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* '''Belt''': A professional wrestling championship or title, represented by a gaudy belt made of leather and precious metals/stones, typically gold.

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* '''Belt''': A professional wrestling championship or title, represented by a gaudy belt made of leather and precious metals/stones, typically gold.gold (in kayfabe at least; they're more likely to be cubic zirconia and gold plate over white metal).


** Also to use personal or real life issues in a promo or interview either for humor or to make the content more vicious. Such as when AJ Lee told the Bella Twins that it was unfortunate that talent wasn't "sexually transmitted", as the Bellas were dating John Cena and Daniel Bryan at the time and were not perceived to be great wrestlers in their own right.

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** Also to use personal or real life issues in a promo or interview either for humor or to make the content more vicious. Such as when AJ Lee told the Bella Twins that it was unfortunate that talent wasn't "sexually transmitted", as the Bellas were dating John Cena and Daniel Bryan at the time time[[note]]Brie eventually married Bryan[[/note]] and were not perceived to be great wrestlers in their own right.


* '''WorkedShoot''': An angle or promo designed and executed in such a way as to attempt to convince the viewers it was real, spontaneous or unplanned. CM Punk most famously delivered a worked shoot promo on Raw on June 27, 2011 about the state of WWE and why he was planning to leave it.
* '''Wrestler's Court:''' A KangarooCourt proceeding backstage, with respected veteran wrestlers as "judge," "jury," and "prosecutor." Wrestler's court is used to mediate disputes between wrestlers, or sanction behavior considered unruly to the locker room. Wrestler's court is *very* controversial, as many feel it is often used as a tool of hazing younger wrestlers.

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* '''WorkedShoot''': An angle or promo designed and executed in such a way as to attempt to convince the viewers it was real, spontaneous or unplanned. CM Punk most famously delivered a worked shoot promo (the "pipe bomb") on Raw on June 27, 2011 about the state of WWE and why he was planning to leave it.
* '''Wrestler's Court:''' A KangarooCourt proceeding backstage, with respected veteran wrestlers as "judge," "jury," and "prosecutor." Wrestler's court is used to mediate disputes between wrestlers, or sanction behavior considered unruly to the locker room. Wrestler's court is *very* ''very'' controversial, as many feel it is often used as a tool of hazing to haze younger wrestlers.


** '''Example:''' In spring 2017, Jinder Mahal was pushed to the moon, receiving WWE Title reign that lasted until November of that year. (Long by 2017 standards.) This was largely because WWE had a major tour of India planned, and wanted to have a champion of Indian descent holding the belt. Once the tour was over, Mahal lost the title and has slipped back into midcard obscurity, as he failed to get over with fans. His reign was marked by lackluster promos, mediocre matches, and the perception that he had been elevated beyond his abilities.

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** '''Example:''' In spring 2017, Jinder Mahal was pushed to the moon, receiving a WWE Title reign that lasted until November of that year. (Long by 2017 standards.) This was largely because WWE had a major tour of India planned, and wanted to have a champion of Indian descent holding the belt. Once the tour was over, Mahal lost the title and has slipped back into midcard obscurity, as he failed to get over with fans. His reign was marked by lackluster promos, mediocre matches, and the perception that he had been elevated beyond his abilities.


* '''{{Kayfabe}}''': The art of presenting professional wrestling as a legitimate athletic competition. Up until the 1980's kayfabe was kept at all times, wrestlers never appeared out of character or acknowledged their lives outside of the ring. These days kayfabe refers more to the in-world context of wrestling performance, ie someone suffering a "kayfabe" injured shoulder doesn't actually have an injured shoulder, they are pretending to for the purposes of a story line.

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* '''{{Kayfabe}}''': The art of presenting professional wrestling as a legitimate athletic competition. Up until the 1980's kayfabe was kept at all times, wrestlers never appeared out of character or acknowledged their lives outside of the ring. These days kayfabe refers more to the in-world context of specific parts of wrestling performance, ie e.g. someone suffering a "kayfabe" injured shoulder doesn't actually have an injured shoulder, they are pretending to for the purposes of a story line.


