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* '''Vince Lombardi''' was ''the'' face of the NFL during the 1960s, as he led the Green Bay Packers to five NFL Championship victories--three of them came before the Super Bowl Era, but he won the first two Super Bowls as well. Following a successful tenure as the offensive coordinator for the New York Giants (opposite defensive coordinator and future [[TheRival rival]] Tom Landry), Lombardi coached the Packers for nine years and the Washington team for one and never recorded a losing season as head coach. He holds the distinction of being the only coach to win three consecutive championships during the modern playoff era.[[note]]1965-1967, after already almost accomplishing it once before with them by losing the championship game in 1960 to Philadelphia and following it with back-to-back championships in '61-2[[/note]] He also led two of the greatest single-season turnarounds in professional sports history, bringing the Packers their first winning season in over a decade after his hire in 1959 (and winning Coach of the Year) and pulling off another one in Washington in 1969 after an even longer drought. Though he was a famously hot-tempered and demanding coach, Lombardi was an anomaly in the '60s-era NFL for his inclusive liberal politics, drawn from his experience as an Italian-American and brother to a gay man; the Packers racially integrated under his leadership and he hired a number of gay men on his staff and teams. Lombardi was so immensely popular in the '60s that UsefulNotes/RichardNixon purportedly floated him as a potential running mate before learning of his politics. Lombardi died suddenly of colon cancer in 1970 at age 57, cutting short an already legendary career, and was posthumously inducted into Canton the next year. As a result of his legacy, often considered to be [[http://www.nfl.com/videos/nfl-network-top-ten/09000d5d810aeeb5/Top-Ten-Motivational-Coaches-Vince-Lombardi the greatest in the sport's history]], the trophy given to the winner of the Super Bowl is called the Vince Lombardi Trophy.

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* '''Vince Lombardi''' was ''the'' face of the NFL during the 1960s, as he led the Green Bay Packers to five NFL Championship victories--three of them came before the Super Bowl Era, but he won the first two Super Bowls as well. Following a successful tenure as the offensive coordinator for the New York Giants (opposite defensive coordinator and future [[TheRival rival]] Tom Landry), Lombardi coached the Packers for nine years and the Washington team for one and never recorded a losing season as head coach. He holds the distinction of being the only coach to win three consecutive championships during the modern playoff era.[[note]]1965-1967, after already almost accomplishing it once before with them by losing the championship game in 1960 to Philadelphia and following it with back-to-back championships in '61-2[[/note]] He also led two of the greatest single-season turnarounds in professional sports history, bringing the Packers their first winning season in over a decade after his hire in 1959 (and winning Coach of the Year) and pulling off another one in Washington in 1969 after an even longer drought. Though he was a famously [[DrillSergeantNasty hot-tempered and demanding coach, coach]], Lombardi was an anomaly in the '60s-era NFL for his inclusive liberal politics, drawn from his experience as an Italian-American and brother to a gay man; the Packers racially integrated under his leadership leadership, and he hired a number of gay men on his staff and teams. Lombardi was so immensely popular in the '60s that UsefulNotes/RichardNixon purportedly floated him as a potential running mate before learning of his politics. Lombardi died suddenly of colon cancer in 1970 at age 57, cutting short an already legendary career, and was posthumously inducted into Canton the next year. As a result of his legacy, often considered to be [[http://www.nfl.com/videos/nfl-network-top-ten/09000d5d810aeeb5/Top-Ten-Motivational-Coaches-Vince-Lombardi the greatest in the sport's history]], the trophy given to the winner of the Super Bowl is called the Vince Lombardi Trophy.


* '''Sid Gillman''' is the only coach to be enshrined in both the Pro and College Football Halls of Fame and a key figure in the refinement and proliferation of the pass in football offense. After briefly playing as an end for the Cleveland Rams after graduating Ohio State in 1936, Gillman moved into coaching and came to dominate UsefulNotes/{{Ohio}} football, leading Miami (OH) and Cincinnati on strong runs as head coach in the late '40s and early '50s. In 1955, he returned to his former pro team, now located in Los Angeles. He saw mixed results with the Rams, taking them to a Championship appearance in his first season but seeing inconsistent performances in the following years. After a 2-10 1959 season, he crossed town to L.A.'s new team, the AFL's Chargers, becoming the franchise's first head coach. Gillman's pass-centric philosophy caught on throughout the AFL after the Chargers appeared in five of the first six AFL Championships and won one in 1963. He stayed with the Chargers up until the NFL-AFL merger that would further spread his offense throughout pro football. He then retired due to health issues... [[TenMinuteRetirement only to return]] four years later, stepping into the middle of a terrible Houston Oilers season in 1973. In his first full year with the team, Gillman improved them to 7-7 after two straight one-win seasons but retired again afterwards. He would return to the NFL for a few more brief stints as an assistant up through the '80s. Gillman passed away in 2001.

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* '''Sid Gillman''' is was the only first coach to be enshrined in both the Pro and College Football Halls of Fame (later joined by Jimmy Johnson) and a key figure in the refinement and proliferation of the pass in football offense. After briefly playing as an end for the Cleveland Rams after graduating Ohio State in 1936, Gillman moved into coaching and came to dominate UsefulNotes/{{Ohio}} football, leading Miami (OH) and Cincinnati on strong runs as head coach in the late '40s and early '50s. In 1955, he returned to his former pro team, now located in Los Angeles. He saw mixed results with the Rams, taking them to a Championship appearance in his first season but seeing inconsistent performances in the following years. After a 2-10 1959 season, he crossed town to L.A.'s new team, the AFL's Chargers, becoming the franchise's first head coach. Gillman's pass-centric philosophy caught on throughout the AFL after the Chargers appeared in five of the first six AFL Championships and won one in 1963. He stayed with the Chargers up until the NFL-AFL merger that would further spread his offense throughout pro football. He then retired due to health issues... [[TenMinuteRetirement only to return]] four years later, stepping into the middle of a terrible Houston Oilers season in 1973. In his first full year with the team, Gillman improved them to 7-7 after two straight one-win seasons but retired again afterwards. He would return to the NFL for a few more brief stints as an assistant up through the '80s. Gillman passed away in 2001.



