Follow TV Tropes

Following

History UsefulNotes / PC88

Go To


Added DiffLines:

** ''VideoGame/YsIAncientYsVanishedOmen''
** ''VideoGame/YsIIAncientYsVanishedTheFinalChapter''
** ''Ys III: Wanderers from Ys''


In the [[TheEighties 1980s]], Western personal computers were scarce in the Japanese market, in large part because they weren't equipped to handle [[UsefulNotes/JapaneseWritingSystem Japanese characters]]. Instead, Japanese electronics companies like Sharp and Fujitsu marketed their own brands of higher-resolution personal computers, and many others sold the {{UsefulNotes/MSX}}. But NEC, the company which later developed the UsefulNotes/TurboGrafx16 console, dominated the market with its PC-8801 series. Introduced in 1981, the [=PC-88=] (as the system is commonly known) held sway until the 16-bit NEC [[UsefulNotes/{{PC98}} PC-9801]] gradually displaced it in the late 1980s.

to:

In the [[TheEighties 1980s]], Western personal computers were scarce in the Japanese market, in large part because they weren't equipped to handle [[UsefulNotes/JapaneseWritingSystem Japanese characters]]. Instead, Japanese electronics companies like Sharp and Fujitsu marketed their own brands of higher-resolution personal computers, and many others sold the {{UsefulNotes/MSX}}. But NEC, the company which later developed the UsefulNotes/TurboGrafx16 console, dominated the market with its PC-8801 '''PC-8801''' series. Introduced in 1981, the [=PC-88=] (as the system is commonly known) held sway until the 16-bit NEC [[UsefulNotes/{{PC98}} PC-9801]] gradually displaced it in the late 1980s.



Notable developers [[Creator/SquareEnix Enix, Squaresoft,]] Creator/GameArts, Creator/TelenetJapan, Creator/{{Falcom}}, and Creator/{{Koei|Tecmo}} all released their first games on the PC-88; the latter two were releasing new games for the system as late as 1992.

to:

Notable developers [[Creator/SquareEnix Enix, Squaresoft,]] Squaresoft]], Creator/GameArts, Creator/TelenetJapan, Creator/{{Falcom}}, Creator/{{Falcom}} and Creator/{{Koei|Tecmo}} all released their first games on the PC-88; the latter two were releasing new games for the system as late as 1992.


Notable developers [[Creator/SquareEnix Enix, Squaresoft,]] Creator/GameArts, Creator/TelenetJapan, Creator/{{Falcom}}, and Creator/{{Koei}} all released their first games on the PC-88; the latter two were releasing new games for the system as late as 1992.

to:

Notable developers [[Creator/SquareEnix Enix, Squaresoft,]] Creator/GameArts, Creator/TelenetJapan, Creator/{{Falcom}}, and Creator/{{Koei}} Creator/{{Koei|Tecmo}} all released their first games on the PC-88; the latter two were releasing new games for the system as late as 1992.


* ''Franchise/{{Ys}}''

to:

* ''Franchise/{{Ys}}''''VideoGame/{{Ys}}''

Added DiffLines:

* ''[[VideoGame/BackToTheFuture1986 Back To The Future]]''


In the [[TheEighties 1980s]], Western personal computers were scarce in the Japanese market, in large part because they weren't equipped to handle [[UsefulNotes/JapaneseWritingSystem Japanese characters]]. Instead, Japanese electronics companies like Sharp and Fujitsu marketed their own brands of higher-resolution personal computers, and many others sold the {{UsefulNotes/MSX}}. But NEC, the company which later developed the TurboGrafx16 console, dominated the market with its PC-8801 series. Introduced in 1981, the [=PC-88=] (as the system is commonly known) held sway until the 16-bit NEC [[UsefulNotes/{{PC98}} PC-9801]] gradually displaced it in the late 1980s.

to:

In the [[TheEighties 1980s]], Western personal computers were scarce in the Japanese market, in large part because they weren't equipped to handle [[UsefulNotes/JapaneseWritingSystem Japanese characters]]. Instead, Japanese electronics companies like Sharp and Fujitsu marketed their own brands of higher-resolution personal computers, and many others sold the {{UsefulNotes/MSX}}. But NEC, the company which later developed the TurboGrafx16 UsefulNotes/TurboGrafx16 console, dominated the market with its PC-8801 series. Introduced in 1981, the [=PC-88=] (as the system is commonly known) held sway until the 16-bit NEC [[UsefulNotes/{{PC98}} PC-9801]] gradually displaced it in the late 1980s.


