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-->'''Current Captain:''' ''Vacant'' %% 2019 captain Michael Parkhurst retired at the end of the season.

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-->'''Current Captain:''' ''Vacant'' TBA %% 2019 captain Michael Parkhurst retired at the end of the season.



-->'''Current Head Coach:''' Veljko Paunović
-->'''Current Captain:''' Dax [=McCarty=]

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-->'''Current Head Coach:''' Veljko Paunović
''Vacant''
-->'''Current Captain:''' Dax [=McCarty=]TBA



-->'''Current Captain:''' ''Vacant'' %% 2019 captain Wayne Rooney left to become a player-coach at Derby County

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-->'''Current Captain:''' ''Vacant'' TBA %% 2019 captain Wayne Rooney left to become a player-coach at Derby County



-->'''Current Head Coach:''' Domènec Torrent
-->'''Current Captain:''' Alexander Ring

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-->'''Current Head Coach:''' Domènec Torrent
''Vacant''
-->'''Current Captain:''' Alexander RingTBA



-->'''Current Head Coach:''' James O'Connor

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-->'''Current Head Coach:''' James O'Connor''Vacant''



-->'''Current Captain:''' ''Vacant''%% 2019 captain Tim Howard retired at the end of that season

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-->'''Current Captain:''' ''Vacant''%% TBA%% 2019 captain Tim Howard retired at the end of that season



-->'''Current Captain:''' ''Vacant''%% 2019 captain DaMarcus Beasley retired at the end of that season

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-->'''Current Captain:''' ''Vacant''%% TBA%% 2019 captain DaMarcus Beasley retired at the end of that season



-->'''Current Captain:''' ''Vacant'' %% 2019 captain Zlatan Ibrahimović left after that season to return to Europe.

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-->'''Current Captain:''' ''Vacant'' %% TBA%% 2019 captain Zlatan Ibrahimović left after that season to return to Europe.Europe


-->'''Current Head Coach:''' Wílmer Cabrera

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-->'''Current Head Coach:''' Wílmer CabreraThierry Henry



Originally the New York[=/=]New Jersey [=MetroStars=] (later just the [=MetroStars=], with no region identifier), they are the only MLS team to have [[ProductPlacement their sponsor]], [[JustifiedTrope who also owns the club]], included in the team name. Three-time Supporters' Shield winners (2013, 2015, 2018). They were the last club of Thierry Henry, who retired after the 2014 season. Also notable for having a severe case of EveryYearTheyFizzleOut (like cans of Red Bull) when they're in good years, especially as of late. Typically, the Red Bulls will field one of the most skilled and talented squads in the league, but fail to make the cup. They also have one the most developed soccer academies in US soccer, directly one of the best USL Championship team (New York Red Bulls II). The Red Bulls' 2018 Supporters Shield win set the MLS record for most points attained in a single season (71) as well as the most wins since regular season penalty kicks were eliminated in 2000 (22). They still hold the wins record, but the points record fell the next season to LAFC.

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Originally the New York[=/=]New Jersey [=MetroStars=] (later just the [=MetroStars=], with no region identifier), they are the only MLS team to have [[ProductPlacement their sponsor]], [[JustifiedTrope who also owns the club]], included in the team name. Three-time Supporters' Shield winners (2013, 2015, 2018). They were the last club of Thierry Henry, who retired as a player after the 2014 season.season but returned to MLS in 2019 as the Montreal Impact head coach. Also notable for having a severe case of EveryYearTheyFizzleOut (like cans of Red Bull) when they're in good years, especially as of late. Typically, the Red Bulls will field one of the most skilled and talented squads in the league, but fail to make the cup. They also have one the most developed soccer academies in US soccer, directly one of the best USL Championship team (New York Red Bulls II). The Red Bulls' 2018 Supporters Shield win set the MLS record for most points attained in a single season (71) as well as the most wins since regular season penalty kicks were eliminated in 2000 (22). They still hold the wins record, but the points record fell the next season to LAFC.



-->'''Current Captain:''' Zlatan Ibrahimović

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-->'''Current Captain:''' ''Vacant'' %% 2019 captain Zlatan IbrahimovićIbrahimović left after that season to return to Europe.



Five time MLS Cup champions, their most recent Cup broke a tie with D.C. United for most decorated team. Made big news in 2007 by signing David Beckham, and later in 2015 by signing Steven Gerrard and 2018 by signing Zlatan Ibrahimović. As a result of this, and other major signings, possibly the best known MLS team in Europe. Current team of Ibrahimović and Mexican international Jonathan dos Santos, and also home to Landon Donovan for most of his MLS career (2005–2014, plus a short comeback in 2016).

