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'''Sega CD''' and '''32X:''' A pair of add-ons released for the UsefulNotes/SegaGenesis and further described in its own page. The Sega CD (known as the Mega-CD outside North America), as its name suggests, was a CD-ROM drive made to compete with the UsefulNotes/TurboGrafx16 and its own CD-ROM add-on (which was popular in Japan, but not so much everywhere else). It added an extra CPU and more memory to the base hardware, giving the console the ability to do sprite scaling and rotation. It was notable for briefly popularizing FullMotionVideo games on consoles (made possible thanks to the media's extensive storage space that allowed for the inclusion of compressed video files), although the add-on also has its share of [=RPGs=] and graphic adventure games. The [=32X=] on the other hand, was an attempt to extend the lifespan of the Genesis, specifically in the U.S. (where the Genesis had a considerable market share) by upgrading it to a 32-bit console with a pair of Hitachi SH-2 chips, allowing the Genesis to display [=3D=] polygonal graphics without the need to implement a special processor in each cartridge. However, it was quickly overshadowed by the UsefulNotes/SegaSaturn (Sega's stand-alone 32-bit console launched almost at the same time), resulting in the add-on being quickly phased out after its launch with only a dozen or so games in its library.

to:

'''Sega CD''' and '''32X:''' A pair of add-ons released for the UsefulNotes/SegaGenesis and further described in its own page. The Sega CD (known as the Mega-CD outside North America), as its name suggests, was a CD-ROM drive made to compete with the UsefulNotes/TurboGrafx16 and its own CD-ROM add-on (which was popular in Japan, but not so much everywhere else). It added an extra CPU and more memory to the base hardware, giving the console the ability to do sprite scaling and rotation. It was notable for briefly popularizing FullMotionVideo games on consoles (made possible thanks to the media's extensive storage space that allowed for the inclusion of compressed video files), although the add-on also has its share of [=RPGs=] and graphic adventure games. The [=32X=] on the other hand, was an attempt to extend the lifespan of the Genesis, specifically in the U.S. (where the Genesis had a considerable market share) by upgrading it to a 32-bit console with a pair of Hitachi SH-2 chips, allowing the Genesis to display [=3D=] polygonal graphics without the need to implement a special processor in each cartridge. However, it was quickly overshadowed by the UsefulNotes/SegaSaturn (Sega's stand-alone 32-bit console launched almost at the same time), resulting in the add-on being quickly phased out after its launch with only a dozen or so about 40 games in its library.


* '''Sega [=MegaNet=]:''' The first online hookup for Japanese Mega Drives began service in 1991, but folded after lackluster sales and a canceled American release as the "Tele-Genesis". Somehow gained a [[ShortRunInPeru Short Run In Brazil]] in 1995.
* '''Sega Channel:''' A joint venture with Time Warner Cable and Charter Communications' predecessor TCI, this service started in 1994 for English-speaking Genesis / Mega Drive owners and used an adapter in the cartridge slot rather than the rear expansion port used by [=MegaNet=] (most American and European redesigns of the console's exterior omitted said port but kept the circuit board connections). Most famous for being the only way American Genesis owners got to play titles such as ''VideoGame/MegaMan: The Wily Wars'', ''VideoGame/GoldenAxe III'', ''VideoGame/{{Pulseman}}'' and ''VideoGame/AlienSoldier''.

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* '''Sega [=MegaNet=]:''' The first online hookup for Japanese Mega Drives (utilizing the "Mega Modem" add-on) began service in 1991, but folded after lackluster sales and a canceled American release as the "Tele-Genesis". Somehow gained a [[ShortRunInPeru Short Run In Brazil]] in 1995.
* '''Sega Channel:''' A joint venture with Time Warner Cable and (since absorbed into Charter Communications' Communications) and Comcast predecessor TCI, this service started in 1994 for English-speaking Genesis / Mega Drive owners and used an adapter in the cartridge slot rather than the rear expansion port used by [=MegaNet=] (most American and European redesigns of the console's exterior omitted said port but kept the circuit board connections). Most famous for being the only way American Genesis owners got to play titles such as ''VideoGame/MegaMan: The Wily Wars'', ''VideoGame/GoldenAxe III'', ''VideoGame/{{Pulseman}}'' and ''VideoGame/AlienSoldier''.


* '''[=SegaNet=] / Sega [=NetLink=]:''' An attempted online service for the UsefulNotes/SegaSaturn that failed due to high cost and lack of in-game support (only five games supported it, at least two of which are re-releases of games that originally preceded the [=NetLink=], and all are uncommon at best and extremely rare at worst). Notable for allowing users to choose their ISP and being built on the Usefulnotes/{{XBAND}} modem technology that once governed third-party online play for the Genesis and UsefulNotes/SuperNES. Also notable in that, unlike the Japanese equivalent that depended on now-defunct XBAND infrastructure, the [=NetLink=] uses a direct-dial system; if you can call someone on a home phone line, you can play with that someone to this very day. The Sega Pluto was to have been a Saturn model incorporating a [=NetLink=] modem; only two prototypes are known to exist.
* '''Dreamarena:''' Bundled with European Dreamcasts, this service absorbed what was left of [=SegaNet=]'s resources and took advantage of that system's built-in modem to provide free online play. Formally discontinued in 2003, but its [=DreamKey=] browser's latest updates allow users to input their own ISP data to continue supporting the Dreamcast's online functions.

