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* ''Enterprise'' (after ''that [[Franchise/StarTrek Enterprise]]'', seriously![[note]]It was originally to be named ''Constitution'' in honor of the frigate launched in 1797[[/note]]). Built primarily for aerodynamic testing purposes, ''Enterprise'' wasn't actually capable of spaceflight (as it is missing several minor things like ''heat shielding'' or ''engines''), though there were originally plans to refit it for such.[[note]]''Enterprise'' was designed internally by superstructure as "OV-101." Rather than an overly costly refit of her for operational use, NASA decided that a structurally-identical frame used for early tests would be fitted for flight instead: "STA-099." This became "OV-099," otherwise known as '''''Challenger.''''' Imagine the MassOhCrap and fandom-mourning moments that the ''Franchise/StarTrek'' community would have doubly-suffered, on top of the general sadness of the tragedy, were it ''Enterprise'' that was destroyed that day.[[/note]]

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* ''Enterprise'' (OV-101) (after ''that [[Franchise/StarTrek Enterprise]]'', seriously![[note]]It was originally to be named ''Constitution'' in honor of the frigate launched in 1797[[/note]]). Built primarily for aerodynamic testing purposes, ''Enterprise'' wasn't actually capable of spaceflight (as it is missing several minor things like ''heat shielding'' or ''engines''), though there were originally plans to refit it for such.[[note]]''Enterprise'' was designed internally by superstructure as "OV-101." Rather than an overly costly refit of her for operational use, NASA decided that a structurally-identical frame used for early tests would be fitted for flight instead: "STA-099." This became "OV-099," otherwise known as '''''Challenger.''''' Imagine the MassOhCrap and fandom-mourning moments that the ''Franchise/StarTrek'' community would have doubly-suffered, on top of the general sadness of the tragedy, were it ''Enterprise'' that was destroyed that day.[[/note]]



* ''Columbia'' (after the first American vessel to circumnavigate the world, and also the ''Apollo 11'' Command Module). The first space shuttle launched (in 1981). Slightly different from later shuttles due to design changes. ''Columbia'' remained in service until 2003, when it broke up during atmospheric reentry, killing all aboard. The reason for the disaster lies in the foam on the external tank. During launch, a piece of foam was shed from the tank, which hit the leading-edge tip of ''Columbia's'' left wing. Shedding foam was a longtime problem with the shuttle system, dating back to the very first mission. This time, though, the foam hit the shuttle in a critical spot on the wing's leading edge, allowing hot gases to seep into the shuttle and basically blowtorch the wing's internal structures, causing increasing destabilization that ultimately tore the shuttle - [[LudicrousGibs and its crew]] - to pieces.
* ''Challenger'' (after the ship used for the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Challenger_expedition Challenger expedition,]] and the Apollo 17 Command Module). First launched in 1983. Carried the first American female astronaut, Sally Ride, into space. Sadly, ''Challenger'' is best known for its [[NeverLiveItDown destruction in 1986 just over a minute after liftoff.]] What made the tragedy even more devastating was the presence of a civilian school teacher, Christa [=McAuliffe=], who would have been the first teacher in space, not knowing that her ultimate fate would be to die in an explosion. The destruction was caused by a design flaw in the solid-rocket booster that, when combined with abnormally-strong wind shear and temperatures you'd never expect for Florida, caused a "bleed-through" on the external tank. It had happened several times before, but nothing wrong ever happened, so NASA made it a feature of the system. On this mission, the bleed-through caused the SRB to tear itself from the external tank, flinging the stack broadside into its own airstream (keep in mind the shuttle was flying at ''Mach-1'' at the time), and tore the orbiter and external tank apart, as the airstream pushed them too far past stress tolerances. The [=SRBs=], which were designed with a higher stress tolerance, remained in flight, out of control, before being destroyed by the Range Safety Officer. To this day, the media still refers to the disaster as an explosion, though the correct term is disintegration, as all indications suggest that the crew was still alive after break-up, only to be killed when they slammed into the Atlantic at roughly 200 MPH.
* ''Discovery'' (after quite a few different ships of exploration). First launched in 1984. ''Discovery'' was used to launch the Hubble Space Telescope, was the first American spacecraft to carry a Russian into space, and was the first shuttle to be launched after the destruction of both ''Challenger'' and ''Columbia''.