** Historically, it was used to refer to wrestlers who were so low on the totem pole they didn't always make it onto the shows, but who were still a step above the generic doughy no-entrance no-gimmick full jobbers. Unlike a normal jobber, who strictly worked television tapings, a jobber to the stars would work underneath on house show tours. They were usually give at least a little bit of time to shine in their matches, and might occasionally win matches against full jobbers or each other. The position was often given to young wrestlers seen as potential future superstars who needed more experience, and to veterans who the company didn't want to push anymore but who were valuable for their ability to make their opponents look good. The vast majority of jobbers to the stars would be considered babyfaces, as they would be used to build up the heel side of the roster in preparation for matches with higher-up babyfaces. Well known jobbers to the stars include Special Delivery Jones, Barry Horrowitz, and The Gambler. This usage is falling off as the role itself isn't used much anymore.

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** Historically, it was used to refer to wrestlers who were so low on the totem pole they didn't always make it onto the shows, but who were still a step above the generic doughy no-entrance no-gimmick full jobbers. Unlike a normal jobber, who strictly worked television tapings, a jobber to the stars would work underneath on house show tours. They were usually give given at least a little bit of time to shine in their matches, and might occasionally win matches against full jobbers or each other. The position was often given to young wrestlers seen as potential future superstars who needed more experience, and to veterans who the company didn't want to push anymore but who were valuable for their ability to make their opponents look good. The vast majority of jobbers to the stars would be considered babyfaces, as they would be used to build up the heel side of the roster in preparation for matches with higher-up babyfaces. Well known jobbers to the stars include Special Delivery Jones, Barry Horrowitz, and The Gambler. This usage is falling off as the role itself isn't used much anymore.


* '''Breaking the field:''' A disorienting effect caused when the floor cameras are positioned opposite to the hard camera in the stands, causing action to be reversed when the director switches from the hard camera to the floor cameras or vice versa. Hallmark of a poor television production.

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* '''Breaking the field:''' A disorienting effect caused when the floor cameras are positioned opposite to the hard camera in the stands, causing action to be reversed when the director switches from the hard camera to the floor cameras or vice versa. Hallmark of a poor television production. (Though there can be extra floor cameras for showing a replay from a different direction where it's easier to see what happened.)

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* '''Heat machine:''' Recorded crowd noise (cheers, boos, or chants for particular wrestlers) piped into the arena's PA system, used to encourage similar reactions among the live attendants. Can also refer to similar effects added in post-production. Can often become a thing of derision; such as when at one WCW PPV, referees were attempting to clean debris from the ring with loud cheers occuring at regular intervals. Largely a thing of the past.


* '''Heat''': Heat is complicated. Its base meaning is the ability of a Heel (see below) to make the crowd hate him or her. This is basically how the heel draws money. The more heat a heel has, the more the fans dislike them and want to see the babyface beat them.
** Heat can also be backstage anger between two pro wrestlers, or between any of the myriad backstage personalities, performers and executives. This is legitimate anger over a legitimate issue and can lead to backstage fights, discipline, suspensions or even to people getting fired if the issue is detrimental enough.
** There is also legit heat or as it's known around here XPacHeat. This is when a crowd legitimately hates a person on a wrestling show as opposed to hating the character a wrestler performs as and how it is presented in the context of the angle or match. This can happen for a variety of reasons. Overexposure. A gap between push and the fans perceived level of a wrestler's performance or entertainment value. It can also be because backstage heat has been made public and the fans choose a side and rally against the wrestler they think was wronged, such as the case when Lita cheated on Matt Hardy with Edge and the fans turned on Lita and Edge. Very rarely a gifted performer can turn XPacHeat into wrestling heat and have it fuel their career...as Edge did in this instance.
** In a more general context, XPacHeat has similarities to what is known in wrestling as "bad" heat. This is when a match outcome or a character so offends the paying audience that they are effectively booing the product rather than the heel. For example, when the Gangstaz debuted in Smoky Mountain Wrestling, their racially charged promos drew loud boos (leading the promotion to think they were getting over as heels), but effectively killed live attendance in return meetings.
* '''Heat machine:''' Recorded crowd noise (cheers, boos, or chants for particular wrestlers) piped into the arena's PA system, used to encourage similar reactions among the live attendants. Can also refer to similar effects added in post-production. Can often become a thing of derision; such as when at one WCW PPV, referees were attempting to clean debris from the ring with loud cheers occuring at regular intervals. Largely a thing of the past.

