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* '''Highest point:''' Kinyeti (3187 m/10,456 ft) (58th)

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* '''Highest point:''' Kinyeti (3187 m/10,456 ft) (58th)(53rd)


* '''Highest point:''' Kinyeti (3187 m/10,456 ft) (77th)

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* '''Highest point:''' Kinyeti (3187 m/10,456 ft) (77th)(58th)


* '''ISO-3166-1 Code:''' SS

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* '''ISO-3166-1 Code:''' SSSS
* '''Country calling code:''' 211
* '''Highest point:''' Kinyeti (3187 m/10,456 ft) (77th)
* '''Lowest point:''' White Nile (350 m/1,148 ft) (69th)


** President
Salva Kiir Mayardit

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** President
President: Salva Kiir Mayardit



[[AC: The South Sudanese flag]]
https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/south_sudan_flag_8394.png
->The flag is almost identical to that of UsefulNotes/{{Kenya}} but with the triangle found in that of Sudan. The black, red and green stripes symbolize the Africans, the blood of the fallen throughout South Sudan's long history of conflict, and the country's natural bounty, respectively; the white fimbriations stand for peace. At the hoist (left) side is a triangle, colored blue to symbolize the Nile River, and within it is the yellow star of unity.


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[[AC:The South Sudanese flag]]
https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/south_sudan_flag_8394.png
->The flag is almost identical to that of UsefulNotes/{{Kenya}} but with the triangle found in that of Sudan. The black, red and green stripes symbolize the Africans, the blood of the fallen throughout South Sudan's long history of conflict, and the country's natural bounty, respectively; the white fimbriations stand for peace. At the hoist (left) side is a triangle, colored blue to symbolize the Nile River, and within it is the yellow star of unity.
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[[AC:The South Sudanese national anthem]]

->Oh God
->We praise and glorify You
->For Your grace on South Sudan,
->Land of great abundance
->Uphold us united in peace and harmony.

->Oh Motherland
->We rise raising flag with the guiding star
->And singing songs of freedom with joy;
->For justice, liberty and prosperity
->Shall forever more reign!

->Oh great patriots
->Let us stand up in silence and respect,
->Saluting our martyrs whose blood
->Cemented our national foundation,
->We vow to protect our nation.

->Oh God, bless South Sudan!
----
[[AC:Government]]
* Federal presidential constitutional republic
** President
Salva Kiir Mayardit
** First Vice President: Riek Machar
** Second Vice President: James Wani Igga
** Third Vice President: Taban Deng Gai
** Fourth Vice President: Rebecca Nyandeng De Mabior
** Fifth Vice President: Hussein Abdelbagi
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[[AC:Miscellaneous]]
* '''Capital and largest city:''' Juba
* '''Population:''' 12,778,250
* '''Area:''' 644,329 km² (248,777 sq mi) (41st)
* '''Currency''': South Sudanese pound (SS£) (SSP)
* '''ISO-3166-1 Code:''' SS


If you think independence is a happy ending for them, you'd be wrong. On December 13, 2013, just two years after the country seceded, the country is embroiled in yet another civil war, this time between the forces allied to President Salva Kiir and Vice-President Riek Machar. The war is still ongoing, seemingly with no end in sight, has killed nearly 400,000 people, displaced more than 2 million, and caused one of the worst refugee crises in the world (over 1.5 million people have fled the country, mostly to neighboring Uganda). The war has basically overshadowed the country's historical enmity with Sudan, who has been normalizing relations with its former colony at a swift rate (contrary to what you might think, despite all said and done, Sudan is more than willing to recognize South Sudan's independence and both countries have embassies on each other's capitals).

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If you think independence is a happy ending for them, you'd be wrong. On December 13, 2013, just two years after the country seceded, the country is embroiled in yet another civil war, this time between the forces allied to President Salva Kiir and Vice-President Riek Machar. The war is still ongoing, seemingly with no end in sight, has killed nearly 400,000 people, displaced more than 2 million, and caused one of the worst refugee crises in the world (over 1.5 million people have fled the country, mostly to neighboring Uganda). The war has Uganda), and basically overshadowed the country's historical enmity with Sudan, who has been normalizing relations with its former colony at a swift rate (contrary to what you might think, despite all said and done, Sudan is more than willing to recognize South Sudan's independence and both countries have embassies on each other's capitals).
capitals). Eventually, in February 2020, Kiir and Machar reached an agreement to share power in a unity government, finally ending six years of the nightmarish war.