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* ''Columbia'' (OV-102) (after the first American vessel to circumnavigate the world, and also the ''Apollo 11'' Command Module). The first space shuttle launched (in 1981). Slightly different from later shuttles due to design changes. ''Columbia'' remained in service until 2003, when it broke up during atmospheric reentry, killing all aboard. The reason for the disaster lies in the foam on the external tank. During launch, a piece of foam was shed from the tank, which hit the leading-edge tip of ''Columbia's'' left wing. Shedding foam was a longtime problem with the shuttle system, dating back to the very first mission. This time, though, the foam hit the shuttle in a critical spot on the wing's leading edge, allowing hot gases to seep into the shuttle and basically blowtorch the wing's internal structures, causing increasing destabilization that ultimately tore the shuttle - [[LudicrousGibs and its crew]] - to pieces.
* ''Challenger'' (OV-099) (after the ship used for the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Challenger_expedition Challenger expedition,]] and the Apollo 17 Command Module). First launched in 1983. Carried the first American female astronaut, Sally Ride, into space. Sadly, ''Challenger'' is best known for its [[NeverLiveItDown destruction in 1986 just over a minute after liftoff.]] What made the tragedy even more devastating was the presence of a civilian school teacher, Christa [=McAuliffe=], who would have been the first teacher in space, not knowing that her ultimate fate would be to die in an explosion. The destruction was caused by a design flaw in the solid-rocket booster that, when combined with abnormally-strong wind shear and temperatures you'd never expect for Florida, caused a "bleed-through" on the external tank. It had happened several times before, but nothing wrong ever happened, so NASA made it a feature of the system. On this mission, the bleed-through caused the SRB to tear itself from the external tank, flinging the stack broadside into its own airstream (keep in mind the shuttle was flying at ''Mach-1'' at the time), and tore the orbiter and external tank apart, as the airstream pushed them too far past stress tolerances. The [=SRBs=], which were designed with a higher stress tolerance, remained in flight, out of control, before being destroyed by the Range Safety Officer. To this day, the media still refers to the disaster as an explosion, though the correct term is disintegration, as all indications suggest that the crew was still alive after break-up, only to be killed when they slammed into the Atlantic at roughly 200 MPH.
* ''Discovery'' (OV-103) (after quite a few different ships of exploration). First launched in 1984. ''Discovery'' was used to launch the Hubble Space Telescope, was the first American spacecraft to carry a Russian into space, and was the first shuttle to be launched after the destruction of both ''Challenger'' and ''Columbia''.



* ''Atlantis'' (after an oceanographic research vessel). First launched in 1985. Has the distinction of being the most heavily damaged spacecraft to return to Earth safely; during launch on [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/STS-27 STS-27]], debris from one of the solid boosters damaged the heat shield tiles, leading the crew to believe that they might die on re-entry. Fortunately, the damage happened around an aluminum mounting plate for the L-band antenna, which absorbed the heat that otherwise might have destroyed the shuttle in a similar manner to ''Columbia''. The final orbiter to be decommissioned, ''Atlantis'' took off on its final mission on July 8, 2011, about half an hour before noon Eastern Daylight Time.

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* ''Atlantis'' (OV-104) (after an oceanographic research vessel). First launched in 1985. Has the distinction of being the most heavily damaged spacecraft to return to Earth safely; during launch on [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/STS-27 STS-27]], debris from one of the solid boosters damaged the heat shield tiles, leading the crew to believe that they might die on re-entry. Fortunately, the damage happened around an aluminum mounting plate for the L-band antenna, which absorbed the heat that otherwise might have destroyed the shuttle in a similar manner to ''Columbia''. The final orbiter to be decommissioned, ''Atlantis'' took off on its final mission on July 8, 2011, about half an hour before noon Eastern Daylight Time.



* ''Endeavour'' (after James Cook's ship and also the ''Apollo 15'' Command Module; Americans normally spell the word "endeavor"). First launched in 1992. Constructed as a replacement for ''Challenger''.

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* ''Endeavour'' (OV-105) (after James Cook's ship and also the ''Apollo 15'' Command Module; Americans normally spell the word "endeavor"). First launched in 1992. Constructed as a replacement for ''Challenger''.


* Gemini 3: First manned Gemini flight, crewed by second-timer Gus Grissom and first-timer John Young, who would fly into space a total of six times.

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* Gemini 3: First manned Gemini flight, crewed by second-timer Gus Grissom UsefulNotes/GusGrissom and first-timer John Young, who would fly into space a total of six times.