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* '''Heat''': Heat can simply refer to a wrestler's ability to get a reaction from the fans. However, heat is complicated. Its base meaning is usually used to describe the ability of a Heel (see below) to make the crowd hate him or her. her, with other kinds of heat being given other names. This is basically how the heel draws money. The more heat a heel has, the more the fans dislike them and want to see the babyface beat them.
** Heat can also be **''Babyface Heat'' refers to a babyface's ability to get people to like them and react loudly to them.
**''Backstage Heat'' refers to
backstage anger between two pro wrestlers, or between any of the myriad backstage personalities, performers and executives. This is legitimate anger over a legitimate issue and can lead to backstage fights, discipline, suspensions or even to people getting fired if the issue is detrimental enough.
** There is also legit
enough. Wrestlers unpopular with the other wrestlers in a promotion can be said to have heat or as it's known around here XPacHeat. This is when a crowd legitimately hates a person on a wrestling show as opposed to hating the character a wrestler performs as and how it is presented in the context of the angle or match. This can happen for a variety of reasons. Overexposure. A gap between push and the fans perceived level of a wrestler's performance or entertainment value. It can also be because backstage heat has been made public and the fans choose a side and rally against the wrestler they think was wronged, such as the case when Lita cheated on Matt Hardy with Edge and the fans turned on Lita and Edge. Very rarely a gifted performer can turn XPacHeat into wrestling heat and have it fuel their career...as Edge did in this instance.
** In a more general context, XPacHeat has similarities to what is known in wrestling as "bad" heat. This
locker room.
**''Bad Heat''
is when a match outcome or a character so offends the paying audience that they are effectively booing the product rather than the heel. For example, when the Gangstaz debuted in Smoky Mountain Wrestling, their racially charged promos drew loud boos (leading the promotion to think they were getting over as heels), but effectively killed live attendance in return meetings.
* '''Heat machine:''' Recorded **''Go-Away Heat'', otherwise known as XPacHeat, is when a crowd noise (cheers, boos, legitimately hates a person on a wrestling show as opposed to hating the character a wrestler performs as and how it is presented in the context of the angle or chants match. This can happen for particular wrestlers) piped into a variety of reasons. Overexposure - this was how [[Wrestling/SeanWaltman X-Pac]] got his go-away heat, by regularly winning midcard and upper midcard matches against more interesting opponents without actually doing anything. A gap between push and the arena's PA system, used to encourage similar reactions among fans perceived level of a wrestler's performance or entertainment value - this is the live attendants. Can problem Wrestling/RomanReigns is facing. It can also refer to similar effects added in post-production. Can often become be because backstage heat has been made public and the fans choose a thing of derision; side and rally against the wrestler they think was wronged, such as the case when at one WCW PPV, referees were attempting to clean debris from the ring Lita cheated on Matt Hardy with loud cheers occuring at regular intervals. Largely a thing of Edge and the past.fans turned on Lita and Edge. Very rarely a gifted performer can turn XPacHeat into wrestling heat and have it fuel their career, as Edge did in this instance, but it's often a career killer, as it was for Lita.



* '''[[{{Heel}} Heel]]''': The "bad guy" or "villain" in a professional wrestling match or angle.

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* '''[[{{Heel}} Heel]]''': '''{{Heel}}''': The "bad guy" or "villain" in a professional wrestling match or angle.

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* '''Heat machine:''' Recorded crowd noise (cheers, boos, or chants for particular wrestlers) piped into the arena's PA system, used to encourage similar reactions among the live attendants. Can also refer to similar effects added in post-production. Can often become a thing of derision; such as when at one WCW PPV, referees were attempting to clean debris from the ring with loud cheers occuring at regular intervals. Largely a thing of the past.