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Five time Five-time MLS Cup champions, their most recent Cup broke a tie with D.C. United for most decorated team. Made big news in 2007 by signing David Beckham, and later in 2015 by signing Steven Gerrard and 2018 by signing Zlatan Ibrahimović. As a result of this, and other major signings, possibly the best known MLS team in Europe. Current team of Ibrahimović and Mexican international Jonathan dos Santos, and also home to Landon Donovan for most of his MLS career (2005–2014, plus a short comeback in 2016).


-->'''Stadium:''' [=SeatGeek=] Stadium[[note]]formerly Toyota Park[[/note]][[note]]Capacity: 20,000[[/note]]

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-->'''Stadium:''' [=SeatGeek=] Stadium[[note]]formerly Toyota Park[[/note]][[note]]Capacity: 20,000[[/note]]Soldier Field [[note]]Capacity: 25,000 (nominal); 61,500 (expanded)[[/note]]


-->'''2019 Position:''' Eastern Conference: 4th. Overall: 9th. Playoffs: Advanced to MLS Cup 2019

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-->'''2019 Position:''' Eastern Conference: 4th. Overall: 9th. Playoffs: Advanced to MLS Cup 2019Runner-up



-->'''Trophies Won:''' 2016 MLS Cup, 2014 Supporters Shield, 2009, 2010, 2011 & 2014 US Open Cup
-->'''2019 Position:''' Western Conference: 2nd. Overall: 4th. Playoffs: Advanced to MLS Cup 2019

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-->'''Trophies Won:''' 2016 & 2019 MLS Cup, 2014 Supporters Shield, 2009, 2010, 2011 & 2014 US Open Cup
-->'''2019 Position:''' Western Conference: 2nd. Overall: 4th. Playoffs: Advanced to MLS Cup 2019Champions


-->'''USL Affiliate:''' Ottawa Fury FC (affiliated)\\

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-->'''USL Affiliate:''' None currently[[note]]The affiliated Ottawa Fury FC (affiliated)\\had served in that role in 2019, but folded after that season.[[/note]]\\


-->'''Shirt Sponsor:''' [=AmFam=][[note]]brand name for American Family Insurance[[/note]]

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-->'''Shirt Sponsor:''' [=AmFam=][[note]]brand name for American Family Insurance[[/note]]Insurance



FC Cincinnati was announced as the next member of MLS in May 2018, becoming the seventh team to be promoted to MLS from a lower-level league. Founded in 2015 and playing its first season in the United Soccer League (now known as the USL Championship) in 2016, FCC is backed by a group led by local billionaire Carl Lindner III. During its time in the USL, FCC was the best-supported U.S. soccer team outside of MLS, consistently drawing crowds at the University of Cincinnati's (American) football stadium that would place the team safely in the top half of MLS (and, in fact, ''fourth'' in 2018). It had been the early favorite to snag one of the franchises awarded in the 2018 phase, but initially lost out to Nashville due largely to problems finding an appropriate site for a new stadium. Shortly before the MLS announcement, FCC reached a deal with the city of Cincinnati for a new stadium in the West End, near downtown and the rapidly gentrifying Over-the-Rhine, that is expected to open in 2021. Although FCC's entry was announced after Miami and Nashville, it joined MLS in 2019, largely because its current home could easily accommodate crowds larger than the new stadium can hold.[[note]]Nippert can hold 40,000, though FCC restricts capacity to 33,250 for MLS games. The capacity of the new stadium has not yet been finalized, but has now been narrowed down to between 25,500 and 26,500.[[/note]] While Cincy's media market is smaller than that of any previously existing MLS team, the market of another future MLS entry, Austin, is smaller still. Even though the team propped up the MLS table in its first season, the fans turned out in droves, placing FCC third in average attendance behind the attendance giants of Atlanta United and the Seattle Sounders.

