Follow TV Tropes

Following

History UsefulNotes / PlayStationVita

Go To



* ''VisualNovel/DanganRonpa 1&[[VisualNovel/SuperDanganRonpa2 2]] RELOAD''[[note]]Released separately outside Japan. The first game's remake was be released as ''Danganronpa: Trigger Happy Havoc'', and the second as ''Danganronpa 2: Goodbye Despair''.[[/note]]
** ''[[VideoGame/AbsoluteDespairGirls Absolute Despair Girls: Danganronpa Another Episode]]''
** ''[[VisualNovel/NewDanganRonpaV3 New Dangan Ronpa V3]]''

to:

* ''VisualNovel/DanganRonpa 1&[[VisualNovel/SuperDanganRonpa2 2]] RELOAD''[[note]]Released separately outside Japan. The first game's remake was be released as ''Danganronpa: Trigger Happy Havoc'', and the second as ''Danganronpa 2: Goodbye Despair''.[[/note]]
''Franchise/{{Danganronpa}}''
** ''[[VideoGame/AbsoluteDespairGirls Absolute Despair Girls: Danganronpa Another Episode]]''
''VisualNovel/DanganronpaTriggerHappyHavoc''
** ''[[VisualNovel/NewDanganRonpaV3 New Dangan Ronpa V3]]''''VisualNovel/Danganronpa2GoodbyeDespair''
** ''VideoGame/DanganronpaAnotherEpisodeUltraDespairGirls''
** ''VisualNovel/DanganronpaV3KillingHarmony''



* ''VideoGame/TheLegendOfHeroesTrailsInTheSky Evolution''



%%* ''VideoGame/MightyNo9'' (No news on the progress of the mobile ports since the release of the game in June 2016...)



%%** ''VideoGame/MinecraftStoryMode'' (not released on Vita)


Added DiffLines:

* ''VideoGame/ZankiZero''


Added DiffLines:

* ''VideoGame/ZeroNoKiseki Evolution''


*** You might have difficulty in getting ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyIII''.

Added DiffLines:

* ''VisualNovel/ClockZero''

Added DiffLines:

* ''VideoGame/{{Crimsonland}}''


* ''VideoGame/HotaruNoNikkiTheFireflyDiary''



%%** ''VideoGame/MinecraftStoryMode'' (not released on Vita

to:

%%** ''VideoGame/MinecraftStoryMode'' (not released on VitaVita)
* ''VideoGame/MiracleGirlsFestival''


Added DiffLines:

* ''2064: VideoGame/ReadOnlyMemories''


Added DiffLines:

* ''VideoGame/AVirusNamedTOM''


* ''Franchise/SlyCooper''

to:

* ''Franchise/SlyCooper''''VideoGame/SlyCooper''

Added DiffLines:

* ''VideoGame/UncannyValley''

Added DiffLines:

* ''VideoGame/{{Shutshimi}}''

Added DiffLines:

* ''VisualNovel/DiabolikLovers''


Added DiffLines:

* ''[[VideoGame/Idolish7 Idolish7 Twelve Fantasia!]]''


Added DiffLines:

* ''VisualNovel/UtaNoPrinceSama''


Short story: Sony's successor to the UsefulNotes/PlayStationPortable that turned the company "successful failure" in the handheld gaming market into an indisputable actual failure. While the device managed to perform decently well in its home country, thanks to Japan's overall preference for handheld gaming over home console, the Vita completely failed in cultivating an user-base outside of Asia and is currently the company's worst-selling system by a ''wide'' margin.

