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* '''XXXII -- 2020: Tokyo, Japan'''

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* '''XXXII -- 2020: Tokyo, Japan'''Japan'''[[note]]Postponed to 2021, but will still be called “Tokyo 2020”[[/note]]



-->This will mark the second time the Games are held in Tokyo, the first time an Asian city hosts the Games twice, and the fifth in a list of such repeats overall, after Athens (1896, 2004), Paris (1900, 1924), London (1908, 1948, 2012), and Los Angeles (1932, 1984). These Olympics will mark the return of baseball and softball to the sports program for the first time since 2008. Four sports will also make their Olympic debut in Tokyo: karate (yet another hand-to-hand combat sport at the Olympics), surfing, skateboarding, and sport climbing[[note]]a variation of rock climbing[[/note]]. On June 9, 2017, 15 new events were announced, including 3-on-3 basketball, the addition of a 4x100-meter mixed medley relay in swimming (along with the long-awaited installation of the 800-meter freestyle for men, and the 1,500-meter freestyle for women), and a 4x400-meter mixed relay for track. Due to the worldwide outbreak of the [=COVID-19=] virus, senior IOC officials indicated in March 2020 that the 2020 Summer Games may be postponed to 2021; however, no official announcement has yet been made by either the IOC or the Tokyo organisers.

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-->This will mark the second time the Games are held in Tokyo, the first time an Asian city hosts the Games twice, and the fifth in a list of such repeats overall, after Athens (1896, 2004), Paris (1900, 1924), London (1908, 1948, 2012), and Los Angeles (1932, 1984). These Olympics will mark the return of baseball and softball to the sports program for the first time since 2008. Four sports will also make their Olympic debut in Tokyo: karate (yet another hand-to-hand combat sport at the Olympics), surfing, skateboarding, and sport climbing[[note]]a variation of rock climbing[[/note]]. On June 9, 2017, 15 new events were announced, including 3-on-3 basketball, the addition of a 4x100-meter mixed medley relay in swimming (along with the long-awaited installation of the 800-meter freestyle for men, and the 1,500-meter freestyle for women), and a 4x400-meter mixed relay for track. Due After mounting pressure to postpone the Games - including indications that Australia and Canada would not send a team - due to the worldwide outbreak of the [=COVID-19=] virus, senior IOC officials indicated in March 2020 that the 2020 Summer Games may be Covid-19 pandemic, they were postponed until 2021 on 24 March 2020; [[NonIndicativeName despite this, they were still referred to 2021; however, no official announcement has yet been made by either the IOC or the Tokyo organisers.as “Tokyo 2020”]].


'''Duration:''' TBD (originally scheduled for July 24 -- August 9)\\

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'''Duration:''' TBD (originally scheduled for July 24 -- - August 9)\\



-->This will mark the second time the Games are held in Tokyo, the first time an Asian city hosts the Games twice, and the fifth in a list of such repeats overall, after Athens (1896, 2004), Paris (1900, 1924), London (1908, 1948, 2012), and Los Angeles (1932, 1984). These Olympics will mark the return of baseball and softball to the sports program for the first time since 2008. Four sports will also make their Olympic debut in Tokyo: karate (yet another hand-to-hand combat sport at the Olympics), surfing, skateboarding, and sport climbing[[note]]a variation of rock climbing[[/note]]. On June 9, 2017, 15 new events were announced, including 3-on-3 basketball, the addition of a 4x100-meter mixed medley relay in swimming (along with the long-awaited installation of the 800-meter freestyle for men, and the 1,500-meter freestyle for women), and a 4x400-meter mixed relay for track. Due to the worldwide outbreak of [=COVID-19=], the a senior IOC official indicated that the 2020 Summer Olympics may be postponed to 2021; however, no official announcement has yet been made by either the IOC or the Tokyo organisers.

to:

-->This will mark the second time the Games are held in Tokyo, the first time an Asian city hosts the Games twice, and the fifth in a list of such repeats overall, after Athens (1896, 2004), Paris (1900, 1924), London (1908, 1948, 2012), and Los Angeles (1932, 1984). These Olympics will mark the return of baseball and softball to the sports program for the first time since 2008. Four sports will also make their Olympic debut in Tokyo: karate (yet another hand-to-hand combat sport at the Olympics), surfing, skateboarding, and sport climbing[[note]]a variation of rock climbing[[/note]]. On June 9, 2017, 15 new events were announced, including 3-on-3 basketball, the addition of a 4x100-meter mixed medley relay in swimming (along with the long-awaited installation of the 800-meter freestyle for men, and the 1,500-meter freestyle for women), and a 4x400-meter mixed relay for track. Due to the worldwide outbreak of [=COVID-19=], the a [=COVID-19=] virus, senior IOC official officials indicated in March 2020 that the 2020 Summer Olympics Games may be postponed to 2021; however, no official announcement has yet been made by either the IOC or the Tokyo organisers.


'''Duration:''' July 24 -- August 9\\

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'''Duration:''' TBD (originally scheduled for July 24 -- August 9\\9)\\



-->This will mark the second time the Games are held in Tokyo, the first time an Asian city hosts the Games twice, and the fifth in a list of such repeats overall, after Athens (1896, 2004), Paris (1900, 1924), London (1908, 1948, 2012), and Los Angeles (1932, 1984). These Olympics will mark the return of baseball and softball to the sports program for the first time since 2008. Four sports will also make their Olympic debut in Tokyo: karate (yet another hand-to-hand combat sport at the Olympics), surfing, skateboarding, and sport climbing[[note]]a variation of rock climbing[[/note]]. On June 9, 2017, 15 new events were announced, including 3-on-3 basketball, the addition of a 4x100-meter mixed medley relay in swimming (along with the long-awaited installation of the 800-meter freestyle for men, and the 1,500-meter freestyle for women), and a 4x400-meter mixed relay for track.

to:

-->This will mark the second time the Games are held in Tokyo, the first time an Asian city hosts the Games twice, and the fifth in a list of such repeats overall, after Athens (1896, 2004), Paris (1900, 1924), London (1908, 1948, 2012), and Los Angeles (1932, 1984). These Olympics will mark the return of baseball and softball to the sports program for the first time since 2008. Four sports will also make their Olympic debut in Tokyo: karate (yet another hand-to-hand combat sport at the Olympics), surfing, skateboarding, and sport climbing[[note]]a variation of rock climbing[[/note]]. On June 9, 2017, 15 new events were announced, including 3-on-3 basketball, the addition of a 4x100-meter mixed medley relay in swimming (along with the long-awaited installation of the 800-meter freestyle for men, and the 1,500-meter freestyle for women), and a 4x400-meter mixed relay for track. Due to the worldwide outbreak of [=COVID-19=], the a senior IOC official indicated that the 2020 Summer Olympics may be postponed to 2021; however, no official announcement has yet been made by either the IOC or the Tokyo organisers.


