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** Is widely considered to be the most influential driver in modern history, for the simple fact that ''every driver on the grid today is modeled after him'': his dedication, fitness regime (brought cardio and 365-days-a-year training into a sport were most drivers thought jogging was adequate enough), sheer commitment (drove an untold number of laps on Ferrari's ''Fiorano'' track while testing new components) and team spirit (famously remembered details about his mechanics' personal lives, bought them freshly-baked Pizza on nights where he'd work with them on the racecars, and was always mentioning his team as a vital part of his success) have changed the profession of ''a modern-day Formula 1 driver'' almost completely.
* ''Ralf Schumacher'', German, and the younger brother of the abovementioned Michael. First drove for the Jordan team in the 1997 season, then transferred to Williams in 1999 (then running Supertec engines.) Earned his maiden win in the 2001 San Marino GP (with the team now running BMW power plants), then won the Canadian GP that same year with his brother Michael in second place (giving them the sole distinction of being the first (and so far only) siblings to get a one-two finish in a Formula 1 race, apart from arguably the siblings with most podium finishes together.) After a tumultuous 2006-2007 season with Toyota, he retired from F1 in favor of running in the German Touring Car Championship (DTM) in 2008. Retired from active motor sport since 2013, and currently mentoring young drivers under the Mücke Motorsport Team.

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** Is widely considered to be the most influential driver in modern history, for the simple fact that ''every driver on the grid today is modeled after him'': his dedication, fitness regime (brought cardio and 365-days-a-year training into a sport were most drivers thought jogging was adequate enough), sheer commitment (drove an untold number of laps on Ferrari's ''Fiorano'' track while testing new components) and team spirit (famously remembered details about his mechanics' personal lives, bought them freshly-baked Pizza on nights where he'd work with them on the racecars, and was always mentioning his team as a vital part of his success) have changed the profession of ''a modern-day Formula 1 driver'' almost completely.
*
completely. His legacy is carried on by his son ''Mick'', who debuted in the 2021 season for the Haas team.
**
''Ralf Schumacher'', German, and the younger brother of the abovementioned Michael. First drove for the Jordan team in the 1997 season, then transferred to Williams in 1999 (then running Supertec engines.) Earned his maiden win in the 2001 San Marino GP (with the team now running BMW power plants), then won the Canadian GP that same year with his brother Michael in second place (giving them the sole distinction of being the first (and so far only) siblings to get a one-two finish in a Formula 1 race, apart from arguably the siblings with most podium finishes together.) After a tumultuous 2006-2007 season with Toyota, he retired from F1 in favor of running in the German Touring Car Championship (DTM) in 2008. Retired from active motor sport since 2013, and currently mentoring young drivers under the Mücke Motorsport Team.


* ''F'' is a Japanese manga series about a country boy who fulfills his dream by racing in a Formula One car. The manga was serialized in the magazine Big Comic Spirits between 1985 and 1992, and received an anime adaptation in 1988, having [[GermansLoveDavidHasselhoff many fans in Europe]] in TheEighties, especially Italy and Spain.

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* ''F'' ''Manga/{{F}}'' is a Japanese manga series about a country boy who fulfills his dream by racing in a Formula One car. The manga was serialized in the magazine Big Comic Spirits between 1985 and 1992, and received an anime adaptation in 1988, having [[GermansLoveDavidHasselhoff many fans in Europe]] in TheEighties, especially Italy and Spain.