Long story: Debuting at the beginning of 2011 in a private press conference by Sony, and bestowed with the official name of [=PlayStation=] Vita at UsefulNotes/{{E3}} 2011, pre-release reactions towards the company's newest handheld eerily mirrored those of its predecessor. Just as the [=PSP=] before it, gaming media denoted the Vita as the Nintendo Killer. In light of the UsefulNotes/Nintendo3DS's lackluster debut, combined with the multimedia capabilities the Vita provided and the substantial power gap between the two, Sony's handheld was once again seen as [[http://www.ign.com/articles/2011/10/22/the-playstation-vita-is-set-to-succeed the obvious consumer buy]] over Nintendo's offering. After all, following their [[UsefulNotes/PlayStationPortable two]] [[UsefulNotes/PlayStation3 previous]] systems falling below expectations in terms of sales, Sony appeared to be making all the right moves:

* Instead of using the highly custom console technology that the [[UsefulNotes/PlayStation3 PS3]] used, the Vita utilized common smartphone technology in order to ease game development.
* It was the first widely-available dual analog handheld. This not only addressed one of the hardware flaws levied at the [=PSP=], but also further differentiated it from the Nintendo 3DS, whose early models required an add-on for a second analog stick.
* The Vita shared features similar to smartphones, such as a touch screen and motion sensor, in addition to a device called [=PlayStation=] Mobile, which allowed users connectivity between the Vita and a smartphone/tablet and essentially allowed developers put their games onto it for free[[note]]Sony initially charged membership fees for the privilege, but eventually waived those fees[[/note]].
* The handheld used flashcards instead of optical disks for game distribution, as the original PSP, despite selling reasonably well, suffered from numerous problems caused by its use of optical discs that are detailed on [[UsefulNotes/PlayStationPortable it's own Useful Notes page]].

to:

Short story: Sony's successor to the UsefulNotes/PlayStationPortable that turned the company company's "successful failure" in the handheld gaming market into an indisputable indisputable, actual failure. While the device managed to perform decently well enough in its home country, country thanks to Japan's overall growing preference for handheld gaming over home console, consoles, the Vita completely failed in cultivating an user-base to cultivate a user base outside of Asia Asia, and is currently the company's worst-selling system by a ''wide'' margin.

Long story: Debuting at the beginning of 2011 in a private press conference by Sony, and bestowed with the official name of [=PlayStation=] Vita at UsefulNotes/{{E3}} 2011, pre-release reactions towards the company's to Sony's newest handheld eerily mirrored those of its predecessor. Just as the [=PSP=] before it, gaming media denoted proclaimed the Vita as to be the Nintendo Killer. In light of the UsefulNotes/Nintendo3DS's lackluster debut, rocky start, combined with the multimedia capabilities the Vita provided and the substantial power gap between the two, Sony's handheld was once again seen as [[http://www.ign.com/articles/2011/10/22/the-playstation-vita-is-set-to-succeed the obvious consumer buy]] over Nintendo's offering. After all, following their [[UsefulNotes/PlayStationPortable two]] [[UsefulNotes/PlayStation3 previous]] systems falling below expectations in terms of sales, Sony appeared to have learned their lesson and to be making all the right moves:

* Instead of using the highly custom console technology components that the [[UsefulNotes/PlayStation3 PS3]] used, the Vita utilized common smartphone technology in order to ease game development.
* It was the first widely-available dual analog handheld. This not only addressed one of the hardware flaws levied at longstanding complaints leveled against the [=PSP=], but also further differentiated it from the Nintendo 3DS, whose early models required an add-on for a second analog stick.
* The Vita shared features similar to smartphones, such as a touch screen and motion sensor, in addition to a device called [=PlayStation=] Mobile, which allowed users connectivity between the Vita and a smartphone/tablet and essentially allowed developers put their games onto it for free[[note]]Sony initially charged membership fees for the privilege, but eventually waived those fees[[/note]].
them[[/note]].
* The handheld used flashcards instead of optical disks for game distribution, as the original PSP, despite selling reasonably well, suffered from numerous problems caused by its use of optical discs that are discs, as detailed on [[UsefulNotes/PlayStationPortable it's its own Useful Notes page]].



* Finally, the launch price was US$249 for the Wi-Fi only model, the same initial price as its much weaker, then-struggling competitor the UsefulNotes/Nintendo3DS. There was also a model with 3G support for US$299.

to:

* Finally, the launch price was US$249 for the Wi-Fi only model, the same initial price as its much weaker, then-struggling competitor competitor, the UsefulNotes/Nintendo3DS. There was also a model with 3G support for US$299.