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FC Cincinnati was announced as the next member of MLS in May 2018, becoming the seventh team to be promoted to MLS from a lower-level league. Founded in 2015 and playing its first season in the United Soccer League (now known as the USL Championship) in 2016, FCC is backed by a group led by local billionaire Carl Lindner III. During its time in the USL, FCC was the best-supported U.S. soccer team outside of MLS, consistently drawing crowds at the University of Cincinnati's (American) football stadium that would place the team safely in the top half of MLS (and, in fact, ''fourth'' in 2018). It had been the early favorite to snag one of the franchises awarded in the 2018 phase, but initially lost out to Nashville due largely to problems finding an appropriate site for a new stadium. Shortly before the MLS announcement, FCC reached a deal with the city of Cincinnati for a new stadium in the West End, near downtown and the rapidly gentrifying Over-the-Rhine, that is expected to open in 2021. Although FCC's entry was announced after Miami and Nashville, it joined MLS in 2019, largely because its current home could easily accommodate crowds larger than the new stadium can hold.[[note]]Nippert can hold 40,000, though FCC restricts capacity to 33,250 for MLS games. The capacity of the new stadium has not yet been finalized, but has now been narrowed down to between 25,500 and 26,500.will be in the vicinity of 26,000.[[/note]] While Cincy's media market is smaller than that of any previously existing MLS team, the market of another future MLS entry, Austin, is smaller still. Even though the team propped up the MLS table in its first season, the fans turned out in droves, placing FCC third in average attendance behind the attendance giants of Atlanta United and the Seattle Sounders.



The first Canadian team to join MLS, having started play in 2007. Though their MLS career started out rather undistinguished (until 2016, they had never finished higher than 11th in the league), they have been more successful in the Canadian Championship (contested by Toronto FC, Montreal Impact, and Vancouver Whitecaps FC since 2008, and also by Ottawa Fury [formerly NASL, now USL] since 2014 and FC Edmonton [then NASL; since 2019 in the Canadian Premier League] from 2011–2017), winning four years in a row from 2009-2012. Rather unlucky in the league for many years, as they were known for purchasing great new players and performing well in the regular season, but missing the playoffs by one or two spots; however, they overcame this in the 2016 playoffs to become the first Canadian team to reach the MLS Cup game, beating national rivals Montreal in the Eastern Conference final. The next year, TFC became the first Canadian team to claim the Supporters Shield ''and'' the MLS Cup. In addition, because they also won the Canadian Championship, it means that TFC became the first Canadian ''and'' MLS team to achieve a domestic treble. Home of American internationals Michael Bradley and Jozy Altidore.

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The first Canadian team to join MLS, having started play in 2007. Though their MLS career started out rather undistinguished (until 2016, they had never finished higher than 11th in the league), they have been more successful in the Canadian Championship (contested (currently contested by Toronto FC, Montreal Impact, and Vancouver Whitecaps FC since 2008, and also by Ottawa Fury [formerly NASL, now USL] since 2014 and FC Edmonton [then NASL; since 2019 in the country's three MLS teams, one of its two USL Championship sides, all Canadian Premier League] from 2011–2017), League teams, and a couple of champions of lower-level Canadian leagues), winning four years in a row from 2009-2012. Rather unlucky in the league for many years, as they were known for purchasing great new players and performing well in the regular season, but missing the playoffs by one or two spots; however, they overcame this in the 2016 playoffs to become the first Canadian team to reach the MLS Cup game, beating national rivals Montreal in the Eastern Conference final. The next year, TFC became the first Canadian team to claim the Supporters Shield ''and'' the MLS Cup. In addition, because they also won the Canadian Championship, it means that TFC became the first Canadian ''and'' MLS team to achieve a domestic treble. Home of American internationals Michael Bradley and Jozy Altidore.


-->'''Current Captain:''' Michael Parkhurst

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-->'''Current Captain:''' ''Vacant'' %% 2019 captain Michael ParkhurstParkhurst retired at the end of the season.



One of two new clubs for 2017. Arthur Blank, founder of The Home Depot and owner of the [[UsefulNotes/NationalFootballLeague Atlanta Falcons]], owns the team. Between 2008 and 2014, Atlanta was the largest media market without a MLS club, and it was also the last top 10 media market to enter the league. Due to construction delays with Mercedes-Benz Stadium, the team played its home matches at Georgia Tech's Bobby Dodd Stadium during the first half of its debut season. Notably ended the Seattle Sounders' reign as the league’s attendance champion, drawing over 48,000 per home game in its inaugural season and well over [=50K=] in both following seasons. Home of Venezuelan international Josef Martínez, who currently holds the MLS record for career hat-tricks (6) and set a record for single-season goals in 2018 (31) that lasted all of one season.

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One of two new clubs for 2017. Arthur Blank, founder of The Home Depot and owner of the [[UsefulNotes/NationalFootballLeague Atlanta Falcons]], owns the team. Between 2008 and 2014, Atlanta was the largest media market without a MLS club, and it was also the last top 10 media market to enter the league. Due to construction delays with Mercedes-Benz Stadium, the team played its home matches at Georgia Tech's Bobby Dodd Stadium during the first half of its debut season. Notably ended the Seattle Sounders' reign as the league’s attendance champion, drawing over 48,000 per home game in its inaugural season and well over [=50K=] in both following seasons. Home of Venezuelan international Josef Martínez, who currently holds the MLS record for career hat-tricks (6) as well as consecutive league matches with at least one goal scored (15), and set a record for single-season goals in 2018 (31) that lasted all of one season.


