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In addition, the PAL versions of some games may be censored or edited to comply with local laws. Germany, for example, has strict laws about violence in video games. Some games, such as ''VideoGame/FireEmblemPathOfRadiance'', have features inexplicably cut from the international release, and importing is the only way to get them. And then, of course, some people simply can't wait a few months to get their hands on a shiny new game that is going to have a PAL release anyway.

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In addition, the PAL versions of some games may be [[BannedInChina censored or edited to comply with local laws.laws]]. Germany, for example, has strict laws about violence in video games. Some games, such as ''VideoGame/FireEmblemPathOfRadiance'', have features inexplicably cut from the international release, and importing is the only way to get them. And then, of course, some people simply can't wait a few months to get their hands on a shiny new game that is going to have a PAL release anyway.


The vast majority of VideoGames are made in America and Japan. These two countries traditionally used NTSC [=TVs=], and so games were naturally optimized to work with this technology. Europe, however, uses PAL [=TV=]s, which the games were not optimized for[[note]]later European [=CRTs=] would generally have NTSC compatibility, but you could never guarantee that the gamer who buys your product owns such a model[[/note]]. Therefore, most games at first were poorly converted from NTSC's 480-line, 60Hz video system to PAL's 576-line, 50Hz video system, with the result that they were slowed down by a sixth and squashed into a bar in the middle of the screen. That does not ''have'' to happen necessarily, as certain 5th and 6th generation games (included but not limited to: Crash Bandicoot, Spyro the Dragon, Jak and Daxter, Metal Gear Solid 2, Prince of Persia Sands of Time, and Final Fantasy 12) got their code reworked to run at the same speed but slower frame rate, and run in full resolution[[note]]it is generally wise to do a research before buying a PAL copy, to see if the game you want runs correctly[[/note]]. The result of the usual extra time required to alter the game's code and animations (when it wasn't developed from the start to run both formats) is many games [[NoExportForYou never got releases in Europe]]. And if they did, there was a considerable delay. This is particularly aggravating in the case of story-heavy games, as Americans and Japanese gamers casually spoil major plot points in forum posts before European gamers even get to touch the game.

to:

The vast majority of VideoGames are made in America and Japan. These two countries traditionally used NTSC [=TVs=], and so games were naturally optimized to work with this technology. Europe, however, uses PAL [=TV=]s, which the games were not optimized for[[note]]later European [=CRTs=] would generally have NTSC compatibility, but you could never guarantee that the gamer who buys your product owns such a model[[/note]]. Therefore, most games at first were poorly converted from NTSC's 480-line, 60Hz video system to PAL's 576-line, 50Hz video system, with the result that they were slowed down by a sixth and squashed into a bar in the middle of the screen. That does not ''have'' to happen necessarily, as certain 5th and 6th generation games (included but not limited to: Crash Bandicoot, Spyro the Dragon, Jak and Daxter, Metal Gear Solid 2, Prince of Persia Sands of Time, and Final Fantasy 12) got their code reworked to run at the same speed but slower frame rate, and run in full resolution[[note]]it is generally wise to do a research before buying a PAL copy, to see if the game you want runs correctly[[/note]]. The result of the usual extra time required to alter the game's code and animations (when it wasn't developed from the start to run both formats) is many games [[NoExportForYou never got releases in Europe]]. And if they did, there was a considerable delay. This is particularly aggravating in the case of story-heavy games, as Americans American and Japanese gamers casually spoil major plot points in forum posts before European gamers even get to touch the game.


The vast majority of VideoGames are made in America and Japan. These two countries traditionally used NTSC [=TVs=], and so games were naturally optimized to work with this technology. Europe, however, uses PAL [=TV=]s, which the games were not optimized for[[note]]later European [=CRTs=] would generally have NTSC compatibility, but you could never guarantee that the gamer who buys your product owns such a model[[/note]]. Therefore, most games at first were poorly converted from NTSC's 480-line, 60Hz video system to PAL's 576-line, 50Hz video system, with the result that they were slowed down by a sixth and squashed into a bar in the middle of the screen. That does not ''have'' to happen necessarily, as certain 5th and 6th generation games (included but not limited to: Crash Bandicoot, Spyro the Dragon, Jak and Daxter, Metal Gear Solid 2, Prince of Persia Sands of Time, and Final Fantasy 12) got their code reworked to run at the same speed but slower frame rate, and run in full resolution[[note]]it is generally wise to do a research before buying a PAL copy, to see if the game you want runs correctly[[/note]]. The result of the usual extra time required to alter the game's code and animations (when it wasn't developed from the start to run both formats) is many games [[NoExportForYou never got releases in Europe]]. And if they do, there is a considerable delay. This is particularly aggravating in the case of story-heavy games, as Americans and Japanese gamers casually spoil major plot points in forum posts before European gamers even get to touch the game.