* Apollo 11: first manned mission to land on the Moon. Neil Armstrong gets to say his famous lines. Gently parodied by ''Film/TheDish'', which loosely follows the tale of the radio observatory in Australia responsible for tracking the mission. [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apollo_11_missing_tapes NASA erased their recordings of the event, which they never lived down.]] [[WhatCouldHaveBeen Deke Slayton originally considered Gus Grissom for the One Small Step]], but TheGrimReaper had other ideas (See Apollo 1 above).

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* Apollo 11: first manned mission to land on the Moon. Neil Armstrong UsefulNotes/NeilArmstrong gets to say his famous lines. Gently parodied by ''Film/TheDish'', which loosely follows the tale of the radio observatory in Australia responsible for tracking the mission. [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apollo_11_missing_tapes NASA erased their recordings of the event, which they never lived down.]] [[WhatCouldHaveBeen Deke Slayton originally considered Gus Grissom for the One Small Step]], but TheGrimReaper had other ideas (See Apollo 1 above).


* Andy Weir's ''Literature/TheMartian'' tells a Robinsonade where Mark Watney was stranded on Mars after a sandstorm forced NASA to abort a Mars mission and seemingly killed Watney. Upon learning of his survival, NASA ends up launching an ambitious operation to rescue him.

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* Andy Weir's ''Literature/TheMartian'' tells a Robinsonade {{Robinsonade}} where Mark Watney was stranded on Mars after a sandstorm forced NASA to abort a Mars mission and seemingly killed Watney. Upon learning of his survival, NASA ends up launching an ambitious operation to rescue him.



* [[WesternAnimation/KimPossible Kim Possible's]] dad works for them.

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* [[WesternAnimation/KimPossible Kim Possible's]] WesternAnimation/KimPossible's dad works for them.



** The fourth episode of ''Series/ThisIsAmericaCharlieBrown'' features the cast as astronauts on a space station. Also, in the episode where the kids visit the Smithsonian, they comment on the [[CelebrityParadox "strange coincidence"]] of the Apollo 10 modules being nicknamed "Charlie Brown" and "Snoopy".

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** The fourth episode of ''Series/ThisIsAmericaCharlieBrown'' features the cast as astronauts on a space station.then-near-future NASA SpaceStation (based on Reagan's proposed Freedom station). Also, in the episode where the kids visit the Smithsonian, they comment on the [[CelebrityParadox "strange coincidence"]] of the Apollo 10 modules being nicknamed "Charlie Brown" and "Snoopy".


* The original creators of the Techno-Trousers in ''WesternAnimation/TheWrongTrousers''.

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* %%* The original creators of the Techno-Trousers in ''WesternAnimation/TheWrongTrousers''.''WesternAnimation/TheWrongTrousers''. %% Zero-Context Example - the original creators are what, exactly?


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* ''Franchise/{{Peanuts}}'':
** The fourth episode of ''Series/ThisIsAmericaCharlieBrown'' features the cast as astronauts on a space station. Also, in the episode where the kids visit the Smithsonian, they comment on the [[CelebrityParadox "strange coincidence"]] of the Apollo 10 modules being nicknamed "Charlie Brown" and "Snoopy".
** ''Snoopy in Space'' features Snoopy as a NASA astronaut.


** The ''New Horizons'' probe, launched in 2006, is the first to study dwarf planet Pluto and its moons when it arrived in July 2015; after its flyby, it can be potentially targeted to other nearby Kuiper Belt objects (three possible targets have been identified). The fifth spacecraft on a trajectory to leave the solar system, ''Horizons'' derives its velocity from a more powerful launch rocket and one gravitational assist from Jupiter. It carries the ashes of Clyde Tombaugh, the discoverer of Pluto. Cue jokes about how Tombaugh is powering up ''New Horizons'' by rolling in his box. Pluto's geology and appearance pleasantly surprised everyone, [[https://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/newhorizons/images/index.html?id=367260 particularly the large heart-shaped ice formation]] that seemingly told its big blue brother, "I still love you, although you call me a dwarf.". After the Pluto flyby, it's expected to study Kuiper belt bodies that are within range of the spacecraft, the first one having been "Ultima Thule" that was flown by in December 31, 2019.

