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* DemonicSpiders: The broomstick, it does not hurt the cat, but it flings him a large distance in a random direction. Usually into something harmful, or through the window so you can't complete the task and have to go to another room.
** The ''actual'' spider in the bookcase levels. Barely qualifies as a [[GoddamnedBats goddamned bat]] initially, as the skill level goes up it becomes ''lightning'' fast and absolutely will bite you (and make you lose a life) if you linger for any time at all.



* GoddamnedBats: the mice running about on the clotheslines. They won't take a life, and you'll eat them if you jump on them, but they'll drop you to the lower line - or out of the screen altogether - if they catch you idling on the line. Their random movement occasionally makes them difficult to intercept, not to mention perfectly capable of creating sequential drops that can drop you from the highest line out of the level in no time at all.

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* GoddamnedBats: the mice running about on the clotheslines. They won't take a life, and you'll eat them if you jump on them, but they'll drop you to the lower line - or out of the screen altogether - if they catch you idling on the line. Their random movement occasionally makes them difficult to intercept, not to mention perfectly capable of creating sequential drops that can drop you from the highest line out of the level in no time at all.

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** The ''actual'' spider in the bookcase levels. Barely qualifies as a [[GoddamnedBats goddamned bat]] initially, as the skill level goes up it becomes ''lightning'' fast and absolutely will bite you (and make you lose a life) if you linger for any time at all.


* DevelopersForesight: Many early MS-DOS games did not bother with precise timing, expecting every processor to be 4.7 [=MHz=] 8088. This made them unplayably fast even on 80286. But not ''Alley Cat''. It used system clock and remained playable on modern machines without extra software (such as Moslo or emulators) until Microsoft abandoned 16-bit subsystem, somewhere between 2007 and 2020.[[note]]64-bit Windows XP, never got widespread, therefore doesn't count. Neither does 32-bit Windows 8, allegedly still alive as of 2021. 64-bit Windows Vista started to appear in 2007, and the end of life of 32-bit Windows 7 is 2020. Thus, it's 2007-2020. Nonetheless. On 64-bit systems, the game runs In DOSBox with no further configuration required.[[/note]]

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* DevelopersForesight: Many early MS-DOS games did not bother with precise timing, expecting every processor to be 4.7 [=MHz=] 8088. This made them unplayably fast even on 80286. But not ''Alley Cat''. It used system clock and remained playable on modern machines without extra software (such as Moslo or emulators) until Microsoft abandoned 16-bit subsystem, somewhere between 2007 and 2020.[[note]]64-bit Windows XP, never got widespread, therefore doesn't count. Neither does 32-bit Windows 8, allegedly still alive as of 2021. 64-bit Windows Vista started to appear in 2007, and the end of life of 32-bit Windows 7 is 2020. Thus, it's 2007-2020. Nonetheless. On Nonetheless, on 64-bit systems, the game runs In DOSBox UsefulNotes/DosBox with no further configuration required.[[/note]]


* DevelopersForesight: Many early MS-DOS games did not bother with precise timing, expecting every processor to be 4.7 [=MHz=] 8088. This made them unplayably fast even on 80286. But not ''Alley Cat''. It used system clock and remained playable on modern machines without extra software (such as Moslo or emulators) until Microsoft abandoned 16-bit subsystem, somewhere between 2007 and 2020.[[note]]64-bit Windows XP, never got widespread, therefore doesn't count. Neither does 32-bit Windows 8, allegedly still alive as of 2021. 64-bit Windows Vista started to appear in 2007, and the end of life of 32-bit Windows 7 is 2020. Thus, it's 2007-2020.[[/note]]

to:

* DevelopersForesight: Many early MS-DOS games did not bother with precise timing, expecting every processor to be 4.7 [=MHz=] 8088. This made them unplayably fast even on 80286. But not ''Alley Cat''. It used system clock and remained playable on modern machines without extra software (such as Moslo or emulators) until Microsoft abandoned 16-bit subsystem, somewhere between 2007 and 2020.[[note]]64-bit Windows XP, never got widespread, therefore doesn't count. Neither does 32-bit Windows 8, allegedly still alive as of 2021. 64-bit Windows Vista started to appear in 2007, and the end of life of 32-bit Windows 7 is 2020. Thus, it's 2007-2020. Nonetheless. On 64-bit systems, the game runs In DOSBox with no further configuration required.[[/note]]


''Alley Cat'' is a PlatformGame created by the late Bill Williams (based in a concept by John Harris) and released for the UsefulNotes/Atari8BitComputers by Synapse Software in 1983, then released the next year for [[UsefulNotes/IBMPersonalComputer [=IBM=] PC]] as well as the UsefulNotes/AppleII computers. It was released first as a Booter game, that is, you insert the disk with the game before starting the computer, and the game will boot itself instead of the OS. Alley Cat was somewhat unique in that the game is a hybrid and aside from booting from the disk (the disk contains a licensed copy of PC-DOS), it can also be loaded at command prompt from MS-DOS or other compatible operating systems.

