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Cromwell's reign was full of contrasts. He seemed undecided as to whether he should present himself as [[JustTheFirstCitizen merely the head of a republican government]] or as a de facto monarch. It is also hard to determine whether he was a power-hungry dictator or whether he was a sincere republican who felt England needed strong rule to rebuild its institutions until Parliament could rule in its own right. Compare to UsefulNotes/JuliusCaesar or UsefulNotes/VladimirLenin or UsefulNotes/MaximilienRobespierre or UsefulNotes/AdolfHitler.

to:

Cromwell's reign was full of contrasts. He seemed undecided as to whether he should present himself as [[JustTheFirstCitizen merely the head of a republican government]] or as a de facto monarch. It is also hard to determine whether he was a power-hungry dictator or whether he was a sincere republican who felt England needed strong rule to rebuild its institutions until Parliament could rule in its own right. Compare to UsefulNotes/JuliusCaesar or UsefulNotes/VladimirLenin or UsefulNotes/MaximilienRobespierre or UsefulNotes/AdolfHitler.
UsefulNotes/AdolfHitler. Another interesting comparison is to UsefulNotes/SimonBolivar, who shows possibly the most similar pattern to Cromwell.


Oliver Cromwell (25 April 1599 – 3 September 1658) was an English military and political leader who became a Parliamentary General and then the Lord Protector of a nominal republic called the Commonwealth of England, Scotland and Ireland. He and his son remain the only 'commoners' to have been head of state in England and Scotland.

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Oliver Cromwell (25 April (April 26, 1599 – 3 September 3, 1658) was an English military and political leader who became a Parliamentary General and then the Lord Protector of a nominal republic called the Commonwealth of England, Scotland and Ireland. He and his son remain the only 'commoners' to have been head of state in England and Scotland.


Outside of England, his legacy remains controversial...at '''best'''. The Irish largely remember Cromwell as a really evil bastard who tried to starve and slaughter as many of them as possible, YMMV whether this is true or not. The Scots, at least those who look with scepticism upon their fanatical Puritan brethren, remember him as a man who ''despite being a fanatical Puritan himself'' thought the Scottish Presbyterians were really taking it all a bit far. ''"I beseech you by the bowels of Christ,"'' he wrote to the General Assembly, ''"think ye it possible ye may be mistaken."''

to:

Outside of England, his legacy remains controversial...at '''best'''.'''[[Administrivia/RuleOfCautiousEditingJudgment best]]'''. The Irish largely remember Cromwell as a really evil bastard who tried to starve and slaughter as many of them as possible, YMMV whether this is true or not. The Scots, at least those who look with scepticism upon their fanatical Puritan brethren, remember him as a man who ''despite being a fanatical Puritan himself'' thought the Scottish Presbyterians were really taking it all a bit far. ''"I beseech you by the bowels of Christ,"'' he wrote to the General Assembly, ''"think ye it possible ye may be mistaken."''


The Creator/MontyPython song[[note]]Actually first written and performed by John Cleese in ''Radio/ImSorryIllReadThatAgain''[[/note]] on him is accurate, though some of its tone is contentious (such as him personally sending Colonel Pride, see below). Conversely the 1970 film ''Cromwell'' seriously exaggerates his importance in the run up to war, promotes him to Commander of the Parliamentary forces far too early, ignores the Second Civil War (the defining moment when he backed the army wanting to kill Charles) and ignores his exploits in Ireland, as well as having him laugh at the offer of the Crown, a matter he gave serious consideration. In the 2003 film ''To Kill A King'' he is portrayed as a Robespierre-like idealist-turned-dictator, committed to republican ideas and popular sovereignty; he is also played by Creator/TimRoth which contrasts with the historical image of Cromwell being a large and imposing man. The 2008 British drama ''The Devil's Whore'', where he is played by ''Series/TheWire'''s Dominic West, also somewhat romanticises Cromwell, making him far more conflicted and angsty than history paints him.

to:

The Creator/MontyPython song[[note]]Actually first written and performed by John Cleese in ''Radio/ImSorryIllReadThatAgain''[[/note]] on him is accurate, though some of its tone is contentious (such as him personally sending Colonel Pride, see below). Conversely the 1970 film ''Cromwell'' seriously exaggerates his importance in the run up to war, promotes him to Commander of the Parliamentary forces far too early, ignores the Second Civil War (the defining moment when he backed the army wanting to kill Charles) and ignores his exploits in Ireland, as well as having him laugh at the offer of the Crown, a matter he gave serious consideration. It also gets very pro-Cromwell in its last few minutes, saying Britain wouldn’t have democracy without him. It never addresses the fact that people hated him so much that they dug up his corpse and beheaded it. In the 2003 film ''To Kill A King'' he is portrayed as a Robespierre-like idealist-turned-dictator, committed to republican ideas and popular sovereignty; he is also played by Creator/TimRoth which contrasts with the historical image of Cromwell being a large and imposing man. The 2008 British drama ''The Devil's Whore'', where he is played by ''Series/TheWire'''s Dominic West, also somewhat romanticises Cromwell, making him far more conflicted and angsty than history paints him.


The Creator/MontyPython song[[note]]Actually first written and performed by John Cleese in ''Radio/ImSorryIllReadThatAgain''[[/note]] on him is accurate, though some of its tone is contentious (such as him personally sending Colonel Pride, see below). Conversely the 1970 film ''Cromwell'' seriously exaggerates his importance in the run up to war, promotes him to Commander of the Parliamentary forces far too early, ignores the Second Civil War (the defining moment when he backed the army wanting to kill Charles) and ignores his exploits in Ireland, as well as having him laugh at the offer of the Crown, a matter he gave serious consideration. In the 2003 film ''To Kill A King'' he is portrayed as a Robespiere-like idealist-turned-dictator, committed to republican ideas and popular sovereignty; he is also played by Tim Roth which contrasts with the historical image of Cromwell being a large and imposing man. The 2008 British drama ''The Devil's Whore'', where he is played by ''Series/TheWire'''s Dominic West, also somewhat romanticises Cromwell, making him far more conflicted and angsty than history paints him.

to:

The Creator/MontyPython song[[note]]Actually first written and performed by John Cleese in ''Radio/ImSorryIllReadThatAgain''[[/note]] on him is accurate, though some of its tone is contentious (such as him personally sending Colonel Pride, see below). Conversely the 1970 film ''Cromwell'' seriously exaggerates his importance in the run up to war, promotes him to Commander of the Parliamentary forces far too early, ignores the Second Civil War (the defining moment when he backed the army wanting to kill Charles) and ignores his exploits in Ireland, as well as having him laugh at the offer of the Crown, a matter he gave serious consideration. In the 2003 film ''To Kill A King'' he is portrayed as a Robespiere-like Robespierre-like idealist-turned-dictator, committed to republican ideas and popular sovereignty; he is also played by Tim Roth Creator/TimRoth which contrasts with the historical image of Cromwell being a large and imposing man. The 2008 British drama ''The Devil's Whore'', where he is played by ''Series/TheWire'''s Dominic West, also somewhat romanticises Cromwell, making him far more conflicted and angsty than history paints him.



* Literature/SixteenThirtyTwo where King Charles I learns of Cromwell's ultimate role in his downfall, arresting him (killing his wife and his son in the process) - notable for discussing the negative view many Irish people have of him.
* In ''Literature/MorganvilleVampires'', its strongly implied throughout the series that [[spoiler:Oliver]], one of the main vampires of said series is none other than Cromwell himself. This is supported by the reveal that he was born in Huntingdon, Cambridgeshire, East Anglia, England, in 1599 and that he became a vampire in 1658 as he was suffering from a sickness at the time which lines up with Cromwell's death on September 3rd, 1658 which also occurred due to an illness. Further evidence comes from Myrin mentioning the Battle of Drogheda to [[spoiler:Oliver]] who was present there.

to:

* Literature/SixteenThirtyTwo ''Literature/SixteenThirtyTwo'' where King Charles I learns of Cromwell's ultimate role in his downfall, arresting him (killing his wife and his son in the process) - notable for discussing the negative view many Irish people have of him.
* In ''Literature/MorganvilleVampires'', its it's strongly implied throughout the series that [[spoiler:Oliver]], one of the main vampires of said series is none other than Cromwell himself. This is supported by the reveal that he was born in Huntingdon, Cambridgeshire, East Anglia, England, in 1599 and that he became a vampire in 1658 as he was suffering from a sickness at the time which lines up with Cromwell's death on September 3rd, 1658 which also occurred due to an illness. Further evidence comes from Myrin mentioning the Battle of Drogheda to [[spoiler:Oliver]] who was present there.

