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* ''[[VideoGame/GodOfWarSeries God of War]]'':

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* ''[[VideoGame/GodOfWarSeries God of War]]'':''VideoGame/GodOfWar'':

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* ''VideoGame/DungeonTravelers2''

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* ''VideoGame/TheImpossibleGame''

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* ''VideoGame/AkibasTripHellboundAndDebriefed''


* ''VideoGame/GodOfWar'':

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* ''VideoGame/GodOfWar'':''[[VideoGame/GodOfWarSeries God of War]]'':


** ''VideoGame/DeathJr'': Roots of Evil
* ''VideoGame/DefJamSeries'': Fight for NY: The Takeover

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** ''VideoGame/DeathJr'': ''VideoGame/DeathJr: Roots of Evil
Evil''
* ''VideoGame/DefJamSeries'': ''VideoGame/DefJamSeries: Fight for NY: The TakeoverTakeover''



* ''VideoGame/{{Devil Summoner}}'' (2005/07/10)

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* ''VideoGame/{{Devil Summoner}}'' (2005/07/10)Summoner}}''



* ''[[VideoGame/DisgaeaHourOfDarkness Disgaea: Afternoon of Darkness]]''
** ''[[VideoGame/Disgaea2CursedMemories Disgaea 2: Dark Hero Days]]''
** ''VisualNovel/DisgaeaInfinite''

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* ''Franchise/{{Disgaea}}'':
**
''[[VideoGame/DisgaeaHourOfDarkness Disgaea: Afternoon of Darkness]]''
** *** ''[[VideoGame/Disgaea2CursedMemories Disgaea 2: Dark Hero Days]]''
*** ''VisualNovel/DisgaeaInfinite''
** ''VisualNovel/DisgaeaInfinite''''VideoGame/PrinnyCanIReallyBeTheHero''
*** ''Prinny 2: Dawn of the Operation Panties, Dood!''



* ''Dungeon Maker'': Hunting Ground

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* ''Dungeon Maker'': Maker: Hunting GroundGround''



* ''Franchise/{{Gundam}}'':
** ''VideoGame/GundamVsSeries''
*** ''Mobile Suit Gundam SEED: Alliance vs ZAFT Portable''
*** ''Gundam vs Gundam''
*** ''Gundam vs Gundam NEXT PLUS''

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* ''Franchise/{{Gundam}}'':
**
''VideoGame/GundamVsSeries''
*** ** ''Mobile Suit Gundam SEED: Alliance vs ZAFT Portable''
*** ** ''Gundam vs Gundam''
*** ** ''Gundam vs Gundam NEXT PLUS''



** ''VideoGame/KamenRiderClimaxHeroes OOO'', ''Fourze'' and ''Wizard''

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** ''VideoGame/KamenRiderClimaxHeroes OOO'', ''Fourze'' ''Fourze'', and ''Wizard''



* ''VideoGame/PrinnyCanIReallyBeTheHero''
** ''Prinny 2: Dawn of the Operation Panties, Dood!''



* ''VideoGame/{{Shinobido}}'' : Tales of the Ninja

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* ''VideoGame/{{Shinobido}}'' : ''VideoGame/{{Shinobido}}: Tales of the NinjaNinja''



* ''VideoGame/SOCOMUSNavySeals'' Fireteam Bravo
** ''SOCOM US Navy Seals'' Fireteam Bravo 2
** ''SOCOM US Navy Seals'' Fireteam Bravo 3
** ''SOCOM US Navy Seals'' Tactical Strike

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* ''VideoGame/SOCOMUSNavySeals'' ''VideoGame/SOCOMUSNavySeals Fireteam Bravo
Bravo''
** ''SOCOM US Navy Seals'' Seals Fireteam Bravo 2
2''
** ''SOCOM US Navy Seals'' Seals Fireteam Bravo 3
3''
** ''SOCOM US Navy Seals'' Seals Tactical StrikeStrike''



