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** Also by Morrison, ''[[ComicBook/AllStarDCComics All-Star]] [[ComicBook/AllStarSuperman Superman]],'' an AlternateUniverse take on {{Superman}} that uses various Silver Age tropes to tell the story of a Superman who is nearing the end of his life. Also notable for the scene in which Superman punches out the Tyrant Sun.

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** Also by Morrison, ''[[ComicBook/AllStarDCComics All-Star]] [[ComicBook/AllStarSuperman Superman]],'' an AlternateUniverse take on {{Superman}} Franchise/{{Superman}} that uses various Silver Age tropes to tell the story of a Superman who is nearing the end of his life. Also notable for the scene in which Superman punches out the Tyrant Sun.


* ''Comicbook/CivilWar'', which combined a long-term change to the status quo of the MarvelUniverse with an attempt at large-scale political commentary.

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* ''Comicbook/CivilWar'', which combined a long-term change to the status quo of the MarvelUniverse Franchise/MarvelUniverse with an attempt at large-scale political commentary.


This effort with animation from both DC and Marvel helped spawn the new flow of superhero blockbusters, including the ''SpiderMan'' films, ''Film/TheDarkKnightSaga'', and ''Film/{{Watchmen}}'', among others. The Iron Age carries probably some of the greatest public awareness of superheroes than any other age due to the nice fresh starts, many an animated series, and successful blockbusters all getting the word out about this medium, fostering a new generation of ComicBook fans.

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This effort with animation from both DC and Marvel helped spawn the new flow of superhero blockbusters, including the ''SpiderMan'' films, ''Film/TheDarkKnightSaga'', ''Film/SpiderManTrilogy'', ''Film/TheDarkKnightTrilogy'', and ''Film/{{Watchmen}}'', among others. The Iron Age carries probably some of the greatest public awareness of superheroes than any other age due to the nice fresh starts, many an animated series, and successful blockbusters all getting the word out about this medium, fostering a new generation of ComicBook fans.


Speaking of ridiculous, Creator/MarvelComics was beginning to struggle majorly with its properties, especially SpiderMan, who was knee deep in the ContinuitySnarl that was the Clone Saga. Perhaps trying to find wiggle room continuity-wise and to provide sources of much needed revenue, Marvel created such shows as ''WesternAnimation/SpiderManTheAnimatedSeries'', the ''WesternAnimation/XMen'' animated series, WesternAnimation/TheIncredibleHulk animated series, the ''WesternAnimation/FantasticFour'' animated series and the IronMan animated series. Perhaps encouraged with the success of these works set in a alternate continuity and the potential new audience that was fostered by it, they gave the new universe thing a try again in 2000 with ''ComicBook/UltimateMarvel'', and sales returned once again.

to:

Speaking of ridiculous, Creator/MarvelComics was beginning to struggle majorly with its properties, especially SpiderMan, ComicBook/SpiderMan, who was knee deep in the ContinuitySnarl that was the Clone Saga. Perhaps trying to find wiggle room continuity-wise and to provide sources of much needed revenue, Marvel created such shows as ''WesternAnimation/SpiderManTheAnimatedSeries'', the ''WesternAnimation/XMen'' animated series, WesternAnimation/TheIncredibleHulk animated series, the ''WesternAnimation/FantasticFour'' animated series and the IronMan animated series. Perhaps encouraged with the success of these works set in a alternate continuity and the potential new audience that was fostered by it, they gave the new universe thing a try again in 2000 with ''ComicBook/UltimateMarvel'', and sales returned once again.