[[quoteright:328:https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/South_Sudan_map_2_3611.gif]]

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[[quoteright:328:https://static.[[quoteright:331:https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/South_Sudan_map_2_3611.org/pmwiki/pub/images/od_map.gif]]



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* In the 2018 movie ''[[https://gbtimes.com/un-peacekeeping-film-set-for-release-in-china China Peacekeeping Forces]]'', the situation is heavily based off of South Sudan and the Chinese UN detachment in the country. The movie barely even tries to hide it, setting the story in [[PaperThinDisguise Tuba, South Cudan.]]


South Sudan is an East African country and the newest country in UsefulNotes/{{Africa}}--as well as the entire world--as of 2011. As one might expect, it broke off from the country of UsefulNotes/{{Sudan}}, following a long civil war and a vote in which over 95% of the people voted to split off. The reasons for the civil war and split are ethnic, religious, and economic; Sudan is mostly Arab and Muslim, while South Sudan is mostly non-Arab and Christian.[[note]]While some reports call the South Sudanese "black" or "African", these terms are highly misleading: most Sudanese Arabs are in fact "black" in that they have very dark skin and distinctly African features (you couldn't tell a Sudanese Arab from, say, a Chadian just by looking at him). Much like "Latin American/Hispanic/Latino", "Arab" is a cultural-linguistic identity rather than a racial one; there are Arabs who are so "white" you'd think they were Russian or German if they didn't tell you otherwise, and there are black Arabs in Sudan, Egypt, and elsewhere, and there are Arabs of every shade in between. And of course Sudan is still in Africa and a member of the African Union.[[/note]] Furthermore, most of the oil in Sudan was located in the South, without which the government of Sudan would have a very hard time operating. Currently, there is an agreement to share the oil revenues between South Sudan (which is where the oil itself is located) and with Sudan (which has the pipelines which transport the petroleum to a port in their territory.)

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South Sudan is an East African UsefulNotes/{{Africa}}n country and the newest country in UsefulNotes/{{Africa}}--as well as the entire world--as world as of 2011. As one might expect, it broke off from the country of UsefulNotes/{{Sudan}}, following a long civil war and a vote in which over 95% of the people voted to split off. The reasons for the civil war and split are ethnic, religious, and economic; economic: Sudan is mostly Arab and Muslim, while South Sudan is mostly non-Arab and Christian.[[note]]While some [[note]]Some reports call the South Sudanese "black" or "African", these terms "African" to distinguish them from northern Sudanese people, but the implications here are highly misleading: most misleading. Most Sudanese Arabs are in fact "black" in that they have very dark skin and distinctly African features (you features. You couldn't tell a Sudanese Arab Arabs from, say, a Chadian Chadians just by looking at him). them. Much like "Latin American/Hispanic/Latino", American/Latino/Hispanic", "Arab" is a cultural-linguistic cultural and linguistic identity rather than a racial one; there are one. Some Arabs who are so "white" have such light skin and Europeanesque features that you'd think they were Russian or German if they didn't tell you otherwise, and there are black otherwise; some Arabs in Sudan, Egypt, countries like Sudan and elsewhere, Egypt are black; and there are other Arabs of are every shade in between. And of course course, Sudan is still in Africa and a member of the African Union.[[/note]] Furthermore, most of the oil in Sudan was located in the South, without which the government of Sudan would have a very hard time operating. Currently, there is an agreement to share the oil revenues between South Sudan (which is where the oil itself is located) and with Sudan (which has the pipelines which transport the petroleum to a port in their territory.)


Currently, South Sudan is underdeveloped, with very little infrastructure, a massive health crisis (extreme rates of infant mortality and diseases that have long since disappeared in western and even most African countries), and continuing instability in the border with Sudan to the north. The consequences of decades of neglect, violence and exploitation from the north have also led to a lack of schools. To top that off, the country is landlocked and dependent on Sudanese infrastructure to export oil, but this may change. There have been plans to build a second pipeline to transport South Sudan's petroleum through predominately Christian East Africa (Ethiopia, Kenya, etc) to a port on the [[UsefulNotes/TheSevenSeas Indian Ocean]], instead of the Sudanese ports on the Red Sea. Since South Sudan is landlocked, it needs help from other countries to export its petroleum.

