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# '''''-ites''''': This suffix is typical for minerals, but has also been applied to some fossil groups of invertebrates (since fossils and rocks have always been associated with each other): more famously the Ammonites and the Trilobites, but also the Graptolites and the protozoan Nummulites.

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# '''''-ites''''': This suffix is typical for minerals, but has also been applied to some fossil groups of invertebrates (since fossils and rocks have always been associated with each other): more famously the Ammonites and the Trilobites, but also the Belemnites, the Graptolites and the protozoan Nummulites.


# '''''-ceras''''': Greek for “horn”. Most nautiloids have this, due to their horn-shaped shells. ''E.g.'' ''Orthoceras'', ''Cameroceras''.

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# '''''-ceras''''': Greek for “horn”. Most Many nautiloids (shelled cephalopods) have this, due to their horn-shaped shells. ''E.g.'' ''Orthoceras'', ''Cameroceras''.''Rhizoceras''.


# '''''-ceras''''': Greek for “horn”. Most ammonites and nautiloids have this, due to their horn-shaped shells. ''E.g.'' ''Orthoceras'', ''Cameroceras''.

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# '''''-ceras''''': Greek for “horn”. Most ammonites and nautiloids have this, due to their horn-shaped shells. ''E.g.'' ''Orthoceras'', ''Cameroceras''.




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# '''''-ites''''': This suffix is typical for minerals, but has also been applied to some fossil groups of invertebrates (since fossils and rocks have always been associated with each other): more famously the Ammonites and the Trilobites, but also the Graptolites and the protozoan Nummulites.


# '''''-(h)oplo''''': Greek for “armor”. ''E.g.'' ''Panoplosaurus'', ''Hoplophorus''.

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# '''''-(h)oplo''''': Greek for “armor”. ''E.g.'' ''Panoplosaurus'', ''Hoplophorus''.''Hoplophoneus''.


# '''''-(h)oplo''''': Greek for “armor”. ''E.g.'' ''Panoplosaurus'', ''Hoplosuchus''.

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# '''''-(h)oplo''''': Greek for “armor”. ''E.g.'' ''Panoplosaurus'', ''Hoplosuchus''.''Hoplophorus''.


# '''''-cetus''''': Greek for “sea-monster&rdquo: Extinct cetaceans can have this in their name. ''E.g.'' ''Pakicetus'', ''Odobenocetops''.

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# '''''-cetus''''': Greek for “sea-monster&rdquo: “sea-monster”. Extinct cetaceans can have this in their name. ''E.g.'' ''Pakicetus'', ''Odobenocetops''.

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# '''''-cetus''''': Greek for “sea-monster&rdquo: Extinct cetaceans can have this in their name. ''E.g.'' ''Pakicetus'', ''Odobenocetops''.


# '''''(h)oplo''''': Greek for “armor”. ''E.g.'' ''Panoplosaurus'', ''Hoplosuchus''.

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# '''''(h)oplo''''': '''''-(h)oplo''''': Greek for “armor”. ''E.g.'' ''Panoplosaurus'', ''Hoplosuchus''.

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# '''''(h)oplo''''': Greek for “armor”. ''E.g.'' ''Panoplosaurus'', ''Hoplosuchus''.


# '''''gorgo-''''' and '''''terato-''''': “Gorgo-” is “fierce&rdquo: (or can refer to the Gorgon of mythology) in Greek, whilst “terato-” is “monstrous”. ''E.g.'' ''Gorgosaurus''[[note]]“fierce lizard”[[/note]], ''Gorgonops''[[note]]“Gorgon face”/“Gorgon eye”[[/note]], ''Teratosaurus''[[note]]“monstrous lizard”[[/note]], ''Teratornis''[[note]]“monstrous bird”[[/note]].

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# '''''gorgo-''''' and '''''terato-''''': “Gorgo-” is “fierce&rdquo: “fierce”: (or can refer to the Gorgon of mythology) in Greek, whilst “terato-” is “monstrous”. ''E.g.'' ''Gorgosaurus''[[note]]“fierce lizard”[[/note]], ''Gorgonops''[[note]]“Gorgon face”/“Gorgon eye”[[/note]], ''Teratosaurus''[[note]]“monstrous lizard”[[/note]], ''Teratornis''[[note]]“monstrous bird”[[/note]].


# '''''drom-''''': Greek for “running” or “runner&rdquo. ''E.g.'' ''Dromaeosaurus''[[note]]“running lizard”[[/note]], ''Orodromeus''[[note]]“mountain runner”[[/note]], ''Kulindadromeus''[[note]]“runner of Kulinda”[[/note]].

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# '''''drom-''''': Greek for “running” or “runner&rdquo.“runner”. ''E.g.'' ''Dromaeosaurus''[[note]]“running lizard”[[/note]], ''Orodromeus''[[note]]“mountain runner”[[/note]], ''Kulindadromeus''[[note]]“runner of Kulinda”[[/note]].


# '''''-onyx/-onychus''''': Greek for &ldquonail” or “claw”. Theropods with one enlarged claw in their hand or foot have often these suffixes. ''E.g.'' ''Baryonyx'', ''Deinonychus''. Alvarezsaurid names end with the variant '''''-onykus''''': ''Mononykus''.

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# '''''-onyx/-onychus''''': Greek for &ldquonail” “nail” or “claw”. Theropods with one enlarged claw in their hand or foot have often these suffixes. ''E.g.'' ''Baryonyx'', ''Deinonychus''. Alvarezsaurid names end with the variant '''''-onykus''''': ''Mononykus''.


# '''''-tyrannus''''': Greek for “tyrant”. Often given to tyrannosaurids. ''E.g.'' ''Sinotyrannus'', ''Yutyrannus''.

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# '''''-tyrannus''''': Greek for “tyrant”. Often given to tyrannosaurids. ''E.g.'' ''Sinotyrannus'', ''Yutyrannus''. '''''-venator''''' (Latin for "hunter") can be sometimes applied to theropods. ''E.g.'' ''Microvenator'', ''Neovenator''.


# '''''-raptor''''': Latin for “thief”, “plunderer” or “robber”: since the success of ''Franchise/JurassicPark'', identifies mainly dromaeosaurids (''Pyroraptor'', ''Bambiraptor''), but many other theropod dinosaurs are named this as well: ''Oviraptor'', ''Megaraptor'', ''Fukuiraptor''. Birds of prey are also commonly called raptors, but no genus of avian dinosaur contains this suffix in its name.



# '''''-raptor''''': Latin for “thief”, “plunderer” or “robber”: since the success of ''Franchise/JurassicPark'', identifies mainly dromaeosaurids (''Pyroraptor'', ''Bambiraptor''), but many other theropod dinosaurs are named this as well: ''Oviraptor'', ''Megaraptor'', ''Fukuiraptor''. Birds of prey are also commonly called raptors, but no genus of avian dinosaur contains this suffix in its name.


# '''''-tyrannus''''': Greek for “tyrant”. Often given to tyrannosaurids. ''E.g.'' ''Sinotyrannus'', ''Yutyrannus''.



# '''''-tyrannus''''': Greek for “tyrant”. Often given to tyrannosaurids. ''E.g.'' ''Sinotyrannus'', ''Yutyrannus''.


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# '''''-tyrannus''''': Greek for “tyrant”. Often given to tyrannosaurids. ''E.g.'' ''Sinotyrannus'', ''Yutyrannus''.

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