* '''Jimmy Johnson''' is a Hall of Fame coach most famous for his time with the Dallas Cowboys where he helped jump-start the team's '90s dynasty (and for his great head of hair). He was Jerry Jones' first head coach after he bought the team in 1989, bringing Johnson from the University of Miami where he won a National Championship. (The two were famously college teammates at Arkansas in the '60s, winning a national title of their own in 1964.) Though the team went an abysmal 1-15 in his first season, he helped to orchestrate the famous Herschel Walker trade, the largest in the NFL history in terms of draft picks exchanged, which netted the Cowboys many of the picks they used to rebuild the team. The team's improvement to a 7-9 record the next year won Johnson Coach of the Year, and he took the team to back-to-back Super Bowls wins in the '92-'93 seasons, making him the first head coach to win a championship on the pro and college level since Paul Brown in the pre-Super Bowl era. However, friction with Jones led the two to part ways. The Cowboys team Johnson constructed won another Super Bowl following the 1995 season under his successor, Barry Switzer, while Johnson would go on to a less-stellar tenure with the Miami Dolphins. Despite not putting up a losing record with the Dolphins and bringing them to the playoffs thrice, he infamously clashed with star QB Dan Marino and repeatedly threatened to retire due to burnout. Johnson retired from coaching completely after suffering a [[CurbStompBattle historically lopsided 62-7 playoff loss]] to the Jaguars. He currently serves as an analyst on the Fox pre-game show and [[HeAlsoDid also]] appeared on a season of ''Series/{{Survivor}}''.

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* '''Jimmy Johnson''' is a Hall of Fame coach most famous for his time with the Dallas Cowboys where he helped jump-start the team's '90s dynasty (and for his great head of hair). He was Jerry Jones' first head coach after he bought the team in 1989, bringing Johnson from the University of Miami where he won a National Championship. (The two were famously college teammates at Arkansas in the '60s, winning a national title of their own in 1964.) Though the team went an abysmal 1-15 in his first season, he helped to orchestrate the famous Herschel Walker trade, the largest in the NFL history in terms of draft picks exchanged, which netted the Cowboys many of the picks they used to rebuild the team. The team's improvement to a 7-9 record the next year won Johnson Coach of the Year, and he took the team to back-to-back Super Bowls wins in the '92-'93 seasons, making him the first head coach to win a championship on the pro and college level since Paul Brown in the pre-Super Bowl era. However, friction with Jones led the two to part ways. The Cowboys team Johnson constructed won another Super Bowl following the 1995 season under his successor, Barry Switzer, while Johnson would go on to a less-stellar tenure with the Miami Dolphins. Despite not putting up a losing record with the Dolphins and bringing them to the playoffs thrice, he infamously clashed with star QB Dan Marino and repeatedly threatened to retire due to burnout. Johnson retired from coaching completely after suffering a [[CurbStompBattle historically lopsided 62-7 playoff loss]] to the Jaguars. He currently serves as an analyst on the Fox pre-game show and [[HeAlsoDid also]] appeared on a season of ''Series/{{Survivor}}''. His induction into Canton in 2020 made him only the second coach after Sid Gillman to be enshrined in both the Pro and College Football Halls of Fame.


* '''Pete Carroll''' is the current head coach of the Seattle Seahawks. Previously a head coach for the New York Jets and New England Patriots in a pair of short and extremely forgettable terms in the '90s, Carroll returned to coaching college football and had an extremely successful tenure as head coach of the USC Trojans, winning a BCS Championship in 2004. In 2010, he returned to the pros and took the reins for the Seahawks, taking on the job of dealing with a franchise in shambles. Given great power and leeway in drafting and personnel decisions as part of his terms for leaving the college ranks, within three years he transformed the Seahawks from one of the worst teams in the league to one that won its first Super Bowl, making him only the forth head coach to win a championship on the college and professional level... were it not for the NCAA [[CanonDiscontinuity stripping USC of its title]] shortly after Carroll's departure after determining the school violated rules about financially rewarding players. Known league-wide as a defensive mastermind, he helped put together the so-called "Legion of Boom" secondary. He is paradoxically one of the oldest coaches in the [=NFL=] and the most energetic--he is extremely hands-on and motivated, almost {{Keet}}-like, and can always, ''always'' be seen [[OralFixation chewing gum]] on the sidelines.

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* '''Pete Carroll''' is the current head coach of the Seattle Seahawks. Previously a head coach for the New York Jets and New England Patriots in a pair of short and extremely forgettable terms in the '90s, Carroll returned to coaching college football and had an extremely successful tenure as head coach of the USC Trojans, winning a BCS Championship in 2004. In 2010, he returned to the pros and took the reins for the Seahawks, taking on the job of dealing with a franchise in shambles. Given great power and leeway in drafting and personnel decisions as part of his terms for leaving the college ranks, within three years he transformed the Seahawks from one of the worst teams in the league to one that won its first Super Bowl, making him only the forth head coach to win a championship on the college and professional level... were it not for the NCAA [[CanonDiscontinuity stripping USC of its title]] shortly after Carroll's departure after determining the school violated rules about financially rewarding players. [[note]]If you do count his college win, this makes him the ''only'' NFL head coach to win a Super Bowl and a college championship in the BCS era.[[/note]] Known league-wide as a defensive mastermind, he helped put together the so-called "Legion of Boom" secondary. He is paradoxically one of the oldest coaches in the [=NFL=] and the most energetic--he is extremely hands-on and motivated, almost {{Keet}}-like, and can always, ''always'' be seen [[OralFixation chewing gum]] on the sidelines.



* '''Jimmy Johnson''' is a Hall of Fame coach most famous for his time with the Dallas Cowboys where he helped jump-start the team's '90s dynasty (and for his great head of hair). He was Jerry Jones' first head coach after he bought the team in 1989, bringing Johnson from the University of Miami where he won a National Championship. (The two were famously college teammates at Arkansas in the '60s, winning a national title of their own in 1964.) Though the team went an abysmal 1-15 in his first season, he helped to orchestrate the famous Herschel Walker trade, the largest in the NFL history in terms of draft picks exchanged, which netted the Cowboys many of the picks they used to rebuild the team. The team's improvement to a 7-9 record the next year won Johnson Coach of the Year, and he took the team to back-to-back Super Bowls wins in the '92-'93 seasons. However, friction with Jones led the two to part ways. The Cowboys team Johnson constructed won another Super Bowl following the 1995 season under his successor, Barry Switzer, while Johnson would go on to a less-stellar tenure with the Miami Dolphins. Despite not putting up a losing record with the Dolphins and bringing them to the playoffs thrice, he infamously clashed with star QB Dan Marino and repeatedly threatened to retire due to burnout. Johnson retired from coaching completely after suffering a [[CurbStompBattle historically lopsided 62-7 playoff loss]] to the Jaguars. He currently serves as an analyst on the Fox pre-game show and [[HeAlsoDid also]] appeared on a season of ''Series/{{Survivor}}''.