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** The ''New Horizons'' probe, launched in 2006, is the first to study dwarf planet Pluto and its moons when it arrived in July 2015; after its flyby, it can be potentially targeted to other nearby Kuiper Belt objects (three possible targets have been identified). The fifth spacecraft on a trajectory to leave the solar system, ''Horizons'' derives its velocity from a more powerful launch rocket and one gravitational assist from Jupiter. It carries the ashes of Clyde Tombaugh, the discoverer of Pluto. Cue jokes about how Tombaugh is powering up ''New Horizons'' by rolling in his box. Pluto's geology and appearance pleasantly surprised everyone, [[https://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/newhorizons/images/index.html?id=367260 particularly the large heart-shaped ice formation]] that seemingly told its big blue brother, "I still love you, although you call me a dwarf.". After the Pluto flyby, it's expected to study Kuiper belt bodies that are within range of the spacecraft, the first one having been [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/486958_Arrokoth 486958 Arrokoth]] (then known as "Ultima Thule" Thule") that was flown by in December 31, 2019.


* ''Atlantis'' (after an oceanographic research vessel). First launched in 1985. The final orbiter to be decommissioned, it took off on its final mission on July 8, 2011, about half an hour before noon Eastern Daylight Time.

to:

* ''Atlantis'' (after an oceanographic research vessel). First launched in 1985. Has the distinction of being the most heavily damaged spacecraft to return to Earth safely; during launch on [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/STS-27 STS-27]], debris from one of the solid boosters damaged the heat shield tiles, leading the crew to believe that they might die on re-entry. Fortunately, the damage happened around an aluminum mounting plate for the L-band antenna, which absorbed the heat that otherwise might have destroyed the shuttle in a similar manner to ''Columbia''. The final orbiter to be decommissioned, it ''Atlantis'' took off on its final mission on July 8, 2011, about half an hour before noon Eastern Daylight Time.


* Gemini 9A: First mission flown by the backup crew (second-timer Tom Stafford[[note]]voice from Gemini 6A in the Gemini 6A video above[[/note]] and first-timer Eugene Cernan), as Elliot See[[note]]the voice from Mission Control in the video, BTW[[/note]] and Charlie Bassett, the prime crew, died in a plane crash while training.

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* Gemini 9A: First mission flown by the backup crew (second-timer Tom Stafford[[note]]voice from Gemini 6A in the Gemini 6A video above[[/note]] Stafford and first-timer Eugene Cernan), as Elliot See[[note]]the voice from Mission Control in the video, Gemini 6A video above, BTW[[/note]] and Charlie Bassett, the prime crew, died in a plane crash while training.


** ''Galileo'', a dedicated Jupiter mission. Named for the famous Italian whose observations of Jupiter revealed [[UsefulNotes/TheMoonsOfJupiter its four largest moons]] (still called the "Galilean moons" in his honor), the first natural planetary satellites known to science (other than ''the'' Moon, of course) and who was held to have challenged Church teaching about the structure of the Universe based on his observations [[labelnote:*]]according to the 18th century Encyclopedists' anti-religious revisionism, anyway. In fact he got in trouble not for what he said, but [[{{Jerkass}} how he said it]][[/labelnote]]. Originally scheduled for launch in 1982, after delays in the Shuttle program and the ''Challenger'' disaster, it was finally released from the cargo bay of ''Atlantis'' in 1989. It arrived at Jupiter in 1995 after swinging by Venus, Earth (twice), and two asteroids (safety concerns after ''Challenger'' necessitated the use of a less powerful solid-fuel booster and multiple gravity assists), and it successfully carried out an extensive survey of Jupiter and its moons, despite its main antenna not opening properly. It dropped a probe into Jupiter's atmosphere (no cameras, sorry), found evidence for a liquid ocean underneath Europa, and observed a '''''lot''''' of volcanoes on Io and (fortuitously) the impact on Jupiter of Comet Shoemaker-Levy 9. After suffering years of cumulative damage from Jupiter's hellish radiation belts, it was intentionally de-orbited and burned up in the upper atmosphere of Jupiter in 2003 to avoid contaminating the Jovian moons with Earth bacteria (important because Europa in particular is thought to be one of the best candidates in the Solar System for extraterrestrial life).