-->'''Motto:''' "Discover Tomorrow"\\

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-->'''Motto:''' "Discover Tomorrow"\\"United by Emotion"\\



'''Mascot:''' Miraitowa (Olympics) and Someity (Paralympics), {{Cartoon Creature}}s with checkered patterns[[note]]They are a nod to Japan's fascination for cute mascots; respectively, the former is colored blue after the Games' official logo, and whose name is based on the Japanese words for "future" and "eternity", while the latter is colored pink in allusion to cherry blossoms, a cherished part of Japanese culture, and is named after the ''somei-yoshino'' (''Prunus × yedoensis'', a kind of cherry blossom) and the English words "So mighty"[[/note]]

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'''Mascot:''' Miraitowa (Olympics) and Someity (Paralympics), {{Cartoon Creature}}s with checkered patterns[[note]]They are a nod to Japan's fascination for cute mascots; mascots as well as anime; respectively, the former is colored blue after the Games' official logo, and whose name is based on the Japanese words for "future" and "eternity", while the latter is colored pink in allusion to cherry blossoms, a cherished part of Japanese culture, and is named after the ''somei-yoshino'' (''Prunus × yedoensis'', a kind of cherry blossom) and the English words "So mighty"[[/note]]


'''Duration:''' February 4-20
'''Mascots:''' Bing Dwen Dawn the panda (Olympics) and Shuy Rhon Rhon the lantern (Paralympics)\\

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'''Duration:''' February 4-20
4-20\\
'''Mascots:''' Bing Dwen Dawn the panda (Olympics) and Shuy Rhon Rhon the lantern (Paralympics)\\(Paralympics)[[note]]As in the 2008 Summer Games in Beijing, the panda is one of the national aninals of China while the lantern is hung on the Lunar New Year.[[/note]]\\\\


'''Mascots:''' Bing Dwen Dawn the panda (Olympics) and Shuy Ehon Rhon the lantern (Paralympics)\\

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'''Mascots:''' Bing Dwen Dawn the panda (Olympics) and Shuy Ehon Rhon Rhon the lantern (Paralympics)\\


'''Mascot:''' Soohorang the white tiger (Olympics) and Bandabi the black bear (Paralympics)[[note]]As in the 1988 Summer Games in Seoul, the white tiger is an auspicious animal in Korean culture, while the bear is both an allusion to the Asiatic black bear common throughout the mountains of Gangwon, where Pyeongchang is located, as well as a nod to the 1988 Summer Paralympic mascot[[/note]]\\

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'''Mascot:''' '''Mascots:''' Soohorang the white tiger (Olympics) and Bandabi the black bear (Paralympics)[[note]]As in the 1988 Summer Games in Seoul, the white tiger is an auspicious animal in Korean culture, while the bear is both an allusion to the Asiatic black bear common throughout the mountains of Gangwon, where Pyeongchang is located, as well as a nod to the 1988 Summer Paralympic mascot[[/note]]\\


Added DiffLines:

'''Mascots:''' Bing Dwen Dawn the panda (Olympics) and Shuy Ehon Rhon the lantern (Paralympics)\\


-->The first Winter Olympics in Asia outside Japan. In the USA, these Games were also the first hosted in primetime by Mike Tirico, who replaced long-time host Bob Costas. In light the aforementioned doping scandal, Russia's NOC is suspended, while athletes proven clean participated as the neutral "Olympic Athletes from Russia" under the Olympic Flag. Also, for the first time since Torino 2006 the two Koreas marched under the Unification Flag at the opening and closing ceremonies, as well as fielded a unified women's ice hockey team. For the first time since Salt Lake 2002, winter powerhouse Norway dominated the medals board, with cross-country skier Marit Bjørgen winning five medals (two golds, one silver, and two bronzes) on her fifth and final Games to surpass her compatriot Ole Einar Bjørndalen from four years ago for most decorated Winter Olympian with eight golds, four silvers and three bronzes. Also famous for the American women's ice hockey team stunning four-time defending gold medalists Canada in the first finals game to ''really'' go the distance (2-2 at regulation time, then a scoreless overtime, and finally a penalty shootout that went to sudden-death after tying 2-2 in ten attempts) to win their first gold since ''the inaugural edition in 1998'', while also drawing some parallels with their male "Miracle on Ice" counterparts from Lake Placid 1980 (both having waited twenty years for their second gold medals at the expense of four-time defending champions on a February 22). Other highlights include Nigeria and Jamaica fielding their very first women's bobsled teams (the former also a first for Africa), Canadian figure skating pair Tessa Virtue and Scott Moir becoming becoming the most decorated Olympians in their sport (three golds and two silvers each), the Czech Republic's Ester Ledecká making history as the first Winter Olympian to win gold in two different disciplines in a single Games (alpine skiing[[note]]where she stunningly won the super-G after many broadcasters had already checked out, believing Austria's Anna Veith would win[[/note]] and snowboarding), Mikaela Shiffrin adding another alpine skiing gold to tie Ted Ligety and Andrea Mead Lawrence for most decorated American alpine skier,[[note]]Not to mention that Ledecká won gold in the super-G on skis that Shiffrin had once used... though Ledecká's camp had acquired said skis about 18 months before the Games.[[/note]] Japanese figure skater Creator/YuzuruHanyu making the first successful gold medal defense in men's figure skating since Canada's Dick Button in 1952, a moment of peace between East Asian rivals in the women's 500m speed skating final with gold medalist Nao Kodaira of Japan and silver medalist Lee Sang-hwa of South Korea sharing a lap of friendship after the former narrowly edged out the erstwhile two-time defending champion, the ragtag American men's curling team stunning world #1 Sweden to win their very first gold, with defending men's and women's champions Canada leaving almost empty-handed (the former lost to the USA in the semis, then missed out on a bronze to Switzerland, while the women fared worse, falling away as early as the group stage, even as Sweden won gold over surprise finalists South Korea) save for a gold at the newly-introduced mixed doubles event, and American Jessie Diggins blasting past Sweden's Stina Nilsson to win the women's team sprint (Kikkan Randall partnered Diggins), claiming the US's first-ever cross-country skiing gold, with Chad Salmela's SuddenlyShouting call on NBCSN[[note]]'''''HERE COMES DIGGINS! HERE COMES DIGGINS!'''''[[/note]] getting as much attention as the finish itself.

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-->The first Winter Olympics in Asia outside Japan. In the USA, these Games were also the first hosted in primetime by Mike Tirico, who replaced long-time host Bob Costas. In light the aforementioned doping scandal, Russia's NOC is suspended, while athletes proven clean participated as the neutral "Olympic Athletes from Russia" under the Olympic Flag. Also, for the first time since Torino 2006 the two Koreas marched under the Unification Flag at the opening and closing ceremonies, as well as fielded a unified women's ice hockey team. For the first time since Salt Lake 2002, winter powerhouse Norway dominated the medals board, with cross-country skier Marit Bjørgen winning five medals (two golds, one silver, and two bronzes) on her fifth and final Games to surpass her compatriot Ole Einar Bjørndalen from four years ago for most decorated Winter Olympian with eight golds, four silvers and three bronzes. Also famous for the American women's ice hockey team stunning four-time defending gold medalists Canada in the first finals game to ''really'' go the distance (2-2 at regulation time, then a scoreless overtime, and finally a penalty shootout that went to sudden-death after tying 2-2 in ten attempts) to win their first gold since ''the inaugural edition in 1998'', while also drawing some parallels with their male "Miracle on Ice" counterparts from Lake Placid 1980 (both having waited twenty years for their second gold medals at the expense of four-time defending champions on a February 22). Other highlights include Nigeria and Jamaica fielding their very first women's bobsled teams (the former also a first for Africa), Canadian figure skating pair Tessa Virtue and Scott Moir becoming becoming the most decorated Olympians in their sport (three golds and two silvers each), the Czech Republic's Ester Ledecká making history as the first Winter Olympian to win gold in two different disciplines in a single Games (alpine skiing[[note]]where she stunningly won the super-G after many broadcasters had already checked out, believing Austria's Anna Veith would win[[/note]] and snowboarding), Mikaela Shiffrin adding another alpine skiing gold to tie Ted Ligety and Andrea Mead Lawrence for most decorated American alpine skier,[[note]]Not to mention that Ledecká won gold in the super-G on skis that Shiffrin had once used... though Ledecká's camp had acquired said skis about 18 months before the Games.[[/note]] Japanese figure skater Creator/YuzuruHanyu making the first successful gold medal defense in men's figure skating since Canada's America's Dick Button in 1952, a moment of peace between East Asian rivals in the women's 500m speed skating final with gold medalist Nao Kodaira of Japan and silver medalist Lee Sang-hwa of South Korea sharing a lap of friendship after the former narrowly edged out the erstwhile two-time defending champion, the ragtag American men's curling team stunning world #1 Sweden to win their very first gold, with defending men's and women's champions Canada leaving almost empty-handed (the former lost to the USA in the semis, then missed out on a bronze to Switzerland, while the women fared worse, falling away as early as the group stage, even as Sweden won gold over surprise finalists South Korea) save for a gold at the newly-introduced mixed doubles event, and American Jessie Diggins blasting past Sweden's Stina Nilsson to win the women's team sprint (Kikkan Randall partnered Diggins), claiming the US's first-ever cross-country skiing gold, with Chad Salmela's SuddenlyShouting call on NBCSN[[note]]'''''HERE COMES DIGGINS! HERE COMES DIGGINS!'''''[[/note]] getting as much attention as the finish itself.