Unlike other major worldwide sports, the playing field for F1 (and for that matter, most professional motorsports) changes at every event. Many of the tracks are equally legendary names as the drivers and cars. The most notorious is the ''Nürburgring Nordschleife'' in Germany - a 12.95 mile course with 89 total corners. It was last used in 1976 (the year that Niki Lauda, who drove for Ferrari alongside Clay Regazzoni, crashed at the post-downhill "Bergwerk" and suffered severe and nearly fatal burns) and now has many barriers and curbs for safety all around the track, plays host to several endurance events, and is a public toll road whenever it's not. Other famous tracks still in use are ''Autodromo Nazionale di Monza'' (Italy, dubbed as the "Temple of Speed" as it is the track with the highest average speeds on the calendar), ''Silverstone Racing Circuit'' (United Kingdom, the track where the very first Formula One championship race in 1950 was held), ''Circuit de Spa-Francorchamps'' (Belgium, originally an extremely fast and very dangerous 14km blast through the Ardennes Forest and several villages), ''Suzuka International Racing Course'' (Japan, famous for its figure-8 layout and usually theater to title deciders as it is placed near the end of the season), ''Circuit de Barcelona-Catalunya'' (Spain, also hosted the road time trial team cycling event in the 1992 Olympic Games) and the street race in Monte-Carlo (Monaco, its race serves as a NostalgiaLevel harking back to the old days of motorsport). The most fan complaint is many tracks, especially ones where the best racing is, is removed or altered for safety reasons-often sacrificing the excitement that comes with danger. Currently the expansion of F1 into new countries such as China, Bahrain, India (dropped after 2013), Malaysia (dropped after 2017) and the United Arab Emirates has led to several bespoke tracks that are frequently condemned for their poor races and lack of character, earning the derisive nickname of ''Tilkedromes'' -- Google the name [[http://uncyclopedia.wikia.com/wiki/Hermann_Tilke "Hermann Tilke"]] to see the explanation and fan reactions.

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Unlike other major worldwide sports, the playing field for F1 (and for that matter, most professional motorsports) changes at every event. Many of the tracks are equally legendary names as the drivers and cars. The most notorious is the ''Nürburgring Nordschleife'' in Germany - a 12.95 mile course with 89 total corners. It was last used in 1976 (the year that Niki Lauda, who drove for Ferrari alongside Clay Regazzoni, crashed at the post-downhill "Bergwerk" and suffered severe and nearly fatal burns) burns)[[note]]A smaller section inside the Südschleife part of the full circuit was used between 1984 and 2007 as the stage for either the German - before Hockenheim started hosting it regularly - or the European GP[[/note]] and now has many barriers and curbs for safety all around the track, plays host to several endurance events, and is a public toll road whenever it's not.not, as well as the place where the Rock am Ring festival happens. Other famous tracks still in use are ''Autodromo Nazionale di Monza'' (Italy, dubbed as the "Temple of Speed" as it is the track with the highest average speeds on the calendar), ''Silverstone Racing Circuit'' (United Kingdom, the track where the very first Formula One championship race in 1950 was held), ''Circuit de Spa-Francorchamps'' (Belgium, originally an extremely fast and very dangerous 14km blast through the Ardennes Forest and several villages), ''Suzuka International Racing Course'' (Japan, famous for its figure-8 layout and usually theater to title deciders as it is placed near the end of the season), ''Circuit de Barcelona-Catalunya'' (Spain, also hosted the road time trial team cycling event in the 1992 Olympic Games) and the street race in Monte-Carlo (Monaco, its race serves as a NostalgiaLevel harking back to the old days of motorsport). The most fan complaint is many tracks, especially ones where the best racing is, is removed or altered for safety reasons-often sacrificing the excitement that comes with danger. Currently the expansion of F1 into new countries such as China, Bahrain, India (dropped after 2013), Malaysia (dropped after 2017) and the United Arab Emirates has led to several bespoke tracks that are frequently condemned for their poor races and lack of character, earning the derisive nickname of ''Tilkedromes'' -- Google the name [[http://uncyclopedia.wikia.com/wiki/Hermann_Tilke "Hermann Tilke"]] to see the explanation and fan reactions.


* '''Alain Prost vs. Ayrton Senna''': By far the biggest and most notorious one, Prost and Senna dominated the mid-to-late 80's and the early 90's. Initially their relationship was pleasant enough as teammates on the dominant [=McLaren=], but after the Brazilian almost drove his rival into a wall in the '88 Portuguese GP, it soured quickly. Mostly notorious for two incidents on consecutive years on the track of Suzuka: in 1989, while leading the championship, Prost simply shut the door on an overtake attempt by Senna, initially retiring them both - but the Brazilian drove off the escape road with the help of some marshals and won the race, only to be disqualified later for using said road. Senna thought of this as a blatantly political act (the then-president of FISA, Jean-Marie Balestre, was French and close friends with Prost), and got his revenge 12 months later. On reverse circumstances, Prost (now with Ferrari) got the better start despite Senna being on pole, but since he hadn't forgotten the past year's shenanigans (although Senna claimed that it was due to the pole position marker being on the inside of the track, considered the "dirty" part, as it was outside the racing line and had less traction), the Brazilian simply drove into Prost on the first corner at speeds of 200+ mph - it was by pure luck that no one was gravely injured.

