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[[AC: Comic Books]]
* Stan Sakai's ''ComicBook/UsagiYojimbo'' adventures, set in a fantasy feudal Japan (with rabbits!), often feature meticulously detailed kimonos among other styles of traditional dress. Sakai is familiar enough with the symbolic language of the kimono that a savvy reader can sometimes even spot foreshadowing based solely on a character's clothing.


In modern Japan, the skill of dressing up in a kimono and carrying it is largely limited to dancers, geisha and such, and aficionados. A run-of-the-mill will have to rely on a relative or a paid professional to dress her up for an event. A woman being able to dress herself up is impressive. High-end formal kimono are incredibly expensive, and can exceed the price of a small car quite easily. Normal quality kimono are not cheap either, with an every-day, synthetic one costing about 100-250 USD in minimum. With all the accessories one needs on top of this, it [[CrackIsCheaper adds up quickly]].

to:

In modern Japan, the skill of dressing up in a kimono and carrying it is largely limited to dancers, geisha and such, and aficionados. A run-of-the-mill will have to rely on a relative or a paid professional to dress her up for an event. A woman being able to dress herself up is impressive. High-end formal kimono are incredibly expensive, and can exceed the price of a small car quite easily. Normal quality kimono are not cheap either, with an every-day, synthetic one costing about 100-250 USD in minimum. With all the accessories one needs on top of this, it [[CrackIsCheaper adds up quickly]].
quickly.


During pre-WWII times, pretty much ''everyone'' wore kimono: women nearly always, and men mainly when not engaged in their primary profession. For a woman to be seen in anything ''other'' than kimono (especially during TheRoaringTwenties, in combination with a FlapperBob and without the company of a man), it was considered something of a rebellion against social norms. If you were rich, you still wore the same garment as your servants did, but ''more'': it was more colourful, more patterned, more embroidered, made of more precious materials, and you wore it in layers. If you had enough money, you had super-thin summer kimono as well as fully lined winter ones, and everything in between, and there was no time of year or occasion you could not mirror with your patterns and themes. When WWII came along, women were suddenly expected to work in factories and whatnot, and men came to wear suits or military-style uniforms almost exclusively. Kimono were kept, but for day-to-day use, they became a cumbersome thing, and a luxury. During UsefulNotes/WorldWarII, many kimono (along with the textile manufacturers that produced the fabric) were destroyed in bombing raids, and more still were sold afterwards in order to buy more important things, like food. In post-war life, there were some people, mainly middle-aged or elderly, who chose to continue wearing kimono daily, but as a general rule anyone wearing kimono day-to-day in post-WWII times has been an exception.

to:

During pre-WWII times, pretty much ''everyone'' wore kimono: women nearly always, and men mainly when not engaged in their primary profession. For a woman to be seen in anything ''other'' than kimono (especially during TheRoaringTwenties, in combination with a FlapperBob TwentiesBobHaircut and without the company of a man), it was considered something of a rebellion against social norms. If you were rich, you still wore the same garment as your servants did, but ''more'': it was more colourful, more patterned, more embroidered, made of more precious materials, and you wore it in layers. If you had enough money, you had super-thin summer kimono as well as fully lined winter ones, and everything in between, and there was no time of year or occasion you could not mirror with your patterns and themes. When WWII came along, women were suddenly expected to work in factories and whatnot, and men came to wear suits or military-style uniforms almost exclusively. Kimono were kept, but for day-to-day use, they became a cumbersome thing, and a luxury. During UsefulNotes/WorldWarII, many kimono (along with the textile manufacturers that produced the fabric) were destroyed in bombing raids, and more still were sold afterwards in order to buy more important things, like food. In post-war life, there were some people, mainly middle-aged or elderly, who chose to continue wearing kimono daily, but as a general rule anyone wearing kimono day-to-day in post-WWII times has been an exception.