to:

The vast majority of VideoGames are made in America and Japan. These two countries traditionally used NTSC [=TVs=], and so games were naturally optimized to work with this technology. Europe, however, uses PAL [=TV=]s, which the games were not optimized for[[note]]later European [=CRTs=] would generally have NTSC compatibility, but you could never guarantee that the gamer who buys your product owns such a model[[/note]]. Therefore, most games at first were poorly converted from NTSC's 480-line, 60Hz video system to PAL's 576-line, 50Hz video system, with the result that they were slowed down by a sixth and squashed into a bar in the middle of the screen. That does not ''have'' to happen necessarily, as certain 5th and 6th generation games (included but not limited to: Crash Bandicoot, Spyro the Dragon, Jak and Daxter, Metal Gear Solid 2, Prince of Persia Sands of Time, and Final Fantasy 12) got their code reworked to run at the same speed but slower frame rate, and run in full resolution[[note]]it is generally wise to do a research before buying a PAL copy, to see if the game you want runs correctly[[/note]]. The result of the usual extra time required to alter the game's code and animations (when it wasn't developed from the start to run both formats) is many games [[NoExportForYou never got releases in Europe]]. And if they do, did, there is was a considerable delay. This is particularly aggravating in the case of story-heavy games, as Americans and Japanese gamers casually spoil major plot points in forum posts before European gamers even get to touch the game.


The vast majority of VideoGames are made in America and Japan. These two countries traditionally used NTSC [=TVs=], and so games were naturally optimized to work with this technology. Europe, however, uses PAL [=TV=]s, which the games were not optimized for[[note]]later European [=CRTs=] would generally have NTSC compatibility, but you could never guarantee that the gamer who buys your product owns such a model[[/note]]. Therefore, most games at first were poorly converted from NTSC's 480-line, 60Hz video system to PAL's 576-line, 50Hz video system, with the result that they were slowed down by a sixth and squashed into a bar in the middle of the screen. That does not ''have'' to happen necessarily, as certain 5th and 6th generation games (included but not limited to: Crash Bandicoot, Spyro the Dragon, Jak and Daxter, Metal Gear Solid 2, Prince of Persia Sands of Time, and Final Fantasy 12) got their code reworked to run at the same speed but slower frame rate, and run in full resolution[[note]]it is generally wise to do a research before buying a PAL copy, to see if the game you want runs correctly[[/note]]. The result of the usual extra time required to alter the game's code and animations (when it wasn't developed from the start to run at both frame rates) is many games [[NoExportForYou never get releases in Europe]]. And if they do, there is a considerable delay. This is particularly aggravating in the case of story-heavy games, as Americans and Japanese gamers casually spoil major plot points in forum posts before European gamers even get to touch the game.

to:

The vast majority of VideoGames are made in America and Japan. These two countries traditionally used NTSC [=TVs=], and so games were naturally optimized to work with this technology. Europe, however, uses PAL [=TV=]s, which the games were not optimized for[[note]]later European [=CRTs=] would generally have NTSC compatibility, but you could never guarantee that the gamer who buys your product owns such a model[[/note]]. Therefore, most games at first were poorly converted from NTSC's 480-line, 60Hz video system to PAL's 576-line, 50Hz video system, with the result that they were slowed down by a sixth and squashed into a bar in the middle of the screen. That does not ''have'' to happen necessarily, as certain 5th and 6th generation games (included but not limited to: Crash Bandicoot, Spyro the Dragon, Jak and Daxter, Metal Gear Solid 2, Prince of Persia Sands of Time, and Final Fantasy 12) got their code reworked to run at the same speed but slower frame rate, and run in full resolution[[note]]it is generally wise to do a research before buying a PAL copy, to see if the game you want runs correctly[[/note]]. The result of the usual extra time required to alter the game's code and animations (when it wasn't developed from the start to run at both frame rates) formats) is many games [[NoExportForYou never get got releases in Europe]]. And if they do, there is a considerable delay. This is particularly aggravating in the case of story-heavy games, as Americans and Japanese gamers casually spoil major plot points in forum posts before European gamers even get to touch the game.