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''Alley Cat'' is a PlatformGame created by the late Bill Williams (based in a concept by John Harris) and released for the UsefulNotes/Atari8BitComputers by Synapse Software in 1983, then released the next year for [[UsefulNotes/IBMPersonalComputer [=IBM=] PC]] as well as the UsefulNotes/AppleII computers. It was released first as a Booter game, that is, you insert the disk with the game before starting the computer, and the game will boot itself instead of the OS. Alley Cat was somewhat unique in that For the PC version however, the game is a hybrid and aside from booting from the disk (the disk contains a licensed copy of PC-DOS), it can also be loaded at command prompt started from MS-DOS or other compatible operating systems.
systems by inserting the disk, switching the prompt to the drive, and typing "cat". On the Atari 800 and Apple II versions of the game, the game is a pure booter title.


''Alley Cat'' is a PlatformGame created by the late Bill Williams (based in a concept by John Harris) and released for the UsefulNotes/Atari8BitComputers by Synapse Software in 1983, then released the next year for [[UsefulNotes/IBMPersonalComputer [=IBM=] PC]] computers. It was released first as a Booter game, that is, you insert the disk with the game before starting the computer, and the game will boot itself instead of the OS. Alley Cat was somewhat unique in that the game is a hybrid and aside from booting from the disk (the disk contains a licensed copy of PC-DOS), it can also be loaded at command prompt from MS-DOS or other compatible operating systems.

to:

''Alley Cat'' is a PlatformGame created by the late Bill Williams (based in a concept by John Harris) and released for the UsefulNotes/Atari8BitComputers by Synapse Software in 1983, then released the next year for [[UsefulNotes/IBMPersonalComputer [=IBM=] PC]] as well as the UsefulNotes/AppleII computers. It was released first as a Booter game, that is, you insert the disk with the game before starting the computer, and the game will boot itself instead of the OS. Alley Cat was somewhat unique in that the game is a hybrid and aside from booting from the disk (the disk contains a licensed copy of PC-DOS), it can also be loaded at command prompt from MS-DOS or other compatible operating systems.


''Alley Cat'' is a PlatformGame created by the late Bill Williams (based in a concept by John Harris) and released for the UsefulNotes/Atari8BitComputers by Synapse Software in 1983, then released the next year for [[UsefulNotes/IBMPersonalComputer [=IBM=] PC]] computers. It was released first as a Booter game, that is, you insert the disk with the game before starting the computer, and the game will boot itself instead of the OS.

to:

''Alley Cat'' is a PlatformGame created by the late Bill Williams (based in a concept by John Harris) and released for the UsefulNotes/Atari8BitComputers by Synapse Software in 1983, then released the next year for [[UsefulNotes/IBMPersonalComputer [=IBM=] PC]] computers. It was released first as a Booter game, that is, you insert the disk with the game before starting the computer, and the game will boot itself instead of the OS.
OS. Alley Cat was somewhat unique in that the game is a hybrid and aside from booting from the disk (the disk contains a licensed copy of PC-DOS), it can also be loaded at command prompt from MS-DOS or other compatible operating systems.


* WrittenSoundEffect: All over the place, usually when the cat is hit by an object (BONK!), touched by an Electric Eel (ZAP!), or bitten by a spider (BYTE!). Also, when a cat loses a life in a task room, a screen briefly reads one of those: OUCH! ALAS! PITY!

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* WrittenSoundEffect: All over the place, usually when the cat is hit by an object (BONK!), touched by an Electric Eel (ZAP!), or bitten by a spider (BYTE!). Also, when a cat loses a life in a task room, a screen briefly reads one of those: OUCH! ALAS! PITY!PITY! And OOPS! for accidentally jumping out of the window.