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* '''Alain Prost vs. Ayrton Senna''': By far the biggest and most notorious one, Prost and Senna dominated the mid-to-late 80's and the early 90's. Initially their relationship was pleasant enough as teammates on the dominant [=McLaren=], but after the Brazilian almost drove his rival into a wall in the '88 Portuguese GP, it soured quickly.quickly, deteriorating further due to an incident in the '89 San Marino GP, in which they had an agreement of not fighting for positions in the first lap which supposedly Senna broke[[note]]This was due to the race being red-flagged followed by a terrible accident Gerhard Berger suffered; on the first lap of the restart, Senna took the lead from Prost, which he saw as a break on their agreement, despite the fact that ''he'' overtook Senna first, and on the ''actual'' first lap of the race (with Senna having the pole position), neither of them attempted to overtake the other.[[/note]]. Mostly notorious for two incidents on consecutive years on the track of Suzuka: in 1989, while leading the championship, Prost simply shut the door on an overtake attempt by Senna, initially retiring them both - but the Brazilian drove off the escape road with the help of some marshals and won the race, only to be disqualified later for using said road. Senna thought of this as a blatantly political act (the then-president of FISA, Jean-Marie Balestre, was French and close friends with Prost), and got his revenge 12 months later. On reverse circumstances, Prost (now with Ferrari) got the better start despite Senna being on pole, but since he hadn't forgotten the past year's shenanigans (although Senna claimed that it was due to the pole position marker being on the inside of the track, considered the "dirty" part, as it was outside the racing line and had less traction), the Brazilian simply drove into Prost on the first corner at speeds of 200+ mph - it was by pure luck that no one was gravely injured.


* ''Kimi Räikkönen'', Finnish, 2007 World Champion, and currently holds the record for most race starts[[labelnote:*]]330 as of December 2020[[/labelnote]], most number of laps raced[[labelnote:*]]17,560 as of December 2020[[/labelnote]], and greatest race distance travelled[[labelnote:*]]87,378 Kilometers as of December 2020[[/labelnote]]. A great character and a fan favorite, well-known off track for his... [[BlatantLies smooth]] approach to [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=46u81sdxEkY press conferences,]] to [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iJvPCfNjXcU his]] [[https://youtu.be/cWMDXFfj4LQ?t=1m12s engineers]] and ''especially'' to [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rBMRsY_UI4E alcohol.]] Also known as "The Ice Man" thanks to his nationality and ([[TheStoic lack of]]) expressiveness. Left F1 after 2009 to participate in the World Rally Championship, and made a start in the NASCAR Truck Series as well as the Nationwide Series, finishing 15th and 27th in each. Returned to the sport in 2012 with a briefly-returning Lotus-Renault, and re-signed with Ferrari for 2014, with which he continued to drive until 2018, on what was however a clear #2 role to eventual teammate Sebastian Vettel. Parted ways with the team for the 2019 season to race for the returning Alfa Romeo (which is actually the rebranded Sauber F1 team, the same team he made his F1 debut). Currently enjoys popularity in recent years for being a FountainOfMemes among fans and detractors alike.

