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* The miniseries ''Series/{{Masada}}'', about TheSiege of the titular citadel in AD 73.

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* The miniseries ''Series/{{Masada}}'', about TheSiege of the titular eponymous citadel in AD 73.


[[caption-width-right:350:"Coinage minted to declare independence from Rome"]]

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[[caption-width-right:350:"Coinage [[caption-width-right:350:Coinage minted to declare independence from Rome"]]
Rome.]]


!!Tropes:
* {{Badass Israeli}}tes: Of course, the next...say...1800 years were a tale of Jewish dispersion and military weakness. They got better, of course.
* BerserkButton: In 66, the Procurator Gessius Florus ordered a massacre in the market of Jerusalem [[ForTheEvulz for no clear reason]], which the Jews regarded as the [[ThisIsUnforgivable last straw]]. After this the Jews rose and slaughtered the soldiers responsible. The Romans considered that a ThisMeansWar.
* BetterToDieThanBeKilled: Masada
* BladeBelowTheShoulder: The Jewish Sicarii codified this trope far before UsefulNotes/TheHashshashin and the Ninja. They would carry knives hidden in cloaks and stab their targets and then disappear in the crowds. So much so that the word Sicario in Italian and Spanish means hitman, as is evidence in the movie Film/{{Sicario}}.
* CatchPhrase: More than one catch phrase references the Jewish revolt, including "Next year in Jerusalem" and "Masada shall not fall again".
* ColdBloodedTorture: A lot of the prisoners were [[FateWorseThanDeath crucified]].
* CycleOfRevenge: Constantly between Romans and Jews.
* DavidVersusGoliath: Which is appropriate as Jerusalem is the "City of David".
* DownerEnding: From the Jewish point of view
* DyingMomentOfAwesome: The whole war really.
* TheEmpire: Rome, in the most literal sense
* TheEmperor: Titus. Apparently the Romans decided that being able to conquer [[BadassIsraeli Jews]] automatically made a person such a badass that he deserved to be Emperor.
** They may have had a point...
** Being the eldest son of the previous Emperor probably helped a bit too. And how did the previous guy ''become'' emperor? Fighting in the Jewish Revolt until the craziness that was the first "Year of Four Emperors" (him being the fourth) called him back to Rome...
* TheExile: The Jews.
** Thus beginning TheHomewardJourney.
* [[ForeignMoneyIsProofOfGuilt Jewish Money is Proof of Rebellion]]: Coins were minted at the time by the Jews as a TakeThat to UsefulNotes/TheRomanEmpire. On them are {{Catch Phrase}}s like ''Jerusalem the Holy'', ''Freedom of Zion'', and ''For the redemption of Zion''.
* HistoricalHeroUpgrade:
** Titus received this for many centuries, with non-Jews like [[Literature/TheDivineComedy Dante]] viewing him as "the good Titus, who, with the aid of the Supreme King, avenged the wounds" of Christ. The Jews [[AlternateCharacterInterpretation begged to differ]].
** In Israel today, the Zealots of Masada are generally regarded as this, though some Jews, largely owing to struggles with the Orthodox community, are critical of people invoking Masada by pointing out that they and their Sicarii were hardly popular and appreciated by fellow Jews (indeed, they killed many Jews that didn't agree with them).
* HonorBeforeReason: Masada.
** Or not. Considering the way Romans normally treated prisoners of war, suicide was perhaps not that unreasonable an option to embrace.
* IWillFightNoMoreForever: The defeat by the Romans ended all armed insurrection against the Romans. After this, Jews settled in various parts of the Mediterranean as nomads, maintaining their religious traditions and communities in exile. It would take till the arrival of Zionism in the 19th Century, emigration to Ottoman Palestine, the British Mandate and the UsefulNotes/ArabIsraeliConflict before they regained their army.
* LaResistance:
** The Jews, the Sicarii and the Zealots especially are identified as precursors to nationalist revolts.
** The Diaspora on the whole is identified as this by many Jewish philosophers and writers such as Philip Roth and Art Spiegelman. The fact that even in exile, Jews maintained their religion and culture, despite repeated violence inflicted on them, millennia of antisemitism and persecution from other religions, is seen by some Jews as a testament to either Jewish persistence or Jewish stubbornness. Secular Jewish identity largely identifies its origin from this sense of being an outsider from every establishment.
* LastStand: The whole war.
* LetsGetDangerous: The Jews, ''Very Dangerous''. Don't [[BerserkButton make them mad]], even if you [[UsefulNotes/TheRomanEmpire own the whole Mediterranean]]. [[YouWouldntLikeMeWhenImAngry You Wouldn't Like Them When They're Angry]].
* OccupiersOutOfOurCountry: {{Subverted}}. The occupiers stayed and they kicked out a lot of the Jews from their homeland, causing diaspora for nearly 2000 years. Things would go FromBadToWorse for the Jews until well into the middle of the 20th Century.
* PrinciplesZealot, ObstructiveZealot, and any other kind of Zealot: TropeNamer.
* {{Privateer}}: A number of Jewish raiders scoured the local seas and made them unsafe. Which is odd because even {{Badass Israeli}}s are not [[NationalStereotypes usually]] thought of as a naval people. But this really did happen and it added to making life miserable for UsefulNotes/TheRomanEmpire.
* TheQuisling: Josephus. While it is perhaps rather unreasonable to be angry at him for not committing suicide (and for not preferring revolution to the peace and prosperity he believed Rome to have brought), he seemed just a wee bit too comfortable with the Romans ruling his native land.
* TheRemnant: The modern Rabbinical Judaism. [[AndZoidberg And Christianity]].
* TheRevolutionWillNotBeCivilized: The extreme Zealots, who were reportedly killing fellow Jews whom they deemed too tepid in revolutionary fervor at the very moment Jerusalem was falling to the Romans.
* TheRevolutionWillNotBeVillified: The Zealots and Sicarii ''were'' mounting a war against the Romans whose tactics were RapePillageAndBurn, crucifixion for rebels (including one particularly well-known Jewish prophet who probably lived in the same era) and selling survivors and citizens into slavery. Later portrayals regard them as nationalist fighters.
* RoaringRampageOfRevenge: Something of a [[CycleOfRevenge mutual]] RoaringRampageOfRevenge, taken SerialEscalation.
* TheScourgeOfGod: The loss of the Second Temple was viewed by both Jews and Christians of that time as God's punishment for different reasons: the Christians believed it was retribution for the Jews denying Jesus as the Messiah, while the Jews believed it was due to neglecting studying the Torah. This solidified the split between Christianity and Judaism, as the former started out as a Jewish sect but gradually became its own separate religion.
* ShellShockedVeteran: Many Roman historians claims that many Roman soldiers ended up as this due to the last war's brutality that was so brutal even to them.
* TheSiege: Jerusalem and Masada are the most famous.
* StoneWall: Masada is a literal example of this: a fortress built atop a towering mesa. No projectiles could come close to reaching the top, and it took a 30-foot high ramp[[note]]Not including the natural bedrock slope it was built on.[[/note]] for the battering ram to reach it. It also lacked both the weaponry and manpower to fend off the Romans when they ''did'' reach the fortress.
* SuicidePact: Josephus escaped from [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Siege_of_Yodfat Yodfat]], which he had defended with some credit, with forty companions who resolved to die rather than surrender. They made an arrangement to draw lots and kill each other in turn (''technically'' not suicide), but Josephus was either very lucky or very cunning and wound up one of the last two survivors and managed to talk the other guy down. And then surrendered to the Romans.
* TearJerker: For a lot of Jews it is this, and thinking of it that way is not unknown among gentiles either.
* UnderestimatingBadassery: Who would ever have believed such a small country could have stood up to Rome?
* WeAreStrugglingTogether: Factionalism tended to hurt the Jewish cause. Appropriate, given the TropeNamer.
** Put two Jews in a room together and pose a question, any question, and you are guaranteed at least three different answers. ''Very'' old Jewish joke probably dating to this period.