Added DiffLines:

* He is a character in ''[[Film/TheThreeMusketeers1973 The Return of the Musketeers]]'', played by Alan Howard.


Outside of England, his legacy remains controversial...at '''best'''. The Irish largely remember Cromwell as a really evil bastard who tried to starve and slaughter as many of them as possible (his policies '''halved''' the Irish population in less than a decade and would today have landed him in a cell-block in the Hague). And, all things considered; their view of the man is probably the more accurate one, at least as far as it relates to them. The Scots, at least those who look with scepticism upon their fanatical Puritan brethren, remember him as a man who ''despite being a fanatical Puritan himself'' thought the Scottish Presbyterians were really taking it all a bit far. ''"I beseech you by the bowels of Christ,"'' he wrote to the General Assembly, ''"think ye it possible ye may be mistaken."''

to:

Outside of England, his legacy remains controversial...at '''best'''. The Irish largely remember Cromwell as a really evil bastard who tried to starve and slaughter as many of them as possible (his policies '''halved''' the Irish population in less than a decade and would today have landed him in a cell-block in the Hague). And, all things considered; their view of the man possible, YMMV whether this is probably the more accurate one, at least as far as it relates to them.true or not. The Scots, at least those who look with scepticism upon their fanatical Puritan brethren, remember him as a man who ''despite being a fanatical Puritan himself'' thought the Scottish Presbyterians were really taking it all a bit far. ''"I beseech you by the bowels of Christ,"'' he wrote to the General Assembly, ''"think ye it possible ye may be mistaken."''


* In ''Literature/MorganvilleVampires'', its strongly implied throughout the series that [[spoiler:Oliver]], one of the main vampires is none other than Cromwell himself. This is supported by the reveal that he was born in Huntingdon, Cambridgeshire, East Anglia, England, in 1599 and that he became a vampire in 1658 as he was suffering from a sickness at the time which lines up with Cromwell's death on September 3rd, 1658 which also occurred due an illness. Further evidence comes from Myrin mentioning the Battle of Drogheda to [[spoiler:Oliver]] who was present there.

to:

* In ''Literature/MorganvilleVampires'', its strongly implied throughout the series that [[spoiler:Oliver]], one of the main vampires of said series is none other than Cromwell himself. This is supported by the reveal that he was born in Huntingdon, Cambridgeshire, East Anglia, England, in 1599 and that he became a vampire in 1658 as he was suffering from a sickness at the time which lines up with Cromwell's death on September 3rd, 1658 which also occurred due to an illness. Further evidence comes from Myrin mentioning the Battle of Drogheda to [[spoiler:Oliver]] who was present there.



to:

* In ''Literature/MorganvilleVampires'', its strongly implied throughout the series that [[spoiler:Oliver]], one of the main vampires is none other than Cromwell himself. This is supported by the reveal that he was born in Huntingdon, Cambridgeshire, East Anglia, England, in 1599 and that he became a vampire in 1658 as he was suffering from a sickness at the time which lines up with Cromwell's death on September 3rd, 1658 which also occurred due an illness. Further evidence comes from Myrin mentioning the Battle of Drogheda to [[spoiler:Oliver]] who was present there.


* Literature/SixteenThirtyTwo where King Charles I learns of Cromwell's ultimate role in his downfall, arresting him (killing his wife and his son in the process) - notable for discussing the negative view many Irish people have of him and contrasting it with reality

to:

* Literature/SixteenThirtyTwo where King Charles I learns of Cromwell's ultimate role in his downfall, arresting him (killing his wife and his son in the process) - notable for discussing the negative view many Irish people have of him him.

[[AC:Film - Live Action]]
* ''Cromwell'', a 1970 {{biopic}} starring Creator/RichardHarris as Cromwell
and contrasting it with reality
Creator/AlecGuinness as Charles I.