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* ''Kimi Räikkönen'', Finnish, 2007 World Champion, and currently holds the record for most race starts[[labelnote:*]]330 as of December 2020[[/labelnote]], most number of laps raced[[labelnote:*]]17,560 as of December 2020[[/labelnote]], and greatest race distance travelled[[labelnote:*]]87,378 Kilometers as of December 2020[[/labelnote]]. Also has equalled Michael Schumacher for the record of fastest laps gained in a single season[[labelnote:*]]Schumacher had 10 fastest laps in 2004, a feat that Räikkönen equaled ''twice'' - in 2005 and 2008, respectively[[/labelnote]] A great character and a fan favorite, well-known off track for his... [[BlatantLies smooth]] approach to [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=46u81sdxEkY press conferences,]] to [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iJvPCfNjXcU his]] [[https://youtu.be/cWMDXFfj4LQ?t=1m12s engineers]] and ''especially'' to [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rBMRsY_UI4E alcohol.]] Also known as "The Ice Man" thanks to his nationality and ([[TheStoic lack of]]) expressiveness. Left F1 after 2009 to participate in the World Rally Championship, and made a start in the NASCAR Truck Series as well as the Nationwide Series, finishing 15th and 27th in each. Returned to the sport in 2012 with a briefly-returning Lotus-Renault, and re-signed with Ferrari for 2014, with which he continued to drive until 2018, on what was however a clear #2 role to eventual teammate Sebastian Vettel. Parted ways with the team for the 2019 season to race for the returning Alfa Romeo (which is actually the rebranded Sauber F1 team, the same team he made his F1 debut). Currently enjoys popularity in recent years for being a FountainOfMemes among fans and detractors alike.

Added DiffLines:

* Coming from [[GermansLoveDavidHasselhoff the reverence the Japanese hold for Ayrton Senna]], Koyu Nishimura's ''F no Senkou'' is a retelling of the 1991 season from Senna's point of view.


** The Fittipaldi family is the one to have the most members to compete in Formula One - apart from Emerson, there's Wilson (Emerson's brother, who competed between 1972 and 1975), Christian (Wilson's son, who competed between 1992 and 1994, and with him they became the first father-son pair to score points in Formula One), and Pietro (Emerson's grandson, who replaced Romain Grosjean in the last two races in the 2020 season, and first grandson of a Formula One driver to compete in the category), as well as Emerson's son-in-law, Max Papis (who competed in 1995).



* ''Fernando Alonso'', Spaniard, second youngest two-time world champion. Ended Schumacher's dominance in 2005 and 2006 driving for Renault. Retired from F1 after a fourth and final middling year with [=McLaren=] in 2018. He also participated in the 2017 Indianapolis 500, to much fanfare of the motorsport world... [[spoiler:Only to be beaten by former F1 driver Takuma Sato after engine failures of teammate Ryan Hunter-Reay and Chip Ganassi driver Charlie Kimball, and one of his own. All three were Hondas, although Sato's was as well.]] He is now starting to show interest in branching out to different motorsports, mostly endurance racing. He participated in the 2018 24 Hours of Daytona in IMSA and is now one of Toyota's [=LMP1=] drivers in the World Endurance Championship, winning the 2018 24 Hours of Le Mans with them on his first attempt, and again in 2019 after which he left the WEC. He is currently slated to return to F1, signing with Renault (now renamed into the company's performance wing Alpine) to race for them again in the 2021 season.

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* ''Fernando Alonso'', Spaniard, second youngest two-time world champion. Ended Schumacher's dominance in 2005 and 2006 driving for Renault. Retired from F1 after a fourth and final middling year with [=McLaren=] in 2018. He also participated in the 2017 Indianapolis 500, to much fanfare of the motorsport world... [[spoiler:Only to be beaten by former F1 driver Takuma Sato after engine failures of teammate Ryan Hunter-Reay and Chip Ganassi driver Charlie Kimball, and one of his own. All three were Hondas, although Sato's was as well.]] He is now starting to show interest in branching out to different motorsports, mostly endurance racing. He participated in the 2018 24 Hours of Daytona in IMSA and is now one of Toyota's [=LMP1=] drivers in the World Endurance Championship, winning the 2018 24 Hours of Le Mans with them on his first attempt, and again in 2019 after which he left the WEC. He is currently slated returned to return to F1, signing with the category in 2021 for a third spell in Renault (now renamed into the company's performance wing Alpine) to race for them again in the 2021 season.Alpine).