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* '''Paper:''' Complimentary tickets to televised shows, allowing for the appearance of a larger crowd than would pay to see such an event. Historically, nearly all TV shows gave tickets away free of charge (although many would have long waiting lists for such events), as TV events were shot in small venues and would feature multiple tapings per one attendance with few "marquee" matches. With weekly traveling TV productions, promotions such as WWE are typically able to charge full freight for live attendance to their programs.


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* '''Scripted''': For a long time, something of a dirty word in the wrestling business. In the past, both matches and promos were largely improvised by the talent, with broad direction given by the booker. Beginning in the 1980's, some wrestlers such as Randy Savage would begin planning matches move-for-move, and even rehearse them with their opponents ahead of time. Nowadays, nearly all matches and promos are planned in such a manner, in order to meet tight time restrictions on the television product.


** '''Example:''' In spring 2017, Jinder Mahal was pushed to the moon, receiving WWE Title reign that lasted until November of that year. (Long by 2017 standards.) This was largely because WWE had a major tour of India planned, and wanted to have a champion of Indian descent holding the belt. Once the tour was over, Mahal lost the title and has slipped back into midcard obscurity.

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** '''Example:''' In spring 2017, Jinder Mahal was pushed to the moon, receiving WWE Title reign that lasted until November of that year. (Long by 2017 standards.) This was largely because WWE had a major tour of India planned, and wanted to have a champion of Indian descent holding the belt. Once the tour was over, Mahal lost the title and has slipped back into midcard obscurity.obscurity, as he failed to get over with fans. His reign was marked by lackluster promos, mediocre matches, and the perception that he had been elevated beyond his abilities.


* '''Potato''': A stiff or painful punch, delivered intentionally or accidentally.



* '''Potato''': A stiff or painful punch, delivered intentionally or accidentally.

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* '''Potato''': A stiff '''Push/Pushed to the Moon:''' When a performer is pushed very suddenly and very quickly to a prominent spot on the card. Possibly even the world championship. Same as Strapping the Rocketship (see below) to a performer. Sometimes this is done to a new character or painful punch, delivered intentionally or accidentally.a newly-signed free agent to establish them as a major player. The phrase "pushed to the moon" is often used derisively in hindsight when this happens to a character but they failed to get over.
** '''Example:''' In spring 2017, Jinder Mahal was pushed to the moon, receiving WWE Title reign that lasted until November of that year. (Long by 2017 standards.) This was largely because WWE had a major tour of India planned, and wanted to have a champion of Indian descent holding the belt. Once the tour was over, Mahal lost the title and has slipped back into midcard obscurity.

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* '''Main event:''' The primary ticket or PPV-selling match of a wrestling card. Often the last match of the card; WWWF/WWF/WWE house shows have historically put the main event before the intermission, giving the top wrestlers a chance to get out of the building without being mobbed, as well as allowing the promotion to use the main event finish to sell tickets for the next month's event (i.e., if a top heel was counted out walking to the back, next month's event could be a steel cage match, preventing such an escape).


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* '''Ribbing on the square:''' A practical joke meant to make a point; a wrestler on the receiving end of one of these has typically offended the wrestler playing the prank or the rest of the locker room in some manner.


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* '''Wrestler's Court:''' A KangarooCourt proceeding backstage, with respected veteran wrestlers as "judge," "jury," and "prosecutor." Wrestler's court is used to mediate disputes between wrestlers, or sanction behavior considered unruly to the locker room. Wrestler's court is *very* controversial, as many feel it is often used as a tool of hazing younger wrestlers.


* '''[[{{Face}} Babyface]]''': Sometimes shortened to "Face", this is the "good guy" or "hero" character in a pro wrestling angle or match.

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* '''[[{{Face}} Babyface]]''': Sometimes Often shortened to "Face", this is the "good guy" or "hero" character in a pro wrestling angle or match.



* '''Blade''': The act of using a small, concealed razor or utility blade to inflict a cut and draw blood for the purposes of making a match look more brutal. Also the instrument of performing the selfsame. The process can also be referred to as "to blade", "blading", "gigging", or a "blade job".