The vast majority of VideoGames are made in America and Japan. These two countries traditionally used NTSC [=TVs=], and so games were naturally optimized to work with this technology. Europe, however, uses PAL [=TV=]s, which the games were not optimized for[[note]]later European [=CRTs=] would generally have NTSC compatibility, but you could never guarantee that the gamer who buys your product owns such a model[[/note]]. Therefore, most games at first were poorly converted from NTSC's 480-line, 60Hz video system to PAL's 576-line, 50Hz video system, with the result that they were slowed down by a sixth and squashed into a bar in the middle of the screen. That does not ''have'' to happen necessarily, as certain 5th and 6th generation games (like Crash Bandicoot, Spyro the Dragon, Jak and Daxter, Metal Gear Solid 2, Prince of Persia Sands of Time, and Final Fantasy 12) got their code reworked to run at the same speed but slower frame rate, and run in full resolution[[note]]it is generally wise to do a research before buying a PAL copy, to see if the game you want runs correctly[[/note]]. The result of the usual extra time required to alter the game's code and animations (when it wasn't developed from the start to run at both frame rates) is many games [[NoExportForYou never get releases in Europe]]. And if they do, there is a considerable delay. This is particularly aggravating in the case of story-heavy games, as Americans and Japanese gamers casually spoil major plot points in forum posts before European gamers even get to touch the game.

to:

The vast majority of VideoGames are made in America and Japan. These two countries traditionally used NTSC [=TVs=], and so games were naturally optimized to work with this technology. Europe, however, uses PAL [=TV=]s, which the games were not optimized for[[note]]later European [=CRTs=] would generally have NTSC compatibility, but you could never guarantee that the gamer who buys your product owns such a model[[/note]]. Therefore, most games at first were poorly converted from NTSC's 480-line, 60Hz video system to PAL's 576-line, 50Hz video system, with the result that they were slowed down by a sixth and squashed into a bar in the middle of the screen. That does not ''have'' to happen necessarily, as certain 5th and 6th generation games (like (included but not limited to: Crash Bandicoot, Spyro the Dragon, Jak and Daxter, Metal Gear Solid 2, Prince of Persia Sands of Time, and Final Fantasy 12) got their code reworked to run at the same speed but slower frame rate, and run in full resolution[[note]]it is generally wise to do a research before buying a PAL copy, to see if the game you want runs correctly[[/note]]. The result of the usual extra time required to alter the game's code and animations (when it wasn't developed from the start to run at both frame rates) is many games [[NoExportForYou never get releases in Europe]]. And if they do, there is a considerable delay. This is particularly aggravating in the case of story-heavy games, as Americans and Japanese gamers casually spoil major plot points in forum posts before European gamers even get to touch the game.


The vast majority of VideoGames are made in America and Japan. These two countries use NTSC [=TVs=], and so games are naturally optimized to work with this technology. Europe, however, uses PAL [=TV=]s, which the games are not optimized for[[note]]later European [=CRTs=] would generally have NTSC compatibility, but you could never guarantee that the gamer who buys your product owns such a model[[/note]]. Therefore, many games are poorly converted from NTSC's 480-line, 60Hz video system to PAL's 576-line, 50Hz video system, with the result that they were slowed down by a sixth and squashed into a bar in the middle of the screen. That does not ''have'' to happen necessarily, as certain [=PS1=] and [=PS2=] games (like Crash Bandicoot, Jak and Daxter, Metal Gear Solid 2, Prince of Persia Sands of Time, and Final Fantasy 12) got their code reworked to run at the same speed but slower frame rate, and run in full resolution[[note]]it is generally wise to do a research before buying a PAL copy[[/note]]. The result of the usual extra time required to alter the game's code and animations (when it wasn't developed from the start to run at both frame rates) is many games [[NoExportForYou never get releases in Europe]]. And if they do, there is a considerable delay. This is particularly aggravating in the case of story-heavy games, as Americans and Japanese gamers casually spoil major plot points in forum posts before European gamers even get to touch the game.