After several years in limbo due to stadium issues, the Miami franchise was finally made official in January 2018 and in September of the same year, the club's name was unveiled: Club Internacional de Fútbol Miami.[[note]]The club's short name, Inter Miami, has drawn ire from Italian Serie A side Inter Milan[[/note]] The club was initially backed by retired English football icon David Beckham, his business partner Simon Fuller (creator of the ''[[Series/AmericanIdol Idol]]'' franchise), and Miami-based Bolivian telecom billionaire Marcelo Claure. In December 2017, the ownership group gained further financial clout with the addition of Miami construction magnates Jorge and José Mas and Japanese telecom billionaire Masayoshi Son (a business partner of Claure). Beckham exercised an option in his original MLS contract to buy an expansion team at a reduced price.[[note]]Beckham's expansion fee was $25 million, while the owners for NYCFC, Orlando City, Atlanta United, LAFC, and Minnesota United paid between $70 million to $100 million, the owners of FC Cincinnati and Nashville SC each paid $150 million, and the St. Louis and (if approved) Sacramento owners will each have to pay $200 million, and team 30 would likely have to pay at least $250 million, if not more.[[/note]] After three failed stadium proposals, Miami Beckham United then planned to build their new stadium in the Overtown neighborhood. The Miami-Dade government had previously endorsed FIU's[[note]]Florida International University[[/note]] on-campus football stadium as a short-term solution. The league sought to have the Miami team ready in 2018, to launch alongside LAFC; however, with the league's announcement of expansion for 2020 and intense competition for new franchises, Beckham's group could have lost their franchise rights if a stadium was not secured in time. More recently, rumors emerged in spring 2017 that the Beckham group may abandon Miami in favor of Las Vegas; however, in June 2017, the group acquired the last parcel of land necessary to build their stadium, and that October, a local judge dismissed a lawsuit seeking to halt construction. In July 2018, Beckham unveiled alternate plans for a stadium as part of a larger mixed-use development, dubbed Miami Freedom Park, on the site of the city-owned Melreese Country Club, near Miami International Airport. The Melreese site was approved by Miami-Dade voters in a November 2018 referendum, but the Miami-Dade council still has to approve it. In late January 2019, Inter Miami announced plans to redevelop the Lockhart Stadium site to serve as their permanent training ground; the development also includes a new 18,000-seat stadium which will host Inter Miami's future USL reserve side while also serving as an interim home for the first team for their first two seasons. The club received unanimous approval from the Fort Lauderdale city council to redevelop the Lockhart Stadium site in April 2019 and demolished the old Lockhart Stadium a month later. The aforementioned USL reserve side will start play in League One in 2020.

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After several years in limbo due to stadium issues, the Miami franchise was finally made official in January 2018 and in September of the same year, the club's name was unveiled: Club Internacional de Fútbol Miami.[[note]]The club's short name, Inter Miami, has drawn ire from Italian Serie A side Inter Milan[[/note]] The club was initially backed by retired English football icon David Beckham, his business partner Simon Fuller (creator of the ''[[Series/AmericanIdol Idol]]'' franchise), and Miami-based Bolivian telecom billionaire Marcelo Claure. In December 2017, the ownership group gained further financial clout with the addition of Miami construction magnates Jorge and José Mas and Japanese telecom billionaire Masayoshi Son (a business partner of Claure). Beckham exercised an option in his original MLS contract to buy an expansion team at a reduced price.[[note]]Beckham's expansion fee was $25 million, while the owners for NYCFC, Orlando City, Atlanta United, LAFC, and Minnesota United paid between $70 million to $100 million, the owners of FC Cincinnati and Nashville SC each paid $150 million, million (Jimmy Halsam also paid the same price to take over the Columbus Crew from Anthony Precourt), and the owners for St. Louis and (if approved) Sacramento owners Republic FC will each have to pay $200 million, and the price for team 30 would likely have to pay at least $250 million, if not more.be even higher.[[/note]] After three failed stadium proposals, Miami Beckham United then planned to build their new stadium in the Overtown neighborhood. The Miami-Dade government had previously endorsed FIU's[[note]]Florida International University[[/note]] on-campus football stadium as a short-term solution. The league sought to have the Miami team ready in 2018, to launch alongside LAFC; however, with the league's announcement of expansion for 2020 and intense competition for new franchises, Beckham's group could have lost their franchise rights if a stadium was not secured in time. More recently, rumors emerged in spring 2017 that the Beckham group may abandon Miami in favor of Las Vegas; however, in June 2017, the group acquired the last parcel of land necessary to build their stadium, and that October, a local judge dismissed a lawsuit seeking to halt construction. In July 2018, Beckham unveiled alternate plans for a stadium as part of a larger mixed-use development, dubbed Miami Freedom Park, on the site of the city-owned Melreese Country Club, near Miami International Airport. The Melreese site was approved by Miami-Dade voters in a November 2018 referendum, but the Miami-Dade council still has to approve it. In late January 2019, Inter Miami announced plans to redevelop the Lockhart Stadium site to serve as their permanent training ground; the development also includes a new 18,000-seat stadium which will host Inter Miami's future USL reserve side while also serving as an interim home for the first team for their first two seasons. The club received unanimous approval from the Fort Lauderdale city council to redevelop the Lockhart Stadium site in April 2019 and demolished the old Lockhart Stadium a month later. The aforementioned USL reserve side will start play in League One in 2020.


