Follow TV Tropes

Following

History UsefulNotes / TheSeventhCavalry

Go To



Their theme song is "Garryowen". Indian people are just about as fond of this tune as Jews are of the ''Horst Wessel Lied''. In 1998 the Native American women's a capella group ''Ulali'' performed a TakeThat by appropriating "Garryowen" as a traditional choral chant. It forms the background to a poem celebrating the survival of Indian people, and is the song played over the closing credits to ''Film/SmokeSignals''.

to:

Their theme song is "Garryowen". Indian First Nations people are just about as fond of this tune as the Jews are of the Nazi ''Horst Wessel Lied''. In 1998 the Native American women's a capella group ''Ulali'' performed a TakeThat by appropriating "Garryowen" as a traditional choral chant. It forms the background to a poem celebrating the survival of Indian people, and is the song played over the closing credits to ''Film/SmokeSignals''.

Added DiffLines:

[[quoteright:350:https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/7th_cavalry.jpg]]


The Seventh Cavalry Regiment was one of the major military forces deployed by the U.S. in the Wild West. As soldiers of the U.S. army, their enemy was often the Indians, as they were in RealLife. It was the unfortunate regiment to be beaten in the Battle of Little Bighorn and responsible for the Wounded Knee Massacre of December 29, 1890[[note]] The exact circumstances of the massacre are lost to history, but it began when a deaf Mineconjou warrior named Black Coyote [[PoorCommunicationKills did not understand]] what was going on and refused to surrender his rifle. A shot was fired and some of the cavalrymen panicked and opened fire. Further details are subject to [[UnreliableNarrator unreliable narrators]], as almost all of the Indians who witnessed the start of the incident were killed, the regimentís senior officers lied in official testimony to cover their own asses, and the "yellow" press falsely painted the massacre as a great battle against the savage Indian. The incontrovertible facts are that at least 150Ėpossibly as many as 300ĖMineconjou and Hunkpapa Lakota were killed, many of them women and children, almost all of them unarmed and simply trying to reach safety, and that some of the cavalrymen chased them down on horseback and shot them at point-blank range. The 7th Cavalry suffered 25 dead and 35 wounded, which was officially cited as proof of hostile resistance, but most (if not all) of them were hit by friendly fire. While many who werenít there called it payback for Little Bighorn, many of the troopers present at Wounded Knee would later express remorse for it. General Nelson Miles was horrified by the massacre and blamed the regimentís commander, Colonel James Forsyth, and relieved him of command, but the federal government quickly reinstated Forsyth as part of its effort to cover up the massacre and avoid bad publicity[[/note]]. Historically, the entire regiment was ''not'' wiped out at Little Bighorn, as CommonKnowledge would have you believe. True, the five companies personally led by General George Armstrong Custer were killed to a man, but the other half of the regiment under Major Marcus Reno[[note]] Reno was accused of cowardice (not least by Libby Custer) afterwards. An official Court of Inquiry cleared his name, but his reputation was irreparably tarnished[[/note]] withdrew to a defensible position and survived. The massacre is often attributed to Custer being a GloryHound (which he was), but poor intelligence drastically underestimating Sitting Bullís numbers and a decision to leave the regimentís heavy weapons behind (based on the poor intelligence) played a significant role as well.

to:

The Seventh Cavalry Regiment was one of the major military forces deployed by the U.S. United States in the Wild West.TheWildWest. As soldiers of the U.S. army, Army, their enemy was often the Indians, as they were in RealLife. It was the unfortunate regiment to be beaten in the Battle of Little Bighorn and responsible for the Wounded Knee Massacre of December 29, 1890[[note]] The exact circumstances of the massacre are lost to history, but it began when a deaf Mineconjou warrior named Black Coyote [[PoorCommunicationKills did not understand]] what was going on and refused to surrender his rifle. A shot was fired and some of the cavalrymen panicked and opened fire. Further details are subject to [[UnreliableNarrator unreliable narrators]], as almost all of the Indians who witnessed the start of the incident were killed, the regimentís senior officers lied in official testimony to cover their own asses, and the "yellow" press falsely painted the massacre as a great battle against the savage Indian. The incontrovertible facts are that at least 150Ėpossibly as many as 300ĖMineconjou and Hunkpapa Lakota were killed, many of them women and children, almost all of them unarmed and simply trying to reach safety, and that some of the cavalrymen chased them down on horseback and shot them at point-blank range. The 7th Cavalry suffered 25 dead and 35 wounded, which was officially cited as proof of hostile resistance, but most (if not all) of them were hit by friendly fire. While many who werenít there called it payback for Little Bighorn, many of the troopers present at Wounded Knee would later express remorse for it. General Nelson Miles was horrified by the massacre and blamed the regimentís commander, Colonel James Forsyth, and relieved him of command, but the federal government quickly reinstated Forsyth as part of its effort to cover up the massacre and avoid bad publicity[[/note]]. Historically, the entire regiment was ''not'' wiped out at Little Bighorn, as CommonKnowledge would have you believe. True, the five companies personally led by General George Armstrong Custer were killed to a man, but the other half of the regiment under Major Marcus Reno[[note]] Reno was accused of cowardice (not least by Libby Custer) afterwards. An official Court of Inquiry cleared his name, but his reputation was irreparably tarnished[[/note]] withdrew to a defensible position and survived. The massacre is often attributed to Custer being a GloryHound (which he was), but poor intelligence drastically underestimating Sitting Bullís numbers and a decision to leave the regimentís heavy weapons behind (based on the poor intelligence) played a significant role as well.