to:

The vast majority of VideoGames are made in America and Japan. These two countries use traditionally used NTSC [=TVs=], and so games are were naturally optimized to work with this technology. Europe, however, uses PAL [=TV=]s, which the games are were not optimized for[[note]]later European [=CRTs=] would generally have NTSC compatibility, but you could never guarantee that the gamer who buys your product owns such a model[[/note]]. Therefore, many most games are at first were poorly converted from NTSC's 480-line, 60Hz video system to PAL's 576-line, 50Hz video system, with the result that they were slowed down by a sixth and squashed into a bar in the middle of the screen. That does not ''have'' to happen necessarily, as certain [=PS1=] 5th and [=PS2=] 6th generation games (like Crash Bandicoot, Spyro the Dragon, Jak and Daxter, Metal Gear Solid 2, Prince of Persia Sands of Time, and Final Fantasy 12) got their code reworked to run at the same speed but slower frame rate, and run in full resolution[[note]]it is generally wise to do a research before buying a PAL copy[[/note]].copy, to see if the game you want runs correctly[[/note]]. The result of the usual extra time required to alter the game's code and animations (when it wasn't developed from the start to run at both frame rates) is many games [[NoExportForYou never get releases in Europe]]. And if they do, there is a considerable delay. This is particularly aggravating in the case of story-heavy games, as Americans and Japanese gamers casually spoil major plot points in forum posts before European gamers even get to touch the game.


The vast majority of VideoGames are made in America and Japan. These two countries use NTSC [=TVs=], and so games are naturally optimized to work with this technology. Europe, however, uses PAL [=TV=]s, which the games are not optimized for[[note]]later European [=CRTs=] would generally have NTSC compatibility, but you could never guarantee that the gamer who buys your product owns such a model. Therefore, many games are poorly converted from NTSC's 480-line, 60Hz video system to PAL's 576-line, 50Hz video system, with the result that they were slowed down by a sixth and squashed into a bar in the middle of the screen. That does not ''have'' to happen necessarily, as certain [=PS1=] and [=PS2=] games (like Crash Bandicoot, Jak and Daxter, Metal Gear Solid 2, Prince of Persia Sands of Time, and Final Fantasy 12) got their code reworked to run at the same speed but slower frame rate, and run in full resolution[[note]]it is generally wise to do a research before buying a PAL copy[[/note]]. The result of the usual extra time required to alter the game's code and animations (when it wasn't developed from the start to run at both frame rates) is many games [[NoExportForYou never get releases in Europe]]. And if they do, there is a considerable delay. This is particularly aggravating in the case of story-heavy games, as Americans and Japanese gamers casually spoil major plot points in forum posts before European gamers even get to touch the game.

to:

The vast majority of VideoGames are made in America and Japan. These two countries use NTSC [=TVs=], and so games are naturally optimized to work with this technology. Europe, however, uses PAL [=TV=]s, which the games are not optimized for[[note]]later European [=CRTs=] would generally have NTSC compatibility, but you could never guarantee that the gamer who buys your product owns such a model.model[[/note]]. Therefore, many games are poorly converted from NTSC's 480-line, 60Hz video system to PAL's 576-line, 50Hz video system, with the result that they were slowed down by a sixth and squashed into a bar in the middle of the screen. That does not ''have'' to happen necessarily, as certain [=PS1=] and [=PS2=] games (like Crash Bandicoot, Jak and Daxter, Metal Gear Solid 2, Prince of Persia Sands of Time, and Final Fantasy 12) got their code reworked to run at the same speed but slower frame rate, and run in full resolution[[note]]it is generally wise to do a research before buying a PAL copy[[/note]]. The result of the usual extra time required to alter the game's code and animations (when it wasn't developed from the start to run at both frame rates) is many games [[NoExportForYou never get releases in Europe]]. And if they do, there is a considerable delay. This is particularly aggravating in the case of story-heavy games, as Americans and Japanese gamers casually spoil major plot points in forum posts before European gamers even get to touch the game.