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* '''[=SegaNet=] / Sega '''Sega [=NetLink=]:''' An attempted online service for the UsefulNotes/SegaSaturn that failed due to high cost and lack of in-game support (only five games supported it, at least two of which are re-releases of games that originally preceded the [=NetLink=], and all are uncommon at best and extremely rare at worst). Notable for allowing users to choose their ISP and being built on the Usefulnotes/{{XBAND}} modem technology that once governed third-party online play for the Genesis and UsefulNotes/SuperNES. Also notable in that, unlike the Japanese equivalent that depended on now-defunct XBAND infrastructure, the [=NetLink=] uses a direct-dial system; if you can call someone on a home phone line, you can play with that someone to this very day. The Sega Pluto was to have been a Saturn model incorporating a [=NetLink=] modem; only two prototypes are known to exist.
* '''[=SegaNet=]:''' The online service for American Dreamcasts, this service absorbed what was left of [=NetLink=]'s resources and took advantage of that system's built-in modem, with connections provided by AT&T [=WorldNet=], to provide online play with a subscription. However, the discontinuation of the Dreamcast in 2001 resulted in the servers for [=SegaNet=] being closed down in late 2001 (with subscribers being offered [=EarthLink=] accounts instead).
* '''Dreamarena:''' Bundled with European Dreamcasts, this service absorbed what was left of [=SegaNet=]'s resources and took advantage of that system's built-in modem to provide free online play. Dreamcasts. Formally discontinued in 2003, but its [=DreamKey=] browser's latest updates allow users to input their own ISP data to continue supporting the Dreamcast's online functions.functions.
* '''Dream Passport:''' The Japanese equivalent to [=SegaNet=] and Dreamarena, it functioned more as a web browser and was updated quite a few times. (Thanks to the Dreamcast's compatibility with Windows CE, Japanese subscribers of Microsoft's now defunct [=WebTV=] service could use their Dreamcasts to access the service.)


* '''[=SegaNet=] / Sega [=NetLink=]:''' An attempted online service for the UsefulNotes/SegaSaturn that failed due to high cost and lack of in-game support (only five games supported it, at least two of which are re-releases of games that originally preceded the [=NetLink=], and all are uncommon at best and extremely rare at worst). Notable for allowing users to choose their ISP and being built on the XBAND modem technology that once governed third-party online play for the Genesis and UsefulNotes/SuperNES. Also notable in that, unlike the Japanese equivalent that depended on now-defunct XBAND infrastructure, the [=NetLink=] uses a direct-dial system; if you can call someone on a home phone line, you can play with that someone to this very day. The Sega Pluto was to have been a Saturn model incorporating a [=NetLink=] modem; only two prototypes are known to exist.

to:

* '''[=SegaNet=] / Sega [=NetLink=]:''' An attempted online service for the UsefulNotes/SegaSaturn that failed due to high cost and lack of in-game support (only five games supported it, at least two of which are re-releases of games that originally preceded the [=NetLink=], and all are uncommon at best and extremely rare at worst). Notable for allowing users to choose their ISP and being built on the XBAND Usefulnotes/{{XBAND}} modem technology that once governed third-party online play for the Genesis and UsefulNotes/SuperNES. Also notable in that, unlike the Japanese equivalent that depended on now-defunct XBAND infrastructure, the [=NetLink=] uses a direct-dial system; if you can call someone on a home phone line, you can play with that someone to this very day. The Sega Pluto was to have been a Saturn model incorporating a [=NetLink=] modem; only two prototypes are known to exist.


* '''Multi-Mega (Genesis [=CDX=]):''' A last-ditch effort to keep Sega CD support alive, this miniaturized Genesis / Sega CD hybrid could also function as a portable CD player, but was locked out of playing games while running on battery power. Adding on to that, it was incompatible with the 32X accessory unless modifications were made to the console and/or accessory due to the accessory obstructing the CD-ROM drive when inserted.

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* '''Multi-Mega (Genesis [=CDX=]):''' A last-ditch effort to keep Sega CD support alive, this miniaturized Genesis / Sega CD hybrid could released in North America and Europe. It also function functions as a portable CD player, but was locked out of playing games while running on battery power. Adding on to that, it was incompatible with the 32X accessory unless modifications were made to the console and/or accessory due to the accessory obstructing the CD-ROM drive when inserted.power.


'''Sega CD''' and '''32X:''' A pair of add-ons released for the UsefulNotes/SegaGenesis and further described in its own page. The Sega CD (known as the Mega-CD outside North America), as its name suggests, was a CD-ROM drive made to compete with the UsefulNotes/TurboGrafx16 and its own CD-ROM add-on (which was popular in Japan, but not so much everywhere else). It added an extra CPU and more memory to the base hardware, giving the console the ability to do sprite scaling and rotation. It was notable for briefly popularizing FullMotionVideo games on consoles thanks to the extensive (for its time) storage space afforded by its media format, giving developers although the add-on also has its share of [=RPGs=] and graphic adventure games. The [=32X=] on the other hand, was an attempt to extend the lifespan of the Genesis, specifically in the U.S. (where the Genesis had a considerable market share) by upgrading it to a 32-bit console with a pair of Hitachi SH-2 chips, allowing the Genesis to display [=3D=] polygonal graphics without the need to implement a special processor in each cartridge. However, it was quickly overshadowed by the UsefulNotes/SegaSaturn (Sega's stand-alone 32-bit console launched almost at the same time), resulting in the add-on being quickly phased out after its launch with only a dozen or so games in its library.

