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The early years of laserdisc were turbulent, to say the least. For the first few years of the format's existence, a ''name'' could not even be agreed upon by Philips (Dutch electronics giant) and MCA (parent company of Universal Studios), the co-developers of the format. Philips, in charge of player manufacturing under their Magnavox brand, preferred "[[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin Video Long Play]]." MCA, handling the software side of things, called it "[[TotallyRadical DiscoVision]]."\\\

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The early years of laserdisc were turbulent, to say the least. For the first few years of the format's existence, a ''name'' could not even be agreed upon by Philips (Dutch electronics giant) and MCA (parent company of [[Creator/{{Universal}} Universal Studios), Studios]]), the co-developers of the format. Philips, in charge of player manufacturing under their Magnavox brand, preferred "[[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin Video Long Play]]." MCA, handling the software side of things, called it "[[TotallyRadical DiscoVision]]."\\\


Because of their disastrous experience with [=DiscoVision=], MCA lost a fortune and was [[AbandonShip eager to be rid of the format]]. In 1980, Pioneer Electronics bought out [=DiscoVision=]'s rights and patents, and subsequently renamed it "[=LaserVision=]," with the format introduced in Japan in 1981. (Had Pioneer not stepped in, laserdisc as a format would have assuredly ceased to exist after 1980.) Although they would later use "[=LaserDisc=]"[[note]]This specific spelling[[/note]] as a brand name, [=LaserVision=] was the official name of the format until the early 1990s, when Pioneer finally began to use "[=LaserDisc=]" as the format's official name.\\\

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Because of their disastrous experience with [=DiscoVision=], MCA lost a fortune and was [[AbandonShip eager to be rid of the format]].format. In 1980, Pioneer Electronics bought out [=DiscoVision=]'s rights and patents, and subsequently renamed it "[=LaserVision=]," with the format introduced in Japan in 1981. (Had Pioneer not stepped in, laserdisc as a format would have assuredly ceased to exist after 1980.) Although they would later use "[=LaserDisc=]"[[note]]This specific spelling[[/note]] as a brand name, [=LaserVision=] was the official name of the format until the early 1990s, when Pioneer finally began to use "[=LaserDisc=]" as the format's official name.\\\


Meanwhile, Magnavox was having its own problems with player manufacturing. The machines had a nasty habit of overheating, sometimes to the point of [[LavaPit melting the disc inside]]. Worst of all, Magnavox was calibrating each player [[BotheringByTheBook strictly by the book]], without any regard for the [[ScrewTheRulesIMakeThem wild quality variations]] of MCA's early laserdiscs. (''Truly'' worst of all was a [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YRAufdE73P0 laserdisc informercial]] produced by Magnavox around this time, which devoted an alarming amount of screen time to Creator/LeonardNimoy inexplicably talking to a rock.) \\\

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Meanwhile, Magnavox was having its own problems with player manufacturing. The machines had a nasty habit of overheating, sometimes to the point of [[LavaPit melting the disc inside]]. Worst of all, Magnavox was calibrating each player [[BotheringByTheBook strictly by the book]], without any regard for the [[ScrewTheRulesIMakeThem wild quality variations]] of MCA's early laserdiscs. (''Truly'' worst of all was a [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YRAufdE73P0 laserdisc informercial]] produced by Magnavox around this time, which devoted an alarming amount of screen time to Creator/LeonardNimoy inexplicably talking to a rock.) \\\



Barely out of the gate, laserdisc had essentially shot itself in the foot at a critical time in history, just as home video was within reach of the average consumer. As laserdisc stumbled through its first years on the market, most buyers brought video cassette recorders into their homes instead. The entire [=DiscoVision=] debacle ensured that videotapes, not videodiscs, would be the standard format for home video entertainment during the [[TheEighties '80s]] and [[TheNineties '90s]]. As the seventies came to a close, the laserdisc format itself was practically dead, less than two years after its debut.

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Barely out of the gate, laserdisc had essentially shot itself in the foot at a critical time in history, just as home video was within reach of the average consumer.consumer at long last. As laserdisc stumbled through its first years on the market, most buyers brought video cassette recorders into their homes instead. The entire [=DiscoVision=] debacle ensured that videotapes, not videodiscs, would be the standard format for home video entertainment during the [[TheEighties '80s]] and [[TheNineties '90s]]. As the seventies came to a close, the laserdisc format itself was practically dead, less than two years after its debut.


