Follow TV Tropes

Following

History UsefulNotes / SpanishAmericanWarsOfIndependence

Go To



* ''Belgrano''



* ''Castelli / Monteagudo''
* ''El cruce de los Andes''
* ''Güemes''




to:

* ''San Martín''



to:

* ''ComicBook/RevolucionDeMayo''


* ''Algo habrán hecho por la historia Argentina''

to:

* ''Algo habrán hecho por la historia Argentina''''Series/AlgoHabranHechoPorLaHistoriaArgentina''


The continent had been colonized in the previous centuries by Spain and Portugal. Portugal held a portion of the east of South America (modern Brazil), and Spanin colonized the rest; organizing the area in viceroyalties and other subdivisions. The political organization depended from the European monarchies and the rulers appointed by it, and although there was some discontent and rebellions, they were largely kept under control. The problems started during UsefulNotes/TheNapoleonicWars in Europe, which was largely a conflict between the United Kingdom and France, with Spain allied to France. Napoleon ordered a trade embargo against the UK in Europe, but Portugal defied it and traded with the UK anyway. The Napoleonic armies marched to Portugal, but all the Portuguese monarchy escaped from the country and set residence in the Brazilian colonies. And, as they were already there, they captured the king of Spain, Fernando VII, and appointed Joseph Bonaparte as the new king of Spain. This started the Peninsular War, and new Juntas in the unconquered territories ruled the country as a result, on behalf of the captured king. The alliances were switched: France became an enemy, and the UK turned into an ally of the Spanish resistance.

to:

The continent had been colonized in the previous centuries by Spain and Portugal. Portugal held a portion of the east of South America (modern Brazil), and Spanin Spain colonized the rest; organizing the area in viceroyalties and other subdivisions. The political organization depended from the European monarchies and the rulers appointed by it, and although there was some discontent and rebellions, they were largely kept under control. The problems started during UsefulNotes/TheNapoleonicWars in Europe, which was largely a conflict between the United Kingdom and France, with Spain allied to France. Napoleon ordered a trade embargo against the UK in Europe, but Portugal defied it and traded with the UK anyway. The Napoleonic armies marched to Portugal, but all the Portuguese monarchy escaped from the country and set residence in the Brazilian colonies. And, as they were already there, they captured the king of Spain, Fernando VII, and appointed Joseph Bonaparte as the new king of Spain. This started the Peninsular War, and new Juntas in the unconquered territories ruled the country as a result, on behalf of the captured king. The alliances were switched: France became an enemy, and the UK turned into an ally of the Spanish resistance.

Added DiffLines:

* {{Biopic}}: Most works take the form of a biography of a specific military leader of the war.


...and having said that, let's go back to South America. The French aggression never got to the Spanish colonies, but there was a big problem in there: if the king is no longer in charge, what happens with the local authorities that rule as representatives of the king of Spain? Yes, some Spanish people organized a Junta in Spain, but why subject to their authority, instead of doing the same and creating local Juntas? This question was asked all across Spanish America, with multiple rebellions taking place. Some rebellions were successful and seized the local government: this happened in Caracas (Venezuela), New Granada (Colombia), Buenos Aires (Argentina), and Santiago de Chile (Chile). Other rebellions were crushed by the remaining Spanish authorities, and so Central America, Peru, the Upper Peru (Bolivia), the Caribbean and the Philippine Islands remained as Spanish strongholds. Note that in some cases the Juntas were replaced by other forms of government (presidents, supreme directors, etc), but we'll keep calling them "Juntas" for simplicity.

to:

...and having said that, let's go back to South America. The French aggression never got to the Spanish colonies, but there was a big problem in there: if the king is no longer in charge, what happens with the local authorities that rule as representatives of the king of Spain? Yes, some Spanish people organized a Junta in Spain, but why subject to their authority, instead of doing the same and creating local Juntas? This question was asked all across Spanish America, with multiple rebellions taking place. Some rebellions were successful and seized the local government: this happened in Caracas (Venezuela), New Granada (Colombia), Buenos Aires (Argentina), and Santiago de Chile (Chile). Other rebellions were crushed by the remaining Spanish authorities, and so Central America, Peru, the Upper Peru (Bolivia), the Caribbean and the Philippine Islands remained as Spanish strongholds. Note that in some cases the Juntas were replaced by other forms of government (presidents, triumvirates, supreme directors, etc), but we'll keep calling them "Juntas" for simplicity.

Added DiffLines:

-->"To the Army of the Andes it is given the glory of saying: in 24 days we made the campaign, we crossed the highest mountain ranges, concluded the tyrants and give freedom to Chile"
-->-- José de San Martín


!!Literature
* ''The General in His Labyrinth''



!!Literature
* ''The General in His Labyrinth''

Added DiffLines:

!!Comic Books
* ''Bicentenario Fantástico''


* ''VideoGame/{{Colonization}}

to:

* ''VideoGame/{{Colonization}}
''VideoGame/{{Colonization}}''


* ''Belgrano''
* ''El general y la fiebre''




to:

* ''The Liberator''

!!Literature
* ''The General in His Labyrinth''



to:

* TheRevolutionWillNotBeVilified: As this war is acknowledged in the involved countries as the point of birth of their nations, they will always treat it with the highest respect, and the revolutionaries always have the high ground. Some revolutionaries would be treated as good and others as bad, because "WeAreStrugglingTogether", but never the revolution itself.

Added DiffLines:

* ''Revolución: Cruce de los Andes''


Added DiffLines:

!!Video games
* ''VideoGame/AgeOfEmpiresIII - The War Chiefs''
* ''VideoGame/{{Colonization}}

Added DiffLines:

!Tropes seen in adaptations
* HeroOfAnotherStory: Most adaptations do not focus on the war as a whole, but just in the specific details of the war as it took place in one region. A work about Bolivar will likely only deal with San Martín at the point of the meeting of Guayaquil, and the same counts for Bolívar in a work about San Martín.


Added DiffLines:

* ''El santo de la espada''

Added DiffLines:

[[quoteright:350:https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/00000000000000000000.jpg]]
[[caption-width-right:350:José de San Martín (left) and UsefulNotes/SimonBolivar (right), the great "Libertadores" of Latin America.]]

Showing 15 edit(s) of 16

Top

How well does it match the trope?

Example of:

/

Media sources:

/

Report