Follow TV Tropes

Following

History UsefulNotes / PrehistoricLife

Go To



# '''''-ryu''''': Japanese for “[[DinosaursAreDragons dragon]]”. Across TheEighties 11 more or less fragmentary dinosaurs found in Japan were unofficially named "Fukuiryu" (an iguanodont), "Futabaryu" (a theropod), "Hironoryu" (a hadrosaur), "Hishanohamaryu" (a sauropod), "Kagaryu", "Katsuyamaryu", "Kitadaniryu", "Mifuneryu" (all theropods), "Moshiryu" (a sauropod), "Sanchuryu" (an ornithomimid), "Sugiyamaryu" (a sauropod). Then, in 1990, all them were renamed with the classic suffix -saurus, becoming "Fukuisaurus", "Futabasaurus", "Hironosaurus", "Hishanohamasaurus", "Kagasaurus", "Katsuyamasaurus", "Kitadanisaurus", "Mifunesaurus", "Moshisaurus", "Sanchusaurus", and "Sugiyamasaurus". All have not been described yet in official science except for ''Fukuisaurus'',[[note]]"Kitadanisaurus" is now lumped in the valid taxon ''Fukuiraptor'', while the name ''Futabasaurus'' is today assigned to a japanese sea-reptile related with ''Elasmosaurus''.[[/note]] and are thus labeled as ''Nomen nudum'' (lit. "naked name"); and some are also ''Nomen dubium'' (lit. "dubious name") -- the latter are those fossils that are too incomplete to be classified correctly. See also [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_informally_named_dinosaurs here]].

to:

# '''''-ryu''''': Japanese for “[[DinosaursAreDragons dragon]]”. Across TheEighties 11 more or less fragmentary dinosaurs found in Japan were unofficially named "Fukuiryu" (an iguanodont), "Futabaryu" (a theropod), "Fukuiryu", "Hironoryu" (a hadrosaur), "Hishanohamaryu" (a sauropod), (both ornithopods), "Hishanohamaryu", "Moshiryu", "Sugiyamaryu" (all sauropods), "Futabaryu", "Kagaryu", "Katsuyamaryu", "Kitadaniryu", "Mifuneryu" (all theropods), "Moshiryu" (a sauropod), "Mifuneryu", "Sanchuryu" (an ornithomimid), "Sugiyamaryu" (a sauropod).(all theropods). Then, in 1990, all them were renamed with the classic suffix -saurus, becoming "Fukuisaurus", "Futabasaurus", "Hironosaurus", "Hishanohamasaurus", "Kagasaurus", "Katsuyamasaurus", "Kitadanisaurus", "Mifunesaurus", "Moshisaurus", "Sanchusaurus", and "Sugiyamasaurus". All have not been described yet in official science except for ''Fukuisaurus'',[[note]]"Kitadanisaurus" is now lumped in the valid taxon ''Fukuiraptor'', while the name ''Futabasaurus'' is today assigned to a japanese sea-reptile related with ''Elasmosaurus''.[[/note]] and are thus labeled as ''Nomen nudum'' (lit. "naked name"); and some are also ''Nomen dubium'' (lit. "dubious name") -- the latter are those fossils that are too incomplete to be classified correctly. See also [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_informally_named_dinosaurs here]].


# '''''-ceras/cerato-/-ceros/-ceroto-''''': Greek for “horn”. Guess wha prominent feature these creatures bear. ''E.g.'' ''Megaloceros'', ''Teleoceras'', ''Ceratosaurus''. Also the common name of a famous modern animal: the rhinoceros of course (meaning “horned nose”).

to:

# '''''-ceras/cerato-/-ceros/-ceroto-''''': Greek for “horn”. Guess wha what prominent feature these creatures bear. ''E.g.'' ''Megaloceros'', ''Teleoceras'', ''Ceratosaurus''. Also the common name of a famous modern animal: the rhinoceros of course (meaning “horned nose”).