Indeed, a well-mastered laserdisc, played back on a high-end machine, can deliver picture quality within spitting distance of a typical UsefulNotes/{{DVD}}. Some diehards still insist, to this day, that laserdisc is the superior format of the two. (Which isn't ''quite'' true when comparing both formats at their best, but considering the 19-year age gap between laserdisc and DVD, it speaks to laserdisc's technical prowess that they can be seriously compared at all.)\\\

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Indeed, a well-mastered laserdisc, played back on a high-end machine, can deliver picture quality within spitting distance of a typical UsefulNotes/{{DVD}}. Some diehards still insist, to this day, that laserdisc is the superior format of the two. (Which isn't ''quite'' true when comparing both formats at their best, but considering the 19-year age gap between laserdisc and DVD, it speaks to [[TheyDontMakeThemLikeTheyUsedTo laserdisc's technical prowess prowess]] that they can be seriously compared at all.)\\\


Laserdisc is unique among home video formats for being an effectively ''uncompressed'' medium. Of course, data compression has no application for an analog medium like laserdisc, but even VHS is notorious for its poor resolution, especially with regard to color. Laserdisc, at least in theory, is capable of preserving the full bandwidth of a standard-definition master videotape, something that DVD is still capable of screwing up on occasion.\\\

to:

Laserdisc is unique among home video formats for being an effectively ''uncompressed'' medium. Of course, data compression has no application for an analog medium like laserdisc, but even VHS is notorious for its poor resolution, especially with regard to color. Laserdisc, at least in theory, is capable of preserving the full bandwidth of a standard-definition master videotape, something that DVD is still capable DVD—for all of screwing up on occasion.its unflinching digital purity—can occasionally fail to do.\\\


Laserdisc is unique among home video formats for being an effectively ''uncompressed'' medium. Of course, data compression has no application for an analog medium like laserdisc, but even VHS is notorious for its poor resolution, especially with regard to color. Laserdisc, at least in theory, is capable of preserving the full bandwidth of a standard-definition master videotape, something that DVD is still capable of screwing up on occasion. Indeed, well-mastered title, played back on a high-end machine, can deliver picture quality within spitting distance of a typical UsefulNotes/{{DVD}}. Some diehards still insist, to this day, that laserdisc is the superior format of the two. (Which isn't ''quite'' true when comparing both formats at their best, but considering the 19-year age gap between laserdisc and DVD, it speaks to laserdisc's technical prowess that they can be seriously compared at all.)\\\

to:

Laserdisc is unique among home video formats for being an effectively ''uncompressed'' medium. Of course, data compression has no application for an analog medium like laserdisc, but even VHS is notorious for its poor resolution, especially with regard to color. Laserdisc, at least in theory, is capable of preserving the full bandwidth of a standard-definition master videotape, something that DVD is still capable of screwing up on occasion. \\\

Indeed, a well-mastered title, laserdisc, played back on a high-end machine, can deliver picture quality within spitting distance of a typical UsefulNotes/{{DVD}}. Some diehards still insist, to this day, that laserdisc is the superior format of the two. (Which isn't ''quite'' true when comparing both formats at their best, but considering the 19-year age gap between laserdisc and DVD, it speaks to laserdisc's technical prowess that they can be seriously compared at all.)\\\


With the exception of Japanese ''Hi-Vision'' discs (which could only play on selected players from the same region and required a matching television set), [=LaserDisc=] is an ''uncompressed'' medium. A well-mastered title, played back on a high-end machine, can deliver picture quality within spitting distance of a typical UsefulNotes/{{DVD}}. Some diehards still insist, to this day, that laserdisc is the superior format of the two. (Which isn't true, of course, but considering the 19-year age gap between laserdisc and DVD, it speaks to the technical prowess of this format that the two can be seriously compared at all.)\\\

to:

With the exception of Japanese ''Hi-Vision'' discs (which could only play on selected players from the same region and required a matching television set), [=LaserDisc=] Laserdisc is unique among home video formats for being an effectively ''uncompressed'' medium. A Of course, data compression has no application for an analog medium like laserdisc, but even VHS is notorious for its poor resolution, especially with regard to color. Laserdisc, at least in theory, is capable of preserving the full bandwidth of a standard-definition master videotape, something that DVD is still capable of screwing up on occasion. Indeed, well-mastered title, played back on a high-end machine, can deliver picture quality within spitting distance of a typical UsefulNotes/{{DVD}}. Some diehards still insist, to this day, that laserdisc is the superior format of the two. (Which isn't true, of course, ''quite'' true when comparing both formats at their best, but considering the 19-year age gap between laserdisc and DVD, it speaks to the laserdisc's technical prowess of this format that the two they can be seriously compared at all.)\\\


