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* [[StealthSequel Stealth Prequel]]: To [[spoiler: ''VideoGame/{{Control}}''.]] A late-game collectible in that game describes [[spoiler: the FBC's investigation into what happened at Bright Falls.]]


** A subtle one. As mentioned above, the character from [[StoryWithinAStory Alan's books, Alex Casey]], is an [[CaptainErsatz Erzatz]] of Max Payne. In the last book Alan wrote he killed off Alex, seeming to imply that Sam Lake has washed his hands off the character and wants no part in ''VideoGame/MaxPayne3'', which is being developed by Rockstar Vancouver rather than Remedy (and that interpretation would seem to imply that, in turn, ''Max Payne'' has technically become a FranchiseZombie to him.). For that matter, Thomas Zane and Alex Casey are voiced by Max Payne's voice actor.
** For that matter, the game as a whole can perhaps be taken as a TakeThat from Remedy to past publishers it has worked with.

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** A subtle one. As mentioned above, the character from [[StoryWithinAStory Alan's books, Alex Casey]], is an [[CaptainErsatz Erzatz]] of Max Payne. In the last book Alan wrote he killed off Alex, seeming to imply that Sam Lake has washed his hands off the character and wants no part in ''VideoGame/MaxPayne3'', which is being developed by Rockstar Vancouver rather than Remedy (and that interpretation would seem to imply that, in turn, ''Max Payne'' has technically become a FranchiseZombie to him.). For that matter, Thomas Zane and Alex Casey are voiced by Max Payne's voice actor.
** For that matter, the
The game as a whole can perhaps be taken as a TakeThat from Remedy to past publishers it has worked with.


The series has many [[ShoutOut/AlanWake pop culture references]] and is exceptionally meta; BreakingTheFourthWall is practically built into the plot and it sometimes goes several levels deep. '''Warning:''' Due to the game's [[StoryToGameplayRatio story-heavy nature]], some of the trope names below may be spoilers by themselves.

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The series has many [[ShoutOut/AlanWake pop culture references]] and is exceptionally meta; BreakingTheFourthWall is practically built into the plot and it sometimes goes several levels deep. deep.

'''Warning:''' Due to the game's [[StoryToGameplayRatio story-heavy nature]], some of the trope names below may be spoilers by themselves.


* EldritchLocation: [[spoiler:The Dark Place at the end and in the DLC is really, ''really'' weird.]] Cauldron Lake, where the Dark Presence lives. Alan says at the end that [[spoiler: "it's an ocean"]], whatever that means. In the final episode, the Dark Presence starts throwing things at you that had fallen into the lake, including boats, an airplane, a boxcar, a deep sea fishing trawler...

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* EldritchLocation: [[spoiler:The Dark Place at the end and in the DLC is really, ''really'' weird.]] Cauldron Lake, where the Dark Presence lives. Alan says at the end that [[spoiler: "it's [[spoiler:"it's an ocean"]], whatever that means. In the final episode, the Dark Presence starts throwing things at you that had fallen into the lake, including boats, an airplane, a boxcar, a deep sea fishing trawler...



* {{Expy}}:[[spoiler: Agent Nightingale heavily resembles Agent Gordon Cole of ''Series/TwinPeaks'', who is himself in turn played by none other than Creator/DavidLynch, who's in addition to that one acting role also one half of the show's writing team and its occasional director alongside Mark Frost. However, unlike Gordon, Nightingale is a terrible person and an alcoholic with no control over his impulses.]]

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* {{Expy}}:[[spoiler: Agent {{Expy}}:[[spoiler:Agent Nightingale heavily resembles Agent Gordon Cole of ''Series/TwinPeaks'', who is himself in turn played by none other than Creator/DavidLynch, who's in addition to that one acting role also one half of the show's writing team and its occasional director alongside Mark Frost. However, unlike Gordon, Nightingale is a terrible person and an alcoholic with no control over his impulses.]]



* InformedAbility: Some people find Alan's writing too cheesy to believe that he's a best-selling writer. Apart from the well-documented fact that there is no necessary connection between commercial success and literary quality, one of the first things we learn about Alan is that he's deeply afraid he's become (or always was) a talentless hack. [[spoiler: In addition, he wasn't exactly ''sane'' when he wrote Departure, and it has all the qualities of a lackluster ''first draft'': he hasn't had the chance to polish it yet, which is just as important as the writing. And he's writing outside of his usual genre.]]

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* InformedAbility: Some people find Alan's writing too cheesy to believe that he's a best-selling writer. Apart from the well-documented fact that there is no necessary connection between commercial success and literary quality, one of the first things we learn about Alan is that he's deeply afraid he's become (or always was) a talentless hack. [[spoiler: In [[spoiler:In addition, he wasn't exactly ''sane'' when he wrote Departure, and it has all the qualities of a lackluster ''first draft'': he hasn't had the chance to polish it yet, which is just as important as the writing. And he's writing outside of his usual genre.]]



** [[spoiler: The meta-fictional narrative of the game leaves open questions like this all over the place. Did Tom Zane write Alan into being? Did Alan's story dictate everything that everyone in Bright Falls did, retroactively changing things? Did Alan write Zane writing Alan? Who knows?]]