* ''Rubens Barrichello'': Brazilian, holds the record for most races contested (326 races with 322 starts) with a career that spanned 19 seasons (1993-2011), longer than any other driver. Notoriously known as Schumacher's former teammate, who was consistently making him play second fiddle, emphasized in the 2002 Austrian and United States Grands Prix. Also drove in the 2012 [=IndyCar=] season, but decided against returning in 2013 after a disappointing result there. He recently raced stock cars in his native Brazil. Oh, and he also beat [[Series/TopGearUK The Stig]].

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* ''Rubens Barrichello'': Brazilian, holds the record for most second-most races contested (326 races with 322 starts) with a career that spanned 19 seasons (1993-2011), longer than any other driver. Notoriously known as Schumacher's former teammate, who was consistently making him play second fiddle, emphasized in the 2002 Austrian and United States Grands Prix. Also drove in the 2012 [=IndyCar=] season, but decided against returning in 2013 after a disappointing result there. He recently raced stock cars in his native Brazil. Oh, and he also beat [[Series/TopGearUK The Stig]].


F1 used to be notorious for frequent driver deaths, but it is now much safer today - before 2014, no driver has died at the wheel of an F1 Car [[XDaysSince since Senna and Ratzenberger in 1994]]. On the other hand, there were still occasional marshal deaths, such as one killed at Australia a few years ago, and another in Canada. However at the 2014 Japanese Grand Prix, Jules Bianchi, after going too fast under yellow flag conditions, lost control of his car and suffered a critical brain injury after he collided with a recovery vehicle in very wet conditions, which left him in a coma. This led to calls to make the car's cockpits fully enclosed.[[note]]They still aren't, but starting in 2018 all cars are fitted with a "Halo" bar that basically looks like the front section of a roll cage.[[/note]] Sadly he would never awaken. [[TearJerker Nine months after his crash]] Bianchi succumbed to his injuries on July 17th, 2015. At the 2020 Bahrain GP it was credited to F1's strict safety standards - and mostly the aforementioned "Halo" bar - that Romain Grosjean was able to survive a 53G impact with the track barriers (which snapped his car in half before the whole thing burst into flames) and escape the burning wreckage with little more than superficial burns on his hands.

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F1 used to be notorious for frequent driver deaths, but it is now much safer today - before 2014, no driver has died at the wheel of an F1 Car [[XDaysSince since Senna and Ratzenberger in 1994]]. On the other hand, there were still occasional marshal deaths, such as one killed at Australia a few years ago, and another in Canada. However at the 2014 Japanese Grand Prix, Jules Bianchi, after going too fast under yellow flag conditions, lost control of his car and suffered a critical brain injury after he collided with a recovery vehicle in very wet conditions, which left him in a coma. This led to calls to make the car's cockpits fully enclosed.[[note]]They still aren't, but starting in 2018 all cars are fitted with a "Halo" bar that basically looks like the front section of a roll cage.[[/note]] Sadly he would never awaken. [[TearJerker Nine months after his crash]] Bianchi succumbed to his injuries on July 17th, 2015. At the 2020 Bahrain GP it was credited to F1's strict safety standards - and mostly the aforementioned "Halo" bar - that Romain Grosjean was able to survive a 53G 192kph, 67G impact with the track barriers (which snapped his car in half before the whole thing burst into flames) and escape the burning wreckage with little more than superficial burns on his hands.


* ''Nigel Mansell'', English driver most associated with Williams, with which he was champion in 1992. Crossed over to CART [=IndyCar=] for its 1993 season and won the championship (and nearly the Indy 500 as well) which lead Mansell to become the only driver so far to hold both of open-wheel racing's top series titles simultaneously.

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* ''Nigel Mansell'', English driver most associated with Williams, with which he was champion in 1992. Crossed over to CART [=IndyCar=] for its 1993 season and won the championship (and nearly the Indy 500 as well) which lead Mansell to become the only driver so far to hold both of open-wheel racing's top series titles simultaneously. His ferocious driving style made him very popular among fans, to the point that Ferrari fans dubbed him "the Lion of England" in his brief stint for the Italian team.