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* '''Jimmy Johnson''' is a Hall of Fame coach most famous for his time with the Dallas Cowboys where he helped jump-start the team's '90s dynasty (and for his great head of hair). He was Jerry Jones' first head coach after he bought the team in 1989, bringing Johnson from the University of Miami where he won a National Championship. (The two were famously college teammates at Arkansas in the '60s, winning a national title of their own in 1964.) Though the team went an abysmal 1-15 in his first season, he helped to orchestrate the famous Herschel Walker trade, the largest in the NFL history in terms of draft picks exchanged, which netted the Cowboys many of the picks they used to rebuild the team. The team's improvement to a 7-9 record the next year won Johnson Coach of the Year, and he took the team to back-to-back Super Bowls wins in the '92-'93 seasons.seasons, making him the first head coach to win a championship on the pro and college level since Paul Brown in the pre-Super Bowl era. However, friction with Jones led the two to part ways. The Cowboys team Johnson constructed won another Super Bowl following the 1995 season under his successor, Barry Switzer, while Johnson would go on to a less-stellar tenure with the Miami Dolphins. Despite not putting up a losing record with the Dolphins and bringing them to the playoffs thrice, he infamously clashed with star QB Dan Marino and repeatedly threatened to retire due to burnout. Johnson retired from coaching completely after suffering a [[CurbStompBattle historically lopsided 62-7 playoff loss]] to the Jaguars. He currently serves as an analyst on the Fox pre-game show and [[HeAlsoDid also]] appeared on a season of ''Series/{{Survivor}}''.



* '''Barry Switzer''' coached the Oklahoma Sooners to three national titles in 1974, 1975, and 1985 before becoming the head coach of the Dallas Cowboys in 1994. He took over a team that had won the Super Bowl under coach Jimmy Johnson the previous two years and led them to the NFC Championship in his first year and a victory in Super Bowl XXX the next. The season after that, however, he led the Cowboys to a loss in the NFC Divisional Round, and his last season saw the team implode to a 6-10 record, at which point he resigned with a total 45-26 record in the NFL. Despite his general success, he is often viewed as among the worst head coaches to ever win a Super Bowl, with many believing that his wins came from the luck of inheriting a great team from Johnson and pointing to his feuding with Troy Aikman (who he had briefly coached in college) as a key reason for the eroding of the Cowboys dynasty that they've never really recovered from.

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* '''Barry Switzer''' coached the Oklahoma Sooners to three national titles in 1974, 1975, and 1985 before becoming the head coach of the Dallas Cowboys in 1994. He took over a team that had won the Super Bowl under coach Jimmy Johnson the previous two years and led them to the NFC Championship in his first year and a victory in Super Bowl XXX the next.next, making him just the third head coach to win championships at the college and pro levels. The season after that, however, he led the Cowboys to a loss in the NFC Divisional Round, and his last season saw the team implode to a 6-10 record, at which point he resigned with a total 45-26 record in the NFL. Despite his general success, he is often viewed as among the worst head coaches to ever win a Super Bowl, with many believing that his wins came from the luck of inheriting a great team from Johnson and pointing to his feuding with Troy Aikman (who he had briefly coached in college) as a key reason for the eroding of the Cowboys dynasty that they've never really recovered from.


* '''Paul Brown''' was coach/general manager of the Cleveland Browns from their inception in 1946 to 1962 (one of the most dominant runs in pro football history) and later owner-coach of the Cincinnati Bengals from their inception in 1968 to 1975 ([[ToughActToFollow they were okay]]). Brown is credited with [[TropeMaker essentially creating]] the modern head coach position and, by proxy, the modern football team. He developed several offensive plays that are still in use to this day, is credited with inventing everything from the practice squad to film review to the ''face mask'', and helped break the color barrier by signing African-American players and having the team stay in the same hotels while traveling. He won seven professional championships with the Browns in just ten years, all before the Super Bowl era. The Browns were named in his honor, something he wasn't enthusiastic about to begin with[[note]]The owner of the Browns wanted to name the team the Panthers, after an earlier independent team that had also appeared in the 1926 version of the AFL; however, the owner of the defunct Panthers refused to give up his rights to the name[[/note]] and something that particularly stung when he was fired from the team with his name on it--the Bengals owes its existence to Brown wanting to return to coaching without risking this happening again. He was inducted into the Hall of Fame just a year before he created the Bengals, making him one of a select few inducted Hall of Famers to remain active in the NFL and the last team owner to coach his own team. He won Coach of the Year only once, with the Bengals. The Bengals' current stadium, which opened in 2000 (nine years after Brown's passing), is named Paul Brown Stadium in his honor and is one of the few NFL stadiums likely not to sell its naming rights to a corporate sponsor due to Paul's son Mike (see below under "Owners/Management") succeeding him as the team's owner and manager. His vast coaching tree includes fellow Hall of Famers Bill Walsh and Don Shula; see their entries below.
* '''Pete Carroll''' is the current head coach of the Seattle Seahawks. Previously a head coach for the New York Jets and New England Patriots in a pair of short and extremely forgettable terms in the '90s, Carroll returned to coaching college football and had an extremely successful tenure as head coach of the USC Trojans, winning a BCS Championship in 2004. In 2010, he returned to the pros and took the reins for the Seahawks, taking on the job of dealing with a franchise in shambles. Given great power and leeway in drafting and personnel decisions as part of his terms for leaving the college ranks, within three years he transformed the Seahawks from one of the worst teams in the league to a team that won its first Super Bowl, making him only the forth head coach to win a championship on the college and professional level... were it not for the NCAA [[CanonDiscontinuity stripping USC of its title]] due to violating NCAA rules about financially rewarding players. Known league-wide as a defensive mastermind, Carroll helped put together the so-called "Legion of Boom" secondary. He is paradoxically one of the oldest coaches in the [=NFL=] and the most energetic--he is extremely hands-on and motivated, almost {{Keet}}-like, and can always, ''always'' be seen [[OralFixation chewing gum]] on the sidelines.