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** ''Galileo'', a dedicated Jupiter mission. Named for the famous Italian whose observations of Jupiter revealed [[UsefulNotes/TheMoonsOfJupiter its four largest moons]] (still called the "Galilean moons" in his honor), the first natural planetary satellites known to science (other than ''the'' Moon, of course) and who was held to have challenged Church teaching about the structure of the Universe based on his observations [[labelnote:*]]according [[note]]according to the 18th century Encyclopedists' anti-religious revisionism, anyway. In fact he got in trouble not for what he said, but [[{{Jerkass}} how he said it]][[/labelnote]].it]][[/note]]. Originally scheduled for launch in 1982, after delays in the Shuttle program and the ''Challenger'' disaster, it was finally released from the cargo bay of ''Atlantis'' in 1989. It arrived at Jupiter in 1995 after swinging by Venus, Earth (twice), and two asteroids (safety concerns after ''Challenger'' necessitated the use of a less powerful solid-fuel booster and multiple gravity assists), and it successfully carried out an extensive survey of Jupiter and its moons, despite its main antenna not opening properly. It dropped a probe into Jupiter's atmosphere (no cameras, sorry), found evidence for a liquid ocean underneath Europa, and observed a '''''lot''''' of volcanoes on Io and (fortuitously) the impact on Jupiter of Comet Shoemaker-Levy 9. After suffering years of cumulative damage from Jupiter's hellish radiation belts, it was intentionally de-orbited and burned up in the upper atmosphere of Jupiter in 2003 to avoid contaminating the Jovian moons with Earth bacteria (important because Europa in particular is thought to be one of the best candidates in the Solar System for extraterrestrial life).


* Gemini 9A: First mission flown by the backup crew (second-timer Tom Stafford[[labelnote:*]]voice from Gemini 6A in the Gemini 6A video above[[/labelnote]] and first-timer Eugene Cernan), as Elliot See[[labelnote:*]]the voice from Mission Control in the video, BTW[[/labelnote]] and Charlie Bassett, the prime crew, died in a plane crash while training.

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* Gemini 9A: First mission flown by the backup crew (second-timer Tom Stafford[[labelnote:*]]voice Stafford[[note]]voice from Gemini 6A in the Gemini 6A video above[[/labelnote]] above[[/note]] and first-timer Eugene Cernan), as Elliot See[[labelnote:*]]the See[[note]]the voice from Mission Control in the video, BTW[[/labelnote]] BTW[[/note]] and Charlie Bassett, the prime crew, died in a plane crash while training.


[[ItIsPronouncedTropay The official pronunciation was "GEM-in-ee"]].

* Gemini 3: First manned Gemini flight, crewed by second-timer Gus Grissom and first-timer John Young, who would fly into space a total of six times.
* Gemini 4: Flown by first-timers James [=McDivitt=] and Ed White. White was the first American to walk in space, with his EVA (Extra-Vehicular Activity) roughly double the length of first spacewalker Alexei Leonov's.
* Gemini 7 and 6A: A backup plan after the original Gemini 6 mission had to be scrubbed was to have two Gemini capsules rendezvous (not dock because the capsules weren't built for it), and Gemini 6A is also noted for [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RmsOmqf7Hso the first musical instruments played in space]], as part of a joke.
* Gemini 8: Crewed by first-timers David Scott and Neil Armstrong. Successful docking with unmanned Agena target, then attitude control problems with Gemini capsule forced crew back dirtside.
* Gemini 9A: First mission flown by the backup crew (second-timer Tom Stafford[[labelnote:*]]voice from Gemini 6A in the Gemini 6A video above[[/labelnote]] and first-timer Eugene Cernan), as Elliot See[[labelnote:*]]the voice from Mission Control in the video, BTW[[/labelnote]] and Charlie Bassett, the prime crew, died in a plane crash while training.



* Apollo 1: caught fire during a "dry run" for the launch, killing the three astronauts on board.[[note]]This mission was originally going to be called "Apollo 3", because there had been two unmanned Apollo missions prior. The astronauts, however, unofficially claimed the "Apollo 1" name for their mission. After the fire, NASA officially granted them the "Apollo 1" name, bumping the two unmanned missions to 2 and 3; this doesn't show up in any official timelines, as these prior unmanned flights are consistently referred to as AS-201 and AS-202. To date, neither of these missions have been referred to as Apollos 2 and 3.[[/note]]

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* Apollo 1: caught fire during a "dry run" for the launch, killing the three astronauts on board.[[note]]This mission was originally going to be called "Apollo 3", because there had been two unmanned Apollo missions prior. The astronauts, however, unofficially claimed the "Apollo 1" name for their mission. After the fire, NASA officially granted them the "Apollo 1" name, bumping the two unmanned missions to 2 and 3; this doesn't show up in any official timelines, as these prior unmanned flights are consistently referred to as AS-201 and AS-202. To date, neither of these missions have been referred to as Apollos 2 and 3.[[/note]][[/note]] This tragedy made Gus Grissom the only astronaut to fly multiple missions yet log a cumulative career total of less than a day in space (total of five hours and seven minutes).