Over a dozen different models of the PC-8801 were made. The [=PC-88VA/VA2/VA3=] deserves special mention: it was a 16-bit machine which tried to bridge the gap between the PC-8801 and PC-9801, and also appeal to gamers with graphical capabilities superior to both. However, the NEC PCEngine console, introduced the same year, took away a lot of interest (confusingly, "PC-Engine" was also the name of the [=PC-88VA=]'s operating system), and the [=PC-88VA=] failed to catch on as Japanese gamers looking for a more powerful 16-bit system generally preferred the UsefulNotes/SharpX68000.

to:

Over a dozen different models of the PC-8801 were made. The [=PC-88VA/VA2/VA3=] deserves special mention: it was a 16-bit machine which tried to bridge the gap between the PC-8801 and PC-9801, and also appeal to gamers with graphical capabilities superior to both. However, the NEC PCEngine UsefulNotes/PCEngine console, introduced the same year, took away a lot of interest (confusingly, "PC-Engine" was also the name of the [=PC-88VA=]'s operating system), and the [=PC-88VA=] failed to catch on as Japanese gamers looking for a more powerful 16-bit system generally preferred the UsefulNotes/SharpX68000.


In the [[TheEighties 1980s]], Western personal computers were scarce in the Japanese market, in large part because they weren't equipped to handle [[UsefulNotes/JapaneseWritingSystem Japanese characters]]. Instead, Japanese electronics companies like Sharp and Fujitsu marketed their own brands of higher-resolution personal computers, and many others sold the {{UsefulNotes/MSX}}. But NEC, the company which later developed the TurboGrafx16 console, dominated the market with its PC-8801 series. Introduced in 1981, the [=PC-88=] (as the system is commonly known) held sway until the 16-bit NEC [[{{PC98}} PC-9801]] gradually displaced it in the late 1980s.

to:

In the [[TheEighties 1980s]], Western personal computers were scarce in the Japanese market, in large part because they weren't equipped to handle [[UsefulNotes/JapaneseWritingSystem Japanese characters]]. Instead, Japanese electronics companies like Sharp and Fujitsu marketed their own brands of higher-resolution personal computers, and many others sold the {{UsefulNotes/MSX}}. But NEC, the company which later developed the TurboGrafx16 console, dominated the market with its PC-8801 series. Introduced in 1981, the [=PC-88=] (as the system is commonly known) held sway until the 16-bit NEC [[{{PC98}} [[UsefulNotes/{{PC98}} PC-9801]] gradually displaced it in the late 1980s.



* The [=PC-88VA=] instead used an NEC [=µPD9002=] ([=8MHz=]), a custom 16-bit processor compatible with both the [=Z80A=] and the V30 CPU which NEC was using in its [[{{PC98}} PC-9801]] models.

to:

* The [=PC-88VA=] instead used an NEC [=µPD9002=] ([=8MHz=]), a custom 16-bit processor compatible with both the [=Z80A=] and the V30 CPU which NEC was using in its [[{{PC98}} [[UsefulNotes/{{PC98}} PC-9801]] models.



to:

* ''VideoGame/LittleComputerPeople''


* ''VideoGame/LittleComputerPeople''

to:

* ''VideoGame/LittleComputerPeople''


* ''Franchise/{{Ultima}}''

to:

* ''Franchise/{{Ultima}}''''VideoGame/{{Ultima}}''


In the [[TheEighties 1980s]], Western personal computers were scarce in the Japanese market, in large part because they weren't equipped to handle [[UsefulNotes/JapaneseWritingSystem Japanese characters]]. Instead, Japanese electronics companies like Sharp and Fujitsu marketed their own brands of higher-resolution personal computers, and many others sold the {{MSX}}. But NEC, the company which later developed the TurboGrafx16 console, dominated the market with its PC-8801 series. Introduced in 1981, the [=PC-88=] (as the system is commonly known) held sway until the 16-bit NEC [[{{PC98}} PC-9801]] gradually displaced it in the late 1980s.

to:

In the [[TheEighties 1980s]], Western personal computers were scarce in the Japanese market, in large part because they weren't equipped to handle [[UsefulNotes/JapaneseWritingSystem Japanese characters]]. Instead, Japanese electronics companies like Sharp and Fujitsu marketed their own brands of higher-resolution personal computers, and many others sold the {{MSX}}.{{UsefulNotes/MSX}}. But NEC, the company which later developed the TurboGrafx16 console, dominated the market with its PC-8801 series. Introduced in 1981, the [=PC-88=] (as the system is commonly known) held sway until the 16-bit NEC [[{{PC98}} PC-9801]] gradually displaced it in the late 1980s.



* The PC-8801's [[UsefulNotes/CentralProcessingUnit CPU]] was a [=4MHz=] NEC [=µPD780=], which was updated in 1986 and later used an [=8MHz=] [=µPD70008=]. Both were compatible with the [=Z80A=] found in the {{MSX}}.

to:

* The PC-8801's [[UsefulNotes/CentralProcessingUnit CPU]] was a [=4MHz=] NEC [=µPD780=], which was updated in 1986 and later used an [=8MHz=] [=µPD70008=]. Both were compatible with the [=Z80A=] found in the {{MSX}}.{{UsefulNotes/MSX}}.


* ''VideoGame/{{Produce}}''

Added DiffLines:

* ''VideoGame/{{Produce}}''

Added DiffLines:

[[quoteright:350:http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/00_pc88_computer.png]]

Showing 15 edit(s) of 19

Top

How well does it match the trope?

Example of:

/

Media sources:

/

Report