* TheScourgeOfGod: The loss of the Second Temple was viewed by both Jews and Christians of that time as God's punishment for different reasons: the Christians believed it was retribution for the Jews denying Jesus as the Messiah, while the Jews believed it was due to neglecting studying the Torah. This solidified the split between Christianity and Judaism, as the former started out as an Jewish sect but gradually became it's own separate religion.

to:

* TheScourgeOfGod: The loss of the Second Temple was viewed by both Jews and Christians of that time as God's punishment for different reasons: the Christians believed it was retribution for the Jews denying Jesus as the Messiah, while the Jews believed it was due to neglecting studying the Torah. This solidified the split between Christianity and Judaism, as the former started out as an a Jewish sect but gradually became it's its own separate religion.


* TheRemnant: The modern Rabbinical Judaism. [[AndZoidberg And Christianity]].



* TheRemnant: The modern Rabbinical Judaism. [[AndZoidberg And Christianity]].


* OccupiersOutOfOurCountry: {{Subverted}}. The occupiers stayed and they kicked out a lot of the Jews from their homeland, causing diaspora for nearly 2000 years. Things would go FromBadToWorse for the Jews until well into the middle of the 20th Century.



* OccupiersOutOfOurCountry: {{Subverted}}. The occupiers stayed and they kicked out a lot of the Jews from their homeland, causing diaspora for nearly 2000 years. Things would go FromBadToWorse for the Jews until well into the middle of the 20th Century.

Added DiffLines:

* TearJerker: For a lot of Jews it is this, and thinking of it that way is not unknown among gentiles either.