* Apollo 8: the first mission in human history that went to the Moon. This was the first time that Humans had left near earth orbit. The flight did not land. Arguably the defining moment where the United States overtook the USSR in UsefulNotes/TheSpaceRace. [[note]]It's arguable that this happened with Gemini 12 in late 1966, when Buzz Aldrin proved gainful EVA was possible. At that point, the Soviet program had been frozen by technical and political issues for over a year, exacerbated by the death of their lead engineer, Sergei Korolev. The Soyuz 1 disaster would prevent any chance for the Soviets to capitalize on the Apollo 1 disaster to re-take the lead. But the achievements of Apollo 8 were more glamorous, and even more symbolic for "saving" the otherwise chaotic and depressing year 1968.[[/note]] Also notable for the Christmas Eve broadcast, in which the astronauts read from [[Literature/TheBible Genesis]] during a scheduled television broadcast, and the famous Earthrise photograph. Many professionals think of this as more significant than even...[[#Apollo11]]

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* Apollo 8: first mission to reunite crewmates from a previous mission (Borman and Lovell, Gemini 7), and the first mission in human history that went to the Moon. This was the first time that Humans had left near earth orbit. The flight did not land. Arguably the defining moment where the United States overtook the USSR in UsefulNotes/TheSpaceRace. [[note]]It's arguable that this happened with Gemini 12 in late 1966, when Buzz Aldrin proved gainful EVA was possible. At that point, the Soviet program had been frozen by technical and political issues for over a year, exacerbated by the death of their lead engineer, Sergei Korolev. The Soyuz 1 disaster would prevent any chance for the Soviets to capitalize on the Apollo 1 disaster to re-take the lead. But the achievements of Apollo 8 were more glamorous, and even more symbolic for "saving" the otherwise chaotic and depressing year 1968.[[/note]] Also notable for the Christmas Eve broadcast, in which the astronauts read from [[Literature/TheBible Genesis]] during a scheduled television broadcast, and the famous Earthrise photograph. Many professionals think of this as more significant than even...[[#Apollo11]]


** ''Galileo'', a dedicated Jupiter mission. Named for the famous Italian whose observations of Jupiter revealed [[UsefulNotes/TheMoonsOfJupiter its four largest moons]] (still called the "Galilean moons" in his honor), the first natural planetary satellites known to science (other than ''the'' Moon, of course) and who was held to have challenged Church teaching about the structure of the Universe based on his observations [[labelnote:*]]according to the 18th century Encyclopedists' anti-religious revisionism; in fact he got in trouble not for what he said, but [[{{Jerkass}} how he said it]][[/labelnote]]. Originally scheduled for launch in 1982, after delays in the Shuttle program and the ''Challenger'' disaster, it was finally released from the cargo bay of ''Atlantis'' in 1989. It arrived at Jupiter in 1995 after swinging by Venus, Earth (twice), and two asteroids (safety concerns after ''Challenger'' necessitated the use of a less powerful solid-fuel booster and multiple gravity assists), and it successfully carried out an extensive survey of Jupiter and its moons, despite its main antenna not opening properly. It dropped a probe into Jupiter's atmosphere (no cameras, sorry), found evidence for a liquid ocean underneath Europa, and observed a '''''lot''''' of volcanoes on Io and (fortuitously) the impact on Jupiter of Comet Shoemaker-Levy 9. After suffering years of cumulative damage from Jupiter's hellish radiation belts, it was intentionally de-orbited and burned up in the upper atmosphere of Jupiter in 2003 to avoid contaminating the Jovian moons with Earth bacteria (important because Europa in particular is thought to be one of the best candidates in the Solar System for extraterrestrial life).

to:

** ''Galileo'', a dedicated Jupiter mission. Named for the famous Italian whose observations of Jupiter revealed [[UsefulNotes/TheMoonsOfJupiter its four largest moons]] (still called the "Galilean moons" in his honor), the first natural planetary satellites known to science (other than ''the'' Moon, of course) and who was held to have challenged Church teaching about the structure of the Universe based on his observations [[labelnote:*]]according to the 18th century Encyclopedists' anti-religious revisionism; in revisionism, anyway. In fact he got in trouble not for what he said, but [[{{Jerkass}} how he said it]][[/labelnote]]. Originally scheduled for launch in 1982, after delays in the Shuttle program and the ''Challenger'' disaster, it was finally released from the cargo bay of ''Atlantis'' in 1989. It arrived at Jupiter in 1995 after swinging by Venus, Earth (twice), and two asteroids (safety concerns after ''Challenger'' necessitated the use of a less powerful solid-fuel booster and multiple gravity assists), and it successfully carried out an extensive survey of Jupiter and its moons, despite its main antenna not opening properly. It dropped a probe into Jupiter's atmosphere (no cameras, sorry), found evidence for a liquid ocean underneath Europa, and observed a '''''lot''''' of volcanoes on Io and (fortuitously) the impact on Jupiter of Comet Shoemaker-Levy 9. After suffering years of cumulative damage from Jupiter's hellish radiation belts, it was intentionally de-orbited and burned up in the upper atmosphere of Jupiter in 2003 to avoid contaminating the Jovian moons with Earth bacteria (important because Europa in particular is thought to be one of the best candidates in the Solar System for extraterrestrial life).


** ''Galileo'', a dedicated Jupiter mission. Named for the famous Italian whose observations of Jupiter revealed [[UsefulNotes/TheMoonsOfJupiter its four largest moons]] (still called the "Galilean moons" in his honor), the first natural planetary satellites known to science (other than ''the'' Moon, of course) and who famously challenged Church teaching about the structure of the Universe based on his observations(according to the 18th century Encyclopedists' anti-religious revisionism; in fact he got in trouble not for what he said, but [[{{Jerkass}} how he said it]]). Originally scheduled for launch in 1982, after delays in the Shuttle program and the ''Challenger'' disaster, it was finally released from the cargo bay of ''Atlantis'' in 1989. It arrived at Jupiter in 1995 after swinging by Venus, Earth (twice), and two asteroids (safety concerns after ''Challenger'' necessitated the use of a less powerful solid-fuel booster and multiple gravity assists), and it successfully carried out an extensive survey of Jupiter and its moons, despite its main antenna not opening properly. It dropped a probe into Jupiter's atmosphere (no cameras, sorry), found evidence for a liquid ocean underneath Europa, and observed a '''''lot''''' of volcanoes on Io and (fortuitously) the impact on Jupiter of Comet Shoemaker-Levy 9. After suffering years of cumulative damage from Jupiter's hellish radiation belts, it was intentionally de-orbited and burned up in the upper atmosphere of Jupiter in 2003 to avoid contaminating the Jovian moons with Earth bacteria (important because Europa in particular is thought to be one of the best candidates in the Solar System for extraterrestrial life).

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** ''Galileo'', a dedicated Jupiter mission. Named for the famous Italian whose observations of Jupiter revealed [[UsefulNotes/TheMoonsOfJupiter its four largest moons]] (still called the "Galilean moons" in his honor), the first natural planetary satellites known to science (other than ''the'' Moon, of course) and who famously was held to have challenged Church teaching about the structure of the Universe based on his observations(according observations [[labelnote:*]]according to the 18th century Encyclopedists' anti-religious revisionism; in fact he got in trouble not for what he said, but [[{{Jerkass}} how he said it]]).it]][[/labelnote]]. Originally scheduled for launch in 1982, after delays in the Shuttle program and the ''Challenger'' disaster, it was finally released from the cargo bay of ''Atlantis'' in 1989. It arrived at Jupiter in 1995 after swinging by Venus, Earth (twice), and two asteroids (safety concerns after ''Challenger'' necessitated the use of a less powerful solid-fuel booster and multiple gravity assists), and it successfully carried out an extensive survey of Jupiter and its moons, despite its main antenna not opening properly. It dropped a probe into Jupiter's atmosphere (no cameras, sorry), found evidence for a liquid ocean underneath Europa, and observed a '''''lot''''' of volcanoes on Io and (fortuitously) the impact on Jupiter of Comet Shoemaker-Levy 9. After suffering years of cumulative damage from Jupiter's hellish radiation belts, it was intentionally de-orbited and burned up in the upper atmosphere of Jupiter in 2003 to avoid contaminating the Jovian moons with Earth bacteria (important because Europa in particular is thought to be one of the best candidates in the Solar System for extraterrestrial life).