-->The attention the Games brought helped make UsefulNotes/SouthKorea a democracy. During most opening ceremonies, doves of peace were released after the lighting of the Flame. In Seoul, they let the doves out ''before'' the torch came in, a number of confused doves perched on the rim of the Olympic Cauldron just before it was lit, and were burned to death on worldwide television; that's why this was the last Games at which live doves were released (future editions of the Games would use replicas). On a side note, [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kristie_Phillips one gymnast]] who was infamously snubbed when participants were selected for this games despite winning the National Championship in her home country went on to become an action star in the ''Film/JamesBond'' parody ''Spitfire''. Canadian Ben Johnson won a gold medal and a new record at the 100 metre dash, only to be promptly stripped of both when he was caught using banned steroids. There was an event that saw a very controversial boxing judgment. There was a boycott by UsefulNotes/NorthKorea, which had demanded that the Games be co-hosted by both Koreas. Albania and Cuba joined the North Korean boycott, but the less hardline communist countries (including glasnost-era USSR) competed.

to:

-->The attention the Games brought helped make UsefulNotes/SouthKorea a democracy. During most opening ceremonies, doves of peace were released after the lighting of the Flame. In Seoul, they let the doves out ''before'' the torch came in, a number of confused doves perched on the rim of the Olympic Cauldron just before it was lit, and were burned to death on worldwide television; that's why this was the last Games at which live doves were released (future editions of the Games would use replicas).allusions). On a side note, [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kristie_Phillips one gymnast]] who was infamously snubbed when participants were selected for this games despite winning the National Championship in her home country went on to become an action star in the ''Film/JamesBond'' parody ''Spitfire''. Canadian Ben Johnson won a gold medal and a new record at the 100 metre dash, only to be promptly stripped of both when he was caught using banned steroids. There was an event that saw a very controversial boxing judgment. There was a boycott by UsefulNotes/NorthKorea, which had demanded that the Games be co-hosted by both Koreas. Albania and Cuba joined the North Korean boycott, but the less hardline communist countries (including glasnost-era USSR) competed.



-->Twelve of the states of the recently defunct USSR competed as a unified team and Yugoslav athletes competed as individuals. As the first Games where NBA players were allowed to compete in men's basketball[[note]]professionals from other leagues that weren't the NBA had previously been allowed to compete[[/note]], the USA exploited the opportunity by sending a "Dream Team" composed of NBA superstars such as UsefulNotes/MichaelJordan, which steamrolled their way to gold. Also best-known for having probably the most memorable lighting of the Olympic Flame in history, featuring Paralympic archer Antonio Rebollo firing a flaming arrow into the cauldron [[note]]If you watch [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BsfwMbXYNsU the footage outside the stadium]], the arrow actually goes over the cauldron and falls behind it, though a large cloud of unlit gas has been allowed to build up over the cauldron so that the passing arrow could set it alight; Rebollo deliberately aimed long because a burning arrow falling on the audience may not have been the best note to start an Olympiad on[[/note]]. Also featured the Olympics theme song "Barcelona", sung by [[Music/{{Queen}} Freddie Mercury]] and Montserrat Caballé. First Games since 1960 to feature South Africa, which had previously been banned as punishment for [[UsefulNotes/TheApartheidEra apartheid]]. Other notables include Fermín Cacho becoming the surprise winner of the 1500m run and the first Spanish running champion; 13-year-old Chinese diver Fu Mingxia the youngest Olympic gold medalist of all time; and Belarusian gymnast Vitaly Scherbo (as part of the Unified Team) winning six golds (four on one day alone), and also tying Eric Heiden's record from the 1980 Winter Games with five golds in individual events.

to:

-->Twelve of the states of the recently defunct USSR competed as a unified team and Yugoslav athletes competed as individuals. As the first Games where NBA players were allowed to compete in men's basketball[[note]]professionals from other leagues that weren't the NBA had previously been allowed to compete[[/note]], the USA exploited the opportunity by sending a "Dream Team" composed of NBA superstars such as UsefulNotes/MichaelJordan, which steamrolled their way to gold. Also best-known for having probably the most memorable lighting of the Olympic Flame in history, featuring Paralympic archer Antonio Rebollo firing a flaming arrow into the cauldron [[note]]If you watch [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BsfwMbXYNsU the footage outside the stadium]], the arrow actually goes over the cauldron and falls behind it, though a large cloud of unlit gas has been allowed to build up over the cauldron so that the passing arrow could set it alight; Rebollo deliberately aimed long because a burning arrow falling on the audience may not have been the best note to start an Olympiad on[[/note]].on, especially with memories of what happened in Seoul still fresh in people’s minds[[/note]]. Also featured the Olympics theme song "Barcelona", sung by [[Music/{{Queen}} Freddie Mercury]] and Montserrat Caballé. First Games since 1960 to feature South Africa, which had previously been banned as punishment for [[UsefulNotes/TheApartheidEra apartheid]]. Other notables include Fermín Cacho becoming the surprise winner of the 1500m run and the first Spanish running champion; 13-year-old Chinese diver Fu Mingxia the youngest Olympic gold medalist of all time; and Belarusian gymnast Vitaly Scherbo (as part of the Unified Team) winning six golds (four on one day alone), and also tying Eric Heiden's record from the 1980 Winter Games with five golds in individual events.