The Seventh Cavalry Regiment was one of the major military forces deployed by the U.S. in the Wild West. As soldiers of the U.S. army, their enemy was often the Indians, as they were in RealLife. It was the unfortunate regiment to be beaten in the Battle of Little Bighorn and responsible for the Wounded Knee Massacre of December 29, 1890[[note]] The exact circumstances of the massacre are lost to history, but it began when a deaf Mineconjou warrior named Black Coyote [[PoorCommunicationKills did not understand]] what was going on and refused to surrender his rifle. A shot was fired and some of the cavalrymen panicked and opened fire. Further details are subject to [[UnreliableNarrator unreliable narrators]], as almost all of the Indians who witnessed the start of the incident were killed, the regimentís senior officers lied in official testimony to cover their own asses, and the "yellow" press falsely painted the massacre as a great battle against the savage Indian. The incontrovertible facts are that at least 150Ėpossibly as many as 300ĖMineconjou and Hunkpapa Lakota were killed, many of them women and children, almost all of them unarmed and simply trying to reach safety, and that some of the cavalrymen chased them down on horseback and shot them at point-blank range. The 7th Cavalry suffered 25 dead and 35 wounded, which was officially cited as proof of hostile resistance, but most (if not all) of them were hit by friendly fire. While many who werenít there called it payback for Little Bighorn, many of the troopers present at Wounded Knee would later express remorse for it. General Nelson Miles was horrified by the massacre and blamed the regimentís commander, Colonel James Forsyth, and relieved him of command, but the federal government quickly reinstated Forsyth as part of its effort to cover up the massacre and avoid bad publicity[[/note]]. Historically, the entire regiment was ''not'' wiped out at Little Bighorn. The five companies personally led by Custer were killed to a man, but the other half of the regiment under Major Marcus Reno[[note]] Reno was accused of cowardice (not least by Libby Custer) afterwards. An official Court of Inquiry cleared his name, but his reputation was irreparably tarnished[[/note]] withdrew to a defensible position and survived. The massacre is often attributed to Custer being a GloryHound (which he was), but poor intelligence drastically underestimating Sitting Bullís numbers and a decision to leave the regimentís heavy weapons behind (based on the poor intelligence) played a significant role as well.

to:

The Seventh Cavalry Regiment was one of the major military forces deployed by the U.S. in the Wild West. As soldiers of the U.S. army, their enemy was often the Indians, as they were in RealLife. It was the unfortunate regiment to be beaten in the Battle of Little Bighorn and responsible for the Wounded Knee Massacre of December 29, 1890[[note]] The exact circumstances of the massacre are lost to history, but it began when a deaf Mineconjou warrior named Black Coyote [[PoorCommunicationKills did not understand]] what was going on and refused to surrender his rifle. A shot was fired and some of the cavalrymen panicked and opened fire. Further details are subject to [[UnreliableNarrator unreliable narrators]], as almost all of the Indians who witnessed the start of the incident were killed, the regimentís senior officers lied in official testimony to cover their own asses, and the "yellow" press falsely painted the massacre as a great battle against the savage Indian. The incontrovertible facts are that at least 150Ėpossibly as many as 300ĖMineconjou and Hunkpapa Lakota were killed, many of them women and children, almost all of them unarmed and simply trying to reach safety, and that some of the cavalrymen chased them down on horseback and shot them at point-blank range. The 7th Cavalry suffered 25 dead and 35 wounded, which was officially cited as proof of hostile resistance, but most (if not all) of them were hit by friendly fire. While many who werenít there called it payback for Little Bighorn, many of the troopers present at Wounded Knee would later express remorse for it. General Nelson Miles was horrified by the massacre and blamed the regimentís commander, Colonel James Forsyth, and relieved him of command, but the federal government quickly reinstated Forsyth as part of its effort to cover up the massacre and avoid bad publicity[[/note]]. Historically, the entire regiment was ''not'' wiped out at Little Bighorn. The Bighorn, as CommonKnowledge would have you believe. True, the five companies personally led by General George Armstrong Custer were killed to a man, but the other half of the regiment under Major Marcus Reno[[note]] Reno was accused of cowardice (not least by Libby Custer) afterwards. An official Court of Inquiry cleared his name, but his reputation was irreparably tarnished[[/note]] withdrew to a defensible position and survived. The massacre is often attributed to Custer being a GloryHound (which he was), but poor intelligence drastically underestimating Sitting Bullís numbers and a decision to leave the regimentís heavy weapons behind (based on the poor intelligence) played a significant role as well.