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** [[spoiler: The [[spoiler:The meta-fictional narrative of the game leaves open questions like this all over the place. Did Tom Zane write Alan into being? Did Alan's story dictate everything that everyone in Bright Falls did, retroactively changing things? Did Alan write Zane writing Alan? Who knows?]]



** One mission has Alan escorted in the wood by Mott, [[spoiler: who kidnapped Alice,]] after a lift explosion caused Alan to lose his stuff. [[spoiler: As neither like each other, Mott only gives Alan a flare, so he must rely on Mott.]]

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** One mission has Alan escorted in the wood by Mott, [[spoiler: who [[spoiler:who kidnapped Alice,]] after a lift explosion caused Alan to lose his stuff. [[spoiler: As [[spoiler:As neither like each other, Mott only gives Alan a flare, so he must rely on Mott.]]



* SuperCellReception: In ''The Signal'', the GPS feature of Alan's phone works, despite being inside a mental world brought upon by the Dark Place. Alan himself [[LampshadeHanging mentions that there's no way it should work in those circumstances]]. [[spoiler: It turns out, Zane is guiding him.]]

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* SuperCellReception: In ''The Signal'', the GPS feature of Alan's phone works, despite being inside a mental world brought upon by the Dark Place. Alan himself [[LampshadeHanging mentions that there's no way it should work in those circumstances]]. [[spoiler: It [[spoiler:It turns out, Zane is guiding him.]]


* CaptainObvious: Alan has quite a few of these moments as he narrates.


* AmbiguousSituation: The ending. [[spoiler:Did Alice and Alan actually reunite? Is it permanent or just a temporary reprieve from Alan's exile in the dark place? Was it a dream? One never knows...in Night Springs.]]



* DiscOneNuke: The crossbow, which you can get on your first visit to the Drive-Thru, and doesn't even require any manuscript pages to unlock. It's a one-hit-kill against every single enemy except for [[GiantMook the Giant]], and even penetrates through darkness shields.

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* DiscOneNuke: DiscOneNuke:
**
The crossbow, which you can get on your first visit to the Drive-Thru, and doesn't even require any manuscript pages to unlock. It's a one-hit-kill against every single enemy except for [[GiantMook the Giant]], and even penetrates through darkness shields.shields.
** The magnum, which only requires ten manuscript pages to unlock and can be found at the Motel. It's got the fire power of a hunting rifle, but carries more ammo and is carried in your sidearm slot.


** Wake is loosely based on Sam Lake, Remedy's lead writer, and he writes a novel starring himself as the protagonist. And to top it off, Sam Lake also appears as... Sam Lake during Alan Wake's late show interview... See also the {{Take That}} since, for ''Max Payne 1'', Sam Lake did double duty as the basis for Max's face.

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** Wake is loosely based on Sam Lake, Remedy's lead writer, and he writes a novel starring himself as the protagonist. And to top it off, Sam Lake also appears as... Sam Lake during Alan Wake's late show interview... See also the {{Take That}} since, for ''Max Payne ''VideoGame/MaxPayne 1'', Sam Lake did double duty as the basis for Max's face.



** A subtle one. As mentioned above, the character from [[StoryWithinAStory Alan's books, Alex Casey]], is an [[CaptainErsatz Erzatz]] of Max Payne. In the last book Alan wrote he killed off Alex, seeming to imply that Sam Lake has washed his hands off the character and wants no part in ''Max Payne 3'', which is being developed by Rockstar Vancouver rather than Remedy (and that interpretation would seem to imply that, in turn, ''Max Payne'' has technically become a FranchiseZombie to him.). For that matter, Thomas Zane and Alex Casey are voiced by Max Payne's voice actor.

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** A subtle one. As mentioned above, the character from [[StoryWithinAStory Alan's books, Alex Casey]], is an [[CaptainErsatz Erzatz]] of Max Payne. In the last book Alan wrote he killed off Alex, seeming to imply that Sam Lake has washed his hands off the character and wants no part in ''Max Payne 3'', ''VideoGame/MaxPayne3'', which is being developed by Rockstar Vancouver rather than Remedy (and that interpretation would seem to imply that, in turn, ''Max Payne'' has technically become a FranchiseZombie to him.). For that matter, Thomas Zane and Alex Casey are voiced by Max Payne's voice actor.



** Could also double as a slightly self-deprecating ShoutOut to the {{Max Payne}} series, in which [[spoiler:Max's ally from the first game, Vladimir Lem, becomes the villain of the second.]]

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** Could also double as a slightly self-deprecating ShoutOut to the {{Max VideoGame/{{Max Payne}} series, in which [[spoiler:Max's ally from the first game, Vladimir Lem, becomes the villain of the second.]]

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* GiantSpider: One of the new enemy types. They're "only" about the size of a puppy, but that's pretty damn big for a spider.

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* MissionPackSequel: ''American Nightmare'' is basically a simpler, budget priced arcade-like combat game made using the assets and engine from ''Alan Wake''.