-->The first Winter Olympics in Asia outside Japan. In the USA, these Games were also the first hosted in primetime by Mike Tirico, who replaced long-time host Bob Costas. In light the aforementioned doping scandal, Russia's NOC is suspended, while athletes proven clean participated as the neutral "Olympic Athletes from Russia" under the Olympic Flag. Also, for the first time since Torino 2006 the two Koreas marched under the Unification Flag at the opening and closing ceremonies, as well as fielded a unified women's ice hockey team. For the first time since Salt Lake 2002, winter powerhouse Norway dominated the medals board, with cross-country skier Marit Bjørgen winning five medals (two golds, one silver, and two bronzes) on her fifth and final Games to surpass her compatriot Ole Einar Bjørndalen from four years ago for most decorated Winter Olympian with eight golds, four silvers and three bronzes. Also famous for the American women's ice hockey team stunning four-time defending gold medalists Canada in the first finals game to ''really'' go the distance (2-2 at regulation time, then a scoreless overtime, and finally a penalty shootout that went to sudden-death after tying 2-2 in ten attempts) to win their first gold since ''the inaugural edition in 1998'', while also drawing some parallels with their male "Miracle on Ice" counterparts from Lake Placid 1980 (both having waited twenty years for their second gold medals at the expense of four-time defending champions on a February 22). Other highlights include Nigeria and Jamaica fielding their very first women's bobsled teams (the former also a first for Africa), Canadian figure skating pair Tessa Virtue and Scott Moir becoming becoming the most decorated Olympians in their sport (three golds and two silvers each), the Czech Republic's Ester Ledecká making history as the first Winter Olympian to win gold in two different disciplines in a single Games (alpine skiing[[note]]where she stunningly won the super-G after many broadcasters had already checked out, believing Austria's Anna Veith would win[[/note]] and snowboarding), Mikaela Shiffrin adding another alpine skiing gold to tie Ted Ligety and Andrea Mead Lawrence for most decorated American alpine skier,[[note]]Not to mention that Ledecká won gold in the super-G on skis that Shiffrin had once used... though Ledecká's camp had acquired said skis about 18 months before the Games.[[/note]] Japanese figure skater Yuzuru Hanyu making the first successful gold medal defense in men's figure skating since Canada's Dick Button in 1952, a moment of peace between East Asian rivals in the women's 500m speed skating final with gold medalist Nao Kodaira of Japan and silver medalist Lee Sang-hwa of South Korea sharing a lap of friendship after the former narrowly edged out the erstwhile two-time defending champion, the ragtag American men's curling team stunning world #1 Sweden to win their very first gold, with defending men's and women's champions Canada leaving almost empty-handed (the former lost to the USA in the semis, then missed out on a bronze to Switzerland, while the women fared worse, falling away as early as the group stage, even as Sweden won gold over surprise finalists South Korea) save for a gold at the newly-introduced mixed doubles event, and American Jessie Diggins blasting past Sweden's Stina Nilsson to win the women's team sprint (Kikkan Randall partnered Diggins), claiming the US's first-ever cross-country skiing gold, with Chad Salmela's SuddenlyShouting call on NBCSN[[note]]'''''HERE COMES DIGGINS! HERE COMES DIGGINS!'''''[[/note]] getting as much attention as the finish itself.

to:

-->The first Winter Olympics in Asia outside Japan. In the USA, these Games were also the first hosted in primetime by Mike Tirico, who replaced long-time host Bob Costas. In light the aforementioned doping scandal, Russia's NOC is suspended, while athletes proven clean participated as the neutral "Olympic Athletes from Russia" under the Olympic Flag. Also, for the first time since Torino 2006 the two Koreas marched under the Unification Flag at the opening and closing ceremonies, as well as fielded a unified women's ice hockey team. For the first time since Salt Lake 2002, winter powerhouse Norway dominated the medals board, with cross-country skier Marit Bjørgen winning five medals (two golds, one silver, and two bronzes) on her fifth and final Games to surpass her compatriot Ole Einar Bjørndalen from four years ago for most decorated Winter Olympian with eight golds, four silvers and three bronzes. Also famous for the American women's ice hockey team stunning four-time defending gold medalists Canada in the first finals game to ''really'' go the distance (2-2 at regulation time, then a scoreless overtime, and finally a penalty shootout that went to sudden-death after tying 2-2 in ten attempts) to win their first gold since ''the inaugural edition in 1998'', while also drawing some parallels with their male "Miracle on Ice" counterparts from Lake Placid 1980 (both having waited twenty years for their second gold medals at the expense of four-time defending champions on a February 22). Other highlights include Nigeria and Jamaica fielding their very first women's bobsled teams (the former also a first for Africa), Canadian figure skating pair Tessa Virtue and Scott Moir becoming becoming the most decorated Olympians in their sport (three golds and two silvers each), the Czech Republic's Ester Ledecká making history as the first Winter Olympian to win gold in two different disciplines in a single Games (alpine skiing[[note]]where she stunningly won the super-G after many broadcasters had already checked out, believing Austria's Anna Veith would win[[/note]] and snowboarding), Mikaela Shiffrin adding another alpine skiing gold to tie Ted Ligety and Andrea Mead Lawrence for most decorated American alpine skier,[[note]]Not to mention that Ledecká won gold in the super-G on skis that Shiffrin had once used... though Ledecká's camp had acquired said skis about 18 months before the Games.[[/note]] Japanese figure skater Yuzuru Hanyu Creator/YuzuruHanyu making the first successful gold medal defense in men's figure skating since Canada's Dick Button in 1952, a moment of peace between East Asian rivals in the women's 500m speed skating final with gold medalist Nao Kodaira of Japan and silver medalist Lee Sang-hwa of South Korea sharing a lap of friendship after the former narrowly edged out the erstwhile two-time defending champion, the ragtag American men's curling team stunning world #1 Sweden to win their very first gold, with defending men's and women's champions Canada leaving almost empty-handed (the former lost to the USA in the semis, then missed out on a bronze to Switzerland, while the women fared worse, falling away as early as the group stage, even as Sweden won gold over surprise finalists South Korea) save for a gold at the newly-introduced mixed doubles event, and American Jessie Diggins blasting past Sweden's Stina Nilsson to win the women's team sprint (Kikkan Randall partnered Diggins), claiming the US's first-ever cross-country skiing gold, with Chad Salmela's SuddenlyShouting call on NBCSN[[note]]'''''HERE COMES DIGGINS! HERE COMES DIGGINS!'''''[[/note]] getting as much attention as the finish itself.



-->Beijing becomes the very first Olympic city to host both summer and winter editions (at least, on ice events, with Yanqing County suburb and the winter resort city of Zhangjiakou in Hebei province to host snow events), after a two-horse race with Almaty, Kazakhstan. Already nicknamed "the Olympics nobody wants" because ''every'' candidate city in a democracy withdrew after voters demanded, and got, a referendum (Oslo, Norway made it the farthest) leaving only the two above. This led to the IOC creating a list of reforms called [[https://stillmed.olympic.org/Documents/Olympic_Agenda_2020/Olympic_Agenda_2020-20-20_Recommendations-ENG.pdf Olympic Agenda 2020]] around Christmas 2014. It will also be the third Asian city in a row to host an Olympic Games, following Pyeonchang in 2018 and Tokyo in 2020. In July 2018, the IOC announced that the following seven events would be added to the program: mixed team events for freestyle skiing aerials, ski jumping, and snowboard cross; a mixed relay for short track speed skating; freestyle skiing big air for both men and women; and women's monobob[[note]]Literally one-person bobsled[[/note]].

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-->Beijing becomes the very first Olympic city to host both summer and winter editions (at least, on ice events, with Yanqing County suburb and the winter resort city of Zhangjiakou in Hebei province to host snow events), after a two-horse race with Almaty, Kazakhstan. Already nicknamed "the Olympics nobody wants" because ''every'' candidate city in a democracy withdrew after voters demanded, and got, a referendum (Oslo, Norway made it the farthest) leaving only the two above. This led to the IOC creating a list of reforms called [[https://stillmed.olympic.org/Documents/Olympic_Agenda_2020/Olympic_Agenda_2020-20-20_Recommendations-ENG.pdf Olympic Agenda 2020]] around Christmas 2014. It will also be the third Asian city in a row to host an Olympic Games, following Pyeonchang Pyeongchang in 2018 and Tokyo in 2020. In July 2018, the IOC announced that the following seven events would be added to the program: mixed team events for freestyle skiing aerials, ski jumping, and snowboard cross; a mixed relay for short track speed skating; freestyle skiing big air for both men and women; and women's monobob[[note]]Literally one-person bobsled[[/note]].