* Like its predecessor, Sony's initial message was that the [=PlayStation=] Vita would be console gaming on-the-go, and it sought to prove this with a launch year lineup that mainly consisted of new entries in major console franchises such as ''VideoGame/{{Uncharted}}'' and ''VideoGame/{{Resistance}}''. However, these games were made by different developers than their console counterparts, with critics viewing most of these new Vita installments as B-Team efforts that sorely lacked in quality; the most notable of these failures including the critically-panned launch title ''[[VideoGame/CallOfDuty Call of Duty: Black Ops Declassified]]''. More impressive efforts such as ''[[VideoGame/{{Killzone}} Killzone: Mercenary]]'' would only come years after initial enthusiasm depleted, and unlike the PSP, Rockstar Games did not develop a single ''Videogame/GrandTheftAuto'' title. By the end of its life, the closest title the system had for a {{killer app}} ended up being ''[[VideoGame/Persona4 Persona 4: Golden]]'', an UpdatedRerelease of a [=PS2=] game.
* The original version of the console has no internal memory; only external memory in the form of a proprietary Sony Memory Stick, a new type of memory stick exclusive to the Vita; as the sticks were modified microSD cards, [[NoBackwardsCompatibilityInTheFuture previous PRO and DUO Memory Sticks used by the PSP could not work with it]]. These memory sticks were also rather expensive and slow: a 32-gigabyte stick cost US$80 at launch (''four times the cost'' of an equivalent SD card at the time), and their transfer rates compared ''very'' poorly to Class-10 and UHS-1 SD cards in the same price bracket, [[http://www.eurogamer.net/articles/df-hardware-how-fast-are-vita-memory-cards with one article about a battery of speed tests]] proving that in some cases, the Vita cards are ''even slower'' than ''Class-4'' SD cards.[[note]]Though, if the user is willing to hack the system's OS and sacrifice either their game card slot (all models), 3G modem (3G model) or USB port (PSTV) then they can adopt traditional storage in the form of microSD cards or USB media. See the homebrew/hacking section below.[[/note]] It didn't help that there seemed to be no rhyme or reason to which retail Vita games [[https://www.engadget.com/2011/10/21/report-these-are-the-vita-games-that-require-a-memory-card/ could save data to the cartridge and which required external memory]]. Later versions of the console would add internal memory to the device, but still stick with the proprietary memory format.
* Portable gaming has traditionally been the realm of "AA" developers due to the cheaper development costs of making a handheld game as opposed to a home console title. In targeting console-quality graphics, the Vita ironically ended up being too powerful for its own good, as the rising trend of [[MobilePhoneGame smartphone gaming]] and even Nintendo 3DS was much cheaper to develop for in comparison and thus seen as a safer finanical risk.

By the end of 2013, Sony decided to shift focus with the [=PlayStation=] Vita, pushing it as a companion system to the UsefulNotes/PlayStation4, with a firmware update allowing [=PS4=] games to be playable on the PS Vita via Remote Play over a wireless network. This had the unfortunate effect of making the device ''even less'' desirable to consumers, as Sony was now painting the Vita as a US$200 game controller in the vein of the UsefulNotes/WiiU's Gamepad rather than a distinct gaming platform with its own library of titles. At this point, many developers outside Japan had all but ceased creating games for the platform due to low sales. Sony themselves would cease development and publishing of first-party content in 2015, in addition to porting the handheld's most noteworthy exclusives (such as ''VideoGame/GravityRush'' and ''VideoGame/{{Tearaway}}'') to the home console, further reducing the value proposition of buying a Vita as the system's life dragged on. Physical game cartridges ceased manufacturing in May 2018, while production of the Vita itself would end the following year in February.