And let's not even get into the subject of ''laser rot'', which is discussed in detail further down this page. Suffice to say that the bane of laserdisc's existence first appeared here, during the [=DiscoVision=] era, and it would continue rearing its ugly head on a regular basis right up until the twilight years of laserdisc in the late [[TheNineties 1990s]].\\\

to:

And let's not even get into the subject of ''laser rot'', which is discussed in detail further down this page. Suffice to say that the [[ElementalRockPaperScissors bane of laserdisc's existence existence]] first appeared here, during the [=DiscoVision=] era, and it would continue rearing its ugly head [[RecurringBoss on a regular basis basis]] right up until the twilight years of laserdisc in the late [[TheNineties 1990s]].\\\


And let's not even get into the subject of ''laser rot'', which is discussed in detail further down this page. Suffice to say that the issue began right here, during the [=DiscoVision=] era, and it would continue rearing its ugly head on a regular basis right up until the twilight years of laserdisc in the late [[TheNineties 1990s]].\\\

to:

And let's not even get into the subject of ''laser rot'', which is discussed in detail further down this page. Suffice to say that the issue began right bane of laserdisc's existence first appeared here, during the [=DiscoVision=] era, and it would continue rearing its ugly head on a regular basis right up until the twilight years of laserdisc in the late [[TheNineties 1990s]].\\\


'''[=LaserDisc=]''' is an optical disc format, primarily used for playback of analog audiovisual content. It was the first laser-based storage medium to be sold as a consumer product, and is the direct ancestor of formats like [=CD=], [=DVD=], and Blu-ray. The technology first began serious development in [[TheSixties the late 1960s]]; however, it didn't debut as a retail product until December 1978.

to:

'''[=LaserDisc=]''' is an optical disc format, primarily used for playback of analog audiovisual content. It was the first laser-based storage medium to be sold as a consumer product, and is the direct ancestor of formats like [=CD=], [=DVD=], and Blu-ray. The technology first began serious development in [[TheSixties the late 1960s]]; however, it didn't debut as a retail product until December 1978.
1978 (United States), 1981 (Japan) and 1982 (Europe).



Laserdiscs are strictly playback-only, but a vast library of program material became available during the format's 23-year retail lifespan. The final consumer laserdisc releases came out in 2001, with industrial-only releases (mostly for [[KaraokeBox Japanese karaoke venues]]) winding down the following year.

to:

Laserdiscs are strictly playback-only, but a vast library of program material became available during the format's 23-year retail lifespan. The final consumer laserdisc releases came out in 2001, with industrial-only industrial releases (mostly for [[KaraokeBox Japanese karaoke venues]]) winding down the following year.


And let's not even get into the subject of ''laser rot'', which is discussed in detail further on. Suffice to say that the issue began right here, during the [=DiscoVision=] era, and would continue rearing its ugly head on a regular basis right up until the twilight years of laserdisc in the late [[TheNineties 1990s]].\\\

to:

And let's not even get into the subject of ''laser rot'', which is discussed in detail further on. down this page. Suffice to say that the issue began right here, during the [=DiscoVision=] era, and it would continue rearing its ugly head on a regular basis right up until the twilight years of laserdisc in the late [[TheNineties 1990s]].\\\


Both companies were pushing the envelope incredibly far for what was, after all, a [[TheSeventies '70s]] consumer product, and making too many critical mistakes along the way. The end result was technological chaos. [[GoneHorriblyWrong Magnavox's players largely could not play MCA's laserdiscs]]; when they did, the image onscreen was often covered with snow and distortion, and the audio was usually filled with static. This was in spite of the fact that, at the last minute before launch, playing time per disc was [[DesperationAttack temporarily slashed]] from two hours to just 50 minutes, making them (supposedly) [[DestructiveSaviour much easier to manufacture and play back]]. (The ensuing side effect––that all early [=DiscoVision=] movies had to span across two or ''three'' laserdiscs instead of being contained on just one––[[IDidWhatIHadToDo added insult to injury]] for those unfortunate early adopters, and helped to drain MCA's coffers even further.) To this day, watching an old [=DiscoVision=] laserdisc is a fraught experience because [[EarlyInstallmentWeirdness you simply have no idea what you will see or hear; if the disc will even start up at all; or how long it will keep playing]] if it actually ''does'' start.\\\

to:

Both companies were pushing the envelope incredibly far for what was, after all, a [[TheSeventies '70s]] consumer product, and making too many critical mistakes along the way. The end result was technological chaos. [[GoneHorriblyWrong Magnavox's players largely could not play MCA's laserdiscs]]; when they did, the image onscreen was often covered with snow and distortion, and the audio was usually filled with static. This \\\