'''Bearers of the Olympic Flag:''' Bruce (now Caitlyn) Jenner[[note]]1976 gold medalist at decathlon and record setter[[/note]], Wyomia Tyus[[note]]1964 silver and 1964 and 2-time 1968 gold medalist at athletics[[/note]], Parry O'Brien[[note]]1960 silver and 1952-1956 gold medalist at shot put[[/note]], John Naber[[note]]1976 silver and 4-time 1976 gold medalist at swimming[[/note]], Al Oerter[[note]]1956-1968 gold medalist at discus and the first four-time champion in the sport[[/note]], Mack Robinson[[note]]1936 silver medalist at athletics (behind Jesse Owens) and older brother of Jackie Robinson, the first black baseball player to be admitted into the MLB[[/note]], Billy Mills[[note]]1964 gold medalist at athletics, the second Native American gold medalist, and the only athlete from the Western Hemisphere to win the 10,000m event[[/note]] and Bill Thorpe Jr.[[note]]Grandson of Jim Thorpe, 1912 gold medalist at decathlon and pentathlon and the first Native American gold medalist[[/note]], accompanied by Sammy Lee[[note]]Korean-American 1948 bronze and 1948-1952 gold medalist at diving and the first Asian American gold medalist (he also serves as a nod to Seoul, the next host city)[[/note]], Pat [=McCormick=][[note]]2-time 1952 and 2-time 1956 gold medalist at diving[[/note]] and Richie Sandoval[[note]]1979 Pan American Games silver medalist at boxing, member of the 1980 team and retired WBA Bantamweight Champion[[/note]]\\

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'''Bearers of the Olympic Flag:''' [[Creator/CaitlynJenner Bruce (now Caitlyn) Jenner[[note]]1976 Jenner]][[note]]1976 gold medalist at decathlon and record setter[[/note]], Wyomia Tyus[[note]]1964 silver and 1964 and 2-time 1968 gold medalist at athletics[[/note]], Parry O'Brien[[note]]1960 silver and 1952-1956 gold medalist at shot put[[/note]], John Naber[[note]]1976 silver and 4-time 1976 gold medalist at swimming[[/note]], Al Oerter[[note]]1956-1968 gold medalist at discus and the first four-time champion in the sport[[/note]], Mack Robinson[[note]]1936 silver medalist at athletics (behind Jesse Owens) and older brother of Jackie Robinson, the first black baseball player to be admitted into the MLB[[/note]], Billy Mills[[note]]1964 gold medalist at athletics, the second Native American gold medalist, and the only athlete from the Western Hemisphere to win the 10,000m event[[/note]] and Bill Thorpe Jr.[[note]]Grandson of Jim Thorpe, 1912 gold medalist at decathlon and pentathlon and the first Native American gold medalist[[/note]], accompanied by Sammy Lee[[note]]Korean-American 1948 bronze and 1948-1952 gold medalist at diving and the first Asian American gold medalist (he also serves as a nod to Seoul, the next host city)[[/note]], Pat [=McCormick=][[note]]2-time 1952 and 2-time 1956 gold medalist at diving[[/note]] and Richie Sandoval[[note]]1979 Pan American Games silver medalist at boxing, member of the 1980 team and retired WBA Bantamweight Champion[[/note]]\\



-->This marked the second time the Games were held in Los Angeles, and the first to turn a profit since 1932. After the financial disaster of Montreal 1976, there were ''no'' other bidders and as the only game in town (or rather, the only town in the game) LA was able to dictate terms to the IOC that allowed them to host a Diet Lite Olympics that used mainly already-existing facilities. A smaller, USSR-led Eastern boycott for this one in retaliation for the USA-led one four years prior. This allowed America to earn its most medals since Saint Louis 1904. Also had a theme by Music/JohnWilliams that is still played by NBC to this day and a guy fly a jet-pack during the opening ceremonies, and the appearance of a fake UFO during the closing ceremonies. Widely considered the most financially successful Games, according to [[Wiki/{{Wikipedia}} The Other Wiki]]. Many of the Games' notable events come from athletics, with USA's Carl Lewis matching Owens' feat in winning the 100m, 200m, 4×100m and long jump (in the first of his four appearances), Morocco's Nawal El Moutawakel becoming the first woman from an Islamic nation to win a gold medal, and Great Britain's Sebastian Coe the first back-to-back 1500m winner. Other notables include British rower Steve Redgrave winning the first of his five consecutive gold medals, Chinese gymnast Li Ning winning 3 gold, 2 silver and 1 bronze -- the most of any Chinese athlete -- presaging his country's ascendancy in future editions, and the first appearance of future Dream Team players UsefulNotes/MichaelJordan, Patrick Ewing and Chris Mullin, then amateurs, as the US basketball team wins gold. These are the last Summer Games to date to be telecast in the United States on a network other than NBC (in this case, ABC). They were also the last Summer Games, and the first since 1960, held in a city without rail transit.[[note]]The Pacific Electric "Red Car", still in its' prime in 1932, was long gone by '84 and UsefulNotes/LosAngelesMetroRail didn't start operation until 1992[[/note]]

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-->This marked the second time the Games were held in Los Angeles, and the first to turn a profit since 1932. After the financial disaster of Montreal 1976, there were ''no'' other bidders and as the only game in town (or rather, the only town in the game) LA was able to dictate terms to the IOC that allowed them to host a Diet Lite Olympics that used mainly already-existing facilities. A smaller, USSR-led Eastern boycott for this one in retaliation for the USA-led one four years prior. This allowed America to earn its most medals since Saint Louis 1904. Also had a theme by Music/JohnWilliams that is still played by NBC to this day and a guy fly a jet-pack during the opening ceremonies, and the appearance of a fake UFO during the closing ceremonies. Widely considered the most financially successful Games, according to [[Wiki/{{Wikipedia}} The Other Wiki]]. Many of the Games' notable events come from athletics, with USA's Carl Lewis matching Owens' feat in winning the 100m, 200m, 4×100m and long jump (in the first of his four appearances), Morocco's Nawal El Moutawakel becoming the first woman from an Islamic nation to win a gold medal, and Great Britain's Sebastian Coe the first back-to-back 1500m winner. Other notables include British rower Steve Redgrave winning the first of his five consecutive gold medals, Chinese gymnast Li Ning winning 3 gold, 2 silver and 1 bronze -- the most of any Chinese athlete -- presaging his country's ascendancy in future editions, and the first appearance of future Dream Team players UsefulNotes/MichaelJordan, Patrick Ewing and Chris Mullin, then amateurs, as the US basketball team wins gold. These are the last Summer Games to date to be telecast in the United States on a network other than NBC (in this case, ABC). They were also the last Summer Games, and the first since 1960, held in a city without rail transit.[[note]]The Pacific Electric "Red Car", still in its' its prime in 1932, was long gone by '84 and UsefulNotes/LosAngelesMetroRail didn't start operation until 1992[[/note]]



-->Like Cortina D'Ampezzo, Sapporo regained hosting rights after surrendering the 1940 edition due to the Sino-Japanese War (which was ultimately cancelled). These Games were the first in Asia, as well as the first time Japan had ever won gold in any Winter Games, with a podium sweep by Yukio Kasaya (gold), Akitsugu Konno (silver) and Seiji Aochi (bronze) on the 70m ski jump as their only medals.