# '''''-therium''''': Greek for “beast” or “wild animal”. Most prehistoric mammals have this--the famous documentary ''Series/WalkingWithBeasts'' was so named in reference to the countless ''-therium''s here. ''E.g.'' ''Uintatherium'', "Baluchitherium", ''Chalicotherium'', ''Arsinoitherium'', ''Deinotherium'', ''Sivatherium'', ''Moeritherium''. But perhaps the most famous example is ''Megatherium''[[note]]“big beast”[[/note]]. Several ''-saurus''es have their ''-therium'' counterpart, too: ''Brontosaurus'' - "Brontotherium"; ''Stegosaurus'' - ''Stegotherium''; ''Elasmosaurus'' - ''Elasmotherium''; ''Megalosaurus'' - ''Megatherium''; ''Ceratosaurus'' - ''Ceratotherium''[[note]]the scientific name of the ''modern'' white rhinoceros![[/note]]. '''''Ther-''''' has the same meaning and is the prefix of two important groups of animals: the theropods and the therapsids.

to:

# '''''-therium''''': Greek for “beast” or “wild animal”. Most prehistoric mammals have this--the famous documentary ''Series/WalkingWithBeasts'' was so named in reference to the countless ''-therium''s here. ''E.g.'' ''Uintatherium'', "Baluchitherium", ''Chalicotherium'', ''Arsinoitherium'', ''Deinotherium'', ''Sivatherium'', ''Moeritherium''. But perhaps the most famous example is ''Megatherium''[[note]]“big beast”[[/note]]. Several ''-saurus''es have their ''-therium'' counterpart, too: ''Brontosaurus'' - "Brontotherium"; ''Stegosaurus'' - ''Stegotherium''; ''Elasmosaurus'' - ''Elasmotherium''; ''Megalosaurus'' - ''Megatherium''; ''Ceratosaurus'' - ''Ceratotherium''[[note]]the scientific name of the ''modern'' white rhinoceros![[/note]]. '''''Ther-''''' has the same meaning and is the prefix of two important groups of animals: the theropods and the therapsids. ''Fulgurotherium'' is an exception, being a dinosaur.


# '''Jurassic period''': Dinosaurs became the largest and most diverse land vertebrates, and some became fliers (including possible proto-birds). New types of pterosaurs and marine reptiles evolved. The three still-living mammalian groups appeared.

to:

# '''Jurassic period''': Dinosaurs became the largest and most diverse land vertebrates, and some became fliers (including possible proto-birds). New types of pterosaurs and marine reptiles evolved. The three still-living mammalian groups (monotremes, marsupials, and eutherians/placentals) appeared.


# '''''-saurus''''': Greek for “lizard”: in paleontology identifies reptiles in general (in the traditional sense of the word), not only dinosaurs. ''E.g.'' ''Allosaurus'', ''Plesiosaurus'', ''Scutosaurus'', ''Edaphosaurus''. Often identifies amphibians as well: ''Mastodonsaurus''. The whale ''Basilosaurus'' is an exception due to ScienceMarchesOn (it was initially believed to be a marine reptile). The suffix can also become a prefix: ''Saurolophus'', ''Sauroctonus'', ''Saurosuchus'', the sauropods, and the saurischians. Also attested is the feminine variant '''''-saura''''': ''Maiasaura'', ''Leaellynasaura''.

to:

# '''''-saurus''''': Greek for “lizard”: in paleontology identifies reptiles in general (in the traditional sense of the word), not only dinosaurs. ''E.g.'' ''Allosaurus'', ''Plesiosaurus'', ''Scutosaurus'', ''Edaphosaurus''. Often identifies amphibians as well: ''Mastodonsaurus''. The whale ''Basilosaurus'' is an exception due to ScienceMarchesOn (it was initially believed to be a marine reptile). [[note]]Which illustrates one of the quirks of taxonomy. The original scientific name assigned to a species will continue to be used, even if it's "wrong". The only exceptions are if it's later discovered to be part of an already-named genus (in which case the genus portion of the name has to be changed), or if the discoverer of the species mistakenly assigns a name that's already in use for a different species.[[/note]] The suffix can also become a prefix: ''Saurolophus'', ''Sauroctonus'', ''Saurosuchus'', the sauropods, and the saurischians. Also attested is the feminine variant '''''-saura''''': ''Maiasaura'', ''Leaellynasaura''.