-->'''2019 Position:''' Eastern Conference: 2nd. Overall: 3rd. Playoffs: Advanced to Conference Finals

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-->'''2019 Position:''' Eastern Conference: 2nd. Overall: 3rd. Playoffs: Advanced to Conference Finals



-->'''2019 Position:''' Eastern Conference: 4th. Overall: 9th. Playoffs: Advanced to Conference Finals

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-->'''2019 Position:''' Eastern Conference: 4th. Overall: 9th. Playoffs: Advanced to Conference FinalsMLS Cup 2019



-->'''2019 Position:''' Western Conference: 1st. Overall: 1st. Playoffs: Advanced to Conference Finals

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-->'''2019 Position:''' Western Conference: 1st. Overall: 1st. Playoffs: Advanced to Conference Finals



-->'''2019 Position:''' Western Conference: 2nd. Overall: 4th. Playoffs: Advanced to Conference Finals

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-->'''2019 Position:''' Western Conference: 2nd. Overall: 4th. Playoffs: Advanced to Conference FinalsMLS Cup 2019


Several cities, particularly those with an existing USL team, are seriously vying for Club #30. Potential markets that have expressed interest include Charlotte, Detroit, Indianapolis, Las Vegas, Phoenix, Raleigh-Durham, St. Louis, San Diego and Tampa Bay.


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Several cities, particularly those with an existing USL team, are seriously vying for Club #30. Potential markets that have expressed interest include Charlotte, Detroit, Indianapolis, Las Vegas, Phoenix, Raleigh-Durham, St. Louis, San Diego and Tampa Bay.



-->'''Current Head Coach:''' Davy Arnaud (interim)

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-->'''Current Head Coach:''' Davy Arnaud (interim)Tab Ramos


MLS also relies on an American-style playoff format to determine its championship.[[note]]As does the A-League; Australian sports developed playoff systems on their own. Several leagues in Latin America, with Mexico's top flight of Liga MX one notable example, also determine their champions via playoffs, although all operate on a promotion/relegation system.[[/note]] It currently has 24 teams, 21 in the U.S. and three in Canada. Former USL Championship side FC Cincinnati is the league's newest entry for 2019, while Inter Miami CF and Nashville SC are currently planned as the league's 25th and 26th teams, joining in 2020. Austin FC will join in 2021 as the 27th team, and an as-yet-unnamed team in St. Louis and Sacramento Republic FC will become the 28th and 29th teams in 2022. MLS commissioner Don Garber had said many times that the league would expand to 28 teams at a future date, but announced in April 2019 that the league would instead expand to 30 teams. Garber added that MLS had entered into exclusive talks with the backers of new teams in Sacramento and St. Louis, and these talks resulted in the official addition of both cities in 2019.

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MLS also relies on an American-style playoff format to determine its championship.[[note]]As does the A-League; Australian sports developed playoff systems on their own. Several leagues in Latin America, with Mexico's top flight of Liga MX one notable example, also determine their champions via playoffs, although all operate on a promotion/relegation system.[[/note]] It currently has 24 teams, 21 in the U.S. and three in Canada. Former USL Championship side FC Cincinnati is the league's newest entry for 2019, while Inter Miami CF and Nashville SC are currently planned as the league's 25th and 26th teams, joining in 2020. Austin FC will join in 2021 as the 27th team, and an as-yet-unnamed team in St. Louis and Sacramento Republic FC will become the 28th and 29th teams in 2022. MLS commissioner Don Garber had said many times that the league would expand to 28 teams at a future date, but announced in April 2019 that the league would instead expand to 30 teams. Garber added that MLS had entered into exclusive talks with the backers of new teams in Sacramento and St. Louis, and these talks resulted in the official addition of both cities in 2019.
teams.