The Iron Age of Comic Books is a different interpretation of comic history that sees the UsefulNotes/TheDarkAgeOfComicBooks and UsefulNotes/TheModernAgeOfComicBooks as one period. This age can be defined with its {{Retcon}}s, {{Reboot}}s, {{Retool}}s and {{Alternate Universe}}s that were deemed necessary after about fifty years of accumulated continuity threatening to create a ContinuityLockOut to new readers.

to:

The Iron Age of Comic Books is a different interpretation of comic history that sees the UsefulNotes/TheDarkAgeOfComicBooks and UsefulNotes/TheModernAgeOfComicBooks as one period. This age can be defined with its {{Retcon}}s, {{Reboot}}s, [[ContinuityReboot Reboots]], {{Retool}}s and {{Alternate Universe}}s that were deemed necessary after about fifty years of accumulated continuity threatening to create a ContinuityLockOut to new readers.


** Also by Morrison, ''[[ComicBook/AllStarDCComics All-Star]] [[ComicBook/AllStarSuperman Superman]],'' an AlternateUniverse take on {{Superman}} that uses various Silver Age tropes to tell the story of a Superman who is nearing the end of his life. Also notable for the scene in which [[CrowningMomentOfAwesome Superman punches out the Tyrant Sun.]]

to:

** Also by Morrison, ''[[ComicBook/AllStarDCComics All-Star]] [[ComicBook/AllStarSuperman Superman]],'' an AlternateUniverse take on {{Superman}} that uses various Silver Age tropes to tell the story of a Superman who is nearing the end of his life. Also notable for the scene in which [[CrowningMomentOfAwesome Superman punches out the Tyrant Sun.]]


-->--''Film/{{Superman}}'' Tagline

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-->--''Film/{{Superman}}'' Tagline
-->-- '''''Film/SupermanTheMovie'' {{Tagline}}'''



This zeitgeist of attempted plausibility and new found seriousness in superhero comic books is reflected in Creator/AlanMoore's ''[[{{Deconstruction}} Watchmen]]'' and Creator/FrankMiller's ''Comicbook/BatmanTheDarkKnightReturns'', both released in 1986. As well, the DC imprint Creator/VertigoComics also followed suit in tone, coming to its zenith with ''ComicBook/TheSandman'' in 1989. The turn to seriousness, especially in ''Comicbook/BatmanTheDarkKnightReturns'' also inspired the efforts of the Film/{{Batman}} film in 1989 and ''WesternAnimation/BatmanTheAnimatedSeries'' in 1992.

to:

This zeitgeist of attempted plausibility and new found seriousness in superhero comic books is reflected in Creator/AlanMoore's ''[[{{Deconstruction}} Watchmen]]'' and Creator/FrankMiller's ''Comicbook/BatmanTheDarkKnightReturns'', both released in 1986. As well, the DC imprint Creator/VertigoComics also followed suit in tone, coming to its zenith with ''ComicBook/TheSandman'' in 1989. The turn to seriousness, especially in ''Comicbook/BatmanTheDarkKnightReturns'' also inspired the efforts of the Film/{{Batman}} ''Film/{{Batman|1989}}'' film in 1989 and ''WesternAnimation/BatmanTheAnimatedSeries'' in 1992.



* ''ThePunisher'' (This pre-existing ultra-violent AntiHero VigilanteMan's stock went way, way up)

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* ''ThePunisher'' ''ComicBook/ThePunisher'' (This pre-existing ultra-violent AntiHero VigilanteMan's stock went way, way up)



** Other Dark Age ''Franchise/{{Batman}}'' stories include ''Comicbook/TheKillingJoke'', ''A Death in the Family'', and ''ComicBook/{{Knightfall}}''. The first modern Film/{{Batman}} movie also came out during this era.
* ''{{Wolverine}}'', like the Punisher and Batman, was a preexisting hero who attained new heights of popularity because he fit the grim and gritty trend; his regular series began in 1988, and WolverinePublicity spread like Kudzu.

to:

** Other Dark Age ''Franchise/{{Batman}}'' stories include ''Comicbook/TheKillingJoke'', ''A Death in the Family'', and ''ComicBook/{{Knightfall}}''. The first modern Film/{{Batman}} ''Film/{{Batman|1989}}'' movie also came out during this era.
* ''{{Wolverine}}'', ''ComicBook/{{Wolverine}}'', like the Punisher and Batman, was a preexisting hero who attained new heights of popularity because he fit the grim and gritty trend; his regular series began in 1988, and WolverinePublicity spread like Kudzu.