# '''''-mimus''''': Greek for “mimic”: mostly identifies small birdlike theropods, particularly ornithomimids (whose names are usually preceded with a bird-related prefix). ''E.g.'' ''Garudimimus'', ''Struthiomimus'', ''Avimimus''. Also applied to some larger and smaller dinosaurs; specifically, theropods seem to get this suffix somewhat often, due to their close relation to avian dinosaurs: ''Suchomimus'', ''Sciurumimus''.

to:

# '''''-mimus''''': Greek for “mimic”: mostly identifies small birdlike theropods, particularly ornithomimids (whose names are usually preceded with a bird-related prefix). ''E.g.'' ''Garudimimus'', ''Struthiomimus'', ''Gallimimus'', ''Avimimus''. Also applied to some larger and smaller dinosaurs; specifically, theropods seem to get this suffix somewhat often, due to their close relation to avian dinosaurs: ''Suchomimus'', ''Sciurumimus''.



# '''''-onyx/-onychus''''': Greek for “nail” or “claw”. Animals with one or more enlarged claws in their hand or foot (or mainly known from their claws) have often these suffixes. ''E.g.'' ''Baryonyx'', ''Deinonychus'', ''Hesperonychus'', ''Megalonyx'', ''Scipionyx''. Alvarezsaurid names end with the variant '''''-onykus''''': ''Mononykus''.

to:

# '''''-onyx/-onychus''''': Greek for “nail” or “claw”. Animals with one or more enlarged claws in their hand or foot (or mainly known from their claws) have often these suffixes. ''E.g.'' ''Baryonyx'', ''Deinonychus'', ''Hesperonychus'', ''Megalonyx'', ''Scaphonyx'', ''Scipionyx''. Alvarezsaurid names end with the variant '''''-onykus''''': ''Mononykus''.


# '''''-ryu''''': Japanese for “[[DinosaursAreDragons dragon]]”. In the 1980s, 11 very fragmentary dinosaurs found in Japan were unofficially named with this ending: "Fukuiryu", "Futabaryu", "Hironoryu", "Hishanohamaryu", "Kagaryu", "Katsuyamaryu", "Kitadaniryu", "Mifuneryu", "Moshiryu", "Sanchuryu", "Sugiyamaryu". Then all them were renamed with the classic suffix -saurus, becoming "Fukuisaurus", "Futabasaurus", "Hironosaurus", "Hishanohamasaurus", "Kagasaurus", "Katsuyamasaurus", "Kitadanisaurus", "Mifunesaurus", "Moshisaurus", "Sanchusaurus", and "Sugiyamasaurus". Most of them are still not described yet and are thus ''Nomen nudum'' ("naked name"); and many are also ''Nomen dubium'' ("dubious name") -- the latter are those fossils that are too incomplete to be classified formally in the known zoological genuses. See also [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_informally_named_dinosaurs here]].

to:

# '''''-ryu''''': Japanese for “[[DinosaursAreDragons dragon]]”. In the 1980s, Across TheEighties 11 very more or less fragmentary dinosaurs found in Japan were unofficially named with this ending: "Fukuiryu", "Futabaryu", "Hironoryu", "Hishanohamaryu", "Fukuiryu" (an iguanodont), "Futabaryu" (a theropod), "Hironoryu" (a hadrosaur), "Hishanohamaryu" (a sauropod), "Kagaryu", "Katsuyamaryu", "Kitadaniryu", "Mifuneryu", "Moshiryu", "Sanchuryu", "Sugiyamaryu". Then "Mifuneryu" (all theropods), "Moshiryu" (a sauropod), "Sanchuryu" (an ornithomimid), "Sugiyamaryu" (a sauropod). Then, in 1990, all them were renamed with the classic suffix -saurus, becoming "Fukuisaurus", "Futabasaurus", "Hironosaurus", "Hishanohamasaurus", "Kagasaurus", "Katsuyamasaurus", "Kitadanisaurus", "Mifunesaurus", "Moshisaurus", "Sanchusaurus", and "Sugiyamasaurus". Most of them are still All have not been described yet in official science except for ''Fukuisaurus'',[[note]]"Kitadanisaurus" is now lumped in the valid taxon ''Fukuiraptor'', while the name ''Futabasaurus'' is today assigned to a japanese sea-reptile related with ''Elasmosaurus''.[[/note]] and are thus labeled as ''Nomen nudum'' ("naked (lit. "naked name"); and many some are also ''Nomen dubium'' ("dubious (lit. "dubious name") -- the latter are those fossils that are too incomplete to be classified formally in the known zoological genuses.correctly. See also [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_informally_named_dinosaurs here]].


# '''''megalo-''''', '''''titano-''''', and '''''giganto-''''': Greek for “big”, “titanic”, and “gigantic”. ''E.g.'' ''Megalosaurus''[[note]]“big lizard”[[/note]], ''Megaloceros''[[note]]“big horn”[[/note]], ''Wintonotitan''[[note]]“Winchester titan”[[/note]], ''Titanoboa''[[note]]“titanic boa”[[/note]], ''Gigantophis''[[note]]“gigantic snake”[[/note]], ''Gigantopithecus''[[note]]“gigantic ape”[[/note]], ''Giganotosaurus''[[note]]“gigantic southern lizard”[[/note]], ''C. megalodon''[[note]]“enormous tooth”[[/note]].

to:

# '''''megalo-''''', '''''mega-/megalo-''''', '''''titano-''''', and '''''giganto-''''': '''''giga-/giganto-''''': Greek for “big”, “titanic”, and “gigantic”. ''E.g.'' ''Megalosaurus''[[note]]“big lizard”[[/note]], ''Megaloceros''[[note]]“big horn”[[/note]], ''Megantereon''[[note]]“big throat/mouth”[[/note]], ''Megaraptor''[[note]]“big robber”[[/note]], ''Wintonotitan''[[note]]“Winchester titan”[[/note]], ''Titanosaurus''[[note]]“titanic lizard”[[/note]], ''Titanoboa''[[note]]“titanic boa”[[/note]], ''Gigantophis''[[note]]“gigantic snake”[[/note]], ''Gigantopithecus''[[note]]“gigantic ape”[[/note]], ''Giganotosaurus''[[note]]“gigantic southern lizard”[[/note]], ''C. megalodon''[[note]]“enormous tooth”[[/note]].


# '''''-odon/-odonto-''''': Greek for “tooth”. Animals with notable teeth (or that are known mainly by their teeth) can get names containing this. ''E.g.'' ''Heterodontosaurus'', ''Thecodontosaurus'', ''Carcharodontosaurus''[[note]] “shark-toothed lizard”[[/note]]. Mammalian example are ''Smilodon'' and ''Glyptodon''. Other examples: ''Iguanodon'', ''Hypsilophodon'', ''Troodon'', ''Dimetrodon'', ''Dimorphodon'', ''Megalodon''. A deceptive case is ''Pteranodon'', which actually means “winged with ''no'' teeth”. Less-frequent is the variant '''''-odus''''', with the same meaning: ''Placodus'', ''Hybodus'', ''Phenacodus''.

to:

# '''''-odon/-odonto-''''': Greek for “tooth”. Animals with notable teeth (or that are known mainly by their teeth) can get names containing this. ''E.g.'' ''Heterodontosaurus'', ''Thecodontosaurus'', ''Carcharodontosaurus''[[note]] “shark-toothed lizard”[[/note]]. Mammalian example are ''Smilodon'' and ''Glyptodon''. Other examples: ''Iguanodon'', ''Hypsilophodon'', ''Troodon'', ''Dimetrodon'', ''Dimorphodon'', ''Megalodon''.''Megalodon'', the Conodonts. A deceptive case is ''Pteranodon'', which actually means “winged with ''no'' teeth”. Less-frequent is the variant '''''-odus''''', with the same meaning: ''Placodus'', ''Hybodus'', ''Phenacodus''.



# '''''-rhinus/rhino-''''': Greek for “nose”. Critters with something prominent on their noses often have this. ''E.g.'' ''Altirhinus'', ''Pachyrhinosaurus'', ''Eurhinodelphis''.
# '''''-rhynchus/rhyncho-''''': Greek for “beak”, but also “muzzle”. ''E.g.'' ''Rhamphorhynchus'', ''Metriorhynchus'', ''Rhynchosaurus'', ''Rhynchippus'', .
# '''''-gnathus/gnatho-''''': Greek for “jaw”. ''E.g.'' ''Compsognathus'', ''Cynognathus'', ''Batrachognathus'', ''Gnathosaurus''.
# '''''-pteryx/ptero-/-pterus/-pteron''''': Greek for “wing”, “feather”, but also “fin”. ''E.g.'' the winged ''Archaeopteryx'', ''Pterodaustro'', ''Dsungaripterus''; and the fish ''Eusthenopteron''. Also known is the variant '''''pteryg-''''' (indicating fins or fin-like structures): ''Pterygotus'', ''Stenopterygius''. Actinopterygii and Sarcopterygii respectively mean “rayed fin” and “fleshy fin”.

to:

# '''''-rhinus/rhino-''''': Greek for “nose”. Critters with something prominent on their noses often have this. ''E.g.'' ''Altirhinus'', ''Pachyrhinosaurus'', ''Eurhinodelphis''.
''Eurhinodelphis'', ''Dicerorhinus''.
# '''''-rhynchus/rhyncho-''''': Greek for “beak”, but also “muzzle”. ''E.g.'' ''Rhamphorhynchus'', ''Metriorhynchus'', ''Rhynchosaurus'', ''Rhynchippus'', .
''Rhynchippus''.
# '''''-gnathus/gnatho-''''': Greek for “jaw”. ''E.g.'' ''Compsognathus'', ''Cynognathus'', ''Batrachognathus'', ''Gnathosaurus''.
''Gnathosaurus'', ''Pristerognathus''.
# '''''-pteryx/ptero-/-pterus/-pteron''''': Greek for “wing”, “feather”, but also “fin”. ''E.g.'' the winged ''Archaeopteryx'', ''Pterodaustro'', ''Dsungaripterus''; and the fish ''Eusthenopteron''. Also known is the variant '''''pteryg-''''' (indicating fins or fin-like structures): ''Pterygotus'', ''Stenopterygius''.''Stenopterygius'', ''Platypterygius''. Actinopterygii and Sarcopterygii respectively mean “rayed fin” and “fleshy fin”.



# '''''-spondylus''''': Greek for “vertebra”. ''E.g.'' ''Massospondylus'', ''Eustreptospondylus'', ''Bothriospondylus''.

to:

# '''''-spondylus''''': Greek for “vertebra”. ''E.g.'' ''Massospondylus'', ''Eustreptospondylus'', ''Bothriospondylus''.''Bothriospondylus'', ''Spondylosoma''.