The vast majority of VideoGames are made in America and Japan. These two countries use NTSC [=TVs=], and so games are naturally optimized to work with this technology. Europe, however, uses PAL [=TV=]s, which the games are not optimized for[[note]]later European [=CRTs=] would generally have NTSC compatibility, but you could never guarantee the gamer who buys your product owns one. Therefore, many games are poorly converted from NTSC's 480-line, 60Hz video system to PAL's 576-line, 50Hz video system, with the result that they were slowed down by a sixth and squashed into a bar in the middle of the screen. That does not ''have'' to happen necessarily, as certain [=PS1=] and [=PS2=] games (like Crash Bandicoot, Jak and Daxter, Metal Gear Solid 2, Prince of Persia Sands of Time, and Final Fantasy 12) got their code reworked to run at the same speed but slower frame rate, and run in full resolution[[note]]it is generally wise to do a research before buying a PAL copy[[/note]]. The result of the usual extra time required to alter the game's code and animations (when it wasn't developed from the start to run at both frame rates) is many games [[NoExportForYou never get releases in Europe]]. And if they do, there is a considerable delay. This is particularly aggravating in the case of story-heavy games, as Americans and Japanese gamers casually spoil major plot points in forum posts before European gamers even get to touch the game.

to:

The vast majority of VideoGames are made in America and Japan. These two countries use NTSC [=TVs=], and so games are naturally optimized to work with this technology. Europe, however, uses PAL [=TV=]s, which the games are not optimized for[[note]]later European [=CRTs=] would generally have NTSC compatibility, but you could never guarantee that the gamer who buys your product owns one.such a model. Therefore, many games are poorly converted from NTSC's 480-line, 60Hz video system to PAL's 576-line, 50Hz video system, with the result that they were slowed down by a sixth and squashed into a bar in the middle of the screen. That does not ''have'' to happen necessarily, as certain [=PS1=] and [=PS2=] games (like Crash Bandicoot, Jak and Daxter, Metal Gear Solid 2, Prince of Persia Sands of Time, and Final Fantasy 12) got their code reworked to run at the same speed but slower frame rate, and run in full resolution[[note]]it is generally wise to do a research before buying a PAL copy[[/note]]. The result of the usual extra time required to alter the game's code and animations (when it wasn't developed from the start to run at both frame rates) is many games [[NoExportForYou never get releases in Europe]]. And if they do, there is a considerable delay. This is particularly aggravating in the case of story-heavy games, as Americans and Japanese gamers casually spoil major plot points in forum posts before European gamers even get to touch the game.


The vast majority of VideoGames are made in America and Japan. These two countries use NTSC [=TVs=], and so games are naturally optimized to work with this technology. Europe, however, uses PAL [=TV=]s, which the games are not optimized for. Therefore, many games are poorly converted from NTSC's 480-line, 60Hz video system to PAL's 576-line, 50Hz video system, with the result that they were slowed down by a sixth and squashed into a bar in the middle of the screen. That does not ''have'' to happen necessarily, as certain [=PS1=] and [=PS2=] games (like Crash Bandicoot, Jak and Daxter, Metal Gear Solid 2, Prince of Persia Sands of Time, and Final Fantasy 12) got their code reworked to run at the same speed but slower frame rate, and run in full resolution[[note]]it is generally wise to do a research before buying a PAL copy[[/note]]. The result of the usual extra time required to alter the game's code and animations (when it wasn't developed from the start to run at both frame rates) is many games [[NoExportForYou never get releases in Europe]]. And if they do, there is a considerable delay. This is particularly aggravating in the case of story-heavy games, as Americans and Japanese gamers casually spoil major plot points in forum posts before European gamers even get to touch the game.

to:

The vast majority of VideoGames are made in America and Japan. These two countries use NTSC [=TVs=], and so games are naturally optimized to work with this technology. Europe, however, uses PAL [=TV=]s, which the games are not optimized for.for[[note]]later European [=CRTs=] would generally have NTSC compatibility, but you could never guarantee the gamer who buys your product owns one. Therefore, many games are poorly converted from NTSC's 480-line, 60Hz video system to PAL's 576-line, 50Hz video system, with the result that they were slowed down by a sixth and squashed into a bar in the middle of the screen. That does not ''have'' to happen necessarily, as certain [=PS1=] and [=PS2=] games (like Crash Bandicoot, Jak and Daxter, Metal Gear Solid 2, Prince of Persia Sands of Time, and Final Fantasy 12) got their code reworked to run at the same speed but slower frame rate, and run in full resolution[[note]]it is generally wise to do a research before buying a PAL copy[[/note]]. The result of the usual extra time required to alter the game's code and animations (when it wasn't developed from the start to run at both frame rates) is many games [[NoExportForYou never get releases in Europe]]. And if they do, there is a considerable delay. This is particularly aggravating in the case of story-heavy games, as Americans and Japanese gamers casually spoil major plot points in forum posts before European gamers even get to touch the game.


The vast majority of VideoGames are made in America and Japan. These two countries use NTSC [=TVs=], and so games are naturally optimized to work with this technology. Europe, however, uses PAL [=TV=]s, which the games are not optimized for. Therefore, many games are poorly converted from NTSC's 480-line, 60Hz video system to PAL's 576-line, 50Hz video system, with the result that they were slowed down by a sixth and squashed into a bar in the middle of the screen. That does not ''have'' to happen necessarily, as certain [=PS1=] and [=PS2=] games (like Crash Bandicoot, Jak and Daxter, Metal Gear Solid 2, Prince of Persia Sands of Time, and Final Fantasy 12) got their code reworked to run at the same speed but slower frame rate, and run in full resolution[[note]]it is generally wise to do a research before buying a PAL copy[[/note]]. The result of the usual extra time required to alter the game's code (when it wasn't developed from the start to run at both frame rates) and/or translation/dubbing is many games [[NoExportForYou never get releases in Europe]]. And if they do, there is a considerable delay. This is particularly aggravating in the case of story-heavy games, as Americans and Japanese gamers casually spoil major plot points in forum posts before European gamers even get to touch the game.

to:

The vast majority of VideoGames are made in America and Japan. These two countries use NTSC [=TVs=], and so games are naturally optimized to work with this technology. Europe, however, uses PAL [=TV=]s, which the games are not optimized for. Therefore, many games are poorly converted from NTSC's 480-line, 60Hz video system to PAL's 576-line, 50Hz video system, with the result that they were slowed down by a sixth and squashed into a bar in the middle of the screen. That does not ''have'' to happen necessarily, as certain [=PS1=] and [=PS2=] games (like Crash Bandicoot, Jak and Daxter, Metal Gear Solid 2, Prince of Persia Sands of Time, and Final Fantasy 12) got their code reworked to run at the same speed but slower frame rate, and run in full resolution[[note]]it is generally wise to do a research before buying a PAL copy[[/note]]. The result of the usual extra time required to alter the game's code and animations (when it wasn't developed from the start to run at both frame rates) and/or translation/dubbing is many games [[NoExportForYou never get releases in Europe]]. And if they do, there is a considerable delay. This is particularly aggravating in the case of story-heavy games, as Americans and Japanese gamers casually spoil major plot points in forum posts before European gamers even get to touch the game.


The vast majority of VideoGames are made in America and Japan. These two countries use NTSC [=TVs=], and so games are naturally optimized to work with this technology. Europe, however, uses PAL [=TV=]s, which the games are not optimized for. Therefore, many games are poorly converted from NTSC's 480-line, 60Hz video system to PAL's 576-line, 50Hz video system, with the result that they were slowed down by a sixth and squashed into a bar in the middle of the screen. That does not ''have'' to happen necessarily, as certain [=PS1=] and [=PS2=] games (like Crash Bandicoot, Jak and Daxter, Metal Gear Solid 2, Prince of Persia Sands of Time, and Final Fantasy 12) got their code reworked to run at the same speed but slower frame rate, and run in full resolution[[note]]it is generally wise to do a research before buying a PAL copy[[/note]]. The result of the usual extra time required to alter the game's code (when it wasn't developed from the start to run at both frame rates) and/or translation/dubbing is many games [[NoExportForYou never get releases in Europe]], and if they do, there is a considerable delay. This is particularly aggravating in the case of story-heavy games, as Americans and Japanese gamers casually spoil major plot points in forum posts before European gamers even get to touch the game.