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* '''Paul Brown''' was coach/general manager of the Cleveland Browns from their inception in 1946 to 1962 (one of the most dominant runs in pro football history) and later owner-coach of the Cincinnati Bengals from their inception in 1968 to 1975 ([[ToughActToFollow they were okay]]). Brown He is credited with [[TropeMaker essentially creating]] the modern head coach position and, by proxy, the modern football team. He developed several offensive plays that are still in use to this day, is credited with inventing everything from the playbook to the practice squad to film review to the ''face mask'', and helped break the color barrier by signing African-American players and having the team stay in the same hotels while traveling. He won seven professional traveling (though he was also known as a major DrillSergeantNasty). After leading his former high school football team, the Massillon Tigers, to four national championships with in the '30s, Brown was hired to coach his alma mater, Ohio State, and led them to a national championship as well. He was subsequently drafted by the Navy in World War II and served as the head coach of the Great Lakes Naval Training Station's team. He was then hired by the nascent Cleveland Browns in just ten years, all before of the Super Bowl era. The Browns AAFC, which were named in his honor, honor (and to attract fans throughout UsefulNotes/{{Ohio}}, where he had already risen to legendary status), something he wasn't enthusiastic about to begin with[[note]]The with.[[note]]The owner of the Browns wanted to name the team the Panthers, after an earlier independent team that had also appeared in the 1926 version of the AFL; however, the owner of the defunct Panthers refused to give up his rights to the name[[/note]] name.[[/note]] He won seven professional championships with the Browns in just ten years: all four of the AAFC's titles, then three in his first six seasons in the NFL, proving the effectiveness of his style and something that particularly stung when he was making him the only head coach to win national championships at the high school, college, and pro levels[[note]]though his high school and college championships were the results of polls[[/note]]. His teams became less dominant as time progressed and more opponents adopted his tactics, eventually leading to him being fired from the team with his name on it--the Bengals owes its existence to Brown wanting to return to coaching without risking this happening again. He it. After a few years of forced retirement, he was inducted into the Hall of Fame just a in 1967; one year before later, [[StartMyOwn he created the Bengals, making him one of a select few inducted Hall of Famers to remain active Bengals]] in the NFL and the last team owner AFL so he could return to coach coaching without being fired again. (See his own team. He won Coach of the Year only once, with the Bengals. The Bengals' current stadium, which opened in 2000 (nine years after Brown's passing), is named Paul Brown Stadium in his honor and is one of the few NFL stadiums likely not to sell its naming rights to a corporate sponsor due to Paul's son Mike (see below entry under "Owners/Management") succeeding him as the team's owner and manager. "Owners" for more.) His vast coaching tree includes fellow Hall of Famers Bill Walsh and Don Shula; see their entries below.
below. For the NFL's 100th Anniversary, NFL Films named Brown the #1 Greatest Game-Changer in the league's history.
* '''Pete Carroll''' is the current head coach of the Seattle Seahawks. Previously a head coach for the New York Jets and New England Patriots in a pair of short and extremely forgettable terms in the '90s, Carroll returned to coaching college football and had an extremely successful tenure as head coach of the USC Trojans, winning a BCS Championship in 2004. In 2010, he returned to the pros and took the reins for the Seahawks, taking on the job of dealing with a franchise in shambles. Given great power and leeway in drafting and personnel decisions as part of his terms for leaving the college ranks, within three years he transformed the Seahawks from one of the worst teams in the league to a team one that won its first Super Bowl, making him only the forth head coach to win a championship on the college and professional level... were it not for the NCAA [[CanonDiscontinuity stripping USC of its title]] due to violating NCAA shortly after Carroll's departure after determining the school violated rules about financially rewarding players. Known league-wide as a defensive mastermind, Carroll he helped put together the so-called "Legion of Boom" secondary. He is paradoxically one of the oldest coaches in the [=NFL=] and the most energetic--he is extremely hands-on and motivated, almost {{Keet}}-like, and can always, ''always'' be seen [[OralFixation chewing gum]] on the sidelines.



* '''Mike Brown''' is the current owner and general manager of the Cincinnati Bengals and the son of the great Paul Brown (see above under "Coaches"). Like his fellow owner-managers in this section, Brown has been greatly criticized for his refusal to delegate more of the actual football operations to hired experts. Unlike Jerry Jones or Al Davis, however, Brown has had little-to-no real on-field success to justify his continued leadership--the team has not won a single playoff game during his tenure as owner and, outside of one period in the early '10s, hasn't done much better in the regular season.[[note]]Incidentally, that was around the time where Brown started to delegate more daily operations to his coaches, directors, and other employees, though he still holds the official role of general manager.[[/note]] He's also been criticized for being one of the absolute cheapest owners in the league, rarely committing to expensive signings and refusing to invest in updating many of the Bengals' practice facilities--this may be because he is [[ImpoverishedPatrician one of two non-billionaire owners in the league]]. Brown has his defenders, though--many former players have stated that Mike is a fairly nice man who simply lacks the temperament for the job, regularly refusing to fire employees who aren't putting up results on the field and letting go stars seeking greener pastures without much of a fight.

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* '''Paul Brown''' had seen massive success as a head coach for decades (see his entry above) before [[StartMyOwn founding]] the Cincinnati Bengals as an AFL expansion team in 1968. Having been inducted into the Hall of Fame as a coach the year prior, this made him one of a select few inducted Hall of Famers to remain active in the NFL and the last team owner to coach his own team. Brown won his only Coach of the Year award with the Bengals in 1970 after bringing them to their first playoff berth. He retired after [[LongRunner 45 years]] of coaching in 1973, carrying on as owner through the Bengals' era of success in the '80s before passing away in 1991. The Bengals' current stadium, which opened in 2000 (nine years after Brown's passing), is named Paul Brown Stadium in his honor and is one of the few NFL stadiums likely not to sell its naming rights to a corporate sponsor due to his son succeeding him as the team's owner and manager.
**
'''Mike Brown''' is the current owner and general manager of the Cincinnati Bengals and the son of the great Paul Brown (see above under "Coaches").Bengals. Like his fellow owner-managers in this section, Brown has been greatly criticized for his refusal to delegate more of the actual football operations to hired experts. Unlike Jerry Jones or Al Davis, however, Brown has had little-to-no real on-field success to justify his continued leadership--the team has not won a single playoff game during his tenure as owner and, outside of one period in the early '10s, hasn't done much better in the regular season.[[note]]Incidentally, season,[[note]]Incidentally, that was around the time where Brown started to delegate more daily operations to his coaches, directors, and other employees, though he still holds the official role of general manager.[[/note]] leading to him being regularly criticized for [[{{Nepotism}} coasting off of his father's accomplishments and inheritance]]. He's also been criticized for being one of the absolute cheapest owners in the league, rarely committing to expensive signings and refusing to invest in updating many of the Bengals' practice facilities--this may be because he is [[ImpoverishedPatrician one of two non-billionaire owners in the league]]. Brown has his defenders, though--many former players have stated that Mike is a fairly nice man who simply lacks the temperament for the job, regularly refusing to fire employees who aren't putting up results on the field and letting go stars seeking greener pastures without much of a fight.