Statistics are hard to come by, but it was believed that until a couple of decades ago, the region that would become South Sudan overwhelmingly followed indigenous African religions, but at present it is largely Christian. In any event, the independence of South Sudan means the Sudanese government has lost about a third of its country, and most of the oil revenue. For the wider Arab Islamic world, it means an area the size of France is no longer Arab or Muslim territory. Considering the ongoing rebellion in Darfur (a Muslim but not Arab region in the western part of the country, not South Sudan), the prospects for the government in Khartoum are not looking very good.

The South Sudanese speak many African languages (mostly from the Nilo-Saharan family, but with a few Niger-Congo languages mixed in), but historically used English and Arabic for business. With the secession from Sudan in the north, the government has plans to change the official language used to English only, and there are plans to move the capital from Juba to another city, but as of this writing, nothing is final.

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Currently, If you think independence is a happy ending for them, you'd be wrong. On December 13, 2013, just two years after the country seceded, the country is embroiled in yet another civil war, this time between the forces allied to President Salva Kiir and Vice-President Riek Machar. The war is still ongoing, seemingly with no end in sight, has killed nearly 400,000 people, displaced more than 2 million, and caused one of the worst refugee crises in the world (over 1.5 million people have fled the country, mostly to neighboring Uganda). The war has basically overshadowed the country's historical enmity with Sudan, who has been normalizing relations with its former colony at a swift rate (contrary to what you might think, despite all said and done, Sudan is more than willing to recognize South Sudan's independence and both countries have embassies on each other's capitals).

With literally no time to develop after decades of war,
South Sudan is underdeveloped, an extremely poor and underdeveloped country (its GDP per capita and HDI are far less than Sudan's), with very little infrastructure, and a massive health crisis (extreme rates of infant mortality and diseases that have long since disappeared in western and even most African countries), and continuing instability in the border with Sudan to the north.countries). The consequences of decades of neglect, violence and exploitation from the north have also led to a lack of schools. To On top that off, of that, the country is landlocked and dependent on Sudanese infrastructure to export oil, but this may change. There have been plans to build a second pipeline to transport South Sudan's petroleum through predominately Christian East Africa (Ethiopia, Kenya, etc) to a port on the [[UsefulNotes/TheSevenSeas Indian Ocean]], instead of the Sudanese ports on the Red Sea. Since South Sudan is landlocked, so it needs help from other countries a third country for it to export its petroleum.

goods and oil.

Statistics are hard to come by, but it was believed that until a couple of decades ago, the region that would become South Sudan overwhelmingly followed indigenous African religions, but at present it is largely Christian. In any event, the independence of South Sudan means the Sudanese government has lost about a third of its country, and most of the oil revenue. For the wider Arab Islamic world, it means an area the size of France is no longer Arab or Muslim territory. Considering the ongoing rebellion in Darfur (a Muslim but not Arab region in the western part of the country, not South Sudan), the prospects for the government in Khartoum are not looking very good.

The South Sudanese speak many African mostly Eastern Sudanic languages (mostly from like Bari, Dinka, and Nuer (part of the proposed Nilo-Saharan family, but although the conjecture is controversial) with a few Niger-Congo languages mixed in), but historically used in, while English and Arabic for business. With is the secession from Sudan in the north, the government has plans to change the sole official language used language. Due to English only, and there are plans to move being a part of an Arab country until recently, Arabic is still widely spoken as a lingua franca, especially among the capital from Juba to another city, but as of this writing, nothing is final.
educated class.



* Film/MachineGunPreacher. A biographic movie about a retired motor gang member turned into constructor in this region before its eventual separation. This film also depict John Garrang, the [[FourStarBadass military commander]] of South Sudan

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* Film/MachineGunPreacher.''Film/MachineGunPreacher''. A biographic movie about a retired motor gang member turned into constructor in this region before its eventual separation. This film also depict John Garrang, the [[FourStarBadass military commander]] of South SudanSudan.