to:

'''Sega CD''' and '''32X:''' A pair of add-ons released for the UsefulNotes/SegaGenesis and further described in its own page. The Sega CD (known as the Mega-CD outside North America), as its name suggests, was a CD-ROM drive made to compete with the UsefulNotes/TurboGrafx16 and its own CD-ROM add-on (which was popular in Japan, but not so much everywhere else). It added an extra CPU and more memory to the base hardware, giving the console the ability to do sprite scaling and rotation. It was notable for briefly popularizing FullMotionVideo games on consoles (made possible thanks to the media's extensive (for its time) storage space afforded by its media format, giving developers that allowed for the inclusion of compressed video files), although the add-on also has its share of [=RPGs=] and graphic adventure games. The [=32X=] on the other hand, was an attempt to extend the lifespan of the Genesis, specifically in the U.S. (where the Genesis had a considerable market share) by upgrading it to a 32-bit console with a pair of Hitachi SH-2 chips, allowing the Genesis to display [=3D=] polygonal graphics without the need to implement a special processor in each cartridge. However, it was quickly overshadowed by the UsefulNotes/SegaSaturn (Sega's stand-alone 32-bit console launched almost at the same time), resulting in the add-on being quickly phased out after its launch with only a dozen or so games in its library.


* '''[=SegaNet=] / Sega [=NetLink=]:''' An attempted online service for the UsefulNotes/SegaSaturn that failed due to high cost and lack of in-game support (only five games supported it, at least two of which are re-releases of games that originally preceded the [=NetLink=], and all are uncommon at best and extremely rare at worst). Notable for allowing users to choose their ISP and being built on the XBAND modem technology that once governed third-party online play for the Genesis and [[SuperNintendoEntertainmentSystem Super NES]]. Also notable in that, unlike the Japanese equivalent that depended on now-defunct XBAND infrastructure, the [=NetLink=] uses a direct-dial system; if you can call someone on a home phone line, you can play with that someone to this very day. The Sega Pluto was to have been a Saturn model incorporating a [=NetLink=] modem; only two prototypes are known to exist.

to:

* '''[=SegaNet=] / Sega [=NetLink=]:''' An attempted online service for the UsefulNotes/SegaSaturn that failed due to high cost and lack of in-game support (only five games supported it, at least two of which are re-releases of games that originally preceded the [=NetLink=], and all are uncommon at best and extremely rare at worst). Notable for allowing users to choose their ISP and being built on the XBAND modem technology that once governed third-party online play for the Genesis and [[SuperNintendoEntertainmentSystem Super NES]].UsefulNotes/SuperNES. Also notable in that, unlike the Japanese equivalent that depended on now-defunct XBAND infrastructure, the [=NetLink=] uses a direct-dial system; if you can call someone on a home phone line, you can play with that someone to this very day. The Sega Pluto was to have been a Saturn model incorporating a [=NetLink=] modem; only two prototypes are known to exist.


'''Sega CD''' and '''32X:''' A pair of add-ons released for the UsefulNotes/SegaGenesis and further described in its own page. The Sega CD (known as the Mega-CD outside North America), as its name suggests, was a CD-ROM drive made to compete with the UsefulNotes/TurboGrafx16 and its own CD-ROM add-on (which was popular in Japan, but not so much everywhere else). It added an extra CPU and more memory to the base hardware, giving the console the ability to do sprite scaling and rotation. It was notable for briefly popularizing FullMotionVideo games on consoles thanks to the extensive storage space afforded by the then-novel optical disc media, although the add-on also has its share of [=RPGs=] and graphic adventure games. The [=32X=] on the other hand, was an attempt to extend the lifespan of the Genesis, specifically in the U.S. (where the Genesis had a considerable market share) by upgrading it to a 32-bit console with a pair of Hitachi SH-2 chips, allowing the Genesis to display [=3D=] polygonal graphics without the need to implement a special processor in each cartridge. However, it was quickly overshadowed by the UsefulNotes/SegaSaturn (Sega's stand-alone 32-bit console launched almost at the same time), resulting in the add-on being quickly phased out after its launch.

to:

'''Sega CD''' and '''32X:''' A pair of add-ons released for the UsefulNotes/SegaGenesis and further described in its own page. The Sega CD (known as the Mega-CD outside North America), as its name suggests, was a CD-ROM drive made to compete with the UsefulNotes/TurboGrafx16 and its own CD-ROM add-on (which was popular in Japan, but not so much everywhere else). It added an extra CPU and more memory to the base hardware, giving the console the ability to do sprite scaling and rotation. It was notable for briefly popularizing FullMotionVideo games on consoles thanks to the extensive (for its time) storage space afforded by the then-novel optical disc media, its media format, giving developers although the add-on also has its share of [=RPGs=] and graphic adventure games. The [=32X=] on the other hand, was an attempt to extend the lifespan of the Genesis, specifically in the U.S. (where the Genesis had a considerable market share) by upgrading it to a 32-bit console with a pair of Hitachi SH-2 chips, allowing the Genesis to display [=3D=] polygonal graphics without the need to implement a special processor in each cartridge. However, it was quickly overshadowed by the UsefulNotes/SegaSaturn (Sega's stand-alone 32-bit console launched almost at the same time), resulting in the add-on being quickly phased out after its launch.
launch with only a dozen or so games in its library.