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-->Like Cortina D'Ampezzo, d'Ampezzo, Sapporo regained hosting rights after surrendering the 1940 edition due to the Sino-Japanese War (which was ultimately cancelled). These Games were the first in Asia, as well as the first time Japan had ever won gold in any Winter Games, with a podium sweep by Yukio Kasaya (gold), Akitsugu Konno (silver) and Seiji Aochi (bronze) on the 70m ski jump as their only medals.



'''Carriers of the Torch and Lighters of the Flame:''' Chun Lee-kyung[[note]]Speed skater and South Korea's most decorated Winter Olympian (four golds and one bronze) in 1994 and 1998, as well as 23-time World Championships medalist (nine golds, eleven silvers and three bronzes) between 1992 and 1998[[/note]] / Park In-bee[[note]]2016 gold medalist at women's golf and currently seven-time LPGA major tournaments champion[[/note]] / Ahn Jung-hwan[[note]]Football star famous for scoring South Korea's quarterfinals-qualifying "golden goal" against Italy at the 2002 FIFA World Cup co-hosted by South Korea and Japan[[/note]] / Jong Su-hyon and Park Jong-ah[[note]]North and South Korean ice hockey players, respectively, and members of the two Koreas' unified women's team[[/note]] / ''Kim Yu-na''[[note]]Figure skating superstar, 2010 gold and 2014 silver medalist, and six-time World Figure Skating Championships medalist in 2007-2011 and 2013 (two each of gold, silver and bronze)[[/note]]

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'''Carriers of the Torch and Lighters of the Flame:''' Chun Lee-kyung[[note]]Speed skater and South Korea's most decorated Winter Olympian (four golds and one bronze) in 1994 and 1998, as well as 23-time World Championships medalist (nine golds, eleven silvers and three bronzes) between 1992 and 1998[[/note]] / Park In-bee[[note]]2016 gold medalist at women's golf and currently seven-time LPGA major tournaments champion[[/note]] / Ahn Jung-hwan[[note]]Football star famous for scoring South Korea's quarterfinals-qualifying "golden goal" against Italy at the 2002 FIFA World Cup co-hosted by South Korea and Japan[[/note]] / Jong Su-hyon and Park Jong-ah[[note]]North and South Korean ice hockey players, respectively, and members of the two Koreas' unified women's team[[/note]] / ''Kim Yu-na''[[note]]Figure ''[[Creator/YunaKim Kim Yu-na]]''[[note]]Figure skating superstar, 2010 gold and 2014 silver medalist, and six-time World Figure Skating Championships medalist in 2007-2011 and 2013 (two each of gold, silver and bronze)[[/note]]

Added DiffLines:

* '''Features the 1996 Atlanta Games''':
** The 2019 film ''Film/RichardJewell'' concerns the Centennial Olympic Park bombing.


-->An unusual choice for Winter Olympic host city, being both a winter ''and'' summer resort town. Also the first Games under current IOC president, 1976 fencing gold medalist Thomas Bach. While the runoff was fraught with controversy, due to allegations of corruption, outrage over anti-gay laws, and a staggering $51B cost (far surpassing Beijing 2008's $44B, which, as a summer edition, had more events and, all things said, is not terribly over-expensive), the main event itself went without a hitch. The Games featured a near-total domination of speed skating events by the Dutch, the Canadian men's ice hockey team making the first successful gold medal defense since the Soviet Union, promising American skier Mikaela Shiffrin becoming the youngest alpine skiing gold medalist at eighteen years old, childhood friends Meryl Davis and Charlie White winning the USA's first ice dancing gold, and Ole Einar Bjørndalen winning the 10km sprint and mixed relay, setting a record for most decorated Winter Olympian with eight golds, four silvers and one bronze.

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-->An unusual choice for Winter Olympic host city, being both a winter ''and'' summer resort town. Also the first Games under current IOC president, 1976 fencing gold medalist Thomas Bach. While the runoff was fraught with controversy, due to allegations of corruption, outrage over anti-gay laws, and a staggering $51B cost (far surpassing Beijing 2008's $44B, which, as a summer edition, had more events and, all things said, is not terribly over-expensive), the main event itself went without a hitch. The Games featured a near-total domination of speed skating events by the Dutch, the Canadian men's ice hockey team making the first successful gold medal defense since the Soviet Union, promising American skier Mikaela Shiffrin becoming the youngest alpine skiing gold medalist at eighteen years old, childhood friends Meryl Davis and Charlie White winning the USA's first ice dancing gold, and Ole Einar Bjørndalen winning the 10km sprint and mixed relay, setting a record for most decorated Winter Olympian with eight golds, four silvers and one bronze. Years after these Games, host Russia has been mired in a massive scandal over allegations of state-sponsored doping and deliberately tampering with any incriminatory evidence, extending even onto Summer Games sports, resulting in thirteen medals revoked (though nine were ultimately returned after an appeal), the Russian track team for the 2016 Summer Games at Rio de Janeiro being almost entirely banned, and the outright suspension of the Russian Olympic Committee in 2017, resulting in athletes declared clean having to compete as neutrals come the next Winter Games at Pyeongchang.



'''Bearers of the South Korean Flag:''' Kang Kwang-bae[[note]]Men's bobsled/luge/skeleton racer and national flag bearer at Vancouver 2010[[/note]], Jin Sun-yu[[note]]3-time gold medalist at women's short-track speedskating at Torino 2006[[/note]], Pak Se-ri[[note]]Golfer, 5-time LPGA major championship winner between 1996 and 2016, and coach of the women's team for Rio 2016[[/note]], Lee Seung-yuop[[note]]2000 bronze and 2008 gold medalist at baseball[[/note]], Hwang Young-cho[[note]]1992 gold medalist at men's marathon[[/note]], Seo Hyang-soon[[note]]1984 gold medalist at women's archery[[/note]], Lim O-kyeong[[note]]1996 and 2004 silver, and 1992 gold medalist at women's handball, and 1996 Handball Player of the Year[[/note]] and Ha Hyung-joo[[note]]1984 gold medalist at men's judo[[/note]]\\
'''Bearers of the Olympic Flag:''' Four veteran and four aspiring Olympians, in alternating order--Kang Chan-yong[[note]]Pioneering coach of South Korea's Nordic skiing team[[/note]], You Young[[note]]South Korea's youngest figure skating national champion in 2016 (and 2018) at age 11, surpassing Kim Yun-a, 2010 gold and 2014 silver medalist[[/note]], Shin Hye-sook[[note]]1980 figure skater and former coach of Kim Yu-na[[/note]], Lee Jun-seo[[note]]15-year-old junior hockey player[[/note]], Kim Yoon-man[[note]]1992 silver medalist at men's speed skating and South Korea's very first Winter Olympic medalist[[/note]], Jang Yu-jin[[note]]16-year-old freestyle skier and the only one of the prospective Olympians competing in these Games[[/note]], Kim Kui-jin[[note]]1964 and 1968 athlete at women's speed skating[[/note]] and Jung Seung-gi[[note]]18-year-old skeleton athlete[[/note]]\\