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* '''Blade''': The act of using a small, concealed razor or utility blade to inflict a cut and draw blood for the purposes of making a match look more brutal. Also the instrument of performing the selfsame.action. The process can also be referred to as "to blade", "blading", "gigging", or a "blade job".



* '''Botch''': A noticeable accident during the course of a match. Can be as harmless as a slip and fall, or it can be something that leads to significant injury. Almost always met with a "You f***ed up!" chant unless someone is badly hurt.

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* '''Botch''': A noticeable accident during the course of a match. Can be as harmless as a slip and fall, or it can be something that leads to significant injury. Almost always met with a "You f***ed fucked up!" chant unless someone chant, assuming no one involved is badly hurt.



* '''Bury''': To hold down a wrestler or talent by forcing them to lose matches, talking about them unfavorably to the fans (such as in promos or on commentary) or backstage, or putting them in unimportant matches in an unfavorable spot on the card. The act of burying someone is highly subjective and hotly debated amongst wrestling fans and other wrestlers. Fans are very quick to accuse a promotion of burying a favorite talent the moment they lose a single match or are put into an angle with someone the fans believe is beneath that performer's level. A good example of burial is the WWE-produced documentary "The Self Destruction of the Wrestling/UltimateWarrior" which the WWE produced at a time when the Warrior was not on favorable terms with the company and an easy target. After the WWE mended fences and The Warrior passed away, the DVD was removed from the WWE shop and is not available on the Network.
* '''Calling spots:''' When one wrestler indicates to his opponent what action to perform. This may be verbally (with some care, as for TV the ring is frequently mic'ed; some wrestlers such as Sid Eudy and John Cena are infamous for being caught calling their spots on camera) or with body language. Traditionally, the heel calls the match, although a more experienced or prominent babyface may opt to do so instead.

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* '''Bury''': To hold down a wrestler or talent by forcing them to lose matches, talking about them unfavorably to the fans (such as in promos or on commentary) or backstage, or putting them in unimportant matches in an unfavorable spot on the card. The act of burying someone is highly subjective and hotly debated amongst wrestling fans and other wrestlers. Fans are very quick to accuse a promotion of burying a favorite talent the moment they lose a single match or are put into an angle with someone the fans believe is beneath that performer's level. A good example of burial is the WWE-produced documentary "The Self Destruction of the Wrestling/UltimateWarrior" which the WWE produced at a time when the Warrior was not on favorable terms with the company and an easy target. After the WWE mended fences and The Warrior passed away, the DVD was removed from the WWE shop and is not available on the Network.
* '''Calling spots:''' When one wrestler indicates to his opponent what action to perform. This may be verbally (with some care, as for TV the ring is frequently mic'ed; some wrestlers such as Sid Eudy and John Cena are infamous for being caught particularly loud while calling their spots on camera) spots) or with body language. Traditionally, the heel calls the match, although a more experienced or prominent babyface may opt to do so instead.



* '''Comeback, The''': Part of what is considered the classic four-part match structure: The shine, the heat, the comeback, the finish. The comeback is the part of the match where the face begins to turn the tides and regain his or her momentum before the finish.

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* '''Comeback, The''': Part of what is considered the classic four-part match structure: The shine, the heat, the comeback, the finish. The comeback is the part of the match where the face begins to turn the tides and regain his or her their momentum before the finish.



* '''Double Cross''': An event where a group of people get together, usually with the promoter, to change the agreed upon finish of the match without telling one of the participants. Considered unscrupulous and unprofessional. Double crosses were much more common in the early days of wrestling. The most famous double cross is probably The Wrestling/MontrealScrewjob.

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* '''Double Cross''': An event where a group of people get together, usually with the promoter, to change the agreed upon finish of the match without telling one of the participants. Considered unscrupulous and unprofessional. Double crosses were much more common in the early days of wrestling. The most famous double cross is probably The the Wrestling/MontrealScrewjob.



* '''Future Endeavored''': Fired. Comes from the WWE standard message for announcing releases, in which the company without fail "wishes him/her well in their future endeavors."