** ''VideoGame/TalesOfTheWorld'': Radiant Mythology
*** ''VideoGame/TalesOfTheWorld'': Radiant Mythology 2
*** ''VideoGame/TalesOfTheWorld'': Radiant Mythology 3

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** ''VideoGame/TalesOfTheWorld'': ''VideoGame/TalesOfTheWorld: Radiant Mythology
Mythology''
*** ''VideoGame/TalesOfTheWorld'': ''Tales of the World: Radiant Mythology 2
2''
*** ''VideoGame/TalesOfTheWorld'': ''Tales of the World: Radiant Mythology 33''



* ''VideoGame/UmiharaKawase Portable'' (AKA ''Yumi's Odd Odyssey'')

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* ''VideoGame/UmiharaKawase Portable'' (AKA (also known as ''Yumi's Odd Odyssey'')


* ''VideoGame/AllKamenRiderGenerations 2''



* ''VideoGame/CrisisCore: Final Fantasy VII''



* ''VideoGame/{{Daxter}}''

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* ''VideoGame/JakAndDaxter'':
**
''VideoGame/{{Daxter}}''



** ''VideoGame/CrisisCore: Final Fantasy VII''



* ''VideoGame/KamenRiderClimaxHeroes OOO'', ''Fourze'' and ''Wizard''

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* ''Franchise/KamenRider'':
** ''VideoGame/AllKamenRiderGenerations 2''
**
''VideoGame/KamenRiderClimaxHeroes OOO'', ''Fourze'' and ''Wizard''



* ''VideoGame/MegaManPoweredUp''
** ''VideoGame/MegaManMaverickHunterX''
** ''[[VideoGame/MegaManLegends Rockman DASH 1 & 2]]''

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* ''Franchise/MegaMan'':
** ''VideoGame/MegaManClassic''
***
''VideoGame/MegaManPoweredUp''
** ''VideoGame/MegaManMaverickHunterX''
** ''[[VideoGame/MegaManLegends Rockman
''VideoGame/MegaManLegends''
*** ''Rockman
DASH 1 & 2]]''2''
** ''VideoGame/MegaManX''
*** ''VideoGame/MegaManMaverickHunterX''



* ''VideoGame/MetalGearAcid''
** ''Metal Gear Ac!d [[superscript:2]]''
* ''VideoGame/MetalGearSolidPortableOps''
** ''Metal Gear Solid Portable Ops Plus''
* ''VideoGame/MetalGearSolidPeaceWalker''

to:

* ''VideoGame/MetalGear'':
**
''VideoGame/MetalGearAcid''
** *** ''Metal Gear Ac!d [[superscript:2]]''
* ** ''VideoGame/MetalGearSolidPortableOps''
** *** ''Metal Gear Solid Portable Ops Plus''
* ** ''VideoGame/MetalGearSolidPeaceWalker''



* ''VideoGame/PacManWorld 3''

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* ''VideoGame/PacMan'':
**
''VideoGame/PacManWorld 3''



* ''[[VideoGame/StarOcean1 Star Ocean: First Departure]]''

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* ''VideoGame/StarOcean'':
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''[[VideoGame/StarOcean1 Star Ocean: First Departure]]''



* ''VideoGame/StarWarsBattlefrontII''
** ''VideoGame/StarWarsBattlefrontRenegadeSquadron''
** ''VideoGame/StarWarsBattlefrontEliteSquadron''
* ''Star Wars: VideoGame/TheForceUnleashed''

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* ''Franchise/StarWars'':
**
''VideoGame/StarWarsBattlefrontII''
** *** ''VideoGame/StarWarsBattlefrontRenegadeSquadron''
** *** ''VideoGame/StarWarsBattlefrontEliteSquadron''
* ** ''Star Wars: VideoGame/TheForceUnleashed''



* ''[[VideoGame/SuperRobotWarsAdvance Super Robot Wars A Portable]]''