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'''Bearers of the South Korean Flag:''' Kang Kwang-bae[[note]]Men's bobsled/luge/skeleton racer and national flag bearer at Vancouver 2010[[/note]], Jin Sun-yu[[note]]3-time Sun-yu[[note]]three-time gold medalist at women's short-track speedskating at Torino 2006[[/note]], Pak Se-ri[[note]]Golfer, 5-time five-time winner of LPGA major championship winner championships between 1996 and 2016, and coach of the women's team for Rio 2016[[/note]], Lee Seung-yuop[[note]]2000 bronze and 2008 gold medalist at baseball[[/note]], Hwang Young-cho[[note]]1992 gold medalist at men's marathon[[/note]], Seo Hyang-soon[[note]]1984 gold medalist at women's archery[[/note]], Lim O-kyeong[[note]]1996 and 2004 silver, and 1992 gold medalist at women's handball, and 1996 Handball Player of the Year[[/note]] and Ha Hyung-joo[[note]]1984 gold medalist at men's judo[[/note]]\\
'''Bearers of the Olympic Flag:''' Four veteran and four aspiring Olympians, in alternating order--Kang Chan-yong[[note]]Pioneering coach of South Korea's Nordic skiing team[[/note]], You Young[[note]]South Korea's youngest figure skating national champion in 2016 (and at age 11 (as well as 2018) at age 11, surpassing Kim Yun-a, 2010 gold and 2014 silver medalist[[/note]], 11[[/note]], Shin Hye-sook[[note]]1980 figure skater and former coach of Kim Yu-na[[/note]], skater[[/note]], Lee Jun-seo[[note]]15-year-old junior hockey player[[/note]], Kim Yoon-man[[note]]1992 silver medalist at men's speed skating and South Korea's very first Winter Olympic medalist[[/note]], Jang Yu-jin[[note]]16-year-old freestyle skier and the only one of the prospective Olympians competing in these Games[[/note]], Kim Kui-jin[[note]]1964 and 1968 athlete at women's speed skating[[/note]] and Jung Seung-gi[[note]]18-year-old skeleton athlete[[/note]]\\



'''Carriers of the Torch and Lighters of the Flame:''' Chun Lee-kyung[[note]]Speed skater and South Korea's most decorated Winter Olympian (four golds and one bronze) in 1994 and 1998, as well as 23-time World Championships medalist (nine golds, eleven silvers and three bronzes) between 1992 and 1998[[/note]] / Park In-bee[[note]]2016 gold medalist at women's golf and currently seven-time LPGA major tournaments champion[[/note]] / Ahn Jung-hwan[[note]]Football star famous for scoring South Korea's quarterfinals-qualifying goal against Italy at the 2002 FIFA World Cup co-hosted by South Korea and Japan[[/note]] / Jong Su-hyon and Park Jong-ah[[note]]North and South Korean ice hockey players, respectively, and members of the two Koreas' unified women's team[[/note]] / ''Kim Yun-a''[[note]]Figure skating superstar, 2010 gold and 2014 silver medalist, and six-time World Figure Skating Championships medalist in 2007-2011 and 2013 (two each of gold, silver and bronze)[[/note]]
-->The first Winter Olympics in Asia outside Japan. In the USA, these Games were also the first hosted in primetime by Mike Tirico, who replaced long-time host Bob Costas. In light of a massive scandal involving government-sponsored doping and interference when they hosted the previous Winter Games, Russia's NOC is suspended, while athletes proven clean will have to participate as the neutral "Olympic Athletes from Russia" under the Olympic Flag. Also, for the first time since Torino 2006 the two Koreas marched under the Unification Flag at the opening and closing ceremonies, as well as fielded a unified women's ice hockey team. For the first time since Salt Lake 2002, winter powerhouse Norway dominated the medals board, with cross-country skier Marit Bjørgen winning five medals (two golds, one silver, and two bronzes) on her fifth and final Games to surpass her compatriot Ole Einar Bjørndalen from four years ago for most decorated Winter Olympian with eight golds, four silvers and three bronzes. Also famous for the American women's ice hockey team stunning four-time defending gold medalists Canada in the first finals game to ''really'' go the distance (2-2 at regulation time, then a scoreless overtime, and finally a penalty shootout that went to sudden-death after tying 2-2 in ten attempts) to win their first gold since ''the inaugural edition in 1998'', while also drawing some parallels with their male "Miracle on Ice" counterparts from Lake Placid 1980 (both having waited twenty years for their second gold medals at the expense of four-time defending champions on a February 22). Other highlights include Nigeria and Jamaica fielding their very first women's bobsled teams (the former also a first for Africa), Canadian figure skating pair Tessa Virtue and Scott Moir becoming becoming the most decorated Olympians in their sport (three golds and two silvers each), the Czech Republic's Ester Ledecká making history as the first Winter Olympian to win gold in two different disciplines in a single Games (alpine skiing[[note]]where she stunningly won the super-G after many broadcasters had already checked out, believing Austria's Anna Veith would win[[/note]] and snowboarding), Mikaela Shiffrin adding another alpine skiing gold to tie Ted Ligety and Andrea Mead Lawrence for most decorated American alpine skier,[[note]]Not to mention that Ledecká won gold in the super-G on skis that Shiffrin had once used... though Ledecká's camp had acquired said skis about 18 months before the Games.[[/note]] Japanese figure skater Yuzuru Hanyu making the first successful gold medal defense in men's figure skating since Canada's Dick Button in 1952, a moment of peace between East Asian rivals in the women's 500m speed skating final with gold medalist Nao Kodaira of Japan and silver medalist Lee Sang-hwa of South Korea sharing a lap of friendship after the former narrowly edged out the erstwhile two-time defending champion, the ragtag American men's curling team stunning world #1 Sweden to win their very first gold, with defending men's and women's champions Canada leaving almost empty-handed (the former lost to the USA in the semis, then missed out on a bronze to Switzerland, while the women fared worse, falling away as early as the group stage, even as Sweden won gold over surprise finalists South Korea) save for a gold at the newly-introduced mixed doubles event, and American Jessie Diggins blasting past Sweden's Stina Nilsson to win the women's team sprint (Kikkan Randall partnered Diggins), claiming the US's first-ever cross-country skiing gold, with Chad Salmela's SuddenlyShouting call on NBCSN[[note]]'''''HERE COMES DIGGINS! HERE COMES DIGGINS!'''''[[/note]] getting as much attention as the finish itself.