Despite all this, the Vita still managed to develop a small but devoted fanbase in non-Asian markets, remaining relevant to that audience thanks to its solid library of {{Eastern RPG}}s and VisualNovels and aforementioned [=PS4=] companion features. Regardless, the system's lack of global success meant the company currently has no plans for a successor, with various Sony execs stating that they saw no future for dedicated gaming portables, though there remain unspecified plans to remain in the mobile market.

to:

* Like its predecessor, Sony's initial message was that the [=PlayStation=] Vita would be console offer console-quality gaming on-the-go, on the go, and it sought to prove this with a launch year lineup that mainly consisted of new entries in major console franchises such as ''VideoGame/{{Uncharted}}'' and ''VideoGame/{{Resistance}}''. However, these games were made by different developers than their console counterparts, with critics viewing most of these new Vita installments as B-Team efforts that sorely lacked in quality; quality compared to the main console branches of their respective series. The most notable of these failures including included the critically-panned critically panned launch title ''[[VideoGame/CallOfDuty Call of Duty: Black Ops Declassified]]''. More impressive efforts such as ''[[VideoGame/{{Killzone}} Killzone: Mercenary]]'' would only come years after initial enthusiasm was already depleted, and unlike the PSP, Rockstar Games did not develop a single ''Videogame/GrandTheftAuto'' title. By the end of its life, the closest title thing the system had for to a {{killer app}} ended up being ''[[VideoGame/Persona4 Persona 4: Golden]]'', an UpdatedRerelease of a [=PS2=] game.
* The original version of the console has no internal memory; memory, using only external memory in the form of a proprietary Sony Memory Stick, a new type of memory stick exclusive to the Vita; as Vita. As the sticks were modified microSD cards, [[NoBackwardsCompatibilityInTheFuture previous PRO and DUO Memory Sticks used by the PSP could not work with it]]. These memory sticks were also rather expensive and slow: a 32-gigabyte stick cost US$80 at launch (''four times the cost'' of an equivalent SD card at the time), and their transfer rates compared ''very'' poorly to Class-10 and UHS-1 SD cards in the same price bracket, bracket. In fact, [[http://www.eurogamer.net/articles/df-hardware-how-fast-are-vita-memory-cards with one article about a battery of speed tests]] proving proved that in some cases, the Vita cards are were ''even slower'' than ''Class-4'' SD cards.[[note]]Though, if the user is willing to hack the system's OS and sacrifice either their game card slot (all models), 3G modem (3G model) or USB port (PSTV) then they can adopt traditional storage in the form of microSD cards or USB media. See the homebrew/hacking section below.[[/note]] It didn't help that there seemed to be no rhyme or reason to which retail Vita games [[https://www.engadget.com/2011/10/21/report-these-are-the-vita-games-that-require-a-memory-card/ could save data to the cartridge and which required external memory]]. Later versions of the console would add internal memory to the device, but still stick with the proprietary memory format.
* Portable gaming has traditionally been the realm of "AA" middle-tier developers due to the cheaper development costs of making a handheld game as opposed to a home console title. In targeting console-quality graphics, the Vita ironically ended up being too powerful for its own good, as the rising trend of [[MobilePhoneGame smartphone gaming]] and even Nintendo 3DS was much cheaper to develop for in comparison and thus seen as a safer finanical risk.

By the end of 2013, Sony decided to shift focus with the [=PlayStation=] Vita, pushing it as a companion system to the UsefulNotes/PlayStation4, with a firmware update allowing [=PS4=] games to be playable on the PS Vita via Remote Play over a wireless network. This had the unfortunate effect of making the device ''even less'' desirable to consumers, as Sony was now painting the Vita as a US$200 game controller in the vein of the UsefulNotes/WiiU's Gamepad rather than a distinct gaming platform with its own library of titles. At this point, many developers outside Japan had all but ceased creating games for the platform due to low sales. Sony themselves would cease development and publishing publication of first-party content in 2015, in addition to porting the handheld's most noteworthy exclusives (such as ''VideoGame/GravityRush'' and ''VideoGame/{{Tearaway}}'') to the home console, further reducing the value proposition of buying a Vita as the system's life dragged on. Physical game cartridges ceased manufacturing in May 2018, while production of the Vita itself would end the following year in February.

Despite all this, the Vita still managed to develop a small but devoted fanbase in non-Asian markets, remaining relevant to that audience thanks to its solid library of {{Eastern RPG}}s and VisualNovels and aforementioned [=PS4=] companion features. Regardless, the system's lack of global success meant the company currently has no plans for a successor, with various Sony execs executives stating that they saw see no future for dedicated gaming portables, though there remain unspecified plans to remain in the mobile market.