'''SC-3000''' and '''SG-1000''': A pair of 8-bit platforms that predated the [[UsefulNotes/SegaMasterSystem Sega Mark III]]. Both launched in Japan on July 15, 1983, the very same day that Creator/{{Nintendo}} launched the [[UsefulNotes/NintendoEntertainmentSystem Famicom]]. The two platforms are functionally identical and compatible with all the same software, with the main difference being that the SC-3000 has an integrated keyboard and was marketed as a microcomputer, while the SG-1000 has a hardwired joystick and functioned primarily as a game console (although a separately available keyboard allowed it to replicate the same functions as its SC-3000 counterpart). Sega later released the redesigned '''SG-1000 II''' model on July 1984, which replaced the original model's hardwired joystick with two detachable joypads in an attempt to make the console more Famicom-like. While never released in North America, the SC-3000 did enjoyed some level of success in countries such as Australia, New Zealand, France, Italy and Finland, where it was briefly sold as an entry-level machine. Specs wise, the SC[=/=]SG family of hardware were essentially identical to the UsefulNotes/ColecoVision and the original UsefulNotes/{{MSX}}, sharing common shelf parts (specifically the [=Z80=] and [=TMS9918=] processors), resulting in easy software portability between them. In fact, one clone console, the [=DINA=] 2-in-1, had compatibility with both, SC[=/=]SG cartridges and [=ColecoVision=] cartridges. In addition to cartridges, these platforms could also plays games in IC card formats (known as Sega My Cards) through the Card Catcher adapter. It was promoted by Japanese celebrity Yuko Saito in its early TV ads in a campaign which also marked the debut of the now famous "SE-GA!" jingle (which is best known in North America for its use in the original ''VideoGame/{{Sonic The Hedgehog|1}}'') and its first few sequels.

'''Sega CD''' and '''32X:''' Described in further detail on the page for the UsefulNotes/SegaGenesis, these attempts to get in on the ground floor of technologies properly defined by the other Fifth Generation consoles fell flat due to the Genesis itself not having the processing power to realize their full potential (more precisely, only the 32X was an attempt to provide a transitional add-on for Genesis owners into the Fifth Generation; the Sega CD was originally released in 1991 for Japan, 1992 in America, and 1993 in Europe as a way to take the system's specs closer to the [[UsefulNotes/SuperNintendoEntertainmentSystem Super NES]], while competing with the [[UsefulNotes/TurboGrafx16 PC Engine]]'s own series of CD-ROM add-ons and consoles). Plus, the 32X was released on December 3, 1994 in Japan, barely a week after the Saturn's November 22 launch, although it reached the US first. The arrival of UsefulNotes/{{PlayStation}} (which also launched on December 3rd in Japan), as well as UsefulNotes/SegaSaturn itself, nailed this add-on as well as UsefulNotes/SegaGenesis itself.

to:

'''SC-3000''' and '''SG-1000''': A pair of 8-bit platforms that predated the [[UsefulNotes/SegaMasterSystem Sega Mark III]]. Both launched in Japan on July 15, 1983, the very same day that Creator/{{Nintendo}} launched the [[UsefulNotes/NintendoEntertainmentSystem Famicom]]. The two platforms are functionally identical and compatible with all the same software, with the main difference being that the SC-3000 has an integrated keyboard and was marketed as a microcomputer, while the SG-1000 has a hardwired joystick and functioned primarily as a game console (although a separately available keyboard allowed it to replicate the same functions as its SC-3000 counterpart). Sega later released the redesigned '''SG-1000 II''' model on July 1984, which replaced the original model's hardwired joystick with two detachable joypads in an attempt to make the console more Famicom-like. While never released in North America, the SC-3000 did enjoyed some level of success in countries such as Australia, New Zealand, France, Italy and Finland, where it was briefly sold as an entry-level machine. Specs wise, the SC[=/=]SG family of hardware were essentially identical to the UsefulNotes/ColecoVision and the original UsefulNotes/{{MSX}}, sharing common shelf parts (specifically the [=Z80=] and [=TMS9918=] processors), resulting in easy software portability between them. In fact, one clone console, the [=DINA=] 2-in-1, had compatibility with both, SC[=/=]SG cartridges and [=ColecoVision=] cartridges. In addition to cartridges, these platforms could also plays games in IC card formats (known as Sega My Cards) through the Card Catcher adapter. It was promoted by Japanese celebrity Yuko Saito in its early TV ads in a campaign which also marked the debut of the now famous "SE-GA!" jingle (which is best known in North America the west for its use in the original ''VideoGame/{{Sonic The Hedgehog|1}}'') and its first few sequels.

Hedgehog|1}}'' games on the Mega Drive/Genesis).