During pre-WWII times, pretty much ''everyone'' wore kimono: women nearly always, and men mainly when not engaged in their primary profession. For a woman to be seen in anything ''other'' than kimono (especially during TheRoaringTwenties, in combination with a FlapperBob and without the company of a man), it was considered something of a rebellion against social norms. If you were rich, you still wore the same garment as your servants did, but ''more'': it was more colourful, more patterned, more embroidered, made of more precious materials, and you wore it in layers. If you had enough money, you had super-thin summer kimono as well as fully lined winter ones, and everything in between, and there was no time of year or occasion you could not mirror with your patterns and themes. When WWII came along, women were suddenly expected to work in factories and whatnot, and men came to wear suits or military-style uniforms almost exclusively. Kimono were kept, but for day-to-day use, they became a cumbersome thing, and a luxury. During UsefulNotes/WorldWarII, many kimono (along with the textile manufacturers that produced the fabric) were destroyed in bombing raids, and more still were sold afterwards in order to buy more important things, like food. In postwar life, there were some people, mainly middle-aged or elderly, who chose to continue wearing kimono daily, but as a general rule, anyone wearing kimono day-today in post-WWII times has been an exception.

to:

During pre-WWII times, pretty much ''everyone'' wore kimono: women nearly always, and men mainly when not engaged in their primary profession. For a woman to be seen in anything ''other'' than kimono (especially during TheRoaringTwenties, in combination with a FlapperBob and without the company of a man), it was considered something of a rebellion against social norms. If you were rich, you still wore the same garment as your servants did, but ''more'': it was more colourful, more patterned, more embroidered, made of more precious materials, and you wore it in layers. If you had enough money, you had super-thin summer kimono as well as fully lined winter ones, and everything in between, and there was no time of year or occasion you could not mirror with your patterns and themes. When WWII came along, women were suddenly expected to work in factories and whatnot, and men came to wear suits or military-style uniforms almost exclusively. Kimono were kept, but for day-to-day use, they became a cumbersome thing, and a luxury. During UsefulNotes/WorldWarII, many kimono (along with the textile manufacturers that produced the fabric) were destroyed in bombing raids, and more still were sold afterwards in order to buy more important things, like food. In postwar post-war life, there were some people, mainly middle-aged or elderly, who chose to continue wearing kimono daily, but as a general rule, rule anyone wearing kimono day-today day-to-day in post-WWII times has been an exception.


* The RosemaryWells's character Yoko has a mother who is always seen wearing a kimono. Yoko herself is seen wearing this in the Yoko book "Yoko's Show And Tell"

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* The RosemaryWells's Creator/RosemaryWells's character Yoko has a mother who is always seen wearing a kimono. Yoko herself is seen wearing this in the Yoko book "Yoko's Show And Tell"


During pre-WWII times, pretty much ''everyone'' wore kimono: women nearly always, and men mainly when not engaged in their primary profession. For a woman to be seen in anything ''other'' than kimono (especially during TheRoaringTwenties, in combination with a FlapperBob and without the company of a man), it was considered something of a rebellion against social norms. If you were rich, you still wore the same garment as your servants did, but ''more'': it was more colourful, more patterned, more embroidered, made of more precious materials, and you wore it in layers. If you had enough money, you had super-thin summer kimono as well as fully lined winter ones, and everything in between, and there was no time of year or occasion you could not mirror with your patterns and themes. When WWII came along, women were suddenly expected to work in factories and whatnot, and men came to wear suits or military-style uniforms almost exclusively. Kimono were kept, but for day-to-day use, they became a cumbersome thing, and a luxury. During WorldWarTwo, many kimono (along with the textile manufacturers that produced the fabric) were destroyed in bombing raids, and more still were sold afterwards in order to buy more important things, like food. In postwar life, there were some people, mainly middle-aged or elderly, who chose to continue wearing kimono daily, but as a general rule, anyone wearing kimono day-today in post-WWII times has been an exception.

to:

During pre-WWII times, pretty much ''everyone'' wore kimono: women nearly always, and men mainly when not engaged in their primary profession. For a woman to be seen in anything ''other'' than kimono (especially during TheRoaringTwenties, in combination with a FlapperBob and without the company of a man), it was considered something of a rebellion against social norms. If you were rich, you still wore the same garment as your servants did, but ''more'': it was more colourful, more patterned, more embroidered, made of more precious materials, and you wore it in layers. If you had enough money, you had super-thin summer kimono as well as fully lined winter ones, and everything in between, and there was no time of year or occasion you could not mirror with your patterns and themes. When WWII came along, women were suddenly expected to work in factories and whatnot, and men came to wear suits or military-style uniforms almost exclusively. Kimono were kept, but for day-to-day use, they became a cumbersome thing, and a luxury. During WorldWarTwo, UsefulNotes/WorldWarII, many kimono (along with the textile manufacturers that produced the fabric) were destroyed in bombing raids, and more still were sold afterwards in order to buy more important things, like food. In postwar life, there were some people, mainly middle-aged or elderly, who chose to continue wearing kimono daily, but as a general rule, anyone wearing kimono day-today in post-WWII times has been an exception.


* In Creator/TamoraPierce's ''Literature/ProtectorOfTheSmall'', naturally, as the protagonist, Lady Keladry of Mindelan, spent her childhood in the Yamani Islands (a fantasy analogue of Japan). Crown Prince Roald later [[PerfectlyArrangedMarriage becomes engaged]] to Princess Shinkokami, a childhood friend of Keladry's, and one of the princess' ladies-in-waiting turns out to be [[YamatoNadeshiko Lady Yukimi noh Daiomoru]], Kel's closest friends from the Islands. Naturally, both Yukimi and Shinkokami wear kimono regularly, as does Lady Haname, another of Shinkokami's attendants.

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* In Creator/TamoraPierce's ''Literature/ProtectorOfTheSmall'', naturally, as the protagonist, Lady Keladry of Mindelan, spent her childhood in the Yamani Islands (a fantasy analogue of Japan). Crown Prince Roald later [[PerfectlyArrangedMarriage becomes engaged]] to Princess Shinkokami, a childhood friend of Keladry's, and one of the princess' ladies-in-waiting turns out to be [[YamatoNadeshiko Lady Yukimi noh Daiomoru]], Kel's closest friends friend from the Islands. Naturally, both Yukimi and Shinkokami wear kimono regularly, as does Lady Haname, another of Shinkokami's attendants.

Added DiffLines:

* In Creator/TamoraPierce's ''Literature/ProtectorOfTheSmall'', naturally, as the protagonist, Lady Keladry of Mindelan, spent her childhood in the Yamani Islands (a fantasy analogue of Japan). Crown Prince Roald later [[PerfectlyArrangedMarriage becomes engaged]] to Princess Shinkokami, a childhood friend of Keladry's, and one of the princess' ladies-in-waiting turns out to be [[YamatoNadeshiko Lady Yukimi noh Daiomoru]], Kel's closest friends from the Islands. Naturally, both Yukimi and Shinkokami wear kimono regularly, as does Lady Haname, another of Shinkokami's attendants.



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* The RosemaryWells's character Yoko has a mother who is always seen wearing a kimono. Yoko herself is seen wearing this in the Yoko book "Yoko's Show And Tell"


It should also be noted that when one wears kimono, the expectations about your behaviour change: you are ''supposed'' to be even more proper than if you were wearing anything else. This might be partly due to the fact that kimono are mostly restricted to formal events these days, and partly due to the garment's status having been turned from "it's what everyone and their mum wears" to "walking memory of the Good Old Days". (Not to mention that you will either fall flat on your face or get your clothes in your food if you are not careful about your movements.) Thus they are a visual cue for the YamatoNadeshiko.

to:

However, for the last 10 years or so, a "Taisho retro" aesthetic of kimono and the casual wearing of kimono have been gaining momentum thanks to the popularity of the [[https://www.flickr.com/photos/satomigrim/sets/72157625293588848/ Kimono Hime mooks]] and the rise of brands like [[http://mamechiyo.jp/ Mamechiyo]], [[http://takahashihiroko-store.com Takahashi Hiroko]], [[http://www.modern-antenna.jp/ Modern Antenna]], [[http://tamao.thebase.in/ Tamao Shigemune]] or [[http://shop.rumirock.com/ RumiRock]], who sell modern, casual designer kimono.