* EliteMooks: Some of the Taken are more powerful than others. It takes much longer to burn off the darkness protecting them, some of them can turn invisible and run around you at high speed, and some are big and have nasty weapons.

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* EliteMooks: Some of the Taken are more powerful than others. It takes much longer to burn off the darkness protecting them, some of them can turn invisible and run around you at high speed, and some are extra big and have nasty weapons.wield chainsaws.


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* GiantMook: Large Taken are burly, axe-wielding lumberjacks and firefighters who stand a good head taller than normal, can take more damage, and sometimes charge at you like a bull. Extra-Large Taken wield chainsaws and can take even more damage.

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* ArmorPiercingAttack: Taken are immune to almost everything except light as long as the cloud of darkness surrounding them is still intact, being able to stop bullets and even stop a ramming Ford pickup in its tracks. However, they can still be electrocuted in this state, which serves as a OneHitKill.

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* KingMook: Taken created from named characters (i.e. Stucky or Ranger Rusty) are probably the toughest enemies in the game, having the most health and the FlashStep ability of the EliteMooks type enemies.


* InformedAbility: Some people find Alan's writing too cheesy to believe that he's a best-selling writer. Apart from the well-documented fact that there is no necessary connection between commercial success and literary quality, one of the first things we learn about Alan is that he has deep-seated fears of having become, or perhaps having always been, a talentless hack. [[spoiler: In addition, he wasn't exactly ''sane'' when he wrote Departure, and it has all the qualities of a lackluster ''first draft'': he hasn't had the chance to polish it yet, which is just as important as the writing.]]

to:

* InformedAbility: Some people find Alan's writing too cheesy to believe that he's a best-selling writer. Apart from the well-documented fact that there is no necessary connection between commercial success and literary quality, one of the first things we learn about Alan is that he has deep-seated fears of having become, or perhaps having he's deeply afraid he's become (or always been, was) a talentless hack. [[spoiler: In addition, he wasn't exactly ''sane'' when he wrote Departure, and it has all the qualities of a lackluster ''first draft'': he hasn't had the chance to polish it yet, which is just as important as the writing. And he's writing outside of his usual genre.]]



* SpiritualSuccessor: To ''VideoGame/MaxPayne'', loosely.

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* SpiritualSuccessor: To ''VideoGame/MaxPayne'', loosely. While MP was inspired by FilmNoir books and novels, AW is inspired by supernatural thrillers (of screens large and small) and horror writers like Stephen King.


* FlareGun: Against the [[LogicalWeakness light-hating enemies]], this is functionally equivalent to a rocket launcher, easily destroying whole groups of weaker enemies and producing enough light to drive away any survivors. You won't find much ammo for it, but it comes in very handy when you get swarmed.
** Episode Six is an exception, [[SuspiciousVideoGameGenerosity where plenty of ammo becomes available for it]].

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* FlareGun: Against the [[LogicalWeakness light-hating enemies]], this is functionally equivalent to a rocket launcher, easily destroying whole groups of weaker enemies and producing enough light to drive away any survivors. You won't find much ammo for it, it ([[SuspiciousVideoGameGenerosity outside of the sixth episode]]), but it comes in very handy when you get swarmed.
** Episode Six is an exception, [[SuspiciousVideoGameGenerosity where plenty of ammo becomes available for it]].
swarmed.



* HeavyMithril: The two songs by Old Gods of Asgard imply that they're this. Their name and their decorating tastes pretty much confirms it. Also, Music/PoetsOfTheFall, which even has a song that's playing in the middle of one of the more difficult fights in the game.
** It's worth mentioning that the two songs by the Old Gods are performed by Poets of the Fall.

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* HeavyMithril: The two songs by Old Gods of Asgard imply that they're this. Their name and their decorating tastes pretty much confirms it. Also, Music/PoetsOfTheFall, which even has a song that's playing in the middle of one of the more difficult fights in the game.
** It's worth
game. Worth mentioning as well that the two songs by the Old Gods are performed by Poets of the Fall.



** In a rather subtle example, Dr. Hartman starts wearing a splint on his nose after Alan punches him. For a writer, he must have a ''mean'' right hook.
*** Actually, one of the manuscript pages reveals Alan punched him ''again'' after Hartman captured him.

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** In a rather subtle example, Dr. Hartman starts wearing a splint on his nose after Alan punches him. For him (once that we see, then once more according to a writer, he must have a ''mean'' right hook.
*** Actually, one of the
manuscript pages reveals Alan punched him ''again'' after Hartman captured him.page).



* IdiotBall:
** Suuuuure, Alan, going into the ''very'' dark trailer owned by the monotone-speaking person who knows you're looking for manuscript pages even though you never told them is ''obviously'' the smart thing to do!

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* IdiotBall:
**
IdiotBall: Suuuuure, Alan, going into the ''very'' dark trailer owned by the monotone-speaking person who knows you're looking for manuscript pages even though you never told them is ''obviously'' the smart thing to do!



* OneBulletClips: Justified, as none of the guns use magazines, and so each bullet has to be loaded one at a time.

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* OneBulletClips: Justified, as none of the guns use detachable magazines, and so each bullet has to be loaded one at a time.

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