was coincidentally introduced in ''Wild World'', which removed the train station (and thus Porter) -- the train station was replaced by the town gate. These changes were undone and Porter was brought back in ''New Leaf''.

to:

** Also in ''New Leaf'', NPC neighbor Champ, a monkey, is absent, although the reason for this isn't clear -- the ''Animal Crossing Wiki'' wiki thinks it's because Champ and Porter are one and the same in the Japanese localization of the game, and Champ was coincidentally introduced in ''Wild World'', which removed the train station (and thus Porter) -- the train station was replaced by the town gate. These changes were undone and Porter was brought back in ''New Leaf''.


* ''VideoGame/AnimalCrossingNewHorizons'' / ''Atsumare Dōbutsu no Mori'' ("Gather! Animal Forest") / ''Moyeobwayo Dongmul-Ui Sup'' / ''Jíhé la! Dòngwù sēnyǒu huì'' [[/index]] (UsefulNotes/NintendoSwitch; 2020) This installment takes place on a deserted island, where villagers explore and gather resources to build tools and furniture, and eventually develop their own little community. Design-wise, the entire main street aspect is removed and players are expected to slowly add new shops to the island and grow the settlement until it becomes a city itself. Transport is changed to an airport. The stalk market that was last seen in ''Wild World'' makes a return, with Joan Sow's granddaughter taking up the mantle. The ability to visit other islands are now accessed from the airport.

to:

* ''VideoGame/AnimalCrossingNewHorizons'' / ''Atsumare Dōbutsu no Mori'' ("Gather! Animal Forest") / ''Moyeobwayo Dongmul-Ui Sup'' / ''Jíhé la! Dòngwù sēnyǒu huì'' [[/index]] (UsefulNotes/NintendoSwitch; 2020) This installment takes place instalment makes even more changes to the gameplay mechanics than New Leaf. Players start on a deserted island, where villagers and explore and gather resources to build tools and furniture, and eventually develop their own little community. Design-wise, the entire main street aspect is removed and players are expected to slowly add new shops to the island and grow the settlement until it becomes a city itself. Transport is changed to an airport. The stalk market that was last seen in ''Wild World'' makes a return, with Joan Sow's granddaughter taking up the mantle. The ability to visit other islands are now accessed from the airport. Larger tress can even be moved by the player!


* ''VideoGame/AnimalCrossingNewHorizons'' / ''Atsumare Dōbutsu no Mori'' ("Gather! Animal Forest") / ''Moyeobwayo Dongmul-Ui Sup'' / ''Jíhé la! Dòngwù sēnyǒu huì'' [[/index]] (UsefulNotes/NintendoSwitch; 2020) This installment takes place on a deserted island, where villagers explore and gather resources to build tools and furniture, and eventually develop their own little community. Design-wise, the entire main street aspect is removed and players are expected to slowly add new shop to the island until it becomes the city itself. Transport is changed to an airport. The stalk market that was last seen in ''Wild World'' makes a return, with Joan Sow's granddaughter taking up the mantle. The ability to visit other islands are now accessed from the airport.

to:

* ''VideoGame/AnimalCrossingNewHorizons'' / ''Atsumare Dōbutsu no Mori'' ("Gather! Animal Forest") / ''Moyeobwayo Dongmul-Ui Sup'' / ''Jíhé la! Dòngwù sēnyǒu huì'' [[/index]] (UsefulNotes/NintendoSwitch; 2020) This installment takes place on a deserted island, where villagers explore and gather resources to build tools and furniture, and eventually develop their own little community. Design-wise, the entire main street aspect is removed and players are expected to slowly add new shop shops to the island and grow the settlement until it becomes the a city itself. Transport is changed to an airport. The stalk market that was last seen in ''Wild World'' makes a return, with Joan Sow's granddaughter taking up the mantle. The ability to visit other islands are now accessed from the airport.


* ''VideoGame/AnimalCrossingNewHorizons'' / ''Atsumare Dōbutsu no Mori'' ("Gather! Animal Forest") / ''Moyeobwayo Dongmul-Ui Sup'' / ''Jíhé la! Dòngwù sēnyǒu huì'' [[/index]] (UsefulNotes/NintendoSwitch; 2020) This installment takes place on a deserted island, where villagers explore and gather resources to build tools and furniture, and eventually develop their own little community.

to:

* ''VideoGame/AnimalCrossingNewHorizons'' / ''Atsumare Dōbutsu no Mori'' ("Gather! Animal Forest") / ''Moyeobwayo Dongmul-Ui Sup'' / ''Jíhé la! Dòngwù sēnyǒu huì'' [[/index]] (UsefulNotes/NintendoSwitch; 2020) This installment takes place on a deserted island, where villagers explore and gather resources to build tools and furniture, and eventually develop their own little community. Design-wise, the entire main street aspect is removed and players are expected to slowly add new shop to the island until it becomes the city itself. Transport is changed to an airport. The stalk market that was last seen in ''Wild World'' makes a return, with Joan Sow's granddaughter taking up the mantle. The ability to visit other islands are now accessed from the airport.