# '''''-ch(e)irus/ch(e)iro-''''': Greek for “hand”. ''E.g.'' ''Deinocheirus'', ''Chirostenotes'', "Chirotherium".
# '''''-pus/-po-''''': Greek for “foot”. ''E.g.'' ''Moropus'', ''Astrapotherium'', ''Saltopus'', ''Saltoposuchus''.

to:

# '''''-ch(e)irus/ch(e)iro-''''': Greek for “hand”. ''E.g.'' ''Deinocheirus'', ''Austrocheirus'', ''Chirostenotes'', "Chirotherium".
# '''''-pus/-po-''''': Greek for “foot”. ''E.g.'' ''Moropus'', ''Astrapotherium'', ''Saltopus'', ''Saltoposuchus''.''Saltoposuchus'', ''Hallopus''.



# '''''diplo-''''': Greek for “double”. ''E.g.'' ''Diplodocus''[[note]]“double beam”[[/note]], ''Diplocaulus''[[note]]“double caul”[[/note]], ''Diplocynodon''[[note]]“double dog tooth”[[/note]],

to:

# '''''diplo-''''': Greek for “double”. ''E.g.'' ''Diplodocus''[[note]]“double beam”[[/note]], ''Diplocaulus''[[note]]“double caul”[[/note]], ''Diplocynodon''[[note]]“double dog tooth”[[/note]], tooth”[[/note]].


# '''''diplo-''''': Greek for “double”. ''E.g.'' ''Diplodocus''[[note]]“double beam”[[/note]], ''Diplocaulus''[[note]]“double caul”[[/note]].

to:

# '''''diplo-''''': Greek for “double”. ''E.g.'' ''Diplodocus''[[note]]“double beam”[[/note]], ''Diplocaulus''[[note]]“double caul”[[/note]].caul”[[/note]], ''Diplocynodon''[[note]]“double dog tooth”[[/note]],


# '''''-cephalus/-cephalo-''''': Greek for “head”. ''E.g.'' ''Euoplocephalus'', ''Cistecephalus'', ''Planocephalosaurus''.

to:

# '''''-cephalus/-cephalo-''''': Greek for “head”. ''E.g.'' ''Euoplocephalus'', ''Cistecephalus'', ''Planocephalosaurus''.''Planocephalosaurus'', ''Caulkicephalus''.



# '''''-rhynchus/rhyncho-''''': Greek for “beak”, but also “muzzle”. ''E.g.'' ''Rhamphorhynchus'', ''Rhynchosaurus'', ''Rhynchippus''.

to:

# '''''-rhynchus/rhyncho-''''': Greek for “beak”, but also “muzzle”. ''E.g.'' ''Rhamphorhynchus'', ''Metriorhynchus'', ''Rhynchosaurus'', ''Rhynchippus''.''Rhynchippus'', .



# '''''-onyx/-onychus''''': Greek for “nail” or “claw”. Theropods with one enlarged claw in their hand or foot (or fossils mainly known from their claws) have often these suffixes. ''E.g.'' ''Baryonyx'', ''Deinonychus'', ''Nothronychus'', ''Megalonyx''. Alvarezsaurid names end with the variant '''''-onykus''''': ''Mononykus''.

to:

# '''''-onyx/-onychus''''': Greek for “nail” or “claw”. Theropods Animals with one or more enlarged claw claws in their hand or foot (or fossils mainly known from their claws) have often these suffixes. ''E.g.'' ''Baryonyx'', ''Deinonychus'', ''Nothronychus'', ''Megalonyx''.''Hesperonychus'', ''Megalonyx'', ''Scipionyx''. Alvarezsaurid names end with the variant '''''-onykus''''': ''Mononykus''.



# '''''-(h)oplo-''''': Greek for “armor”, “weapon”. ''E.g.'' ''Panoplosaurus'', ''Hoplophoneus'', ''Hoplitomeryx''.

to:

# '''''-(h)oplo-''''': Greek for “armor”, “weapon”. ''E.g.'' ''Panoplosaurus'', ''Dyoplosaurus'', ''Hoplophoneus'', ''Hoplitomeryx''.