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* '''Future Endeavored''': Fired. Comes from the WWE WWE's standard message for announcing releases, in which the company without fail "wishes him/her [wrestler] well in their future endeavors."



* '''Hardway:''' One word. Drawing blood legitimately, without the use of a blade, either intentionally or by accident. When someone bleeds the "hardway" they typically had a cut or gash inflicted by a strike or a weapon and split open. Sometimes done intentionally, more often than not a mistake. Also used as a verb, to "hardway" someone is to strike them and draw blood. Brock Lesnar's forearm strike that split open Roman Reigns at Wrestlemania 34 is a good example of someone being busted open the hardway.

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* '''Hardway:''' One word. Drawing blood legitimately, without the use of a blade, either intentionally or by accident. When someone bleeds the "hardway" they typically had a cut or gash inflicted by a strike or a weapon and split open. Sometimes done intentionally, more often than not a mistake. Also used as a verb, to "hardway" someone is to strike them and draw blood. Brock Lesnar's forearm strike that split open Roman Reigns at Wrestlemania 34 is a good example of someone being busted open the hardway.



** The term's meaning changes with the times. Before the National Wrestling Alliance and for sometime afterwards, all champions such as Thesz would be hookers, in case someone tried to go into business for themselves. As the NWA territories became established so did the "hooking" practice of baiting fans into lasting a certain amount of time in the ring with a wrestler for a cash prize. In this case the "hooker" would know at least one hold that could quickly subdue an unexpectedly tough challenger, to prevent the promoter from having to pay up while also having the theatrical skills to let the suckers think they stood a chance. With the collapse of the territories, hooker tends to refer to someone a promoter or booker puts someone they don't like in a match with specifically to get them hurt(see policeman below).

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** The term's meaning changes with the times. Before the National Wrestling Alliance and for sometime afterwards, all champions such as Thesz would be hookers, in case someone tried to go into business for themselves. As the NWA territories became established so did the "hooking" practice of baiting fans into lasting a certain amount of time in the ring with a wrestler for a cash prize. In this case the "hooker" would know at least one hold that could quickly subdue an unexpectedly tough challenger, to prevent the promoter from having to pay up while also having the theatrical skills to let the suckers think they stood a chance. With the collapse of the territories, hooker tends to refer to someone a promoter or booker puts someone they don't like in a match with specifically to get them hurt(see hurt (see policeman below).



* '''[[{{Jobber}} Jobber]]''': Also referred to as "job guy", "carpenter" and "enhancement talent", this is a pro wrestler whose primary purpose is to lose matches. These performers are important, as they are needed to build up new stars by giving them ring experience and someone to win matches against. Oftentimes Jobbers are some of the more experienced wrestlers in a promotion and work with young talent, sort of on the job training. The Brooklyn Brawler served in this role for a long time in the WWE, and is still a trainer and agent behind the scenes.

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* '''[[{{Jobber}} Jobber]]''': '''{{Jobber}}''': Also referred to as "job guy", "carpenter" and "enhancement talent", this is a pro wrestler whose primary purpose is to lose matches. These performers are important, as they are needed to build up new stars by giving them ring experience and someone to win matches against. Oftentimes Jobbers are some of the more experienced wrestlers in a promotion and work with young talent, sort of on the job training. The Brooklyn Brawler served in this role for a long time in the WWE, and is still a trainer and agent behind the scenes.



* '''[[{{Kayfabe}} Kayfabe]]''': The art of presenting professional wrestling as a legitimate athletic competition. Up until the 1980's kayfabe was kept at all times, wrestlers never appeared out of character or acknowledged their lives outside of the ring. These days kayfabe refers more to the in-world context of wrestling performance, ie someone suffering a "kayfabe" injured shoulder doesn't actually have an injured shoulder, they are pretending to for the purposes of a story line.

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* '''[[{{Kayfabe}} Kayfabe]]''': '''{{Kayfabe}}''': The art of presenting professional wrestling as a legitimate athletic competition. Up until the 1980's kayfabe was kept at all times, wrestlers never appeared out of character or acknowledged their lives outside of the ring. These days kayfabe refers more to the in-world context of wrestling performance, ie someone suffering a "kayfabe" injured shoulder doesn't actually have an injured shoulder, they are pretending to for the purposes of a story line.