* '''Pete Carroll''' is the current head coach of the Seattle Seahawks. Previously a head coach for the New York Jets and New England Patriots in a pair of short and extremely forgettable terms in the '90s, Carroll returned to coaching college football and had an extremely successful tenure as head coach of the USC Trojans. He took the reins for the Seahawks in 2010, taking on the job of dealing with a franchise in shambles. Given great power and leeway in drafting and personnel decisions, within three years he transformed the Seahawks from one of the worst teams in the league to a team that won its first Super Bowl. Known league-wide as a defensive mastermind, he helped put together the so-called "Legion of Boom" secondary. Carroll is paradoxically one of the oldest coaches in the [=NFL=] and the most energetic--he is extremely hands-on and motivated, almost {{Keet}}-like. He can always, ''always'' be seen [[OralFixation chewing gum]] on the sidelines.

to:

* '''Pete Carroll''' is the current head coach of the Seattle Seahawks. Previously a head coach for the New York Jets and New England Patriots in a pair of short and extremely forgettable terms in the '90s, Carroll returned to coaching college football and had an extremely successful tenure as head coach of the USC Trojans. He Trojans, winning a BCS Championship in 2004. In 2010, he returned to the pros and took the reins for the Seahawks in 2010, Seahawks, taking on the job of dealing with a franchise in shambles. Given great power and leeway in drafting and personnel decisions, decisions as part of his terms for leaving the college ranks, within three years he transformed the Seahawks from one of the worst teams in the league to a team that won its first Super Bowl. Bowl, making him only the forth head coach to win a championship on the college and professional level... were it not for the NCAA [[CanonDiscontinuity stripping USC of its title]] due to violating NCAA rules about financially rewarding players. Known league-wide as a defensive mastermind, he Carroll helped put together the so-called "Legion of Boom" secondary. Carroll He is paradoxically one of the oldest coaches in the [=NFL=] and the most energetic--he is extremely hands-on and motivated, almost {{Keet}}-like. He {{Keet}}-like, and can always, ''always'' be seen [[OralFixation chewing gum]] on the sidelines.


* '''Bud Grant''' was the head coach for the Minnesota Vikings from 1967 to 1983 and again in 1985. Grant made a unique name in American sports as a player by being the only person to concurrently play in both the NBA and NFL, playing for the Minneapolis Lakers from 1949-1951 and the Philadelphia Eagles from 1951-1952[[note]]The Eagles drafted Grant #14 overall out of Minnesota as a defensive end; after he led the team in sacks in his rookie year, he [[JackOfAllTrades switched to wide receiver in his second year]] and ranked second in the league in receiving yards[[/note]]. After his contract with the Eagles expired, Grant moved to Winnipeg to play for a higher contract with the CFL's Blue Bombers, where he did well for four seasons and set a league record for most caught interceptions in a playoff game that still stands today. When the Bombers' management fired their old coach, Grant successfully applied for the position and won four Grey Cups with the team over the next decade. He was then hired by the Vikings, who would see 11 division titles and 4 Super Bowl appearances during his next two decades with the young team--Grant won Coach of the Year in 1969. His combined CFL and NFL record makes him the third most successful head coach in professional football history behind only Don Shula and George Halas; that also makes him the most successful coach to have been active during the Super Bowl era [[EveryYearTheyFizzleOut to never win the Big Game]]. He is also the only coach enshrined in both the Pro and Canadian Football Hall of Fame. Grant was well known for his [[TheStoic stoic]] coaching style that was a good match for the Minnesota weather. Besides showing little emotion on the sidelines, he also had his teams practice outdoors during the winter to get used to the cold, forbade the use of warmers during games, and even had dedicated ''national anthem practice'' to ensure all his players could stand in a regimented line during the anthem.

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* '''Bud Grant''' was the head coach for the Minnesota Vikings from 1967 to 1983 and again in 1985. Grant made a unique name in American sports as a player by being the only person to concurrently play in both the NBA and NFL, playing for the Minneapolis Lakers from 1949-1951 and the Philadelphia Eagles from 1951-1952[[note]]The Eagles drafted Grant #14 overall out of Minnesota as a defensive end; after he led the team in sacks in his rookie year, he [[JackOfAllTrades switched to wide receiver in his second year]] and ranked second in the league in receiving yards[[/note]]. After his contract with the Eagles expired, Grant moved to Winnipeg to play for a higher contract with the CFL's Blue Bombers, where he did well for four seasons and set a league record for most caught interceptions in a playoff game that still stands today. When the Bombers' management fired their old coach, Grant successfully applied for the position and won four Grey Cups with the team over the next decade. He was then hired by the Vikings, who would see 11 division titles and 4 Super Bowl appearances during his next two decades with the young team--Grant won Coach of the Year in 1969. His combined CFL and NFL record makes him the third most successful head coach in professional football history behind only Don Shula and George Halas; that also makes him the most successful coach to have been active during the Super Bowl era [[EveryYearTheyFizzleOut to never win the Big Game]]. He is also was the only first coach enshrined in both the Pro and Canadian Football Hall of Fame.Fame (later joined by Marv Levy). Grant was well known for his [[TheStoic stoic]] coaching style that was a good match for the Minnesota weather. Besides showing little emotion on the sidelines, he also had his teams practice outdoors during the winter to get used to the cold, forbade the use of warmers during games, and even had dedicated ''national anthem practice'' to ensure all his players could stand in a regimented line during the anthem.



* '''Marv Levy''' was most famously the Hall of Fame coach of the 4-in-a-row Super Bowl runner-up Buffalo Bills and the creator of the "K-Gun" no-huddle offense. Prior to joining the Bills, Levy coached in college for nearly two decades, briefly worked as a special teams coach for a few NFL teams in the early '70s, led the CFL's Montreal Alouettes to two Grey Cups, had a middling stint as the head coach of the Kansas City Chiefs, and even coached in the short-lived USFL. He finally saw real NFL success upon joining the Bills as head coach in 1987--his team completely dominated the AFC in the early '90s and he won Coach of the Year twice, though he never managed to coach the team [[EveryYearTheyFizzleOut to a Super Bowl win]]. A veteran of the Second World War, he refused to use the common metaphors of "war" and "battle" for the game and famously stated about the Super Bowl, "It is not a must-win; ''World War II'' was a must-win." After he retired in 1997 as the oldest coach in the league, he was brought back to Buffalo in 2006 at the age of ''80'' as general manager--he retired for good after two seasons.

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* '''Marv Levy''' was most famously the Hall of Fame coach of the 4-in-a-row Super Bowl runner-up Buffalo Bills and the creator of the "K-Gun" no-huddle offense. Prior to joining the Bills, Levy coached in college for nearly two decades, briefly worked as a special teams coach for a few NFL teams in the early '70s, led the CFL's Montreal Alouettes to two Grey Cups, had a middling stint as the head coach of the Kansas City Chiefs, and even coached in the short-lived USFL. He finally saw real NFL success upon joining the Bills as head coach in 1987--his team completely dominated the AFC in the early '90s and he won Coach of the Year twice, though he never managed to coach the team [[EveryYearTheyFizzleOut to a Super Bowl win]]. A veteran of the Second World War, he refused to use the common metaphors of "war" and "battle" for the game and famously stated about the Super Bowl, "It is not a must-win; ''World War II'' was a must-win." After he retired in 1997 as the oldest coach in the league, he was brought back to Buffalo in 2006 at the age of ''80'' as general manager--he retired for good after two seasons. In 2021, he was elected into the CFL Hall of Fame, joining Bud Grant as the only coaches to be enshrined in both.