** Their rivalry cooled off after that, helped by the fact that they never fought for the championship together again,[[note]]In 1991, while Senna won his third championship, Prost had a dismal no-win season at Ferrari, and while Senna clinched a second-place finish in the 1993 season, his now-underperforming [=McLaren=] struggled a lot against the Renault-powered Williams, which had beaten him the year before with Nigel Mansell and again with Prost. That said, Senna expressed interest in driving for Williams in 1993 following Mansell's retirement from [=F1=], but Williams decided that putting Senna and Prost on the same team was still too risky; after Prost retired, Williams gave his seat to Senna.[[/note]] and Ayrton ended it formally by getting Prost into the top spot on the podium at the latters last race, the 1993 Australian GP, which Senna won. They were friendly after that, with Senna even proclaiming "We miss you, Alain" while on a lap for the French TV feed, only a few hours before his passing. Alain Prost was a pallbearer at the Brazilian's funeral, and he has since been on the board of the Senna Foundation.

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** Their rivalry cooled off after that, helped by the fact that they never fought for the championship together again,[[note]]In 1991, while Senna won his third championship, Prost had a dismal no-win season at Ferrari, and while Senna clinched a second-place finish in the 1993 season, his now-underperforming [=McLaren=] struggled a lot against the Renault-powered Williams, which had beaten him the year before with Nigel Mansell (with Prost having taken a sabbatical year) and again with Prost. That said, Senna expressed interest in driving for Williams in 1993 following Mansell's retirement from [=F1=], but Williams decided that putting Senna and Prost on the same team was still too risky; after Prost retired, Williams gave his seat to Senna.[[/note]] and Ayrton ended it formally by getting Prost into the top spot on the podium at the latters last race, the 1993 Australian GP, which Senna won. They were friendly after that, with Senna even proclaiming "We miss you, Alain" while on a lap for the French TV feed, only a few hours before his passing. Alain Prost was a pallbearer at the Brazilian's funeral, and he has since been on the board of the Senna Foundation.


* '''Mika Häkkinen vs. Michael Schumacher''': A surprisingly respectful rivalry (in stark contrast to Schumi's other adversaries), the pair dominated the late 90's [[note]] they were regularly qualifying a whole freaking second over their teammates - in Formula 1 terms, that's a lifetime[[/note]] with Mika winning two titles (despite the 1999 season becoming a no-contest due to Schumi missing about half of it following an accident in Silverstone which left him with a broken leg) to Schumacher's one. However, after a 2001 season that was filled with reliability and driving issues, Häkkinen stepped away from the sport, leaving (according to many) the door wide open for Schumacher's dominance. Highlights include the penultimate race of 1998 in Germany which all but sealed Mika's first title, the 2000 Japanese GP which did the same for Schumacher, and of course, [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Pd0LMH6yijA one of the greatest overtakes of all time at the 2000 Belgian GP.]] After his first retirement in 2006, Schumacher recognized Häkkinen as his strongest and fiercest rival, with the Finn accepting it graciously.

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* '''Mika Häkkinen vs. Michael Schumacher''': A surprisingly respectful rivalry (in stark contrast to Schumi's other adversaries), the pair dominated the late 90's [[note]] they were regularly qualifying a whole freaking second over their teammates - in Formula 1 terms, that's a lifetime[[/note]] with Mika winning two titles (despite titles[[note]]despite most of the 1999 season becoming a no-contest being fought instead against Schumi's teammate Eddie Irvine, due to Schumi Schumacher missing about most of the second half of it the season following an accident in Silverstone which left him with a broken leg) leg[[/note]] to Schumacher's one. However, after a 2001 season that was filled with reliability and driving issues, Häkkinen stepped away from the sport, leaving (according to many) the door wide open for Schumacher's dominance. Highlights include the penultimate race of 1998 in Germany which all but sealed Mika's first title, the 2000 Japanese GP which did the same for Schumacher, and of course, [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Pd0LMH6yijA one of the greatest overtakes of all time at the 2000 Belgian GP.]] After his first retirement in 2006, Schumacher recognized Häkkinen as his strongest and fiercest rival, with the Finn accepting it graciously.