In continental club competition, three to five MLS clubs participate in the CONCACAF[[note]]Confederation of North, Central American and Caribbean Association Football[[/note]] Champions League[[note]]CONCACAF's counterpart of the UsefulNotes/UEFAChampionsLeague and UsefulNotes/CopaLibertadores[[/note]]. The United States is given four direct berths in the tournament while Canada is given one direct berth.[[note]]Mexico receives four CCL berths via Liga MX, awarded to the Apertura and Clausara playoffs finalists, and the tenth CCL berth is awarded to the Caribbean Club Championship winner. Starting in 2020, six CCL berths are determined by performance in the previous year's preliminary tournament, the CONCACAF League. Three CL berths are each given to Costa Rica, Honduras, Panama, El Salvador, and Guatemala, awarded to their respective top leagues' Apertura champion, Clausura champion and non-champion with the best aggregate record. Nicaragua receives two CL berths, awarded to their top league's Apertura and Clausura champions, and Belize receives one CL berth, awarded to their top league's Apertura or Clausura champion with the better record. The runner-up and semifinalists in the Caribbean Club Championship each receive a CL berth. Canada receives one CL berth, awarded to the Canadian Premier League Finals champion.[[/note]] Three of the United States' CCL berths are allocated through MLS, which are currently awarded to the MLS Cup champion and the two regular season conference champions. The fourth United States CCL berth is awarded to the winner of the Lamar Hunt US Open Cup[[note]]The United States Soccer Federation's equivalent to UsefulNotes/TheFACup[[/note]], which is also contested by lower division professional teams and men's amateur teams sanctioned by the United States Soccer Federation[[note]]Since 2016, any professional lower division team either majority-owned by a higher division team or whose player roster is managed by a higher division team is ineligible. Amateur teams that have similar relationships with MLS teams are still allowed to enter, but can only meet their affiliated side in the cup final.[[/note]]; however, except for one year, MLS has dominated the US Open Cup since its 1996 launch. If a US-based team earns qualification by more than one method or if a Canadian team holds any MLS-allocated berth, then the affected berth is given to the highest ranked US-based team in the Supporters' Shield standings which has otherwise failed to qualify. For the single Canadian direct CCL berth, the three Canadian MLS teams play in the Canadian Championship against other professional lower division Canadian teams.[[note]]Like the US, any professional lower division club owned directly by a Canadian MLS club is disqualified.[[/note]] Starting in 2017, teams must start at least three Canadian players during the Canadian Championship. The competition expanded in 2018 to include the winners of the semi-pro [=League1=] Ontario and Première Ligue de soccer du Québec. It expanded further for 2019, with all seven teams of the newly launched Canadian Premier League also competing for the Canadian Championship. To date, no MLS club, American or Canadian, has won the Champions League in its current format, which has been largely dominated by Liga MX clubs; however, Real Salt Lake, the Montreal Impact, and Toronto FC have reached the Champions League finals in 2011, 2015, and 2018, respectively, and DC United and the LA Galaxy have won the Champions League's predecessor tournament, the CONCACAF Champions' Cup, in 1998 and 2000, respectively.