It should be noted that the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seventh_Cavalry_Regiment United States Army Seventh Cavalry Regiment]] is still an active unit and has served with distinction in UsefulNotes/WorldWarII and UsefulNotes/TheVietnamWar, in particular the Battle of the Ia Drang Valley which was immortalized in ''Film/WeWereSoldiers''. The Army ROTC unit at the [[MilitaryAcademy New Mexico Military Institute]] wears the unit crest of the 7th Cavalry Regiment.

to:

It should be noted that the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seventh_Cavalry_Regiment org/wiki/7th_Cavalry_Regiment United States Army Seventh Cavalry Regiment]] is still an active unit and has served with distinction in UsefulNotes/WorldWarII and UsefulNotes/TheVietnamWar, in particular the Battle of the Ia Drang Valley which was immortalized in ''Film/WeWereSoldiers''. The Army ROTC unit at the [[MilitaryAcademy New Mexico Military Institute]] wears the unit crest of the 7th Cavalry Regiment.


It should be noted that the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seventh_Cavalry United States Army Seventh Cavalry Regiment]] is still an active unit and has served with distinction in UsefulNotes/WorldWarII and UsefulNotes/TheVietnamWar, in particular the Battle of the Ia Drang Valley which was immortalized in ''Film/WeWereSoldiers''. The Army ROTC unit at the [[MilitaryAcademy New Mexico Military Institute]] wears the unit crest of the 7th Cavalry Regiment.

to:

It should be noted that the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seventh_Cavalry org/wiki/Seventh_Cavalry_Regiment United States Army Seventh Cavalry Regiment]] is still an active unit and has served with distinction in UsefulNotes/WorldWarII and UsefulNotes/TheVietnamWar, in particular the Battle of the Ia Drang Valley which was immortalized in ''Film/WeWereSoldiers''. The Army ROTC unit at the [[MilitaryAcademy New Mexico Military Institute]] wears the unit crest of the 7th Cavalry Regiment.


The Seventh Cavalry Regiment was one of the major military forces deployed by the U.S. in the Wild West. As soldiers of the U.S. army, their enemy was often the Indians, as they were in RealLife. It was the unfortunate regiment to be beaten in the Battle of Little Bighorn and responsible for the Wounded Knee Massacre. Historically, the entire regiment was ''not'' wiped out at Little Bighorn. The five companies personally led by Custer were killed to a man, but the other half of the regiment under Major Marcus Reno withdrew to a defensible position and survived. The massacre is often attributed to Custer being a GloryHound (which he was), but poor intelligence drastically underestimating Sitting Bullís numbers and a decision to leave the regimentís heavy weapons behind (based on the poor intelligence) played a significant role as well.

They were often given an idealized portrayal in older media, while more recent works usually lean heavily to the opposite extreme. Neither is particularly close to RealLife. When Indians are involved, they are seen as organized thugs who make the lives of the Indians miserable. For the average citizen in a Western Town, expect some twisted form of martial law be carried out by this group. KickTheDog and ShootTheDog is standard procedure for the Seventh Calvary. Often the leader of the antagonists will be the Lieutenant of the regiment who is more often than not a CavalryOfficer, acting as the brain behind the attacks against the Indians and consisting mostly of GeneralRipper and TheNeidermeyer type characters.

to:

The Seventh Cavalry Regiment was one of the major military forces deployed by the U.S. in the Wild West. As soldiers of the U.S. army, their enemy was often the Indians, as they were in RealLife. It was the unfortunate regiment to be beaten in the Battle of Little Bighorn and responsible for the Wounded Knee Massacre.Massacre of December 29, 1890[[note]] The exact circumstances of the massacre are lost to history, but it began when a deaf Mineconjou warrior named Black Coyote [[PoorCommunicationKills did not understand]] what was going on and refused to surrender his rifle. A shot was fired and some of the cavalrymen panicked and opened fire. Further details are subject to [[UnreliableNarrator unreliable narrators]], as almost all of the Indians who witnessed the start of the incident were killed, the regimentís senior officers lied in official testimony to cover their own asses, and the "yellow" press falsely painted the massacre as a great battle against the savage Indian. The incontrovertible facts are that at least 150Ėpossibly as many as 300ĖMineconjou and Hunkpapa Lakota were killed, many of them women and children, almost all of them unarmed and simply trying to reach safety, and that some of the cavalrymen chased them down on horseback and shot them at point-blank range. The 7th Cavalry suffered 25 dead and 35 wounded, which was officially cited as proof of hostile resistance, but most (if not all) of them were hit by friendly fire. While many who werenít there called it payback for Little Bighorn, many of the troopers present at Wounded Knee would later express remorse for it. General Nelson Miles was horrified by the massacre and blamed the regimentís commander, Colonel James Forsyth, and relieved him of command, but the federal government quickly reinstated Forsyth as part of its effort to cover up the massacre and avoid bad publicity[[/note]]. Historically, the entire regiment was ''not'' wiped out at Little Bighorn. The five companies personally led by Custer were killed to a man, but the other half of the regiment under Major Marcus Reno[[note]] Reno was accused of cowardice (not least by Libby Custer) afterwards. An official Court of Inquiry cleared his name, but his reputation was irreparably tarnished[[/note]] withdrew to a defensible position and survived. The massacre is often attributed to Custer being a GloryHound (which he was), but poor intelligence drastically underestimating Sitting Bullís numbers and a decision to leave the regimentís heavy weapons behind (based on the poor intelligence) played a significant role as well.

They were often given an idealized portrayal in older media, while more recent works usually lean heavily to the opposite extreme. Neither is particularly close to RealLife. When Indians are involved, they are seen as organized thugs who make the lives of the Indians miserable. For the average citizen in a Western Town, expect some twisted form of martial law be carried out by this group. KickTheDog and ShootTheDog is standard procedure for the Seventh Calvary. Often the leader of the antagonists will be the Lieutenant of the regiment who is more often than not a CavalryOfficer, acting as the brain behind the attacks against the Indians and consisting mostly of GeneralRipper and TheNeidermeyer type characters. Expect Custer, if he appears, to get a HistoricalVillainUpgrade[[note]] While his conduct was by no means above reproach, Custer was apparently surprisingly sympathetic to the Indians in principle, which didnít do his career any favors. This probably contributed to his [[GloryHound gloryhounding]] against the Sioux as, despite his sympathies, Custer was very ambitious and had his sights set on General rank and likely a political career post-retirement. Like many controversial historical figures, George Armstrong Custer was neither a shining hero nor a sneering ObviouslyEvil villain[[/note]].


The Seventh Cavalry Regiment was one of the major military forces deployed by the U.S. in the Wild West. As soldiers of the U.S. army, their enemy was often the Indians, as they were in RealLife. It was the unfortunate regiment to be beaten in the Battle of Little Bighorn and responsible for the Wounded Knee Massacre.

They are rarely portrayed in a positive light these days. When Indians are involved, they are seen as organized thugs who make the lives of the Indians miserable. For the average citizen in a Western Town, expect some twisted form of martial law be carried out by this group. KickTheDog and ShootTheDog is standard procedure for the Seventh Calvary. Often the leader of the antagonists will be the Lieutenant of the regiment who is more often than not a CavalryOfficer, acting as the brain behind the attacks against the Indians and consisting mostly of GeneralRipper and TheNeidermeyer type characters.

to:

The Seventh Cavalry Regiment was one of the major military forces deployed by the U.S. in the Wild West. As soldiers of the U.S. army, their enemy was often the Indians, as they were in RealLife. It was the unfortunate regiment to be beaten in the Battle of Little Bighorn and responsible for the Wounded Knee Massacre.