Sony also released a home version of the device called the PS Vita TV in Japan on November 14th, 2013. A "microconsole", the Vita TV was a HDMI device that could play PS Vita and [=PlayStation=] Plus games on the television with the use of a [=DualShock=] controller, as well as stream [=PS4=] games onto a different television through Wi-Fi. The device's primary purpose was to form a foothold for Sony in the multi-function streaming device (Apple TV, Roku Box, etc.) market in the Eastern markets, where living room streaming admittedly had less of a foothold. Sadly, a fair chunk of VITA games are not compatible with it[[note]]Seemingly mostly due to a combination of licensing difficulty (technically, having to relicense a portable video game as a home title one is a legal hassle), incompatible controls (the PSTV lacks the camera and microphone from the Vita, it's touchscreen emulation is imperfect and for some unknown reason, the native motion controls on the DS4 haven't been used yet to emulate those of the Vita) and outright laziness by the dev teams. This CAN be circumvented easily enough by a whitelist "Fail Mail" hack or newer alternatives, but it obviously doesn't allow the aforementioned controls to be used and prevents the PSTV from ever being able to access the UsefulNotes/PlayStationNetwork (locking out for example [=PS4=] remote streaming) so, at best, games have to be "sideloaded" via a [=PS3=]. All told it's an inelegant solution, but one worth doing if you don't have a Vita but want to play the games regardless. Note that some hacks permitted by Henkaku allow spoofing of certain functions not natively possible on the PSTV, e.g. faking a camera signal.[[/note]], though a large collection of [=PS1=]/PSN games are downloadable and compatible with it. Due to low sales, it was renamed [=PlayStation=] TV when it was released in North America and Japan the following year, to avoid association with the Vita brand.

to:

Sony also released a home version of the device called the PS Vita TV in Japan on November 14th, 2013. A "microconsole", the Vita TV was a HDMI device that could play PS Vita and [=PlayStation=] Plus games on the television with the use of a [=DualShock=] controller, as well as stream [=PS4=] games onto a different television through Wi-Fi. The device's primary purpose was to form a foothold for Sony in the multi-function streaming device (Apple TV, Roku Box, etc.) market in the Eastern markets, where living room streaming admittedly had less of a foothold. Sadly, a fair chunk of VITA Vita games are not compatible actually incompatible with it[[note]]Seemingly mostly due to a combination of licensing difficulty (technically, having to relicense a portable video game as a home title one is a legal hassle), incompatible controls (the PSTV lacks the camera and microphone from the Vita, it's its touchscreen emulation is imperfect imperfect, and for some unknown reason, the native motion controls on the DS4 PS4 haven't been used yet to emulate those of the Vita) and outright laziness by the dev teams. This CAN be circumvented easily enough by a whitelist "Fail Mail" hack or newer alternatives, but it obviously doesn't allow the aforementioned controls to be used and prevents the PSTV from ever being able to access the UsefulNotes/PlayStationNetwork (locking out for example [=PS4=] remote streaming) so, at best, games have to be "sideloaded" via a [=PS3=]. All told it's an inelegant solution, but one worth doing if you don't have a Vita but want to play the games regardless. Note that some hacks permitted by Henkaku allow spoofing of certain functions not natively possible on the PSTV, e.g. faking a camera signal.[[/note]], though a large collection of [=PS1=]/PSN games are downloadable and compatible with it. Due to low sales, it was renamed [=PlayStation=] TV when it was released in North America and Japan the following year, to avoid association with the Vita brand.