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* ''VideoGame/SuperRobotWars'':
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''[[VideoGame/SuperRobotWarsAdvance Super Robot Wars A Portable]]''



* ''VideoGame/SyphonFilter: Dark Mirror''

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* ''VideoGame/SyphonFilter: ''VideoGame/SyphonFilter'':
** ''Syphon Filter:
Dark Mirror''



* ''VideoGame/TalesOfEternia''
* ''VideoGame/TalesOfTheWorld'': Radiant Mythology
** ''VideoGame/TalesOfTheWorld'': Radiant Mythology 2
** ''VideoGame/TalesOfTheWorld'': Radiant Mythology 3
* ''VideoGame/{{Tekken}}: Dark Resurrection''

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* ''VideoGame/TalesSeries'':
**
''VideoGame/TalesOfEternia''
* ** ''VideoGame/TalesOfTheWorld'': Radiant Mythology
** *** ''VideoGame/TalesOfTheWorld'': Radiant Mythology 2
** *** ''VideoGame/TalesOfTheWorld'': Radiant Mythology 3
* ''VideoGame/{{Tekken}}: ''VideoGame/{{Tekken}}'':
** ''Tekken:
Dark Resurrection''



* ''VideoGame/ValhallaKnights''

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* ''VideoGame/ValhallaKnights''''Valhalla Knights''



* ''Franchise/{{Ys}}

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* ''Franchise/{{Ys}}''Franchise/{{Ys}}'':


!!Games:

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!!Games:!!Notable Games/Series:

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[[folder:#-D]]



* ''VideoGame/CrashTagTeamRacing''

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* ''VideoGame/CrashBandicoot'':
**
''VideoGame/CrashTagTeamRacing''



* ''VideoGame/DissidiaFinalFantasy''
** ''Dissidia 012 Final Fantasy''



* ''VideoGame/DungeonMaker'': Hunting Ground

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* ''VideoGame/DungeonMaker'': ''Dungeon Maker'': Hunting Ground



[[/index]]
[[/folder]]

[[folder:E-H]]
[[index]]



* ''VideoGame/FateExtra''
* ''VideoGame/FateUnlimitedCodes''
* ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyI''

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* ''Franchise/FateSeries'':
**
''VideoGame/FateExtra''
* ** ''VideoGame/FateUnlimitedCodes''
* ''Franchise/FinalFantasy'':
** ''VideoGame/DissidiaFinalFantasy''
*** ''Dissidia 012 Final Fantasy''
**
''VideoGame/FinalFantasyI''



* ''VideoGame/GodOfWarChainsOfOlympus''

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* ''VideoGame/GodOfWar'':
**
''VideoGame/GodOfWarChainsOfOlympus''



* ''VideoGame/GrandTheftAutoLibertyCityStories''

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* ''VideoGame/GrandTheftAuto'':
**
''VideoGame/GrandTheftAutoLibertyCityStories''



* ''VideoGame/GundamVsSeries''
** ''Mobile Suit Gundam SEED: Alliance vs ZAFT Portable''
** ''Gundam vs Gundam''
** ''Gundam vs Gundam NEXT PLUS''

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* ''Franchise/{{Gundam}}'':
**
''VideoGame/GundamVsSeries''
** *** ''Mobile Suit Gundam SEED: Alliance vs ZAFT Portable''
** *** ''Gundam vs Gundam''
** *** ''Gundam vs Gundam NEXT PLUS''



[[/index]]
[[/folder]]

[[folder:I-L]]
[[index]]



* ''K-ON! Houkago Live!!'' (Also has an HD version on the UsefulNotes/PlayStation3.)

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* ''K-ON! ''[[Manga/{{KOn}} K-On! Houkago Live!!'' Live!!]]'' (Also has an HD version on the UsefulNotes/PlayStation3.)