* Grant Morrison's ''[[JusticeLeagueOfAmerica JLA]]'', which brought back the bright, shiny heroes in huge, epic plots. Began in 1997, one year after ComicBook/KingdomCome, and helped to [[TropeCodifier Codify]] many of the concepts and trends introduced by ComicBook/KingdomCome, and did more to [[{{Reconstruction}} Reconstruct]] the Main DCU than any other series.

to:

* Grant Morrison's ''[[JusticeLeagueOfAmerica ''[[ComicBook/JusticeLeagueOfAmerica JLA]]'', which brought back the bright, shiny heroes in huge, epic plots. Began in 1997, one year after ComicBook/KingdomCome, and helped to [[TropeCodifier Codify]] many of the concepts and trends introduced by ComicBook/KingdomCome, and did more to [[{{Reconstruction}} Reconstruct]] the Main DCU than any other series.

Added DiffLines:

* ''ComicBook/{{Thunderbolts}}'': Marvel's team of villains trying to go good, this was considered by many to be the answer to DC's own ''ComicBook/SuicideSquad'', yet is more optimistic in that the villains ''willingly'' become good guys instead.


Speaking of ridiculous, Creator/MarvelComics was beginning to struggle majorly with its properties, especially SpiderMan, who was knee deep in the ContinuitySnarl that was the Clone Saga. Perhaps trying to find wiggle room continuity-wise and to provide sources of much needed revenue, Marvel created such shows as ''WesternAnimation/SpiderManTheAnimatedSeries'', the ''WesternAnimation/XMen'' animated series, the IncredibleHulk animated series, the ''WesternAnimation/FantasticFour'' animated series and the IronMan animated series. Perhaps encouraged with the success of these works set in a alternate continuity and the potential new audience that was fostered by it, they gave the new universe thing a try again in 2000 with ''ComicBook/UltimateMarvel'', and sales returned once again.

to:

Speaking of ridiculous, Creator/MarvelComics was beginning to struggle majorly with its properties, especially SpiderMan, who was knee deep in the ContinuitySnarl that was the Clone Saga. Perhaps trying to find wiggle room continuity-wise and to provide sources of much needed revenue, Marvel created such shows as ''WesternAnimation/SpiderManTheAnimatedSeries'', the ''WesternAnimation/XMen'' animated series, the IncredibleHulk WesternAnimation/TheIncredibleHulk animated series, the ''WesternAnimation/FantasticFour'' animated series and the IronMan animated series. Perhaps encouraged with the success of these works set in a alternate continuity and the potential new audience that was fostered by it, they gave the new universe thing a try again in 2000 with ''ComicBook/UltimateMarvel'', and sales returned once again.


* ''{{Spawn}}'' (The scion of Creator/{{Image}} and the model for its many imitators)

to:

* ''{{Spawn}}'' ''ComicBook/{{Spawn}}'' (The scion of Creator/{{Image}} and the model for its many imitators)


Perhaps because of the new blank slate attitude that prevailed ComicBook/PostCrisis, new comic book companies remerged, like Creator/DarkHorseComics in 1986 and Creator/ValiantComics in 1989. They published such acclaimed works as ''ComicBook/{{Hellboy}}'' and ''ComicBook/SinCity'', as well as releasing works like ''Manga/{{Akira}}'', perhaps because this tone of serious and plausible now matched Japan's similar sense of serious and plausible, not to mention [[JapanTakesOverTheWorld the economic success of Japan at the time as well.]] Other new companies include Creator/ImageComics founded in 1992, which was a major TropeCodifier for the NinetiesAntiHero, in {{Spawn}} and most of Rob Liefeld's work. However these excesses quickly collapsed somewhere around 1996 due in part to the UsefulNotes/TheGreatComicsCrashOf1996.