* '''NoSell:''' ''Not'' reacting to an opponent's move, as if it didn't hurt them at all. This was once considered a major dick move for making the other guy look weak and/or undermining kayfabe, but it can be used legitimately to convey that a wrestler is ''just that tough''.

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* '''NoSell:''' ''Not'' reacting to an opponent's move, as if it didn't hurt them at all. This was once Unplanned No Selling is considered a major dick move for making the other guy look weak and/or undermining kayfabe, but it can be used legitimately to convey that a wrestler is ''just that tough''.



* '''Shooter''': Someone who has a legitimate fighting background. Shooters are revered even amongst wrestlers as tough guys as someone that even they don't want to fight in RealLife. In the old days most pro wrestlers were legitimate amateur wrestlers, some with impressive pedigrees. Verne Gagne was a two-sport All-American for example. Brock Lesnar was an NCAA and UFC Heavyweight Champion. Kurt Angle won an Olympic Gold Medal (with a broken frikkin' neck). Some guys were just tougher than nails and nobody wanted to fight them, most notably Haku/Meng.

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* '''Shooter''': Someone who has a legitimate fighting background. Shooters are revered even amongst wrestlers as tough guys as someone that even they don't want to fight in RealLife. In the old days most pro wrestlers were legitimate amateur wrestlers, some with impressive pedigrees. Verne Gagne was a two-sport All-American for example. Brock Lesnar was an NCAA and UFC Heavyweight Champion. Kurt Angle won an Olympic Gold Medal (with ([[MemeticMutation with a broken frikkin' neck).freakin' neck]]). Some guys were just tougher than nails and nobody wanted to fight them, most notably Haku/Meng.


* '''Green''': Inexperienced, a rookie wrestler.



** Historically, it was used to refer to wrestlers who were so low on the totem pole they didn't always make it onto the shows, but who were still a step above the generic doughy no-entrance no-gimmick full jobbers. Unlike a normal jobber, who strictly worked television tapings, a jobber to the stars would work preliminary matches on house show tours. They were usually give at least a little bit of time to shine in their matches, and might occasionally win matches against full jobbers or each other. The position was often given to young wrestlers seen as potential future superstars who needed more experience, and to veterans who the company didn't want to push anymore but who were valuable for their ability to make their opponents look good. The vast majority of jobbers to the stars would be considered babyfaces, as they would be used to build up the heel side of the roster in preparation for matches with higher-up babyfaces. Well known jobbers to the stars include Special Delivery Jones, Barry Horrowitz, and The Gambler. This usage is falling off as the role itself isn't used much anymore.

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** Historically, it was used to refer to wrestlers who were so low on the totem pole they didn't always make it onto the shows, but who were still a step above the generic doughy no-entrance no-gimmick full jobbers. Unlike a normal jobber, who strictly worked television tapings, a jobber to the stars would work preliminary matches underneath on house show tours. They were usually give at least a little bit of time to shine in their matches, and might occasionally win matches against full jobbers or each other. The position was often given to young wrestlers seen as potential future superstars who needed more experience, and to veterans who the company didn't want to push anymore but who were valuable for their ability to make their opponents look good. The vast majority of jobbers to the stars would be considered babyfaces, as they would be used to build up the heel side of the roster in preparation for matches with higher-up babyfaces. Well known jobbers to the stars include Special Delivery Jones, Barry Horrowitz, and The Gambler. This usage is falling off as the role itself isn't used much anymore.


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* '''Mid-carder''': A wrestler who is over enough to not be considered a preliminary wrestler, but is not over enough to consistently work main events. Mid-carders typically hold the majority of a promotion's secondary titles.


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* '''Underneath:''' The bottom half of a wrestling card, typically working matches before the intermission. Wrestlers working underneath are the lowest full-time wrestlers in a promotion, typically only ranking above part-time TV jobbers. In the territory days, underneath matches would have shorter time limits and restrictions from the booker (no two men on the floor at the same time, no color) in order to not eclipse the top wrestlers.

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