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In continental club competition, three to five MLS clubs participate in the CONCACAF[[note]]Confederation of North, Central American and Caribbean Association Football[[/note]] Champions League[[note]]CONCACAF's counterpart of the UsefulNotes/UEFAChampionsLeague and UsefulNotes/CopaLibertadores[[/note]]. The United States is given four direct berths in the tournament while Canada is given one direct berth.[[note]]Mexico receives four CCL berths via Liga MX, awarded to the Apertura and Clausara playoffs finalists, and the tenth CCL berth is awarded to the Caribbean Club Championship winner. Starting in 2020, six CCL berths are determined by performance in the previous year's preliminary tournament, the CONCACAF League. Three CL berths are each given to Costa Rica, Honduras, Panama, El Salvador, and Guatemala, awarded to their respective top leagues' Apertura champion, Clausura champion and non-champion (typically the Apertura or Clausura runner-up) with the best aggregate record. Nicaragua receives two CL berths, awarded to their top league's Apertura and Clausura champions, and Belize receives one CL berth, awarded to their top league's Apertura or Clausura champion with the better aggregate record. The runner-up and semifinalists in the Caribbean Club Championship each receive a CL berth. Canada receives one CL berth, awarded to the Canadian Premier League Finals champion.[[/note]] Three of the United States' CCL berths are allocated through MLS, which are currently awarded to the MLS Cup champion and the two regular season conference champions. The fourth United States CCL berth is awarded to the winner of the Lamar Hunt US Open Cup[[note]]The United States Soccer Federation's equivalent to UsefulNotes/TheFACup[[/note]], which is also contested by lower division professional teams and men's amateur teams sanctioned by the United States Soccer Federation[[note]]Since 2016, any professional lower division team either majority-owned by a higher division team or whose player roster is managed by a higher division team is ineligible. Amateur teams that have similar relationships with MLS teams are still allowed to enter, but can only meet their affiliated side in the cup final.[[/note]]; however, except for one year, MLS has dominated the US Open Cup since its 1996 launch. If a US-based team earns qualification by more than one method or if a Canadian team holds any MLS-allocated berth, then the affected berth is given to the highest ranked US-based team in the Supporters' Shield standings which has otherwise failed to qualify. For the single Canadian direct CCL berth, the three Canadian MLS teams play in the Canadian Championship against other professional lower division Canadian teams.[[note]]Like the US, any professional lower division club owned or managed directly by a Canadian MLS higher level club is disqualified.[[/note]] Starting in 2017, teams must start at least three Canadian players during the Canadian Championship. The competition expanded in 2018 to include the winners of the semi-pro [=League1=] Ontario and Première Ligue de soccer du Québec. It expanded further for 2019, with all seven teams of the newly launched Canadian Premier League also competing for the Canadian Championship. To date, no MLS club, American or Canadian, has won the Champions League in its current format, which has been largely dominated by Liga MX clubs; however, Real Salt Lake, the Montreal Impact, and Toronto FC have reached the Champions League finals in 2011, 2015, and 2018, respectively, and DC United and the LA Galaxy have won the Champions League's predecessor tournament, the CONCACAF Champions' Cup, in 1998 and 2000, respectively.



Several other cities, particularly those with an existing NASL or USL team, are also seriously vying for expansion slots when the league formally reopens expansion for 2020. With Detroit and Sacramento losing out to Cincinnati and Nashville in the most recent round of expansion, they rejoined a pool of potential markets that also includes Charlotte, Indianapolis, Phoenix, Raleigh-Durham, St. Louis, San Diego and Tampa Bay. St. Louis and Sacramento have since been announced as the homes of teams 28 and 29.


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Several other cities, particularly those with an existing NASL or USL team, are also seriously vying for expansion slots when the league formally reopens expansion for 2020. With Detroit and Sacramento losing out to Cincinnati and Nashville in the most recent round of expansion, they rejoined a pool of potential Club #30. Potential markets that also includes have expressed interest include Charlotte, Detroit, Indianapolis, Las Vegas, Phoenix, Raleigh-Durham, St. Louis, San Diego and Tampa Bay. St. Louis and Sacramento have since been announced as the homes of teams 28 and 29.

Bay.



-->'''2019 Position:''' Eastern Conference: 2nd. Overall: 3rd. Playoffs: Advanced to Conference Semifinals

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-->'''2019 Position:''' Eastern Conference: 2nd. Overall: 3rd. Playoffs: Advanced to Conference SemifinalsFinals



-->'''2019 Position:''' Eastern Conference: 1st. Overall: 2nd. Playoffs: Bye to Conference Semifinals

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-->'''2019 Position:''' Eastern Conference: 1st. Overall: 2nd. Playoffs: Bye to Conference Semifinals



-->'''2019 Position:''' Eastern Conference: 3rd. Overall: 5th. Playoffs: Advanced to Conference Semifinals

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-->'''2019 Position:''' Eastern Conference: 3rd. Overall: 5th. Playoffs: Advanced to Conference Semifinals



-->'''2019 Position:''' Eastern Conference: 4th. Overall: 9th. Playoffs: Advanced to Conference Semifinals

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-->'''2019 Position:''' Eastern Conference: 4th. Overall: 9th. Playoffs: Advanced to Conference SemifinalsFinals



-->'''2019 Position:''' Western Conference: 5th. Overall: 8th. Playoffs: Advanced to Conference Semifinals

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-->'''2019 Position:''' Western Conference: 5th. Overall: 8th. Playoffs: Advanced to Conference Semifinals



-->'''2019 Position:''' Western Conference: 1st. Overall: 1st. Playoffs: Bye to Conference Semifinals

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-->'''2019 Position:''' Western Conference: 1st. Overall: 1st. Playoffs: Bye Advanced to Conference SemifinalsFinals



-->'''2019 Position:''' Western Conference: 3rd. Overall: 6th. Playoffs: Advanced to Conference Semifinals