[[/index]]
[[/folder]]

[[folder:M-P]]
[[index]]



[[/index]]
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Q-T]]
[[index]]



[[/index]]
[[/folder]]

[[folder:U-Z]]
[[index]]



* ''Videogame/YsVITheArkOfNapishtim''

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* ''Videogame/YsVITheArkOfNapishtim''''Franchise/{{Ys}}
** ''VideoGame/YsVITheArkOfNapishtim''



** ''Videogame/YsTheOathInFelghana''

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** ''Videogame/YsTheOathInFelghana''''VideoGame/YsTheOathInFelghana''


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[[/folder]]


* ''VisualNovel/DanganRonpa''[[note]]Japanese version only. This game and its sequel (below) were released in North America after its UpdatedRerelease to the Vita, so the version given to those territories is based off that version.[[/note]]

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* ''VisualNovel/DanganRonpa''[[note]]Japanese ''{{Franchise/Danganronpa}}''
** ''VisualNovel/DanganronpaTriggerHappyHavoc''[[note]]Japanese
version only. This game and its sequel (below) were released in North America after its UpdatedRerelease to the Vita, so the version given to those territories is based off that version.[[/note]]

Added DiffLines:

* ''VisualNovel/ClockZero''

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* ''VideoGame/DanballSenki''

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** ''VideoGame/{{Persona 2}}: Eternal Punishment'' (Japan only)


Long story: in 2004, Sony was riding high off the massive success first two [=PlayStation=] systems[[note]]Both of which put Sony on the top of two UsefulNotes/ConsoleWars. They had dethroned Nintendo from home consoles in the 5th console generation, and beat Microsoft's newcomer system in the 6th. Both [=PlayStation=]systems outsold all their competitors in each generation '''combined''' by over 2-to-1.[[/note]], and decided to get into the handheld market, confident they could replicate that level of success in this new arena. The gaming press were just as confident. It seemed like all the factors were in place for it to happen. Sony's use of discs versus the UsefulNotes/NintendoDS's cartridges, a traditional control scheme versus unconventional inputs, better third-party support, multimedia capabilities, and far greater processing power (which wasn't the case with the two console systems, but still a touted factor) had all paid off for Sony in the past. It seemed like the PSP could become the leader in the handheld gaming market, and finally take Nintendo's crown.

to:

Long story: in 2004, Sony was riding high off the massive success first two [=PlayStation=] systems[[note]]Both of which put Sony on the top of two UsefulNotes/ConsoleWars. They had dethroned Nintendo from home consoles in the 5th console generation, and beat Microsoft's newcomer system in the 6th. Both [=PlayStation=]systems [=PlayStation=] systems outsold all their competitors in each generation '''combined''' by over 2-to-1.more than two to one.[[/note]], and decided to get into the handheld market, confident they could replicate that level of success in this new arena. The gaming press were just as confident. It seemed like all the factors were in place for it to happen. Sony's use of discs versus the UsefulNotes/NintendoDS's cartridges, a traditional control scheme versus unconventional inputs, better third-party support, multimedia capabilities, and far greater processing power (which wasn't the case with the two console systems, but still a touted factor) had all paid off for Sony in the past. It seemed like the PSP could become the leader in the handheld gaming market, and finally take Nintendo's crown.


Short story: the [=PlayStation=] Portable could be called a "successful failure." It failed in the sense that it did not enable Sony to achieve their goal of stealing the market Nintendo, who went on to achieve dominance in the handheld space for the third time in a row. But it was a success in that it still sold tens of millions of systems (it has so far sold nearly 70% as many systems as the original UsefulNotes/PlayStation). It was the closest anyone had ever come to presenting real competition for Nintendo's handhelds, and it featured a number of hit games -- ''particularly'' in Japan, where a few {{Killer App}}s led to the system getting a second lease of life in the latter half of its release cycle and becoming, at least locally, a real competitor for the UsefulNotes/NintendoDS.

to:

Short story: the [=PlayStation=] Portable could be called a "successful failure." It failed in the sense that it did not enable Sony to achieve their goal of stealing the market from Nintendo, who who, in turn, went on to achieve dominance in the handheld space for the third time in a row. But it was a success in that it still sold tens of millions of systems (it has so far sold nearly 70% as many systems as the original UsefulNotes/PlayStation). It was the closest anyone had ever come to presenting real competition for Nintendo's handhelds, and it featured a number of hit games -- ''particularly'' in Japan, where a few {{Killer App}}s led to the system getting a second lease of life in the latter half of its release cycle and becoming, at least locally, a real competitor for the UsefulNotes/NintendoDS.


Short story: the [=PlayStation=] Portable could be called a "successful failure." It was a failure in stealing the market from Nintendo for the third time in a row, but a success in that it still sold tens of millions of systems (so far has sold nearly 70% as many systems as the original UsefulNotes/PlayStation), and had a number of hit games -- ''particularly'' in Japan, where a few {{Killer App}}s led to the system getting a second lease of life in the latter half of its release cycle and becoming, at least locally, a real competitor for the UsefulNotes/NintendoDS.

Long story: in 2004, Sony was riding high off the first two [=PlayStation=] systems[[note]]Both of which put Sony on the top of two UsefulNotes/ConsoleWars, dethroning Nintendo from home consoles in the 5th console generation and beating Microsoft's newcomer system in the 6th; both systems outsold all their competitors '''combined''' by over 2-to-1.[[/note]], and decided to get into the handheld market, confident they could repeat their success for a third time. The gaming press were just as confident. It seemed like all the factors were in place for it to happen. Sony's use of discs versus the UsefulNotes/NintendoDS's cartridges, a traditional controller versus an unconventional controller, better third-party support, multimedia capabilities, and far greater processing power (which wasn't the case with the last two systems, but still a touted factor) had all paid off for Sony in the past. It seemed like the PSP could become the leader in the handheld gaming market, dethroning Nintendo.

to:

Short story: the [=PlayStation=] Portable could be called a "successful failure." It was a failure failed in the sense that it did not enable Sony to achieve their goal of stealing the market from Nintendo Nintendo, who went on to achieve dominance in the handheld space for the third time in a row, but row. But it was a success in that it still sold tens of millions of systems (so (it has so far has sold nearly 70% as many systems as the original UsefulNotes/PlayStation), UsefulNotes/PlayStation). It was the closest anyone had ever come to presenting real competition for Nintendo's handhelds, and had it featured a number of hit games -- ''particularly'' in Japan, where a few {{Killer App}}s led to the system getting a second lease of life in the latter half of its release cycle and becoming, at least locally, a real competitor for the UsefulNotes/NintendoDS.

Long story: in 2004, Sony was riding high off the massive success first two [=PlayStation=] systems[[note]]Both of which put Sony on the top of two UsefulNotes/ConsoleWars, dethroning UsefulNotes/ConsoleWars. They had dethroned Nintendo from home consoles in the 5th console generation generation, and beating beat Microsoft's newcomer system in the 6th; both systems 6th. Both [=PlayStation=]systems outsold all their competitors in each generation '''combined''' by over 2-to-1.[[/note]], and decided to get into the handheld market, confident they could repeat their replicate that level of success for a third time.in this new arena. The gaming press were just as confident. It seemed like all the factors were in place for it to happen. Sony's use of discs versus the UsefulNotes/NintendoDS's cartridges, a traditional controller control scheme versus an unconventional controller, inputs, better third-party support, multimedia capabilities, and far greater processing power (which wasn't the case with the last two console systems, but still a touted factor) had all paid off for Sony in the past. It seemed like the PSP could become the leader in the handheld gaming market, dethroning Nintendo.
and finally take Nintendo's crown.