'''Sega CD''' and '''32X:''' Described in further detail on the page for the UsefulNotes/SegaGenesis, these attempts to get in on the ground floor A pair of technologies properly defined by the other Fifth Generation consoles fell flat due to the Genesis itself not having the processing power to realize their full potential (more precisely, only the 32X was an attempt to provide a transitional add-on for Genesis owners into the Fifth Generation; the Sega CD was originally add-ons released in 1991 for Japan, 1992 in America, and 1993 in Europe as a way to take the system's specs closer to the [[UsefulNotes/SuperNintendoEntertainmentSystem Super NES]], while competing with the [[UsefulNotes/TurboGrafx16 PC Engine]]'s own series of CD-ROM add-ons and consoles). Plus, the 32X was released on December 3, 1994 in Japan, barely a week after the Saturn's November 22 launch, although it reached the US first. The arrival of UsefulNotes/{{PlayStation}} (which also launched on December 3rd in Japan), as well as UsefulNotes/SegaSaturn itself, nailed this add-on as well as UsefulNotes/SegaGenesis itself.
and further described in its own page. The Sega CD (known as the Mega-CD outside North America), as its name suggests, was a CD-ROM drive made to compete with the UsefulNotes/TurboGrafx16 and its own CD-ROM add-on (which was popular in Japan, but not so much everywhere else). It added an extra CPU and more memory to the base hardware, giving the console the ability to do sprite scaling and rotation. It was notable for briefly popularizing FullMotionVideo games on consoles thanks to the extensive storage space afforded by the then-novel optical disc media, although the add-on also has its share of [=RPGs=] and graphic adventure games. The [=32X=] on the other hand, was an attempt to extend the lifespan of the Genesis, specifically in the U.S. (where the Genesis had a considerable market share) by upgrading it to a 32-bit console with a pair of Hitachi SH-2 chips, allowing the Genesis to display [=3D=] polygonal graphics without the need to implement a special processor in each cartridge. However, it was quickly overshadowed by the UsefulNotes/SegaSaturn (Sega's stand-alone 32-bit console launched almost at the same time), resulting in the add-on being quickly phased out after its launch.


'''SC-3000''' and '''SG-1000''': A pair of 8-bit platforms that predated the [[UsefulNotes/SegaMasterSystem Sega Mark III]]. Both launched in Japan on July 15, 1983, the very same day that Creator/{{Nintendo}} launched the [[UsefulNotes/NintendoEntertainmentSystem Famicom]]. The two platforms are functionally identical and compatible with all the same software, with the main difference being that the SC-3000 has an integrated keyboard and was marketed as a microcomputer, while the SG-1000 has a hardwired joystick and was marketed as a game console. Sega later released the redesigned '''SG-1000 II''' model on July 1984, which replaced the original model's hardwired joystick with two detachable joypads in an attempt to make the console more Famicom-like. While never released in North America, the SC-3000 did enjoyed some level of success in countries such as Australia, New Zealand, France, Italy and Finland, where it was briefly sold as an entry-level machine. Specs wise, the SC[=/=]SG family of hardware were essentially identical to the UsefulNotes/ColecoVision and the original UsefulNotes/{{MSX}}, sharing common shelf parts (specifically the [=Z80=] and [=TMS9918=] processors), resulting in easy software portability between them. In fact, one clone console, the [=DINA=] 2-in-1, had compatibility with both, SC[=/=]SG cartridges and [=ColecoVision=] cartridges. It was promoted by Japanese celebrity Yuko Saito in its early TV ads. This campaign also marked the debut of the now famous "SE-GA!" jingle (which is best known in North America for its use in the original ''VideoGame/{{Sonic The Hedgehog|1}}'') and its first few sequels.

to:

'''SC-3000''' and '''SG-1000''': A pair of 8-bit platforms that predated the [[UsefulNotes/SegaMasterSystem Sega Mark III]]. Both launched in Japan on July 15, 1983, the very same day that Creator/{{Nintendo}} launched the [[UsefulNotes/NintendoEntertainmentSystem Famicom]]. The two platforms are functionally identical and compatible with all the same software, with the main difference being that the SC-3000 has an integrated keyboard and was marketed as a microcomputer, while the SG-1000 has a hardwired joystick and was marketed functioned primarily as a game console.console (although a separately available keyboard allowed it to replicate the same functions as its SC-3000 counterpart). Sega later released the redesigned '''SG-1000 II''' model on July 1984, which replaced the original model's hardwired joystick with two detachable joypads in an attempt to make the console more Famicom-like. While never released in North America, the SC-3000 did enjoyed some level of success in countries such as Australia, New Zealand, France, Italy and Finland, where it was briefly sold as an entry-level machine. Specs wise, the SC[=/=]SG family of hardware were essentially identical to the UsefulNotes/ColecoVision and the original UsefulNotes/{{MSX}}, sharing common shelf parts (specifically the [=Z80=] and [=TMS9918=] processors), resulting in easy software portability between them. In fact, one clone console, the [=DINA=] 2-in-1, had compatibility with both, SC[=/=]SG cartridges and [=ColecoVision=] cartridges. In addition to cartridges, these platforms could also plays games in IC card formats (known as Sega My Cards) through the Card Catcher adapter. It was promoted by Japanese celebrity Yuko Saito in its early TV ads. This ads in a campaign which also marked the debut of the now famous "SE-GA!" jingle (which is best known in North America for its use in the original ''VideoGame/{{Sonic The Hedgehog|1}}'') and its first few sequels.