to:

Perhaps because of the new blank slate attitude that prevailed ComicBook/PostCrisis, new comic book companies remerged, like Creator/DarkHorseComics in 1986 and Creator/ValiantComics in 1989. They published such acclaimed works as ''ComicBook/{{Hellboy}}'' and ''ComicBook/SinCity'', as well as releasing works like ''Manga/{{Akira}}'', perhaps because this tone of serious and plausible now matched Japan's similar sense of serious and plausible, not to mention [[JapanTakesOverTheWorld the economic success of Japan at the time as well.]] Other new companies include Creator/ImageComics founded in 1992, which was a major TropeCodifier for the NinetiesAntiHero, in {{Spawn}} ComicBook/{{Spawn}} and most of Rob Liefeld's work. However these excesses quickly collapsed somewhere around 1996 due in part to the UsefulNotes/TheGreatComicsCrashOf1996.


* ''Comicbook/{{Starman}}'', which started out as a spinoff of ''ComicBook/ZeroHour'' but surpassed its originator in terms of quality. A thorough exploration of the LegacyCharacter concept that delved into DC's rich history like few comics before it and helped lead the way to the ModernAge.

to:

* ''Comicbook/{{Starman}}'', which started out as a spinoff of ''ComicBook/ZeroHour'' but surpassed its originator in terms of quality. A thorough exploration of the LegacyCharacter concept that delved into DC's rich history like few comics before it and helped lead the way to the ModernAge.UsefulNotes/{{the Modern Age|of Comic Books}}.


The Iron Age of Comic Books is a different interpretation of comic history that sees the UsefulNotes/TheDarkAgeOfComicBooks and TheModernAgeOfComicBooks as one period. This age can be defined with its {{Retcon}}s, {{Reboot}}s, {{Retool}}s and {{Alternate Universe}}s that were deemed necessary after about fifty years of accumulated continuity threatening to create a ContinuityLockOut to new readers.

to:

The Iron Age of Comic Books is a different interpretation of comic history that sees the UsefulNotes/TheDarkAgeOfComicBooks and TheModernAgeOfComicBooks UsefulNotes/TheModernAgeOfComicBooks as one period. This age can be defined with its {{Retcon}}s, {{Reboot}}s, {{Retool}}s and {{Alternate Universe}}s that were deemed necessary after about fifty years of accumulated continuity threatening to create a ContinuityLockOut to new readers.


This zeitgeist of attempted plausibility and new found seriousness in superhero comic books is reflected in Creator/AlanMoore's ''[[{{Deconstruction}} Watchmen]]'' and Creator/FrankMiller's ''Comicbook/BatmanTheDarkKnightReturns'', both released in 1986. As well, the DC imprint VertigoComics also followed suit in tone, coming to its zenith with ''ComicBook/TheSandman'' in 1989. The turn to seriousness, especially in ''Comicbook/BatmanTheDarkKnightReturns'' also inspired the efforts of the Film/{{Batman}} film in 1989 and ''WesternAnimation/BatmanTheAnimatedSeries'' in 1992.

to:

This zeitgeist of attempted plausibility and new found seriousness in superhero comic books is reflected in Creator/AlanMoore's ''[[{{Deconstruction}} Watchmen]]'' and Creator/FrankMiller's ''Comicbook/BatmanTheDarkKnightReturns'', both released in 1986. As well, the DC imprint VertigoComics Creator/VertigoComics also followed suit in tone, coming to its zenith with ''ComicBook/TheSandman'' in 1989. The turn to seriousness, especially in ''Comicbook/BatmanTheDarkKnightReturns'' also inspired the efforts of the Film/{{Batman}} film in 1989 and ''WesternAnimation/BatmanTheAnimatedSeries'' in 1992.

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