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-->'''2019 Position:''' Western Conference: 3rd. Overall: 6th. Playoffs: Advanced to Conference Semifinals



-->'''2019 Position:''' Western Conference: 2nd. Overall: 4th. Playoffs: Advanced to Conference Semifinals

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-->'''2019 Position:''' Western Conference: 2nd. Overall: 4th. Playoffs: Advanced to Conference SemifinalsFinals


-->'''USL Affiliates:''' Indy Eleven (affiliated)\\

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-->'''USL Affiliates:''' Affiliate:''' Indy Eleven (affiliated)\\


'''Major League Soccer''' ('''MLS''') is the United States' and Canada's[[note]]Technically Canada's sanctioned top-tier league is the ''Canadian Premier League'' (CPL), although the quality of players is much better in MLS[[/note]] top-tier professional [[UsefulNotes/AssociationFootball soccer]] league. Its predecessor league, the North American Soccer League (NASL) closed its doors in 1984. MLS was founded in 1993 as a condition FIFA imposed on the US Soccer Federation in exchange for allowing the United States to host the 1994 [[UsefulNotes/TheWorldCup World Cup]]. MLS operates more like the other North American professional sports leagues. Unlike almost every other Association Football league in the world, it currently does not have a relegation/promotion system. Each of the teams in the league are franchises granted by the league, as opposed to being completely individual entities like their European counterparts. The A-League in Australia is the only other soccer league to operate the same way.[[note]]While the Canadian Premier League currently has no promotion and relegation, the league organizers have publicly stated that they intend to create a promotion/relegation system once enough teams enter.[[/note]] Also, unlike any of the traditional major leagues of the US and Canada (MLB, NFL, NBA, NHL), MLS operates on a "single-entity" model, in which all teams—and even (technically) player contracts—are owned by the league itself. The team operators, who do enjoy much the same control that team owners do in other major leagues, are actually shareholders in the league. The second-level USL Championship (formerly the United Soccer League, a name now used by the governing body of several lower-level leagues) serves as Major League Soccer's minor league, with each MLS team either owning their own reserve team or affiliating with an independently-owned team (although this has not yet been strictly enforced). Starting with the 2019 season, a few MLS teams have their reserve sides in USL League One, a new third-level league operated by the USL organization, rather than the USLC. One team (the Chicago Fire) has affiliated sides in ''both'' the USLC and USL 1.

to:

'''Major League Soccer''' ('''MLS''') is the United States' and Canada's[[note]]Technically Canada's sanctioned top-tier league is the ''Canadian Premier League'' (CPL), although the quality of players is much better in MLS[[/note]] top-tier professional [[UsefulNotes/AssociationFootball soccer]] league. Its predecessor league, the North American Soccer League (NASL) closed its doors in 1984. MLS was founded in 1993 as a condition FIFA imposed on the US Soccer Federation in exchange for allowing the United States to host the 1994 [[UsefulNotes/TheWorldCup World Cup]]. MLS operates more like the other North American professional sports leagues. Unlike almost every other men's (or women's) Association Football league in the world, it currently does not have a relegation/promotion system. Each of the teams in the league are franchises granted by the league, as opposed to being completely individual entities like their European counterparts. The A-League in Australia is the only other men's soccer league to operate the same way.way; both countries' top women's leagues, the National Women's Soccer League in the States and the W-League in Australia, also use this model.[[note]]While the Canadian Premier League currently has no promotion and relegation, the league organizers have publicly stated that they intend to create a promotion/relegation system once enough teams enter.[[/note]] Also, unlike any of the traditional major leagues of the US and Canada (MLB, NFL, NBA, NHL), MLS operates on a "single-entity" model, in which all teams—and even (technically) player contracts—are owned by the league itself. The team operators, who do enjoy much the same control that team owners do in other major leagues, are actually shareholders in the league. The second-level USL Championship (formerly the United Soccer League, a name now used by the governing body of several lower-level leagues) serves as Major League Soccer's minor league, with each MLS team either owning their own reserve team or affiliating with an independently-owned team (although this has not yet been strictly enforced). Starting with the 2019 season, a few MLS teams have their reserve sides in USL League One, a new third-level league operated by the USL organization, rather than the USLC. One team (the Chicago Fire) has had affiliated sides in ''both'' the USLC and USL 1.
1 in 2019, but the USL 1 side folded after that season.



-->'''USL Affiliates:''' Indy Eleven (USL Championship), Lansing Ignite FC (USL League One) (both affiliated)\\

to:

-->'''USL Affiliates:''' Indy Eleven (USL Championship), Lansing Ignite FC (USL League One) (both affiliated)\\(affiliated)\\

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