'''SC-3000''' and '''SG-1000''': A pair of 8-bit platforms that predated the [[UsefulNotes/SegaMasterSystem Sega Mark III]]. Both launched in Japan on July 15, 1983, the very same day that Creator/{{Nintendo}} launched the [[UsefulNotes/NintendoEntertainmentSystem Famicom]]. The two platforms are functionally identical and compatible with all the same software, with the main difference being that the SC-3000 has an integrated keyboard and was marketed as a microcomputer, while the SG-1000 has a hardwired joystick and was marketed as a game console. Sega later released the redesigned '''SG-1000 II''' model on July 1984, which replaced the original model's hardwired joystick with two detachable joypads in an attempt to make the console more competitive with the Famicom. While never released in North America, the SC-3000 did enjoyed some level of success in other countries such as Australia, New Zealand, France, Italy and Finland, where it was briefly sold as an entry-level machine. Specs wise, the SC-3000 and its derivatives were essentially identical to the UsefulNotes/ColecoVision and the UsefulNotes/{{MSX}}, as they were constructed from common shelf parts (namely the [=Z80=] and [=TMS9918=] processors), resulting in easy software portability between them. In fact, one clone console, the [=DINA=] 2-in-1, had compatibility with both, SC[=/=]SG cartridges and [=ColecoVision=] cartridges. It may also be remembered for an early advertising campaign featuring Japanese celebrity Yuko Saito[[note]]Who had done commercials for many other (non-video game) products as well as stores (such as 7-Eleven).[[/note]]. Many of the commercials can be found on [=YouTube=]. This campaign also marked the debut of the now famous "SE-GA!" jingle (which is best known in North America for its use in the original ''VideoGame/{{Sonic The Hedgehog|1}}'') and its first few sequels.

to:

'''SC-3000''' and '''SG-1000''': A pair of 8-bit platforms that predated the [[UsefulNotes/SegaMasterSystem Sega Mark III]]. Both launched in Japan on July 15, 1983, the very same day that Creator/{{Nintendo}} launched the [[UsefulNotes/NintendoEntertainmentSystem Famicom]]. The two platforms are functionally identical and compatible with all the same software, with the main difference being that the SC-3000 has an integrated keyboard and was marketed as a microcomputer, while the SG-1000 has a hardwired joystick and was marketed as a game console. Sega later released the redesigned '''SG-1000 II''' model on July 1984, which replaced the original model's hardwired joystick with two detachable joypads in an attempt to make the console more competitive with the Famicom. Famicom-like. While never released in North America, the SC-3000 did enjoyed some level of success in other countries such as Australia, New Zealand, France, Italy and Finland, where it was briefly sold as an entry-level machine. Specs wise, the SC-3000 and its derivatives SC[=/=]SG family of hardware were essentially identical to the UsefulNotes/ColecoVision and the original UsefulNotes/{{MSX}}, as they were constructed from sharing common shelf parts (namely (specifically the [=Z80=] and [=TMS9918=] processors), resulting in easy software portability between them. In fact, one clone console, the [=DINA=] 2-in-1, had compatibility with both, SC[=/=]SG cartridges and [=ColecoVision=] cartridges. It may also be remembered for an early advertising campaign featuring was promoted by Japanese celebrity Yuko Saito[[note]]Who had done commercials for many other (non-video game) products as well as stores (such as 7-Eleven).[[/note]]. Many of the commercials can be found on [=YouTube=].Saito in its early TV ads. This campaign also marked the debut of the now famous "SE-GA!" jingle (which is best known in North America for its use in the original ''VideoGame/{{Sonic The Hedgehog|1}}'') and its first few sequels.


'''SC-3000''' and '''SG-1000''': An 8-bit personal computer and console respectively that predated the [[UsefulNotes/SegaMasterSystem Sega Mark III/Master System]]. Both launched in Japan on July 15, 1983, the very same day that Creator/{{Nintendo}} launched the [[UsefulNotes/NintendoEntertainmentSystem Famicom]]. The two platforms are functionally identical and compatible with all the same software, with the main difference being that the SC-3000 has an integrated keyboard, while the SG-1000 has a hardwired joystick. Sega later released the redesigned '''SG-1000 II''' model on July 1984, which replaced the original model's hardwired joystick with two detachable joypads in an attempt to make the console more Famicom-like. While never released in North America, the SC-3000 did enjoyed some level of success in other countries such as Australia, New Zealand, France, Italy and Finland, where it was briefly sold as an entry-level machine. Specs wise, the SC-3000 and its derivatives were essentially identical to the UsefulNotes/ColecoVision and the UsefulNotes/{{MSX}}, as they were constructed from common shelf parts (namely the [=Z80=] and [=TMS9918=] processors), resulting in easy software portability between them. In fact, one clone console, the [=DINA=] 2-in-1, had compatibility with both, SC[=/=]SG cartridges and [=ColecoVision=] cartridges. It may also be remembered for an early advertising campaign featuring Japanese celebrity Yuko Saito[[note]]Who had done commercials for many other (non-video game) products as well as stores (such as 7-Eleven).[[/note]]. Many of the commercials can be found on [=YouTube=]. This campaign also marked the debut of the now famous "SE-GA!" jingle (which is best known in North America for its use in the original ''VideoGame/{{Sonic The Hedgehog|1}}'') and its first few sequels.