It should also be noted that when one wears kimono, kimono in a formal context, the expectations about your behaviour change: you are ''supposed'' to be even more proper than if you were wearing anything else. This might be partly due to the fact that kimono are mostly restricted to formal events these days, and partly due to the garment's status having been turned from "it's what everyone and their mum wears" to "walking memory of the Good Old Days". (Not to mention that you will either fall flat on your face or get your clothes in your food if you are not careful about your movements.) Thus they are a visual cue for the YamatoNadeshiko.



For the last 10 years or so, a "Taisho retro" aesthetic of kimono and the casual wearing of kimono have been gaining momentum thanks to the popularity of the [[https://www.flickr.com/photos/satomigrim/sets/72157625293588848/ Kimono Hime mooks]] and the rise of brands like [[http://mamechiyo.jp/ Mamechiyo]], [[http://takahashihiroko-store.com Takahashi Hiroko]], [[http://www.modern-antenna.jp/ Modern Antenna]], [[http://tamao.thebase.in/ Tamao Shigemune]] or [[http://shop.rumirock.com/ RumiRock]], who sell modern, casual designer kimono.


For the last 10 years or so, a "Taisho retro" aesthetic of kimono and the casual wearing of kimono have been gaining momentum thanks to the popularity of the [[https://www.flickr.com/photos/satomigrim/sets/72157625293588848/ Kimono Hime mooks]] and the rise of brands like [[http://mamechiyo.jp/ Mamechiyo]], [[http://takahashihiroko-store.com Takahashi Hiroko]], [[http://www.modern-antenna.jp/ Modern Antenna]] or [[http://shop.rumirock.com/ RumiRock]], who sell modern, casual designer kimono.

to:

For the last 10 years or so, a "Taisho retro" aesthetic of kimono and the casual wearing of kimono have been gaining momentum thanks to the popularity of the [[https://www.flickr.com/photos/satomigrim/sets/72157625293588848/ Kimono Hime mooks]] and the rise of brands like [[http://mamechiyo.jp/ Mamechiyo]], [[http://takahashihiroko-store.com Takahashi Hiroko]], [[http://www.modern-antenna.jp/ Modern Antenna]] Antenna]], [[http://tamao.thebase.in/ Tamao Shigemune]] or [[http://shop.rumirock.com/ RumiRock]], who sell modern, casual designer kimono.


For the last 10 years or so, a "Taisho retro" aesthetic of kimono and the casual wearing of kimono have been gaining momentum thanks to the popularity of the [[https://www.flickr.com/photos/satomigrim/sets/72157625293588848/ Kimono Hime mooks]] and the rise of brands like [[http://mamechiyo.jp/ Mamechiyo]], [[takahashihiroko-store.com Takahashi Hiroko]], [[http://www.modern-antenna.jp/ Modern Antenna]] or [[http://shop.rumirock.com/ RumiRock]], who sell modern, casual designer kimono.

to:

For the last 10 years or so, a "Taisho retro" aesthetic of kimono and the casual wearing of kimono have been gaining momentum thanks to the popularity of the [[https://www.flickr.com/photos/satomigrim/sets/72157625293588848/ Kimono Hime mooks]] and the rise of brands like [[http://mamechiyo.jp/ Mamechiyo]], [[takahashihiroko-store.[[http://takahashihiroko-store.com Takahashi Hiroko]], [[http://www.modern-antenna.jp/ Modern Antenna]] or [[http://shop.rumirock.com/ RumiRock]], who sell modern, casual designer kimono.