** ''Galileo'', a dedicated Jupiter mission. Named for the famous Italian whose observations of Jupiter revealed [[UsefulNotes/TheMoonsOfJupiter its four largest moons]] (still called the "Galilean moons" in his honor), the first natural planetary satellites known to science (other than ''the'' Moon, of course) and who famously challenged Church teaching about the structure of the Universe based on his observations. Originally scheduled for launch in 1982, after delays in the Shuttle program and the ''Challenger'' disaster, it was finally released from the cargo bay of ''Atlantis'' in 1989. It arrived at Jupiter in 1995 after swinging by Venus, Earth (twice), and two asteroids (safety concerns after ''Challenger'' necessitated the use of a less powerful solid-fuel booster and multiple gravity assists), and it successfully carried out an extensive survey of Jupiter and its moons, despite its main antenna not opening properly. It dropped a probe into Jupiter's atmosphere (no cameras, sorry), found evidence for a liquid ocean underneath Europa, and observed a '''''lot''''' of volcanoes on Io and (fortuitously) the impact on Jupiter of Comet Shoemaker-Levy 9. After suffering years of cumulative damage from Jupiter's hellish radiation belts, it was intentionally de-orbited and burned up in the upper atmosphere of Jupiter in 2003 to avoid contaminating the Jovian moons with Earth bacteria (important because Europa in particular is thought to be one of the best candidates in the Solar System for extraterrestrial life).

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** ''Galileo'', a dedicated Jupiter mission. Named for the famous Italian whose observations of Jupiter revealed [[UsefulNotes/TheMoonsOfJupiter its four largest moons]] (still called the "Galilean moons" in his honor), the first natural planetary satellites known to science (other than ''the'' Moon, of course) and who famously challenged Church teaching about the structure of the Universe based on his observations.observations(according to the 18th century Encyclopedists' anti-religious revisionism; in fact he got in trouble not for what he said, but [[{{Jerkass}} how he said it]]). Originally scheduled for launch in 1982, after delays in the Shuttle program and the ''Challenger'' disaster, it was finally released from the cargo bay of ''Atlantis'' in 1989. It arrived at Jupiter in 1995 after swinging by Venus, Earth (twice), and two asteroids (safety concerns after ''Challenger'' necessitated the use of a less powerful solid-fuel booster and multiple gravity assists), and it successfully carried out an extensive survey of Jupiter and its moons, despite its main antenna not opening properly. It dropped a probe into Jupiter's atmosphere (no cameras, sorry), found evidence for a liquid ocean underneath Europa, and observed a '''''lot''''' of volcanoes on Io and (fortuitously) the impact on Jupiter of Comet Shoemaker-Levy 9. After suffering years of cumulative damage from Jupiter's hellish radiation belts, it was intentionally de-orbited and burned up in the upper atmosphere of Jupiter in 2003 to avoid contaminating the Jovian moons with Earth bacteria (important because Europa in particular is thought to be one of the best candidates in the Solar System for extraterrestrial life).


* Apollo 11: first manned mission to land on the Moon. Neil Armstrong gets to say his famous lines. Gently parodied by ''Film/TheDish'', which loosely follows the tale of the radio observatory in Australia responsible for tracking the mission. [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apollo_11_missing_tapes NASA erased their recordings of the event, which they never lived down.]]

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* Apollo 11: first manned mission to land on the Moon. Neil Armstrong gets to say his famous lines. Gently parodied by ''Film/TheDish'', which loosely follows the tale of the radio observatory in Australia responsible for tracking the mission. [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apollo_11_missing_tapes NASA erased their recordings of the event, which they never lived down.]]]] [[WhatCouldHaveBeen Deke Slayton originally considered Gus Grissom for the One Small Step]], but TheGrimReaper had other ideas (See Apollo 1 above).



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* ''LightNovel/FateRequiem'': As implied by the ending of the first volume, and confirmed in the {{Crossover}} with ''VideoGame/FateGrandOrder'', [[spoiler:the name of Erice's mysterious Servant "Prin" is actually Voyager, as in he's the manifestation of the ''Voyager-1'' space probe as a Servant having taken a human form to appeal to Erice and learn more about humanity and the world that sent him to explore the outer reaches of the cosmos.]]

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