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'''SC-3000''' and '''SG-1000''': An A pair of 8-bit personal computer and console respectively platforms that predated the [[UsefulNotes/SegaMasterSystem Sega Mark III/Master System]].III]]. Both launched in Japan on July 15, 1983, the very same day that Creator/{{Nintendo}} launched the [[UsefulNotes/NintendoEntertainmentSystem Famicom]]. The two platforms are functionally identical and compatible with all the same software, with the main difference being that the SC-3000 has an integrated keyboard, keyboard and was marketed as a microcomputer, while the SG-1000 has a hardwired joystick. joystick and was marketed as a game console. Sega later released the redesigned '''SG-1000 II''' model on July 1984, which replaced the original model's hardwired joystick with two detachable joypads in an attempt to make the console more Famicom-like.competitive with the Famicom. While never released in North America, the SC-3000 did enjoyed some level of success in other countries such as Australia, New Zealand, France, Italy and Finland, where it was briefly sold as an entry-level machine. Specs wise, the SC-3000 and its derivatives were essentially identical to the UsefulNotes/ColecoVision and the UsefulNotes/{{MSX}}, as they were constructed from common shelf parts (namely the [=Z80=] and [=TMS9918=] processors), resulting in easy software portability between them. In fact, one clone console, the [=DINA=] 2-in-1, had compatibility with both, SC[=/=]SG cartridges and [=ColecoVision=] cartridges. It may also be remembered for an early advertising campaign featuring Japanese celebrity Yuko Saito[[note]]Who had done commercials for many other (non-video game) products as well as stores (such as 7-Eleven).[[/note]]. Many of the commercials can be found on [=YouTube=]. This campaign also marked the debut of the now famous "SE-GA!" jingle (which is best known in North America for its use in the original ''VideoGame/{{Sonic The Hedgehog|1}}'') and its first few sequels.


'''SG-1000:''' Sega's very first home game console and a precursor to the [[UsefulNotes/SegaMasterSystem Sega Mark III]]. It was launched in Japan on July 15, 1983, the very same day Nintendo launched the [[UsefulNotes/NintendoEntertainmentSystem Famicom]]. While never released in North America, the SG-1000 was available in certain markets within Europe, Oceania and South Africa through licensing deals with local companies. The original console came with a hardwired joystick controller with two shoulder buttons similar to the one bundled with the {{Atari 5200}}, plus a port for an additional controller. The '''SC-3000''', an alternate version that was marketed as a home computer, had an integrated keyboard (sold separately as a peripheral for the SG-1000) with two controller ports instead. The '''SG-1000 II''' redesign (aka the "Mark II"), released on July 1984, featured two Famicom-style joypads that could be placed on the sides of the console when not in use, but were also detachable (making them easily replaceable if they ever got damaged). Specs wise, the SG-1000 and its derivatives were essentially identical to the UsefulNotes/ColecoVision and the UsefulNotes/{{MSX}}, as they were constructed from common shelf parts (namely the [=Z80=] and [=TMS9918=] processors), resulting in easy software portability between them. In fact, one clone console, the [=DINA=] 2-in-1, had compatibility with both, SG-1000 and [=ColecoVision=] cartridges. It may also be remembered for an early advertising campaign featuring Japanese celebrity Yuko Saito[[note]]Who had done commercials for many other (non-video game) products as well as stores (such as 7-Eleven).[[/note]]. Many of the commercials can be found on You Tube. This campaign also marked the debut of the now famous "SE-GA!" jingle (which is best known in North America for its use in the original ''VideoGame/{{Sonic The Hedgehog|1}}'') and its first few sequels.

to:

'''SG-1000:''' Sega's very first home game '''SC-3000''' and '''SG-1000''': An 8-bit personal computer and console and a precursor to respectively that predated the [[UsefulNotes/SegaMasterSystem Sega Mark III]]. It was III/Master System]]. Both launched in Japan on July 15, 1983, the very same day Nintendo that Creator/{{Nintendo}} launched the [[UsefulNotes/NintendoEntertainmentSystem Famicom]]. While never released in North America, the SG-1000 was available in certain markets within Europe, Oceania The two platforms are functionally identical and South Africa through licensing deals compatible with local companies. The original console came with a hardwired joystick controller with two shoulder buttons similar to all the one bundled same software, with the {{Atari 5200}}, plus a port for an additional controller. The '''SC-3000''', an alternate version main difference being that was marketed as a home computer, had the SC-3000 has an integrated keyboard (sold separately as a peripheral for keyboard, while the SG-1000) with two controller ports instead. The SG-1000 has a hardwired joystick. Sega later released the redesigned '''SG-1000 II''' redesign (aka the "Mark II"), released model on July 1984, featured which replaced the original model's hardwired joystick with two Famicom-style detachable joypads that could be placed on the sides of in an attempt to make the console when not more Famicom-like. While never released in use, but were also detachable (making them easily replaceable if they ever got damaged). North America, the SC-3000 did enjoyed some level of success in other countries such as Australia, New Zealand, France, Italy and Finland, where it was briefly sold as an entry-level machine. Specs wise, the SG-1000 SC-3000 and its derivatives were essentially identical to the UsefulNotes/ColecoVision and the UsefulNotes/{{MSX}}, as they were constructed from common shelf parts (namely the [=Z80=] and [=TMS9918=] processors), resulting in easy software portability between them. In fact, one clone console, the [=DINA=] 2-in-1, had compatibility with both, SG-1000 SC[=/=]SG cartridges and [=ColecoVision=] cartridges. It may also be remembered for an early advertising campaign featuring Japanese celebrity Yuko Saito[[note]]Who had done commercials for many other (non-video game) products as well as stores (such as 7-Eleven).[[/note]]. Many of the commercials can be found on You Tube.[=YouTube=]. This campaign also marked the debut of the now famous "SE-GA!" jingle (which is best known in North America for its use in the original ''VideoGame/{{Sonic The Hedgehog|1}}'') and its first few sequels.