* '''Steve Maruicci''' was a successful head coach with the San Francisco 49ers from 1997-2002. His first season seen him win a then-record 11 consecutive wins [[note]] Since broken by Jim Caldwell in 2009[[/note]] en route to his best season as a head coach, going 13-3 before losing to the Packers in the NFC Championship Game. He was fired from the 49ers after losing a power struggle with his GM. He went on to coach the Detroit Lions 2003-2005, where he was fired midseason after posting 2 straight losing seasons. He is a current analyst for the NFL Network and was long rumored to return coaching anytime an opening occurred until 2012.

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* '''Steve Maruicci''' was a successful head coach with the San Francisco 49ers from 1997-2002. His first season seen saw him win a then-record 11 consecutive wins [[note]] Since wins[[note]]since broken by Jim Caldwell in 2009[[/note]] en route to his best season as a head coach, going 13-3 before losing to the Packers in the NFC Championship Game. He remained generally successful with the team but was fired from the 49ers after losing two straight playoff berths due to a power struggle with his GM. the GM (the Niners wouldn't return to the playoffs for another nine seasons). He went on to coach the Detroit Lions 2003-2005, where he was fired midseason after posting 2 two straight losing seasons. He is a current analyst for the then joined NFL Network and was long rumored to return coaching anytime as an opening occurred until 2012. analyst, a role that he has stayed in ever since.

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* '''Steve Maruicci''' was a successful head coach with the San Francisco 49ers from 1997-2002. His first season seen him win a then-record 11 consecutive wins [[note]] Since broken by Jim Caldwell in 2009[[/note]] en route to his best season as a head coach, going 13-3 before losing to the Packers in the NFC Championship Game. He was fired from the 49ers after losing a power struggle with his GM. He went on to coach the Detroit Lions 2003-2005, where he was fired midseason after posting 2 straight losing seasons. He is a current analyst for the NFL Network and was long rumored to return coaching anytime an opening occurred until 2012.


* '''George Allen''' was a head coach for the Los Angeles Rams from 1966-1970 and the team in Washington from 1971-1977. Allen holds the fourth-highest winning record in NFL history and won Coach of the Year twice despite [[EveryYearTheyFizzleOut never winning a playoff game]] outside of the 1972 season, his sole visit to the Super Bowl in which his team was the final step in the Dolphins' perfect season. Allen famously had a squeaky-clean persona that would make a '50s TV dad jealous: he never [[GoshDangItToHeck swore]], [[TheTeetotaler drank, or smoked]], and led his locker rooms in chants of "Hip hip hooray!" after victories. He was also a near obsessive worker who demanded an almost complete level of control over all team operations. His teams became famous for the high number of trades made at Allen's request to bring in veteran players that could immediately keep up with his meticulous playbooks; Washington's team earned the nickname "the Over the Hill Gang" during his tenure, and Allen made "the future is now" his catch phrase. However, his ControlFreak tendencies and refusal to plan for the future led to trouble later in his career. After he was let go by Washington, he returned to Los Angeles and was met by a team and ownership that did ''not'' tolerate his autocratic style--he was fired during the ''preseason''. After a few years of broadcasting and a brief return to coaching in the USFL, Allen retired for several years before deciding to come back for OneLastJob to try to save Long Beach State's struggling football program. There he became the only known coach to potentially be ''killed'' by a DrenchCelebration--the 72-year-old coach fell ill after being dunked with ice water in the final December game of the team's winning season, with some believing it contributed to his death from a heart attack not long after. He was posthumously inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2002. His son George Jr. became Governor of Virginia and a U.S. Senator; his other son, '''Bruce Allen''', became a general manager whose [[UltimateJobSecurity long and generally unsuccessful stints with various teams]], most prominently his father's old team in Washington, was attributed to owners [[{{Nepotism}} going off his name]] rather than his record.[[note]]Bruce's record as a team executive is 83-125, with three playoff appearances in 13 seasons and an 0-3 record in those games.[[/note]]

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* '''George Allen''' was a head coach for the Los Angeles Rams from 1966-1970 and the team in Washington from 1971-1977. Allen holds the fourth-highest winning record in NFL history and won Coach of the Year twice despite [[EveryYearTheyFizzleOut never winning a playoff game]] outside of the 1972 season, his sole visit to the Super Bowl in which his team was the final step in the Dolphins' perfect season. Allen famously had a squeaky-clean persona that would make a '50s TV dad jealous: he never [[GoshDangItToHeck swore]], [[TheTeetotaler drank, or smoked]], and led his locker rooms in chants of "Hip hip hooray!" after victories. He was also a near obsessive worker who demanded an almost complete level of control over all team operations. His teams became famous for the high number of trades made at Allen's request to bring in veteran players that could immediately keep up with his meticulous playbooks; Washington's team earned the nickname "the Over the Hill Gang" during his tenure, and Allen made "the future is now" his catch phrase. However, his ControlFreak tendencies and refusal to plan for the future led to trouble later in his career. After he was let go by Washington, he returned to Los Angeles and was met by a team and ownership that did ''not'' tolerate his autocratic style--he was fired during the ''preseason''. After a few years of broadcasting and a brief return to coaching in the USFL, Allen retired for several years before deciding to come back for OneLastJob to try to save Long Beach State's struggling football program. There he became the only known coach to potentially be ''killed'' by a DrenchCelebration--the 72-year-old coach fell ill after being dunked with ice water in the final December game of the team's winning season, with some believing it contributed to his death from a heart attack not long after. He was posthumously inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2002. His son George Jr. became Governor of Virginia and a U.S. Senator; his other son, '''Bruce Allen''', became a general manager whose [[UltimateJobSecurity long and generally unsuccessful stints with various teams]], most prominently his father's old team in Washington, was attributed to owners [[{{Nepotism}} going off his name]] rather than his record.[[note]]Bruce's record as a team executive is 83-125, with three playoff appearances in 13 seasons and an 0-3 record in those games.[[/note]]