Added DiffLines:

* ''VideoGame/EiyuuSenkiTheWorldConquest''

Added DiffLines:

* ''VideoGame/{{Nihilumbra}}''

Added DiffLines:

* ''VisualNovel/OurWorldIsEnded''


* It was visually stunning; while not as powerful as the [=PlayStation=] 3, games for the Vita did boast similar visuals, with certain titles being decent if not one-to-one ports of their home console counterparts - two examples, ''Videogame/{{Killzone}}'':Mercenary looks like a contemporary Videogame/CallOfDuty title, and the Vita port of Creator/CriterionGames' ''VideoGame/NeedForSpeedMostWanted'' was acclaimed for being largely unabridged, save for less complex lighting and lower-resolution textures. The system also sported an OLED screen[[note]]normally seen in smartphones, these are very high-quality screens with vibrant colors that don't wash out in light like [=LCDs=] and [=LEDs=] do[[/note]] at a resolution of 960×544, far surpassing the 3DS's LCD 800×240 screen.

to:

* It was visually stunning; while not as powerful as the [=PlayStation=] 3, games for the Vita did boast similar visuals, with certain titles being decent if not one-to-one ports of their home console counterparts - two examples, ''Videogame/{{Killzone}}'':Mercenary looks like a contemporary Videogame/CallOfDuty title, and the Vita port of Creator/CriterionGames' counterparts. ''VideoGame/NeedForSpeedMostWanted'' in particular was acclaimed for being largely unabridged, save for less complex lighting and lower-resolution textures. The system also sported an OLED screen[[note]]normally seen in smartphones, these are very high-quality screens with vibrant colors that don't wash out in light like [=LCDs=] and [=LEDs=] do[[/note]] at a resolution of 960×544, far surpassing the 3DS's LCD 800×240 screen.



By the end of 2013, Sony decided to shift focus with the [=PlayStation=] Vita, pushing it as a companion system to the UsefulNotes/PlayStation4, with a firmware update allowing [=PS4=] games to be playable on the PS Vita via Remote Play over a wireless network. This had the unfortunate effect of making the device ''even less'' desirable to consumers, as Sony was now painting the Vita as a US$200 game controller in the vein of the UsefulNotes/WiiU's Gamepad rather than a distinct gaming platform with its own library of titles. At this point, many developers outside Japan had all but ceased creating games for the platform due to low sales. Sony themselves would cease development and publishing of first-party content in 2015, in addition to porting the handheld's most noteworthy exclusives (such as ''VideoGame/GravityRush'' and ''VideoGame/{{Tearaway}}'') to the home console, further reducing the value proposition of buying a Vita as the system's life dragged on. Physical game cartridges for North America and Europe ceased manufacturing in May 2018, with shipments of the Vita itself to those regions rumored to be ending in the same year.

Despite all this, the Vita has still managed to develop a small but devoted fanbase in non-Asian markets, remaining relevant to that audience thanks to its solid library of {{Eastern RPG}}s and VisualNovels and aforementioned [=PS4=] companion features. Regardless, the system's lack of global success meant the company currently has no plans for a successor, with various Sony execs stating that they saw no future for dedicated gaming portables, though there remain unspecified plans to remain in the mobile market.

to:

By the end of 2013, Sony decided to shift focus with the [=PlayStation=] Vita, pushing it as a companion system to the UsefulNotes/PlayStation4, with a firmware update allowing [=PS4=] games to be playable on the PS Vita via Remote Play over a wireless network. This had the unfortunate effect of making the device ''even less'' desirable to consumers, as Sony was now painting the Vita as a US$200 game controller in the vein of the UsefulNotes/WiiU's Gamepad rather than a distinct gaming platform with its own library of titles. At this point, many developers outside Japan had all but ceased creating games for the platform due to low sales. Sony themselves would cease development and publishing of first-party content in 2015, in addition to porting the handheld's most noteworthy exclusives (such as ''VideoGame/GravityRush'' and ''VideoGame/{{Tearaway}}'') to the home console, further reducing the value proposition of buying a Vita as the system's life dragged on. Physical game cartridges for North America and Europe ceased manufacturing in May 2018, with shipments while production of the Vita itself to those regions rumored to be ending in would end the same year.

following year in February.

Despite all this, the Vita has still managed to develop a small but devoted fanbase in non-Asian markets, remaining relevant to that audience thanks to its solid library of {{Eastern RPG}}s and VisualNovels and aforementioned [=PS4=] companion features. Regardless, the system's lack of global success meant the company currently has no plans for a successor, with various Sony execs stating that they saw no future for dedicated gaming portables, though there remain unspecified plans to remain in the mobile market.

Showing 15 edit(s) of 239

Top

Example of:

/
/

Feedback