* '''SD-G5:''' An upgrade module for Pioneer's '''SEED''' family of television monitors, which used a module expansion system similar to the later [=LaserActive=] player. Because of its lack of expansion port it cannot use the SK-1100 keyboard, rendering all SC-3000 software incompatible.

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* '''SD-G5:''' An upgrade module for Pioneer's '''SEED''' family of television monitors, which used a module expansion system similar to the later [=LaserActive=] player. Because of its lack of expansion port It allowed users to play SG-1000 cartridges directly into the TV monitor. However, it cannot use is incompatible with the SK-1100 keyboard, rendering all SC-3000 software incompatible.unplayable.


'''SG-1000:''' Sega's very first home game console and a precursor to the [[UsefulNotes/SegaMasterSystem Sega Mark III]]. It was launched in Japan on July 15, 1983, the very same day Nintendo launched the [[UsefulNotes/NintendoEntertainmentSystem Famicom]]. While never released in North America, the SG-1000 was available in certain markets within Europe, Oceania and South Africa through licensing deals with local companies. The original console came with a hardwired joystick controller with two shoulder buttons similar to the one bundled with the {{Atari 5200}}, plus a port for an additional controller. The '''SC-3000''', an alternate version that was marketed as a home computer, had an integrated keyboard (sold separately as a peripheral for the SG-1000) with two controller ports instead. The '''SG-1000 II''' redesign (aka the "Mark II"), released on July 1984, featured two Famicom-style joypads that could be placed on the sides of the console when not in use, but were also detachable (making them easily replaceable if they ever got damaged). Specs wise, the SG-1000 and its derivatives were essentially identical to the UsefulNotes/ColecoVision and the UsefulNotes/{{MSX}}, as they were constructed from common shelf parts (namely the [=Z80=] and [=TMS9918=] processors), resulting in easy software portability between them. In fact, one clone console, the [=DINA=] 2-in-1, had compatibility with both, SG-1000 and [=ColecoVision=] cartridges. It may also be remembered for an early advertising campaign featuring Japanese celebrity Yuko Saito[[note]]Who had done commercials for many other (non-video game) products as well as stores (such as 7-Eleven).[[/note]]. Many of the commercials can be found on You Tube. This campaign also marked the debut of the now famous "SE-GA!" jingle (which is best known in North America for it's use in the original ''VideoGame/{{Sonic The Hedgehog|1}}'' and its first few sequels.

to:

'''SG-1000:''' Sega's very first home game console and a precursor to the [[UsefulNotes/SegaMasterSystem Sega Mark III]]. It was launched in Japan on July 15, 1983, the very same day Nintendo launched the [[UsefulNotes/NintendoEntertainmentSystem Famicom]]. While never released in North America, the SG-1000 was available in certain markets within Europe, Oceania and South Africa through licensing deals with local companies. The original console came with a hardwired joystick controller with two shoulder buttons similar to the one bundled with the {{Atari 5200}}, plus a port for an additional controller. The '''SC-3000''', an alternate version that was marketed as a home computer, had an integrated keyboard (sold separately as a peripheral for the SG-1000) with two controller ports instead. The '''SG-1000 II''' redesign (aka the "Mark II"), released on July 1984, featured two Famicom-style joypads that could be placed on the sides of the console when not in use, but were also detachable (making them easily replaceable if they ever got damaged). Specs wise, the SG-1000 and its derivatives were essentially identical to the UsefulNotes/ColecoVision and the UsefulNotes/{{MSX}}, as they were constructed from common shelf parts (namely the [=Z80=] and [=TMS9918=] processors), resulting in easy software portability between them. In fact, one clone console, the [=DINA=] 2-in-1, had compatibility with both, SG-1000 and [=ColecoVision=] cartridges. It may also be remembered for an early advertising campaign featuring Japanese celebrity Yuko Saito[[note]]Who had done commercials for many other (non-video game) products as well as stores (such as 7-Eleven).[[/note]]. Many of the commercials can be found on You Tube. This campaign also marked the debut of the now famous "SE-GA!" jingle (which is best known in North America for it's its use in the original ''VideoGame/{{Sonic The Hedgehog|1}}'' Hedgehog|1}}'') and its first few sequels.


'''Yamaha Mixt Book Player Copera''': A Japan-only variant of the Sega Pico manufactured by Yamaha, it reinstated the [=OPN2=] FM synth into the Pico to allow for better quality music while still retaining the [=uPD=] PCM CODEC for speech and sound samples (the Pico is based on [=MegaDrive=] hardware, but omitted the [=OPN2=] synth to cut costs and added the [=uPD=] PCM CODEC to allow for superior speech and sound effects).

to:

'''Yamaha Mixt Book Player Copera''': A Japan-only variant of the Sega Pico manufactured by Yamaha, it reinstated the [=OPN2=] FM synth into the Pico to allow for better quality music while still retaining the [=uPD=] PCM CODEC for speech and sound samples (the Pico is based on [=MegaDrive=] Mega Drive hardware, but omitted the [=OPN2=] synth to cut costs and added the [=uPD=] PCM CODEC to allow for superior speech and sound effects).

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