And let's not even get into the subject of ''laser rot'', which is discussed in detail further on. Suffice to say that the issue began right here, during the [=DiscoVision=] era, and would continue rearing its ugly head on a regular basis right up until the twilight years of laserdisc in the late [[TheNineties 1990s]].\\\

All of this
was in spite of the fact that, at the last minute before launch, playing time per disc was [[DesperationAttack temporarily slashed]] from two hours to just 50 minutes, making them (supposedly) [[DestructiveSaviour much easier to manufacture and play back]]. (The ensuing side effect––that all early [=DiscoVision=] movies had to span across two or ''three'' laserdiscs instead of being contained on just one––[[IDidWhatIHadToDo added insult to injury]] for those unfortunate early adopters, and helped to drain MCA's coffers even further.) To this day, watching an old [=DiscoVision=] laserdisc is a fraught experience because [[EarlyInstallmentWeirdness you simply have no idea what you will see or hear; if the disc will even start up at all; or how long it will keep playing]] if it actually ''does'' start.\\\


'''[=LaserDisc=]''' is an optical disc format, primarily used for playback of analog video content. It was the first laser storage medium to be sold as a consumer product, and is the direct ancestor of formats like [=CD=], [=DVD=], and Blu-ray. The technology first began serious development in [[TheSixties the late 1960s]]; however, it didn't debut as a retail product until December 1978.

The format was envisioned as a high-tech audiovisual successor to LP records, and though the two formats ended up having effectively nothing in common, laserdisc still bears a few vestigial similarities: physically, it's a double-sided 12" disc made of (clear) vinyl, stored inside a cardboard jacket. A laserdisc side can last up to 60 minutes, for a maximum play time of two hours on a single disc. ''All'' laserdiscs are double-sided, though one side may be blank if the program is under an hour long.

to:

'''[=LaserDisc=]''' is an optical disc format, primarily used for playback of analog video audiovisual content. It was the first laser laser-based storage medium to be sold as a consumer product, and is the direct ancestor of formats like [=CD=], [=DVD=], and Blu-ray. The technology first began serious development in [[TheSixties the late 1960s]]; however, it didn't debut as a retail product until December 1978.

The format was envisioned as a high-tech audiovisual successor to LP records, and though the two formats ended up having effectively nothing in common, laserdisc still bears a few vestigial similarities: physically, it's a double-sided 12" disc made of (clear) vinyl, stored inside a cardboard jacket. A laserdisc side can last up to 60 minutes, for a maximum play time of two hours on a single disc. ''All'' laserdiscs are double-sided, though one side may be blank if the program is under an hour long.


The format was envisioned as a high-tech audiovisual successor to LP records, and though the two formats ended up having (effectively) nothing in common, laserdisc still bears a few vestigial similarities: physically, it's a double-sided 12" diameter disc, stored inside a cardboard jacket. A laserdisc side can last up to 60 minutes, for a maximum play time of two hours on a single disc. ''All'' laserdiscs are double-sided, though one side may be blank if the program is under an hour long.

to:

The format was envisioned as a high-tech audiovisual successor to LP records, and though the two formats ended up having (effectively) effectively nothing in common, laserdisc still bears a few vestigial similarities: physically, it's a double-sided 12" diameter disc, disc made of (clear) vinyl, stored inside a cardboard jacket. A laserdisc side can last up to 60 minutes, for a maximum play time of two hours on a single disc. ''All'' laserdiscs are double-sided, though one side may be blank if the program is under an hour long.


The early years of laserdisc were turbulent, to say the least. For the first few years of the format's existence, a ''name'' could not even be agreed upon by Philips (Dutch electronics giant) and MCA (parent company of Universal Studios), the co-developers of the format. Philips, in charge of player manufacturing under their Magnavox brand, preferred "[[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin Video Long Play]]," but MCA—handling the software side of things—disc production) called it "[[TotallyRadical DiscoVision]]."\\\

to:

The early years of laserdisc were turbulent, to say the least. For the first few years of the format's existence, a ''name'' could not even be agreed upon by Philips (Dutch electronics giant) and MCA (parent company of Universal Studios), the co-developers of the format. Philips, in charge of player manufacturing under their Magnavox brand, preferred "[[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin Video Long Play]]," but MCA—handling Play]]." MCA, handling the software side of things—disc production) things, called it "[[TotallyRadical DiscoVision]]."\\\

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