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'''Carriers of the Torch and Lighters of the Flame:''' Chun Lee-kyung[[note]]Speed skater and South Korea's most decorated Winter Olympian (four golds and one bronze) in 1994 and 1998, as well as 23-time World Championships medalist (nine golds, eleven silvers and three bronzes) between 1992 and 1998[[/note]] / Park In-bee[[note]]2016 gold medalist at women's golf and currently seven-time LPGA major tournaments champion[[/note]] / Ahn Jung-hwan[[note]]Football star famous for scoring South Korea's quarterfinals-qualifying goal "golden goal" against Italy at the 2002 FIFA World Cup co-hosted by South Korea and Japan[[/note]] / Jong Su-hyon and Park Jong-ah[[note]]North and South Korean ice hockey players, respectively, and members of the two Koreas' unified women's team[[/note]] / ''Kim Yun-a''[[note]]Figure Yu-na''[[note]]Figure skating superstar, 2010 gold and 2014 silver medalist, and six-time World Figure Skating Championships medalist in 2007-2011 and 2013 (two each of gold, silver and bronze)[[/note]]
-->The first Winter Olympics in Asia outside Japan. In the USA, these Games were also the first hosted in primetime by Mike Tirico, who replaced long-time host Bob Costas. In light of a massive scandal involving government-sponsored the aforementioned doping and interference when they hosted the previous Winter Games, scandal, Russia's NOC is suspended, while athletes proven clean will have to participate participated as the neutral "Olympic Athletes from Russia" under the Olympic Flag. Also, for the first time since Torino 2006 the two Koreas marched under the Unification Flag at the opening and closing ceremonies, as well as fielded a unified women's ice hockey team. For the first time since Salt Lake 2002, winter powerhouse Norway dominated the medals board, with cross-country skier Marit Bjørgen winning five medals (two golds, one silver, and two bronzes) on her fifth and final Games to surpass her compatriot Ole Einar Bjørndalen from four years ago for most decorated Winter Olympian with eight golds, four silvers and three bronzes. Also famous for the American women's ice hockey team stunning four-time defending gold medalists Canada in the first finals game to ''really'' go the distance (2-2 at regulation time, then a scoreless overtime, and finally a penalty shootout that went to sudden-death after tying 2-2 in ten attempts) to win their first gold since ''the inaugural edition in 1998'', while also drawing some parallels with their male "Miracle on Ice" counterparts from Lake Placid 1980 (both having waited twenty years for their second gold medals at the expense of four-time defending champions on a February 22). Other highlights include Nigeria and Jamaica fielding their very first women's bobsled teams (the former also a first for Africa), Canadian figure skating pair Tessa Virtue and Scott Moir becoming becoming the most decorated Olympians in their sport (three golds and two silvers each), the Czech Republic's Ester Ledecká making history as the first Winter Olympian to win gold in two different disciplines in a single Games (alpine skiing[[note]]where she stunningly won the super-G after many broadcasters had already checked out, believing Austria's Anna Veith would win[[/note]] and snowboarding), Mikaela Shiffrin adding another alpine skiing gold to tie Ted Ligety and Andrea Mead Lawrence for most decorated American alpine skier,[[note]]Not to mention that Ledecká won gold in the super-G on skis that Shiffrin had once used... though Ledecká's camp had acquired said skis about 18 months before the Games.[[/note]] Japanese figure skater Yuzuru Hanyu making the first successful gold medal defense in men's figure skating since Canada's Dick Button in 1952, a moment of peace between East Asian rivals in the women's 500m speed skating final with gold medalist Nao Kodaira of Japan and silver medalist Lee Sang-hwa of South Korea sharing a lap of friendship after the former narrowly edged out the erstwhile two-time defending champion, the ragtag American men's curling team stunning world #1 Sweden to win their very first gold, with defending men's and women's champions Canada leaving almost empty-handed (the former lost to the USA in the semis, then missed out on a bronze to Switzerland, while the women fared worse, falling away as early as the group stage, even as Sweden won gold over surprise finalists South Korea) save for a gold at the newly-introduced mixed doubles event, and American Jessie Diggins blasting past Sweden's Stina Nilsson to win the women's team sprint (Kikkan Randall partnered Diggins), claiming the US's first-ever cross-country skiing gold, with Chad Salmela's SuddenlyShouting call on NBCSN[[note]]'''''HERE COMES DIGGINS! HERE COMES DIGGINS!'''''[[/note]] getting as much attention as the finish itself.


-->Twelve of the states of the recently defunct USSR competed as a unified team and Yugoslav athletes competed as individuals. As the first Games where NBA players were allowed to compete in men's basketball[[note]]professionals from other leagues that weren't the NBA had previously been allowed to compete[[/note]], the USA exploited the opportunity by sending a "Dream Team" composed of NBA superstars such as UsefulNotes/MichaelJordan, which steamrolled their way to gold. Also best-known for having probably the most memorable lighting of the Olympic Flame in history, featuring Paralympic archer Antonio Rebollo firing a flaming arrow into the cauldron [[note]]If you watch [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RIl_3sYPzsQ&t=4m28s the footage]] closely, the arrow actually goes over the cauldron and falls behind it, though a large cloud of unlit gas has been allowed to build up over the cauldron so that the passing arrow could set it alight; Rebollo deliberately aimed long because a burning arrow falling on the audience may not have been the best note to start an Olympiad on[[/note]]. Also featured the Olympics theme song "Barcelona", sung by [[Music/{{Queen}} Freddie Mercury]] and Montserrat Caballé. First Games since 1960 to feature South Africa, which had previously been banned as punishment for [[UsefulNotes/TheApartheidEra apartheid]]. Other notables include Fermín Cacho becoming the surprise winner of the 1500m run and the first Spanish running champion; 13-year-old Chinese diver Fu Mingxia the youngest Olympic gold medalist of all time; and Belarusian gymnast Vitaly Scherbo (as part of the Unified Team) winning six golds (four on one day alone), and also tying Eric Heiden's record from the 1980 Winter Games with five golds in individual events.

to:

-->Twelve of the states of the recently defunct USSR competed as a unified team and Yugoslav athletes competed as individuals. As the first Games where NBA players were allowed to compete in men's basketball[[note]]professionals from other leagues that weren't the NBA had previously been allowed to compete[[/note]], the USA exploited the opportunity by sending a "Dream Team" composed of NBA superstars such as UsefulNotes/MichaelJordan, which steamrolled their way to gold. Also best-known for having probably the most memorable lighting of the Olympic Flame in history, featuring Paralympic archer Antonio Rebollo firing a flaming arrow into the cauldron [[note]]If you watch [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RIl_3sYPzsQ&t=4m28s com/watch?v=BsfwMbXYNsU the footage]] closely, footage outside the stadium]], the arrow actually goes over the cauldron and falls behind it, though a large cloud of unlit gas has been allowed to build up over the cauldron so that the passing arrow could set it alight; Rebollo deliberately aimed long because a burning arrow falling on the audience may not have been the best note to start an Olympiad on[[/note]]. Also featured the Olympics theme song "Barcelona", sung by [[Music/{{Queen}} Freddie Mercury]] and Montserrat Caballé. First Games since 1960 to feature South Africa, which had previously been banned as punishment for [[UsefulNotes/TheApartheidEra apartheid]]. Other notables include Fermín Cacho becoming the surprise winner of the 1500m run and the first Spanish running champion; 13-year-old Chinese diver Fu Mingxia the youngest Olympic gold medalist of all time; and Belarusian gymnast Vitaly Scherbo (as part of the Unified Team) winning six golds (four on one day alone), and also tying Eric Heiden's record from the 1980 Winter Games with five golds in individual events.


-->These Games make the city the third three-time host after London and Paris, as well as the first Summer Games in the USA after 32 years (Atlanta 1996). Boston was originally the USA's candidate for 2024, but withdrew due to lack of support, causing its NOC to turn to experienced Los Angeles. Withdrawals of other candidate cities forced the IOC to simultaneously award the 2024 and 2028 Games to the two remaining candidates, and with Los Angeles eventually conceding the 2024 Games to Paris, it was nevertheless rewarded with the 2028 Games, with its eleven-year preparation period the longest to date. Once again as in 1984, heavy use of already-existing facilities with what new infrastructure is built to be planned with the city's long-term needs in mind (such as finally connecting the Metro to LAX and building much-needed housing).

to:

-->These Games make the city the third three-time host after London and Paris, as well as the first Summer Games in the USA after 32 years (Atlanta 1996). Boston was originally the USA's candidate for 2024, but withdrew due to lack of support, causing its NOC the USOC to turn to experienced Los Angeles. Withdrawals of other candidate cities forced the IOC to simultaneously award the 2024 and 2028 Games to the two remaining candidates, and with Los Angeles eventually conceding the 2024 Games to Paris, it was nevertheless rewarded with the 2028 Games, with its eleven-year preparation period the longest to date. Once again as in 1984, heavy use of already-existing facilities with what new infrastructure is built to be planned with the city's long-term needs in mind (such as finally connecting the Metro [[UsefulNotes/LosAngelesMetroRail Metro]] to LAX and building much-needed housing).

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