Added DiffLines:

For the last 10 years or so, a "Taisho retro" aesthetic of kimono and the casual wearing of kimono have been gaining momentum thanks to the popularity of the [[https://www.flickr.com/photos/satomigrim/sets/72157625293588848/ Kimono Hime mooks]] and the rise of brands like [[http://mamechiyo.jp/ Mamechiyo]], [[takahashihiroko-store.com Takahashi Hiroko]], [[http://www.modern-antenna.jp/ Modern Antenna]] or [[http://shop.rumirock.com/ RumiRock]], who sell modern, casual designer kimono.


In modern Japan, the skill of dressing up in a kimono and carrying it is largely limited to dancers, geisha and such, and aficionados. A run-of-the-mill will have to rely on a relative or a paid professional to dress her up for an event. A woman being able to dress herself up is impressive. High-end formal kimono are incredibly expensive, and can exceed the price of a small car quite easily. Normal quality kimono are not cheap either, with an every-day, synthetic one costing about 200-250 USD in minimum. With all the accessories one needs on top of this, it [[CrackIsCheaper adds up quickly]].

to:

In modern Japan, the skill of dressing up in a kimono and carrying it is largely limited to dancers, geisha and such, and aficionados. A run-of-the-mill will have to rely on a relative or a paid professional to dress her up for an event. A woman being able to dress herself up is impressive. High-end formal kimono are incredibly expensive, and can exceed the price of a small car quite easily. Normal quality kimono are not cheap either, with an every-day, synthetic one costing about 200-250 100-250 USD in minimum. With all the accessories one needs on top of this, it [[CrackIsCheaper adds up quickly]].


During pre-WWII times, pretty much ''everyone'' wore kimono: women nearly always, and men mainly when not engaged in their primary profession. For a woman to be seen in anything ''other'' than kimono (especially during TheRoaringTwenties, in combination with a FlapperBob and without the company of a man), it was consdidered something of a rebellion against social norms. If you were rich, you still wore the same garment as your servants did, but ''more'': it was more colourful, more patterned, more embroidered, made of more precious materials, and you wore it in layers. If you had enough money, you had super-thin summer kimono as well as fully lined winter ones, and everything in between, and there was no time of year or occasion you could not mirror with your patterns and themes. When WWII came along, women were suddenly expected to work in factories and whatnot, and men came to wear suits or military-style uniforms almost exclusively. Kimono were kept, but for day-to-day use, they became a cumbersome thing, and a luxury. During WorldWarTwo, many kimono (along with the textile manufacturers that produced the fabric) were destroyed in bombing raids, and more still were sold afterwards in order to buy more important things, like food. In postwar life, there were some people, mainly middle-aged or elderly, who chose to continue wearing kimono daily, but as a general rule, anyone wearing kimono day-today in post-WWII times has been an exception.

to:

During pre-WWII times, pretty much ''everyone'' wore kimono: women nearly always, and men mainly when not engaged in their primary profession. For a woman to be seen in anything ''other'' than kimono (especially during TheRoaringTwenties, in combination with a FlapperBob and without the company of a man), it was consdidered considered something of a rebellion against social norms. If you were rich, you still wore the same garment as your servants did, but ''more'': it was more colourful, more patterned, more embroidered, made of more precious materials, and you wore it in layers. If you had enough money, you had super-thin summer kimono as well as fully lined winter ones, and everything in between, and there was no time of year or occasion you could not mirror with your patterns and themes. When WWII came along, women were suddenly expected to work in factories and whatnot, and men came to wear suits or military-style uniforms almost exclusively. Kimono were kept, but for day-to-day use, they became a cumbersome thing, and a luxury. During WorldWarTwo, many kimono (along with the textile manufacturers that produced the fabric) were destroyed in bombing raids, and more still were sold afterwards in order to buy more important things, like food. In postwar life, there were some people, mainly middle-aged or elderly, who chose to continue wearing kimono daily, but as a general rule, anyone wearing kimono day-today in post-WWII times has been an exception.

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