to:

The vast majority of VideoGames are made in America and Japan. These two countries use NTSC [=TVs=], and so games are naturally optimized to work with this technology. Europe, however, uses PAL [=TV=]s, which the games are not optimized for. Therefore, many games are poorly converted from NTSC's 480-line, 60Hz video system to PAL's 576-line, 50Hz video system, with the result that they were slowed down by a sixth and squashed into a bar in the middle of the screen. That does not ''have'' to happen necessarily, as certain [=PS1=] and [=PS2=] games (like Crash Bandicoot, Jak and Daxter, Metal Gear Solid 2, Prince of Persia Sands of Time, and Final Fantasy 12) got their code reworked to run at the same speed but slower frame rate, and run in full resolution[[note]]it is generally wise to do a research before buying a PAL copy[[/note]]. The result of the usual extra time required to alter the game's code (when it wasn't developed from the start to run at both frame rates) and/or translation/dubbing is many games [[NoExportForYou never get releases in Europe]], and Europe]]. And if they do, there is a considerable delay. This is particularly aggravating in the case of story-heavy games, as Americans and Japanese gamers casually spoil major plot points in forum posts before European gamers even get to touch the game.


The vast majority of VideoGames are made in America and Japan. These two countries use NTSC [=TVs=], and so games are naturally optimized to work with this technology. Europe, however, uses PAL [=TV=]s, which the games are not optimized for. Therefore, many games are poorly converted from NTSC's 480-line, 60Hz video system to PAL's 576-line, 50Hz video system, with the result that they were slowed down by a sixth and squashed into a bar in the middle of the screen. That does not ''have'' to happen necessarily, as certain PS1 and PS2 games (like Crash Bandicoot, Jak and Daxter, Metal Gear Solid 2, Prince of Persia Sands of Time, and Final Fantasy 12) got their code reworked to run at the same speed but slower frame rate, and run in full resolution. The result of the usual extra time required to alter the game's code (when it wasn't developed from the start to run at both frame rates) and/or translation/dubbing is many games [[NoExportForYou never get releases in Europe]], and if they do, there is a considerable delay. This is particularly aggravating in the case of story-heavy games, as Americans and Japanese gamers casually spoil major plot points in forum posts before European gamers even get to touch the game.

to:

The vast majority of VideoGames are made in America and Japan. These two countries use NTSC [=TVs=], and so games are naturally optimized to work with this technology. Europe, however, uses PAL [=TV=]s, which the games are not optimized for. Therefore, many games are poorly converted from NTSC's 480-line, 60Hz video system to PAL's 576-line, 50Hz video system, with the result that they were slowed down by a sixth and squashed into a bar in the middle of the screen. That does not ''have'' to happen necessarily, as certain PS1 [=PS1=] and PS2 [=PS2=] games (like Crash Bandicoot, Jak and Daxter, Metal Gear Solid 2, Prince of Persia Sands of Time, and Final Fantasy 12) got their code reworked to run at the same speed but slower frame rate, and run in full resolution.resolution[[note]]it is generally wise to do a research before buying a PAL copy[[/note]]. The result of the usual extra time required to alter the game's code (when it wasn't developed from the start to run at both frame rates) and/or translation/dubbing is many games [[NoExportForYou never get releases in Europe]], and if they do, there is a considerable delay. This is particularly aggravating in the case of story-heavy games, as Americans and Japanese gamers casually spoil major plot points in forum posts before European gamers even get to touch the game.


The vast majority of VideoGames are made in America and Japan. These two countries use NTSC [=TVs=], and so games are naturally optimized to work with this technology. Europe, however, uses PAL [=TV=]s, which the games are not optimized for. Therefore, many games are poorly converted from NTSC's 480-line, 60Hz video system to PAL's 576-line, 50Hz video system, with the result that they were slowed down by a sixth and squashed into a bar in the middle of the screen[[note]]That does not ''have'' to happen however, as certain games (like Crash Bandicoot for [=PS1=], Jak and Daxter for [=PS2=], Metal Gear Solid 2 for [=PS2=] and Final Fantasy 12 for [=PS2=]) got their code reworked to run at the same speed but slower frame rate, and run in full resolution.[[/note]]. The result of this is that many games [[NoExportForYou never get released in Europe]], and if they do, there is a considerable delay. This is particularly aggravating in the case of story-heavy games, as Americans and Japanese gamers casually spoil major plot points in forum posts before European gamers even get to touch the game.