* Although disc-based formats proved to be superior to cartridges for home consoles, the format's advantages were less pronounced on a handheld device. The discs still offered higher capacity, but the optical format resulted in comparatively longer loading times, louder system noise, and increased battery usage due to disc spinning and seeking. Without the production volume of UsefulNotes/{{DVD}}s or UsefulNotes/{{CD}}s, the format didn't have the huge cost differential that made discs preferable to cartridges in the 5th generation. Storage of multiple games was also made less efficient due to each disc being permanently encased in an outer shell. The console and discs support UsefulNotes/RegionCoding, and though only three PSP applications/games made use of region coding (the Asian release of the ''VideoGame/{{Battlezone|2006}}'' remake, as well as the Comic Book reader and Remote TV Viewer applications), all UMD movies were region coded and couldn't play on [=PSPs=] from a different region.
* [[LoadsAndLoadsOfLoading Loading times]] aren't as much of an issue with home consoles, but handheld systems are often played here and there in two-minute windows. Taking even 30 seconds to load is a major downside under those circumstances. In the later models, Sony incorporated a method which considerably shortened loading times [[note]](adding extra RAM, and allowing games to selectively load data instead of strictly from the UMD)[[/note]] for compatible games. The console also has a "sleep" function which saves the current memory-state for quick revival later.
* The system didn't have a KillerApp by the time the DS had ''VideoGame/{{Nintendogs}}'', ''[[VideoGame/MarioKartDS Mario Kart]]'', and ''[[VideoGame/NewSuperMarioBros1 New Super Mario Bros]]''. The PSP did later get sales boosts from the redesigns and true killer apps like ''VideoGame/MonsterHunter Portable'' in Japan, but those were well after the DS took off ''and'' after the PSP had lost any lead.[[note]]Now, to get really ''gritty'' about it, the PSP ultimately did post what would've been "success" numbers in Japan in any other circumstance - it ultimately sold nineteen million units in Japan, which actually did accomplish the original mission Sony set out to do, which was produce a system that would out-sell the UsefulNotes/GameBoyAdvance, which it did by about 3 million units. The problem is, the DS ended up capturing the same lightning-in-a-bottle that the Game Boy did - it ended up selling ''thirty-three million units'' in Japan (which means it sold to just under a third of the population and, mathematically, must have been present in nearly every single household in Japan). The PSP was never designed to be a device with ''that'' kind of appeal, and never really had a shot at being that kind of success.[[/note]]
* Poor advertising, a problem that the UsefulNotes/PlayStation3 was also suffering from at the same time. Most infamously it resulted in the [="alliwantforxmasisaPSP.com"=] fiasco, a botched attempt at a viral marketing campaign that if anything hurt the system just when it was starting to get some momentum back.
* Most important of all was the different focus. Sony was convinced there was a "handheld gaming ghetto," which meant that the smaller-scale games on handhelds were supposedly inferior to home console games. The PSP was an unsuccessful attempt to bring home gaming to portables, which left developers scrambling to find a medium between the huge games of home consoles and the "bite-sized" gaming for portables, whereas Nintendo already had plenty of practice with that golden mean.

to:

* Although disc-based formats proved to be superior to cartridges for home consoles, the format's advantages were less pronounced on a handheld device. The discs still offered higher capacity, but the optical format resulted in comparatively longer loading times, louder system noise, and increased battery usage due to disc spinning and seeking. Without the production volume of UsefulNotes/{{DVD}}s or UsefulNotes/{{CD}}s, the format didn't have the huge cost differential that made discs preferable to cartridges in the 5th generation.console generation (and beyond). Storage of multiple games was also made less efficient due to each disc being permanently encased in an outer shell. The console system and discs support UsefulNotes/RegionCoding, and though only three PSP applications/games made use of region coding (the Asian release of the ''VideoGame/{{Battlezone|2006}}'' remake, as well as the Comic Book reader and Remote TV Viewer applications), all UMD movies were region coded and couldn't play on [=PSPs=] from a different region.
* [[LoadsAndLoadsOfLoading Loading times]] aren't as much of an issue with home consoles, but where a player is usually settled in to play for a while. But handheld systems are often played here and there there, on the go, in two-minute windows.windows of possibly just a few minutes. Taking even 30 seconds to load is a major downside under those circumstances. In the later models, Sony incorporated a method which considerably shortened loading times [[note]](adding extra RAM, and allowing games to selectively load data instead of strictly from the UMD)[[/note]] for compatible games. The console system also has a "sleep" function to compensate for this difficulty, which saves the current memory-state for quick revival later.
* The system didn't have a KillerApp by the time the DS had ''VideoGame/{{Nintendogs}}'', ''[[VideoGame/MarioKartDS Mario Kart]]'', and ''[[VideoGame/NewSuperMarioBros1 New Super Mario Bros]]''. The PSP did later get sales boosts from the redesigns and true killer apps like ''VideoGame/MonsterHunter Portable'' in Japan, but those were well after the DS took off ''and'' after the PSP had lost any lead.[[note]]Now, to get really ''gritty'' about it, the PSP ultimately did post what would've been "success" numbers in Japan in any other circumstance - it ultimately sold nineteen million units in Japan, which actually did accomplish the original mission Sony set out to do, which was produce a system that would out-sell the UsefulNotes/GameBoyAdvance, which it did by about 3 million units. The problem is, the DS ended up capturing the same lightning-in-a-bottle that the Game Boy did - it ended up selling ''thirty-three million units'' in Japan (which means it sold to just under a third of the population and, mathematically, must have been present in nearly every single household in Japan). The PSP was never designed to be a device with ''that'' kind of appeal, and never really had a shot at being that kind of success. Thus it failed to break Nintendo's market dominance.[[/note]]
* Poor advertising, a problem that was also plaguing the UsefulNotes/PlayStation3 was also suffering from at the same time. Most infamously infamously, it resulted in the [="alliwantforxmasisaPSP.com"=] fiasco, a botched attempt at a viral marketing campaign that that, if anything anything, hurt the system just when it was starting to get some momentum back.
* Most important of all was the different focus. Sony was convinced there was a "handheld gaming ghetto," which ghetto". This meant that the smaller-scale games on handhelds were supposedly inferior to home console games. The PSP was an unsuccessful attempt to bring the sense of scale and level of production quality that were the hallmarks of home console gaming to portables, which portables. This left developers scrambling to find a medium balance between the huge games of home consoles and the "bite-sized" style of gaming for portables, whereas Nintendo already had plenty of practice with hitting that golden mean.



However, in some countries, namely developing markets such as Morocco, the Philippines and India, the PSP was and still is the most successful handheld gaming device, where the absence of Pro Evolution Soccer and a 3D GTA title didn't allow for the DS, and subsequently the 3DS to thrive. Additionally, the relative ease of using Custom Firmware (see below) allowed salesmen to make a business of installing downloaded games into the PSP for a small price (about £0.50 or $0.70 each).

Moreover, as has been mentioned above, while the system foundered a bit in other developed nations, in Japan the system experienced a full-bloom renaissance, initially spearheaded by one specific game: ''VideoGame/MonsterHunter Portable''. An enhanced port of ''Monster Hunter G'' for the [=PS2=], the addition of local multiplayer proved to be the real missing element that ''Monster Hunter'' needed to become a legitimate social phenomenon, and sales of the system were driven heavily by ''MHP'' and its sequels. Once the system began establishing a real userbase, other developers took note and developed for it as well, because ''MHP'' had inadvertently proven something else: PSP development was rather similar to [=PS2=] development in cost and labor scope. Many mid-size dev studios, or publishers with mid-size development houses attached, had been very hesitant to develop for the [=PS3=] because of the ballooning costs for HD development in the mid and late Noughts, and the PSP, with ''MHP'' as a proof-of-concept, proved to be an ideal platform for developers who knew and could handle a [=PS2=]-like workload and wanted to make a game more complicated than what the DS could handle but didn't want to commit to HD development costs. As a result, Japanese software development for the PSP exploded in the wake of ''Monster Hunter Portable'', and its software list from the latter half of its life cycle - 2007 or so on - is a who's who of some of the greatest games of the entire Seventh Console Generation.