The game received several sequels, including ''Animal Crossing: Wild World'' for the Nintendo DS. It added a few new features such as the ability to get haircuts, hats and accessories to wear, new items to collect, the ability to communicate with friends over Wi-Fi (though the servers for it have since shut down), and a limited increase in interaction with your neighbors. ''City Folk'', released for Wii, adds in the ability to visit the city, where most of the temporary shops that appeared in prior games (like Gracie and Crazy Redd) have taken up permanent residence. The game also allowed you to visit other people's towns and play with them online through Nintendo Wi-Fi Connection before the service was shut down. ''Animal Crossing: New Leaf'' for the 3DS has the first character you create become mayor of the town, and adds the option to upload your town to Nintendo's servers, allowing other players to visit even if you're not online. ''Animal Crossing: New Horizons'' for Nintendo Switch is set to release in March 20, 2020.

to:

The game received several sequels, including ''Animal Crossing: Wild World'' for the Nintendo DS. It added a few new features such as the ability to get haircuts, hats and accessories to wear, new items to collect, the ability to communicate with friends over Wi-Fi (though the servers for it have since shut down), and a limited increase in interaction with your neighbors. ''City Folk'', released for Wii, adds in the ability to visit the city, where most of the temporary shops that appeared in prior games (like Gracie and Crazy Redd) have taken up permanent residence. The game also allowed you to visit other people's towns and play with them online through Nintendo Wi-Fi Connection before the service was shut down. ''Animal Crossing: New Leaf'' for the 3DS has the first character you create become mayor of the town, and adds the option to upload your town to Nintendo's servers, allowing other players to visit even if you're not online. ''Animal Crossing: New Horizons'' for Nintendo Switch is set to release in released on March 20, 2020.


* ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin: An Sisterly villager in The Roost may ask Brewster what his upcoming Winter Blend of coffee is going to be called. Brewster says its name will be "Winter Coffee".

to:

* ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin: An Sisterly A sisterly villager in The Roost may ask Brewster what his upcoming Winter Blend of coffee is going to be called. Brewster says its name will be "Winter Coffee".



** In ''New Leaf'', an Sisterly villager may ask you what kind of pet would suit her best. The options? Hedgehog (a la the Able Sisters), raccoon (Tom Nook and the Nooklings), pelican (Pete, Pelly, and Phyllis), and ''the actual species of the villager''. If you choose the villager's species, she asks if they bite.

to:

** In ''New Leaf'', an Sisterly a sisterly villager may ask you what kind of pet would suit her best. The options? Hedgehog (a la the Able Sisters), raccoon (Tom Nook and the Nooklings), pelican (Pete, Pelly, and Phyllis), and ''the actual species of the villager''. If you choose the villager's species, she asks if they bite.



* PronounTrouble: When villagers are referring to others, the parser is usually smart enough to use the proper pronouns. However, Sisterly villagers are sometimes referred to with male pronouns, despite all Sisterly villagers being female.

to:

* PronounTrouble: When villagers are referring to others, the parser is usually smart enough to use the proper pronouns. However, Sisterly sisterly villagers are sometimes referred to with male pronouns, despite all Sisterly sisterly villagers being female.female. With this in mind, ''New Horizons'' has completely GenderNeutralWriting, unless referring to static characters like Tom Nook or Isabelle.


* ''VideoGame/{{Animal Crossing|2001}}'' [[/index]] (sometimes seen as ''Animal Crossing: Population: Growing!'') ([=GameCube=]; North America 2002, Australia 2003, Europe 2004) A RemadeForTheExport version of ''Dōbutsu no Mori+''. New holidays based on those of the United States, better e-Reader support, and several other enhancements.

to:

* ''VideoGame/{{Animal Crossing|2001}}'' [[/index]] (sometimes seen as ''Animal Crossing: Population: Growing!'') ([=GameCube=]; North America 2002, Australia 2003, Europe 2004) A RemadeForTheExport An extensively localized version of ''Dōbutsu no Mori+''. New holidays based on those of the United States, better e-Reader support, and several other enhancements.

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