* '''Mika Häkkinen vs. Michael Schumacher''': A surprisingly respectful rivalry (in stark contrast to Schumi's other adversaries), the pair dominated the late 90's [[note]] they were regularly qualifying a whole freaking second over their teammates - in Formula 1 terms, that's a lifetime[[/note]] with Mika winning two titles to Schumacher's one. However, after a 2001 season that was filled with reliability and driving issues, Häkkinen stepped away from the sport, leaving (according to many) the door wide open for Schumacher's dominance. Highlights include the penultimate race of 1998 in Germany which all but sealed Mika's first title, the 2000 Japanese GP which did the same for Schumacher, and of course, [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Pd0LMH6yijA one of the greatest overtakes of all time at the 2000 Belgian GP.]] After his first retirement in 2006, Schumacher recognized Häkkinen as his strongest and fiercest rival, with the Finn accepting it graciously.

to:

* '''Mika Häkkinen vs. Michael Schumacher''': A surprisingly respectful rivalry (in stark contrast to Schumi's other adversaries), the pair dominated the late 90's [[note]] they were regularly qualifying a whole freaking second over their teammates - in Formula 1 terms, that's a lifetime[[/note]] with Mika winning two titles (despite the 1999 season becoming a no-contest due to Schumi missing about half of it following an accident in Silverstone which left him with a broken leg) to Schumacher's one. However, after a 2001 season that was filled with reliability and driving issues, Häkkinen stepped away from the sport, leaving (according to many) the door wide open for Schumacher's dominance. Highlights include the penultimate race of 1998 in Germany which all but sealed Mika's first title, the 2000 Japanese GP which did the same for Schumacher, and of course, [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Pd0LMH6yijA one of the greatest overtakes of all time at the 2000 Belgian GP.]] After his first retirement in 2006, Schumacher recognized Häkkinen as his strongest and fiercest rival, with the Finn accepting it graciously.

Added DiffLines:

* ''F'' is a Japanese manga series about a country boy who fulfills his dream by racing in a Formula One car. The manga was serialized in the magazine Big Comic Spirits between 1985 and 1992, and received an anime adaptation in 1988, having [[GermansLoveDavidHasselhoff many fans in Europe]] in TheEighties, especially Italy and Spain.


* ''Fernando Alonso'', Spaniard, second youngest two-time world champion. Ended Schumacher's dominance in 2005 and 2006 driving for Renault. Retired from F1 after a fourth and final middling year with [=McLaren=] in 2018. He also participated in the 2017 Indianapolis 500, to much fanfare of the motorsport world... [[spoiler:Only to be beaten by former F1 driver Takuma Sato after engine failures of teammate Ryan Hunter-Reay and Chip Ganassi driver Charlie Kimball, and one of his own. All three were Hondas, although Sato's was as well.]] He is now starting to show interest in branching out to different motorsports, mostly endurance racing. He participated in the 2018 24 Hours of Daytona in IMSA and is now one of Toyota's [=LMP1=] drivers in the World Endurance Championship, winning the 2018 24 Hours of Le Mans with them on his first attempt, and again in 2019 after which he left the WEC. He is currently slated to return to F1, signing with Renault to race for them again in the 2021 season.

to:

* ''Fernando Alonso'', Spaniard, second youngest two-time world champion. Ended Schumacher's dominance in 2005 and 2006 driving for Renault. Retired from F1 after a fourth and final middling year with [=McLaren=] in 2018. He also participated in the 2017 Indianapolis 500, to much fanfare of the motorsport world... [[spoiler:Only to be beaten by former F1 driver Takuma Sato after engine failures of teammate Ryan Hunter-Reay and Chip Ganassi driver Charlie Kimball, and one of his own. All three were Hondas, although Sato's was as well.]] He is now starting to show interest in branching out to different motorsports, mostly endurance racing. He participated in the 2018 24 Hours of Daytona in IMSA and is now one of Toyota's [=LMP1=] drivers in the World Endurance Championship, winning the 2018 24 Hours of Le Mans with them on his first attempt, and again in 2019 after which he left the WEC. He is currently slated to return to F1, signing with Renault (now renamed into the company's performance wing Alpine) to race for them again in the 2021 season.

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