** Being the eldest son of the previous Emperor probably helped a bit too.

to:

** Being the eldest son of the previous Emperor probably helped a bit too. And how did the previous guy ''become'' emperor? Fighting in the Jewish Revolt until the craziness that was the first "Year of Four Emperors" (him being the fourth) called him back to Rome...


These were a series of revolts by the Jews against UsefulNotes/TheRomanEmpire, which ended with the Jews uprooted from the province of Judea and scattered. This began the Diaspora era, in which the Jews were scattered across the globe. They were not to return to their ancient lands as a nation again until the founding of the State of UsefulNotes/{{Israel}}.

to:

These were a series of revolts by the Jews against UsefulNotes/TheRomanEmpire, which ended with the Jews uprooted from the province of Judea and scattered. This began the Diaspora era, in which the Jews were scattered across the globe. They were not to return to their ancient lands as a nation again again[[note]] There were however ''individual'' Jews in the general area all throughout the next two thousand years. In fact, Jerusalem had a Jewish majority by the turn to the twentieth century. Hebron's Jewish community was only interrupted twice, both in the 20th century, due to the Arab Uprising and later due to the 1948 war[[/note]] until the founding of the State of UsefulNotes/{{Israel}}.

Added DiffLines:

* TheScourgeOfGod: The loss of the Second Temple was viewed by both Jews and Christians of that time as God's punishment for different reasons: the Christians believed it was retribution for the Jews denying Jesus as the Messiah, while the Jews believed it was due to neglecting studying the Torah. This solidified the split between Christianity and Judaism, as the former started out as an Jewish sect but gradually became it's own separate religion.



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* The ''Series/{{Highlander}}'' tie-in novel, "Zealot", deals with Avram ben Mordecai, a Jew who became an Immortal at Masada. He was then taken in by an Immortal Roman general who was part of the siege force.


This war was ritualistically mourned by Jews through the ages. It was the beginning of the custom of pouring part of the Passover wine on the ground in mourning for the lost Temple as well as the CatchPhrase "Next Year In Jerusalem". It was also the beginning of adjustments in Jewish doctrine which included the end of the priesthood, and the increase in the prestige of the Rabbinate, with their expertise in the study of Literature/TheTalmud.

The aftermath of the war would forever change the religious landscape of the region, as Literature/TheFourGospels were all written after the conclusion of the first revolt and reflect rejection of the sort of ideology which contributed to the rebellions breaking out (notably, Simon the Zealot is convinced to become an apostle of the more peaceable Jesus), as well as numerous retroactive "predictions" of the destruction of the Temple by Jesus, which aren't all that surprising in retrospect.

to:

This war was ritualistically mourned by Jews through the ages. It was the beginning of the custom of pouring part of the Passover wine on the ground in mourning for the lost Temple as well as the CatchPhrase "Next Year In Jerusalem". It was also the beginning of adjustments in Jewish doctrine which included the end of the priesthood, and the increase in the prestige of the Rabbinate, with their expertise in the study of Literature/TheTalmud.

The aftermath of the war would forever change the religious landscape of the region, as Literature/TheFourGospels
''Literature/TheTalmud''.

''Literature/TheFourGospels''
were all written after the conclusion of the first revolt and reflect rejection of the sort of ideology which contributed to the rebellions breaking out (notably, Simon the Zealot is convinced to become an apostle of the more peaceable Jesus), as well as numerous retroactive "predictions" of the destruction of the Temple by Jesus, which aren't all that surprising in retrospect.
retrospect. There were rebellions in Judea even after the fall of Jerusalem, most notably the Simon bar Kochba revolt under Emperor Hadrian, who suppressed it, and renamed the city Aelia Capitolina, and forbade Jews from entering the city for a 150 years, during which time [[MonumentOfHumiliationAndDefeat he attempted to rebuild the city as a pagan colony]].


The aftermath of the war would forever change the religious landscape of the region, as UsefulNotes/TheFourGospels were all written after the conclusion of the first revolt and reflect rejection of the sort of ideology which contributed to the rebellions breaking out, as well as numerous retroactive "predictions" of the destruction of the Temple by Jesus, which aren't all that surprising in retrospect.

to:

The aftermath of the war would forever change the religious landscape of the region, as UsefulNotes/TheFourGospels Literature/TheFourGospels were all written after the conclusion of the first revolt and reflect rejection of the sort of ideology which contributed to the rebellions breaking out, out (notably, Simon the Zealot is convinced to become an apostle of the more peaceable Jesus), as well as numerous retroactive "predictions" of the destruction of the Temple by Jesus, which aren't all that surprising in retrospect.

Added DiffLines:

The aftermath of the war would forever change the religious landscape of the region, as UsefulNotes/TheFourGospels were all written after the conclusion of the first revolt and reflect rejection of the sort of ideology which contributed to the rebellions breaking out, as well as numerous retroactive "predictions" of the destruction of the Temple by Jesus, which aren't all that surprising in retrospect.

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