to:

The vast majority of VideoGames are made in America and Japan. These two countries use NTSC [=TVs=], and so games are naturally optimized to work with this technology. Europe, however, uses PAL [=TV=]s, which the games are not optimized for. Therefore, many games are poorly converted from NTSC's 480-line, 60Hz video system to PAL's 576-line, 50Hz video system, with the result that they were slowed down by a sixth and squashed into a bar in the middle of the screen[[note]]That screen. That does not ''have'' to happen however, necessarily, as certain PS1 and PS2 games (like Crash Bandicoot for [=PS1=], Bandicoot, Jak and Daxter for [=PS2=], Daxter, Metal Gear Solid 2 for [=PS2=] 2, Prince of Persia Sands of Time, and Final Fantasy 12 for [=PS2=]) 12) got their code reworked to run at the same speed but slower frame rate, and run in full resolution.[[/note]]. resolution. The result of this the usual extra time required to alter the game's code (when it wasn't developed from the start to run at both frame rates) and/or translation/dubbing is that many games [[NoExportForYou never get released releases in Europe]], and if they do, there is a considerable delay. This is particularly aggravating in the case of story-heavy games, as Americans and Japanese gamers casually spoil major plot points in forum posts before European gamers even get to touch the game.


The vast majority of VideoGames are made in America and Japan. These two countries use NTSC [=TVs=], and so games are naturally optimized to work with this technology. Europe, however, uses PAL [=TV=]s, which the games are not optimized for. Therefore, many games are poorly converted from NTSC's 480-line, 60Hz video system to PAL's 576-line, 50Hz video system, with the result that they were slowed down by a sixth and squashed into a bar in the middle of the screen. The result of this is that many games [[NoExportForYou never get released in Europe]], and if they do, there is a considerable delay. This is particularly aggravating in the case of story-heavy games, as Americans and Japanese gamers casually spoil major plot points in forum posts before European gamers even get to touch the game.

to:

The vast majority of VideoGames are made in America and Japan. These two countries use NTSC [=TVs=], and so games are naturally optimized to work with this technology. Europe, however, uses PAL [=TV=]s, which the games are not optimized for. Therefore, many games are poorly converted from NTSC's 480-line, 60Hz video system to PAL's 576-line, 50Hz video system, with the result that they were slowed down by a sixth and squashed into a bar in the middle of the screen.screen[[note]]That does not ''have'' to happen however, as certain games (like Crash Bandicoot for [=PS1=], Jak and Daxter for [=PS2=], Metal Gear Solid 2 for [=PS2=] and Final Fantasy 12 for [=PS2=]) got their code reworked to run at the same speed but slower frame rate, and run in full resolution.[[/note]]. The result of this is that many games [[NoExportForYou never get released in Europe]], and if they do, there is a considerable delay. This is particularly aggravating in the case of story-heavy games, as Americans and Japanese gamers casually spoil major plot points in forum posts before European gamers even get to touch the game.



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Things have improved markedly since the end of the [[{{PlayStation 2}} PS2]]'s generation (including in Asia, when Sony pledged to launch more English titles in the markets), but there's still a 3-month time lag for most titles to be translated and subtitled. Two-year delays for low-priority titles are still not much of a surprise, and Nintendo of Europe are still going strong, having announced two separate release dates for 2005's ''VideoGame/{{WarioWare}} Twisted'' but never actually following through.

to:

Things have improved markedly since the end of the [[{{PlayStation 2}} [[UsefulNotes/PlayStation2 PS2]]'s generation (including in Asia, when Sony pledged to launch more English titles in the markets), but there's still a 3-month time lag for most titles to be translated and subtitled. Two-year delays for low-priority titles are still not much of a surprise, and Nintendo of Europe are still going strong, having announced two separate release dates for 2005's ''VideoGame/{{WarioWare}} Twisted'' but never actually following through.

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