Works of fiction that depict Cromwell include:

to:

Works !!Works of fiction that depict Cromwell include:


Cromwell's reign was full of contrasts. He seemed undecided as to whether he should present himself as [[JustTheFirstCitizen merely the head of a republican government]] or as a de facto monarch. It is also hard to determine whether he was a power-hungry dictator or whether he was a sincere republican who felt England needed strong rule to rebuild its institutions until Parliament could rule in its own right. Compare to UsefulNotes/JuliusCaesar or UsefulNotes/VladimirLenin or UsefulNotes/MaximilienRobespierre or UsefulNotes/Adolfhitler.

to:

Cromwell's reign was full of contrasts. He seemed undecided as to whether he should present himself as [[JustTheFirstCitizen merely the head of a republican government]] or as a de facto monarch. It is also hard to determine whether he was a power-hungry dictator or whether he was a sincere republican who felt England needed strong rule to rebuild its institutions until Parliament could rule in its own right. Compare to UsefulNotes/JuliusCaesar or UsefulNotes/VladimirLenin or UsefulNotes/MaximilienRobespierre or UsefulNotes/Adolfhitler.
UsefulNotes/AdolfHitler.


Cromwell's reign was full of contrasts. He seemed undecided as to whether he should present himself as [[JustTheFirstCitizen merely the head of a republican government]] or as a de facto monarch. It is also hard to determine whether he was a power-hungry dictator or whether he was a sincere republican who felt England needed strong rule to rebuild its institutions until Parliament could rule in its own right. Compare to UsefulNotes/JuliusCaesar or UsefulNotes/VladimirLenin or UsefulNotes/MaximilienRobespierre.

to:

Cromwell's reign was full of contrasts. He seemed undecided as to whether he should present himself as [[JustTheFirstCitizen merely the head of a republican government]] or as a de facto monarch. It is also hard to determine whether he was a power-hungry dictator or whether he was a sincere republican who felt England needed strong rule to rebuild its institutions until Parliament could rule in its own right. Compare to UsefulNotes/JuliusCaesar or UsefulNotes/VladimirLenin or UsefulNotes/MaximilienRobespierre.
UsefulNotes/MaximilienRobespierre or UsefulNotes/Adolfhitler.


The Creator/MontyPython song[[note]]Actually first written and performed by John Cleese in ''Radio/ImSorryIllReadThatAgain''[[/note]] on him is accurate, though some of its tone is contentious (such as him personally sending Colonel Pride, see below). Conversely the 1970 film ''Cromwell'' seriously exaggerates his importance in the run up to war, promotes him to Commander of the Parliamentary forces far too early, ignores the Second Civil War (the defining moment when he backed the army wanting to kill Charles) and ignores his exploits in Ireland, as well as having him laugh at the offer of the Crown, a matter he gave serious consideration. In the 2003 film ''To Kill A King'' he is portrayed as a Robespiere-like idealist-turned-dictator, committed to republican ideas and popular sovereignty; he is also played by Tim Roth which contrasts with the historical image of Cromwell being a large and imposing man. The 2008 British drama ''The Devil's Whore'', where he is played by ''TheWire'''s Dominic West, also somewhat romanticises Cromwell, making him far more conflicted and angsty than history paints him.

to:

The Creator/MontyPython song[[note]]Actually first written and performed by John Cleese in ''Radio/ImSorryIllReadThatAgain''[[/note]] on him is accurate, though some of its tone is contentious (such as him personally sending Colonel Pride, see below). Conversely the 1970 film ''Cromwell'' seriously exaggerates his importance in the run up to war, promotes him to Commander of the Parliamentary forces far too early, ignores the Second Civil War (the defining moment when he backed the army wanting to kill Charles) and ignores his exploits in Ireland, as well as having him laugh at the offer of the Crown, a matter he gave serious consideration. In the 2003 film ''To Kill A King'' he is portrayed as a Robespiere-like idealist-turned-dictator, committed to republican ideas and popular sovereignty; he is also played by Tim Roth which contrasts with the historical image of Cromwell being a large and imposing man. The 2008 British drama ''The Devil's Whore'', where he is played by ''TheWire'''s ''Series/TheWire'''s Dominic West, also somewhat romanticises Cromwell, making him far more conflicted and angsty than history paints him.

Added DiffLines:

Works of fiction that depict Cromwell include:
[[AC:Literature]]
* Literature/SixteenThirtyTwo where King Charles I learns of Cromwell's ultimate role in his downfall, arresting him (killing his wife and his son in the process) - notable for discussing the negative view many Irish people have of him and contrasting it with reality

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