* Film/MachineGunPreacher. A biographic movie about a retired motor gang member turned into constructor in this region before it eventual separation. This film also depict John Garrang, the [[FourStarBadass military commander]] of South Sudan

to:

* Film/MachineGunPreacher. A biographic movie about a retired motor gang member turned into constructor in this region before it its eventual separation. This film also depict John Garrang, the [[FourStarBadass military commander]] of South Sudan


Currently, South Sudan is underdeveloped, with very little infrastructure, a massive health crisis (extreme rates of infant mortality and diseases that have long since disappeared in western and even most African countries), and continuing instability in the border with Sudan to the north. The consequences of decades of neglect, violence and exploitation from the north have also led to a lack of schools. To top that off, the country is landlocked and dependent on Sudanese infrastructure to export oil, but this may change. There have been plans to build a second pipeline to transport South Sudan's petroleum through predominately Christian East Africa (Ethiopia, Kenya, etc) to a port on the Indian Ocean, instead of the Sudanese ports on the Red Sea. Since South Sudan is landlocked, it needs help from other countries to export its petroleum.

to:

Currently, South Sudan is underdeveloped, with very little infrastructure, a massive health crisis (extreme rates of infant mortality and diseases that have long since disappeared in western and even most African countries), and continuing instability in the border with Sudan to the north. The consequences of decades of neglect, violence and exploitation from the north have also led to a lack of schools. To top that off, the country is landlocked and dependent on Sudanese infrastructure to export oil, but this may change. There have been plans to build a second pipeline to transport South Sudan's petroleum through predominately Christian East Africa (Ethiopia, Kenya, etc) to a port on the [[UsefulNotes/TheSevenSeas Indian Ocean, Ocean]], instead of the Sudanese ports on the Red Sea. Since South Sudan is landlocked, it needs help from other countries to export its petroleum.


South Sudan is an East African country and the newest country in Africa- as well as the entire world- as of 2011. As one might expect, it broke off from the country of UsefulNotes/{{Sudan}}, following a long civil war and a vote in which over 95% of the people voted to split off. The reasons for the civil war and split are ethnic, religious, and economic; Sudan is mostly Arab and Muslim, while South Sudan is mostly non-Arab and Christian.[[note]]While some reports call the South Sudanese "black" or "African", these terms are highly misleading: most Sudanese Arabs are in fact "black" in that they have very dark skin and distinctly African features (you couldn't tell a Sudanese Arab from, say, a Chadian just by looking at him). Much like "Latin American/Hispanic/Latino", "Arab" is a cultural-linguistic identity rather than a racial one; there are Arabs who are so "white" you'd think they were Russian or German if they didn't tell you otherwise, and there are black Arabs in Sudan, Egypt, and elsewhere, and there are Arabs of every shade in between. And of course Sudan is still in Africa and a member of the African Union.[[/note]] Furthermore, most of the oil in Sudan was located in the South, without which the government of Sudan would have a very hard time operating. Currently, there is an agreement to share the oil revenues between South Sudan (which is where the oil itself is located) and with Sudan (which has the pipelines which transport the petroleum to a port in their territory.)

to:

South Sudan is an East African country and the newest country in Africa- as UsefulNotes/{{Africa}}--as well as the entire world- as world--as of 2011. As one might expect, it broke off from the country of UsefulNotes/{{Sudan}}, following a long civil war and a vote in which over 95% of the people voted to split off. The reasons for the civil war and split are ethnic, religious, and economic; Sudan is mostly Arab and Muslim, while South Sudan is mostly non-Arab and Christian.[[note]]While some reports call the South Sudanese "black" or "African", these terms are highly misleading: most Sudanese Arabs are in fact "black" in that they have very dark skin and distinctly African features (you couldn't tell a Sudanese Arab from, say, a Chadian just by looking at him). Much like "Latin American/Hispanic/Latino", "Arab" is a cultural-linguistic identity rather than a racial one; there are Arabs who are so "white" you'd think they were Russian or German if they didn't tell you otherwise, and there are black Arabs in Sudan, Egypt, and elsewhere, and there are Arabs of every shade in between. And of course Sudan is still in Africa and a member of the African Union.[[/note]] Furthermore, most of the oil in Sudan was located in the South, without which the government of Sudan would have a very hard time operating. Currently, there is an agreement to share the oil revenues between South Sudan (which is where the oil itself is located) and with Sudan (which has the pipelines which transport the petroleum to a port in their territory.)



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* Episode 5 of ''Series/SEALTeam'' is set in Juba as Bravo Team evacuates American personnel from the U.S. embassy in the face of massive city-wide riots.

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