* '''George Allen''' was a head coach for the Los Angeles Rams from 1966-1970 and the team in Washington from 1971-1977. Allen holds the fourth-highest winning record in NFL history and won Coach of the Year twice despite [[EveryYearTheyFizzleOut never winning a playoff game]] outside of the 1972 season, his sole visit to the Super Bowl in which his team was the final step in the Dolphins' perfect season. Allen famously had a squeaky-clean persona that would make a '50s TV dad jealous: he never [[GoshDangItToHeck swore]], [[TheTeetotaler drank, or smoked]], and led his locker rooms in chants of "Hip hip hooray!" after victories. He was also a near obsessive worker who popularized the current 16+ hour days that most NFL coaches are expected to maintain and demanded an almost complete level of control over all team operations. His teams became famous for the high number of trades made at Allen's request to bring in veteran players that could immediately keep up with his meticulous playbooks; Washington's team earned the nickname "the Over the Hill Gang" during his tenure, and Allen made "the future is now" his catch phrase. However, his ControlFreak tendencies and refusal to plan for the future led to trouble later in his career. After he was let go by Washington, he returned to Los Angeles and was met by a team and ownership that did ''not'' tolerate his autocratic style--he was fired during the ''preseason''. After a few years of broadcasting and a brief return to coaching in the USFL, Allen retired for several years before deciding to come back for OneLastJob to try to save Long Beach State's struggling football program. There he became the only known coach to potentially be ''killed'' by a DrenchCelebration--the 72-year-old coach fell ill after being dunked with ice water in the final December game of the team's winning season, with some believing it contributed to his death from a heart attack not long after. He was posthumously inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2002. His son George Jr. became Governor of Virginia and a U.S. Senator; his other son, '''Bruce Allen''', became a general manager whose [[UltimateJobSecurity long and generally unsuccessful stints with various teams]], most prominently his father's old team in Washington, was attributed to owners [[{{Nepotism}} going off his name]] rather than his record.[[note]]Bruce's record as a team executive is 83-125, with three playoff appearances in 13 seasons and an 0-3 record in those games.[[/note]]

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* '''George Allen''' was a head coach for the Los Angeles Rams from 1966-1970 and the team in Washington from 1971-1977. Allen holds the fourth-highest winning record in NFL history and won Coach of the Year twice despite [[EveryYearTheyFizzleOut never winning a playoff game]] outside of the 1972 season, his sole visit to the Super Bowl in which his team was the final step in the Dolphins' perfect season. Allen famously had a squeaky-clean persona that would make a '50s TV dad jealous: he never [[GoshDangItToHeck swore]], [[TheTeetotaler drank, or smoked]], and led his locker rooms in chants of "Hip hip hooray!" after victories. He was also a near obsessive worker who popularized the current 16+ hour days that most NFL coaches are expected to maintain and demanded an almost complete level of control over all team operations. His teams became famous for the high number of trades made at Allen's request to bring in veteran players that could immediately keep up with his meticulous playbooks; Washington's team earned the nickname "the Over the Hill Gang" during his tenure, and Allen made "the future is now" his catch phrase. However, his ControlFreak tendencies and refusal to plan for the future led to trouble later in his career. After he was let go by Washington, he returned to Los Angeles and was met by a team and ownership that did ''not'' tolerate his autocratic style--he was fired during the ''preseason''. After a few years of broadcasting and a brief return to coaching in the USFL, Allen retired for several years before deciding to come back for OneLastJob to try to save Long Beach State's struggling football program. There he became the only known coach to potentially be ''killed'' by a DrenchCelebration--the 72-year-old coach fell ill after being dunked with ice water in the final December game of the team's winning season, with some believing it contributed to his death from a heart attack not long after. He was posthumously inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2002. His son George Jr. became Governor of Virginia and a U.S. Senator; his other son, '''Bruce Allen''', became a general manager whose [[UltimateJobSecurity long and generally unsuccessful stints with various teams]], most prominently his father's old team in Washington, was attributed to owners [[{{Nepotism}} going off his name]] rather than his record.[[note]]Bruce's record as a team executive is 83-125, with three playoff appearances in 13 seasons and an 0-3 record in those games.[[/note]]



* '''Jerry Glanville''' was the head coach for the Houston Oilers for the last two games of the 1985 season to the 1989 season. Under his leadership, Houston became a playoff contender for the first time since the Bum Phillips era. On the field, his Oilers teams were known for being a vicious team that weren't afraid of taking cheap shots, helping the Astrodome earn the moniker "The House of Pain". He also earned the ire of opposing coaches, including infamously taking a dressing down from Chuck Noll in 1987 after his Oilers defeated Noll's Steelers in a game. He was fired after the 1989 season, after three consecutive losses seen Houston lose the division and the Wild Card game. He brought his aggressive style to Atlanta, where he was far less successful, only reaching the playoffs in the 1991 season. He is also famous for leaving tickets out for Elvis Presley and also attempted a career as a NASCAR driver, achieving only minor success there.

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* '''Jerry Glanville''' was a head coach in the late '80s/early '90s known for being one of the league's more [[CloudCuckooLander unique characters]]. After nearly two decades as an assistant at the college and professional level, Glanville became head coach for the Houston Oilers for the last two games of the 1985 season to the 1989 season. Under his leadership, Houston became a playoff contender for the first time since the Bum Phillips era. On the field, his Oilers teams were known for being a vicious team that weren't afraid of taking cheap shots, helping the Astrodome earn the moniker "The House of Pain". He also Off the field, Glanville was known for being rather strange; he famously always left tickets out for Music/ElvisPresley in the hope he'd [[ElvisLives come out of hiding]] and coined the phrase "NFL means 'Not For Long'!" while dressing down a first-year ref. All this earned the ire of opposing coaches, including infamously taking a dressing down from Chuck Noll in 1987 after his Oilers defeated Noll's Steelers in a game. He was fired after the 1989 season, after season despite taking the team to the playoffs for the past three consecutive losses seen Houston lose the division and the Wild Card game. seasons. He next brought his aggressive style to Atlanta, where he was far less successful, only reaching the playoffs in the 1991 season; he was fired after the 1993 season. He is also famous for leaving tickets out for Elvis Presley and also subsequently attempted a career as a NASCAR UsefulNotes/{{NASCAR}} driver, achieving only minor success there. He has been in and out of college and semi-pro coaching ever since, currently coaching in the Spring League at the cusp of his eighties.

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* '''Jerry Glanville''' was the head coach for the Houston Oilers for the last two games of the 1985 season to the 1989 season. Under his leadership, Houston became a playoff contender for the first time since the Bum Phillips era. On the field, his Oilers teams were known for being a vicious team that weren't afraid of taking cheap shots, helping the Astrodome earn the moniker "The House of Pain". He also earned the ire of opposing coaches, including infamously taking a dressing down from Chuck Noll in 1987 after his Oilers defeated Noll's Steelers in a game. He was fired after the 1989 season, after three consecutive losses seen Houston lose the division and the Wild Card game. He brought his aggressive style to Atlanta, where he was far less successful, only reaching the playoffs in the 1991 season. He is also famous for leaving tickets out for Elvis Presley and also attempted a career as a NASCAR driver, achieving only minor success there.