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* IdiosyncraticDifficultyLevels: Although it plays more like a level select feature. Every difficulty level changes the obstacle placement on the alley and the type of task rooms you can enter. Every time you clear a level, it will advance to the next:
** Kitten (Easy)
** House Cat (Normal)
** Tomcat (Hard)
** [[TitleDrop Alley Cat]] (Very Hard)


* DevelopersForesight: Many early MS-DOS games did not bother with precise timing, expecting every processor to be 4.7 [=MHz=] 8088. This made them unplayably fast even on 80286. But not ''Alley Cat''. It used system clock and remained playable on modern machines without extra software (such as Moslo or emulators) until Microsoft dropped support for 16-bit subsystem either with introduction of 64-bit Windows Vista in 2007 or with the end of life of 32-bit Windows 7 in 2020.[[note]]Well, there had been a 64-bit XP, but it never got widespread, and neither is 32-bit Windows 8, allegedly still alive as of 2021. Thus, it's 2007 or 2020.[[/note]]

to:

* DevelopersForesight: Many early MS-DOS games did not bother with precise timing, expecting every processor to be 4.7 [=MHz=] 8088. This made them unplayably fast even on 80286. But not ''Alley Cat''. It used system clock and remained playable on modern machines without extra software (such as Moslo or emulators) until Microsoft dropped support for abandoned 16-bit subsystem either with introduction of 64-bit subsystem, somewhere between 2007 and 2020.[[note]]64-bit Windows Vista in 2007 or with the end of life of 32-bit Windows 7 in 2020.[[note]]Well, there had been a 64-bit XP, but it never got widespread, and neither is therefore doesn't count. Neither does 32-bit Windows 8, allegedly still alive as of 2021. 64-bit Windows Vista started to appear in 2007, and the end of life of 32-bit Windows 7 is 2020. Thus, it's 2007 or 2020.2007-2020.[[/note]]


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* {{Troll}}: If a dog attacks the cat inside the house on levels above "Kitten", you get a screen with the dog saying "Here, kitty, kitty, kitty."


* DevelopersForesight: Many early MS-DOS games did not bother with precise timing, expectimg every processor to be 4.7 [=MHz=] 8088. This made them unplayably fast even on 80286. But not ''Alley Cat''. It used system clock and remained playable on modern machines without extra software (such as Moslo or emulators) until Microsoft dropped support for 16-bit subsystem either with introduction of 64-bit Windows Vista in 2007 or with the end of life of 32-bit Windows 7 in 2020.[[note]]Well, there had been a 64-bit XP, but it never got widespread, and neither is 32-bit Windows 8, allegedly still alive as of 2021. Thus, it's 2007 or 2020.[[/note]]

to:

* DevelopersForesight: Many early MS-DOS games did not bother with precise timing, expectimg expecting every processor to be 4.7 [=MHz=] 8088. This made them unplayably fast even on 80286. But not ''Alley Cat''. It used system clock and remained playable on modern machines without extra software (such as Moslo or emulators) until Microsoft dropped support for 16-bit subsystem either with introduction of 64-bit Windows Vista in 2007 or with the end of life of 32-bit Windows 7 in 2020.[[note]]Well, there had been a 64-bit XP, but it never got widespread, and neither is 32-bit Windows 8, allegedly still alive as of 2021. Thus, it's 2007 or 2020.[[/note]]

Added DiffLines:

* DevelopersForesight: Many early MS-DOS games did not bother with precise timing, expectimg every processor to be 4.7 [=MHz=] 8088. This made them unplayably fast even on 80286. But not ''Alley Cat''. It used system clock and remained playable on modern machines without extra software (such as Moslo or emulators) until Microsoft dropped support for 16-bit subsystem either with introduction of 64-bit Windows Vista in 2007 or with the end of life of 32-bit Windows 7 in 2020.[[note]]Well, there had been a 64-bit XP, but it never got widespread, and neither is 32-bit Windows 8, allegedly still alive as of 2021. Thus, it's 2007 or 2020.[[/note]]

Added DiffLines:

* BigBallOfViolence: Upon touching a dog, one of these form and roll out of the screen, but because you are the cat, you lose a life.


* SymbolSwearing: What the cat says if he falls out of the heart room.

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* SymbolSwearing: What the cat says if he falls out of the heart room.room.
* WrittenSoundEffect: All over the place, usually when the cat is hit by an object (BONK!), touched by an Electric Eel (ZAP!), or bitten by a spider (BYTE!). Also, when a cat loses a life in a task room, a screen briefly reads one of those: OUCH! ALAS! PITY!

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