# '''''-urus/uro-''''': Greek for “tail”. ''E.g.'' ''Dacentrurus'', ''Coelurus'', ''Urocordylus'', ''Macrurosaurus''. There is also '''''-cercus''''' with the same meaning: ''E.g.'' ''Pholidocercus'', ''Eucercosaurus''.

to:

# '''''-urus/uro-''''': Greek for “tail”. ''E.g.'' ''Dacentrurus'', ''Coelurus'', ''Urocordylus'', ''Macrurosaurus''.''Teinurosaurus''. There is also '''''-cercus''''' with the same meaning: ''E.g.'' ''Pholidocercus'', ''Eucercosaurus''.



# '''''-oides''''': Greek for “similar to”, or figuratively, “false”. ''E.g.'' ''Dromaeosauroides'', ''Sinornithoides'', ''Campylognathoides''.

to:

# '''''-oides''''': Greek for “similar to”, or figuratively, “false”. ''E.g.'' ''Dromaeosauroides'', ''Sinornithoides'', ''Archaeornithoides'', ''Saurornithoides'', ''Campylognathoides''.



# '''''micro-''''': Greek for “small”, “tiny”. ''E.g.'' ''Microraptor''[[note]]“tiny plunderer”[[/note]], ''Microceratus''[[note]]“small horned one”[[/note]], ''Micropachycephalosaurus''[[note]]“small thick-headed lizard”[[/note]].

to:

# '''''macro-''''' and '''''micro-''''': Greek for “small”, “tiny”.“big”/ “large” and “small”/ “tiny” respectively. ''E.g.'' ''Macrophalangia''[[note]]“big digits”[[/note]], ''Macrurosaurus''[[note]]“large-tailed lizard”[[/note]], ''Microraptor''[[note]]“tiny plunderer”[[/note]], ''Microceratus''[[note]]“small horned one”[[/note]], ''Micropachycephalosaurus''[[note]]“small thick-headed lizard”[[/note]].


# '''''-ryu''''': Japanese for “[[DinosaursAreDragons dragon]]”. In the 1980s, 11 very fragmentary dinosaurs found in Japan were unofficially named with this ending: "Fukuiryu", "Futabaryu", "Hironoryu", "Hishanohamaryu", "Kagaryu", "Katsuyamaryu", "Kitadaniryu", "Mifuneryu", "Moshiryu", "Sanchuryu", "Sugiyamaryu". Then all them were renamed with the classic suffix -saurus, becoming "Fukuisaurus", "Futabasaurus", "Hironosaurus", "Hishanohamasaurus", "Kagasaurus", "Katsuyamasaurus", "Kitadanisaurus", "Mifunesaurus", "Moshisaurus", "Sanchusaurus", and "Sugiyamasaurus". Most of them are still not described yet and are thus ''Nomen nudum'' ("naked name"); and many are also ''Nomen dubium'' ("dubious name") -- the latter are those fossils that are too incomplete to be classified formally in the known zoological genuses. See also [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lust_of_informally_named_dinosaurs here]].

to:

# '''''-ryu''''': Japanese for “[[DinosaursAreDragons dragon]]”. In the 1980s, 11 very fragmentary dinosaurs found in Japan were unofficially named with this ending: "Fukuiryu", "Futabaryu", "Hironoryu", "Hishanohamaryu", "Kagaryu", "Katsuyamaryu", "Kitadaniryu", "Mifuneryu", "Moshiryu", "Sanchuryu", "Sugiyamaryu". Then all them were renamed with the classic suffix -saurus, becoming "Fukuisaurus", "Futabasaurus", "Hironosaurus", "Hishanohamasaurus", "Kagasaurus", "Katsuyamasaurus", "Kitadanisaurus", "Mifunesaurus", "Moshisaurus", "Sanchusaurus", and "Sugiyamasaurus". Most of them are still not described yet and are thus ''Nomen nudum'' ("naked name"); and many are also ''Nomen dubium'' ("dubious name") -- the latter are those fossils that are too incomplete to be classified formally in the known zoological genuses. See also [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lust_of_informally_named_dinosaurs org/wiki/List_of_informally_named_dinosaurs here]].