* '''Sid Gillman''' is the only coach to be enshrined in both the Pro and College Football Halls of Fame and a key figure in the refinement and proliferation of the pass in football offense. After briefly playing as an end for the Cleveland Rams after graduating Ohio State in 1936, Gillman moved into coaching and came to dominate UsefulNotes/{{Ohio}} football, leading Miami (OH) and Cincinnati on strong runs as head coach in the late '40s and early '50s. In 1955, Gillman returned to his former pro team, now located in Los Angeles. He saw mixed results with the Rams, taking them to a Championship appearance in his first season but seeing inconsistent performances in the following years. After a 2-10 1959 season, Gillman crossed town to L.A.'s new team, the AFL's Chargers, becoming the franchise's first head coach. Gillman's pass-centric philosophy caught on throughout the AFL after the Chargers appeared in five of the first six AFL Championships and won one in 1963. He stayed with the Chargers up until the NFL -AFL merger that would further spread his offense throughout pro football. He then retired due to health issues... [[TenMinuteRetirement only to return]] four years later, stepping into the middle of a terrible Houston Oilers season in 1973. In his first full year with the team, Gillman improved them to 7-7 after two straight one-win seasons but retired again afterwards. He would return to the NFL for a few more brief stints as an assistant up through the '80s. Gillman passed away in 2001.

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* '''Sid Gillman''' is the only coach to be enshrined in both the Pro and College Football Halls of Fame and a key figure in the refinement and proliferation of the pass in football offense. After briefly playing as an end for the Cleveland Rams after graduating Ohio State in 1936, Gillman moved into coaching and came to dominate UsefulNotes/{{Ohio}} football, leading Miami (OH) and Cincinnati on strong runs as head coach in the late '40s and early '50s. In 1955, Gillman he returned to his former pro team, now located in Los Angeles. He saw mixed results with the Rams, taking them to a Championship appearance in his first season but seeing inconsistent performances in the following years. After a 2-10 1959 season, Gillman he crossed town to L.A.'s new team, the AFL's Chargers, becoming the franchise's first head coach. Gillman's pass-centric philosophy caught on throughout the AFL after the Chargers appeared in five of the first six AFL Championships and won one in 1963. He stayed with the Chargers up until the NFL -AFL NFL-AFL merger that would further spread his offense throughout pro football. He then retired due to health issues... [[TenMinuteRetirement only to return]] four years later, stepping into the middle of a terrible Houston Oilers season in 1973. In his first full year with the team, Gillman improved them to 7-7 after two straight one-win seasons but retired again afterwards. He would return to the NFL for a few more brief stints as an assistant up through the '80s. Gillman passed away in 2001.


* '''Sid Gillman''' is the only coach to be enshrined in both the Pro and College Football Halls of Fame and a key figure in the refinement and proliferation of the pass in football offense. After briefly playing for as an end for the Cleveland Rams after graduating Ohio State in 1936, Gillman moved into coaching and came to dominate UsefulNotes/{{Ohio}} football, leading Miami (OH) and Cincinnati on strong runs as head coach in the late '40s and early '50s. In 1955, Gillman returned to his former pro team, now located in Los Angeles. He saw mixed results with the Rams, taking them to a Championship appearance in his first season but seeing inconsistent results in the following years. After a 2-10 1959 season, Gillman crossed town to L.A.'s new team, the AFL's Chargers, becoming the franchise's first head coach. Gillman's pass-centric philosophy caught on throughout the AFL after the Chargers appeared in five of the first six AFL Championships and won one in 1963. He stayed with the Chargers up until the NFL -AFL merger that would ultimately spread his offense throughout pro football. He then retired due to health issues... [[TenMinuteRetirement only to return]] four years later, stepping into the middle of a terrible Houston Oilers season in 1973. In his first full year with the team, Gillman improved them to 7-7 after two straight one-win seasons, but retired again afterwards. He would return to the NFL for a few more brief stints as an assistant up through the '80s. Gillman passed away in 2001.

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* '''Sid Gillman''' is the only coach to be enshrined in both the Pro and College Football Halls of Fame and a key figure in the refinement and proliferation of the pass in football offense. After briefly playing for as an end for the Cleveland Rams after graduating Ohio State in 1936, Gillman moved into coaching and came to dominate UsefulNotes/{{Ohio}} football, leading Miami (OH) and Cincinnati on strong runs as head coach in the late '40s and early '50s. In 1955, Gillman returned to his former pro team, now located in Los Angeles. He saw mixed results with the Rams, taking them to a Championship appearance in his first season but seeing inconsistent results performances in the following years. After a 2-10 1959 season, Gillman crossed town to L.A.'s new team, the AFL's Chargers, becoming the franchise's first head coach. Gillman's pass-centric philosophy caught on throughout the AFL after the Chargers appeared in five of the first six AFL Championships and won one in 1963. He stayed with the Chargers up until the NFL -AFL merger that would ultimately further spread his offense throughout pro football. He then retired due to health issues... [[TenMinuteRetirement only to return]] four years later, stepping into the middle of a terrible Houston Oilers season in 1973. In his first full year with the team, Gillman improved them to 7-7 after two straight one-win seasons, seasons but retired again afterwards. He would return to the NFL for a few more brief stints as an assistant up through the '80s. Gillman passed away in 2001.

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* '''Sid Gillman''' is the only coach to be enshrined in both the Pro and College Football Halls of Fame and a key figure in the refinement and proliferation of the pass in football offense. After briefly playing for as an end for the Cleveland Rams after graduating Ohio State in 1936, Gillman moved into coaching and came to dominate UsefulNotes/{{Ohio}} football, leading Miami (OH) and Cincinnati on strong runs as head coach in the late '40s and early '50s. In 1955, Gillman returned to his former pro team, now located in Los Angeles. He saw mixed results with the Rams, taking them to a Championship appearance in his first season but seeing inconsistent results in the following years. After a 2-10 1959 season, Gillman crossed town to L.A.'s new team, the AFL's Chargers, becoming the franchise's first head coach. Gillman's pass-centric philosophy caught on throughout the AFL after the Chargers appeared in five of the first six AFL Championships and won one in 1963. He stayed with the Chargers up until the NFL -AFL merger that would ultimately spread his offense throughout pro football. He then retired due to health issues... [[TenMinuteRetirement only to return]] four years later, stepping into the middle of a terrible Houston Oilers season in 1973. In his first full year with the team, Gillman improved them to 7-7 after two straight one-win seasons, but retired again afterwards. He would return to the NFL for a few more brief stints as an assistant up through the '80s. Gillman passed away in 2001.

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* '''Chris "Boomer" Berman''' has been a sportscaster for ESPN for over four decades and was the face of their football coverage for a large part of that time, particularly as the co-host of ''NFL Primetime'' with Tom Jackson and the network's various gameday ''Countdown'' programs. Berman is known for his booming voice, equally bombastic personality, and the various catchphrases he coined while performing his memorable highlight recaps of the week's games. He remains with the network today in a more limited capacity, having stepped back from his more omnipresent hosting schedule in 2016.

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