to:

However, in some countries, namely developing markets such as Morocco, the Philippines and India, the PSP was and still is the most successful handheld gaming device, where the absence of Pro Evolution Soccer and a 3D GTA title didn't allow for the DS, and subsequently the 3DS 3DS, to thrive. Additionally, the relative ease of using Custom Firmware (see below) allowed salesmen to make a business of installing downloaded games into the PSP for a small price (about £0.50 or $0.70 each).

Moreover, as has been mentioned above, while the system foundered a bit in other developed nations, in Japan the system experienced a full-bloom renaissance, initially spearheaded by one specific game: ''VideoGame/MonsterHunter Portable''. An enhanced port of ''Monster Hunter G'' for the [=PS2=], the addition of local multiplayer proved to be the real missing element that ''Monster Hunter'' needed to become a legitimate social phenomenon, and sales of the system were driven heavily by ''MHP'' and its sequels. Once the system began establishing a real userbase, other developers took note and developed for it as well, because ''MHP'' had inadvertently proven something else: PSP development was rather similar to [=PS2=] development in cost and labor scope. Many mid-size dev studios, or publishers with mid-size development houses attached, had been very hesitant to develop for the [=PS3=] because of the ballooning costs for HD development in the mid and late Noughts, and the PSP, with ''MHP'' as a proof-of-concept, proved to be an ideal platform for developers who knew and could handle a [=PS2=]-like workload and wanted to make a game more complicated than what the DS could handle but didn't want to commit to HD development costs. As a result, Japanese software development for the PSP exploded in the wake of ''Monster Hunter Portable'', and its software list from the latter half of its life cycle - 2007 or so on onward - is a who's who who's-who of some of the greatest games of the entire Seventh Console Generation.



The PSP is capable of downloading retail titles available for it through [[UsefulNotes/PlayStationNetwork Sony's online storefront]], as well as smaller games, video, and DownloadableContent for existing games. Furthermore, the final incarnation of the PSP, the '''PSP Go''', was specifically built around digital distribution, having no support for the UMD medium. Despite fears from older PSP owners, Sony insists that the Go was never meant to replace the PSP. Response was lackluster at best, with reports that some stores wouldn't even stock it. [[note]]One of the major US video-game-only retailers, [=GameStop/EB Games=], makes a good portion of their money from reselling used games, and was unsurprisingly unimpressed with the system for this reason. Although they grudgingly sold the console in the end, they did not promote it.[[/note]] To this day, the Go remains the only console revision by the big three to be digital only, home or handheld. It's pretty safe to say that most gamers and brick-and-mortar retailers hope it stays that way, for various reasons.

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The PSP is capable of downloading retail titles available for it through [[UsefulNotes/PlayStationNetwork Sony's online storefront]], as well as smaller games, video, and DownloadableContent for existing games. Furthermore, the final incarnation of the PSP, the '''PSP Go''', was specifically built around digital distribution, having no support for the UMD medium. Despite fears from older PSP owners, Sony insists that the Go was never meant to replace the PSP. Response was lackluster at best, with reports that some stores wouldn't even stock it. [[note]]One of the major US video-game-only retailers, [=GameStop/EB Games=], makes a good portion of their money from reselling used games, and was unsurprisingly naturally unimpressed with the system for this reason. Although they grudgingly sold the console in the end, they did not promote it.[[/note]] To this day, the Go remains the only console revision by the big three to be digital only, home or handheld. It's pretty safe to say that most gamers and brick-and-mortar retailers hope it stays that way, for various reasons.

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