# '''''-ryu''''': Japanese for “[[DinosaursAreDragons dragon]]”. In the 1980s 11 fragmentary dinosaurs found in Japan in those years were unofficially named with this ending: "Fukuiryu", "Futabaryu", "Hironoryu", "Hishanohamaryu", "Kagaryu", "Katsuyamaryu", "Kitadaniryu", "Mifuneryu", "Moshiryu", "Sanchuryu", "Sugiyamaryu". Then all them were renamed with the classic suffix ''-saurus'', becoming "Fukuisaurus", "Futabasaurus", "Hironosaurus", "Hishanohamasaurus", "Kagasaurus", "Katsuyamasaurus", "Kitadanisaurus", "Mifunesaurus", "Moshisaurus", "Sanchusaurus", and "Sugiyamasaurus". Most of them are still not described yet and are thus ''Nomen nudum'' ("naked name"), and many are also ''Nomen dubium'' ("dubious name") -- the latter are those fossils that are too incomplete to be classified formally in the known zoological genuses.

to:

# '''''-ryu''''': Japanese for “[[DinosaursAreDragons dragon]]”. In the 1980s 1980s, 11 very fragmentary dinosaurs found in Japan in those years were unofficially named with this ending: "Fukuiryu", "Futabaryu", "Hironoryu", "Hishanohamaryu", "Kagaryu", "Katsuyamaryu", "Kitadaniryu", "Mifuneryu", "Moshiryu", "Sanchuryu", "Sugiyamaryu". Then all them were renamed with the classic suffix ''-saurus'', -saurus, becoming "Fukuisaurus", "Futabasaurus", "Hironosaurus", "Hishanohamasaurus", "Kagasaurus", "Katsuyamasaurus", "Kitadanisaurus", "Mifunesaurus", "Moshisaurus", "Sanchusaurus", and "Sugiyamasaurus". Most of them are still not described yet and are thus ''Nomen nudum'' ("naked name"), name"); and many are also ''Nomen dubium'' ("dubious name") -- the latter are those fossils that are too incomplete to be classified formally in the known zoological genuses. See also [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lust_of_informally_named_dinosaurs here]].

Added DiffLines:

# '''''-ryu''''': Japanese for “[[DinosaursAreDragons dragon]]”. In the 1980s 11 fragmentary dinosaurs found in Japan in those years were unofficially named with this ending: "Fukuiryu", "Futabaryu", "Hironoryu", "Hishanohamaryu", "Kagaryu", "Katsuyamaryu", "Kitadaniryu", "Mifuneryu", "Moshiryu", "Sanchuryu", "Sugiyamaryu". Then all them were renamed with the classic suffix ''-saurus'', becoming "Fukuisaurus", "Futabasaurus", "Hironosaurus", "Hishanohamasaurus", "Kagasaurus", "Katsuyamasaurus", "Kitadanisaurus", "Mifunesaurus", "Moshisaurus", "Sanchusaurus", and "Sugiyamasaurus". Most of them are still not described yet and are thus ''Nomen nudum'' ("naked name"), and many are also ''Nomen dubium'' ("dubious name") -- the latter are those fossils that are too incomplete to be classified formally in the known zoological genuses.


# '''''syn-''''': Greek for “fused” or “united”. ''E.g.'' ''Synthetoceras''[[note]]“fused horn”[[/note]].

to:

# '''''syn-''''': Greek for “fused” or “united”. ''E.g.'' ''Synthetoceras''[[note]]“fused horn”[[/note]].
horn”[[/note]], "Syntarsus".[[note]]“fused keel”[[/note]],

Showing 15 edit(s) of 527

Top

How well does it match the trope?

Example of:

/

Media sources:

/

Report