Massacre. Historically, the entire regiment was ''not'' wiped out at Little Bighorn. The five companies personally led by Custer were killed to a man, but the other half of the regiment under Major Marcus Reno withdrew to a defensible position and survived. The massacre is often attributed to Custer being a GloryHound (which he was), but poor intelligence drastically underestimating Sitting Bullís numbers and a decision to leave the regimentís heavy weapons behind (based on the poor intelligence) played a significant role as well.

They are rarely portrayed were often given an idealized portrayal in a positive light these days.older media, while more recent works usually lean heavily to the opposite extreme. Neither is particularly close to RealLife. When Indians are involved, they are seen as organized thugs who make the lives of the Indians miserable. For the average citizen in a Western Town, expect some twisted form of martial law be carried out by this group. KickTheDog and ShootTheDog is standard procedure for the Seventh Calvary. Often the leader of the antagonists will be the Lieutenant of the regiment who is more often than not a CavalryOfficer, acting as the brain behind the attacks against the Indians and consisting mostly of GeneralRipper and TheNeidermeyer type characters.


It should be noted that the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seventh_Cavalry United States Army Seventh Cavalry Regiment]] is still an active unit and has served with distinction in UsefulNotes/WorldWarII and UsefulNotes/TheVietnamWar, in particular the Battle of the Ia Drang Valley which was immortalized in ''WeWereSoldiers''. The Army ROTC unit at the [[MilitaryAcademy New Mexico Military Institute]] wears the unit crest of the 7th Cavalry Regiment.

to:

It should be noted that the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seventh_Cavalry United States Army Seventh Cavalry Regiment]] is still an active unit and has served with distinction in UsefulNotes/WorldWarII and UsefulNotes/TheVietnamWar, in particular the Battle of the Ia Drang Valley which was immortalized in ''WeWereSoldiers''.''Film/WeWereSoldiers''. The Army ROTC unit at the [[MilitaryAcademy New Mexico Military Institute]] wears the unit crest of the 7th Cavalry Regiment.


It should be noted that the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seventh_Cavalry United States Army Seventh Cavalry Regiment]] is still an active unit and has served with distinction in WorldWarII and TheVietnamWar, in particular the Battle of the Ia Drang Valley which was immortalized in ''WeWereSoldiers''. The Army ROTC unit at the [[MilitaryAcademy New Mexico Military Institute]] wears the unit crest of the 7th Cavalry Regiment.

to:

It should be noted that the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seventh_Cavalry United States Army Seventh Cavalry Regiment]] is still an active unit and has served with distinction in WorldWarII UsefulNotes/WorldWarII and TheVietnamWar, UsefulNotes/TheVietnamWar, in particular the Battle of the Ia Drang Valley which was immortalized in ''WeWereSoldiers''. The Army ROTC unit at the [[MilitaryAcademy New Mexico Military Institute]] wears the unit crest of the 7th Cavalry Regiment.

Added DiffLines:

Their theme song is "Garryowen". Indian people are just about as fond of this tune as Jews are of the ''Horst Wessel Lied''. In 1998 the Native American women's a capella group ''Ulali'' performed a TakeThat by appropriating "Garryowen" as a traditional choral chant. It forms the background to a poem celebrating the survival of Indian people, and is the song played over the closing credits to ''Film/SmokeSignals''.

Added DiffLines:

The Seventh Cavalry Regiment was one of the major military forces deployed by the U.S. in the Wild West. As soldiers of the U.S. army, their enemy was often the Indians, as they were in RealLife. It was the unfortunate regiment to be beaten in the Battle of Little Bighorn and responsible for the Wounded Knee Massacre.

They are rarely portrayed in a positive light these days. When Indians are involved, they are seen as organized thugs who make the lives of the Indians miserable. For the average citizen in a Western Town, expect some twisted form of martial law be carried out by this group. KickTheDog and ShootTheDog is standard procedure for the Seventh Calvary. Often the leader of the antagonists will be the Lieutenant of the regiment who is more often than not a CavalryOfficer, acting as the brain behind the attacks against the Indians and consisting mostly of GeneralRipper and TheNeidermeyer type characters.

It should be noted that the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seventh_Cavalry United States Army Seventh Cavalry Regiment]] is still an active unit and has served with distinction in WorldWarII and TheVietnamWar, in particular the Battle of the Ia Drang Valley which was immortalized in ''WeWereSoldiers''. The Army ROTC unit at the [[MilitaryAcademy New Mexico Military Institute]] wears the unit crest of the 7th Cavalry Regiment.

[[BattleCry GARRYOWEN!]]

Showing 12 edit(s) of 12

Top

How well does it match the trope?

Example of:

/

Media sources:

/

Report