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!!Depictions in fiction

to:

!!Depictions in fiction
media



* ''Literature/TwentyYearsAfter'': The musketeers see the tail end of the second war, attempting to rescue the king at the request of his wife.

to:

* ''Literature/TwentyYearsAfter'': The musketeers see the tail end of the second war, attempting to rescue the king at the request of his wife.wife.
* ''Podcast/{{Revolutions}}'': The very first season of this podcast by Creator/MikeDuncan is about this conflict, which he is quite explicit about regarding as an "English Revolution" or "British Revolution". On the whole, Season 1 of ''Revolutions'' is a good primer on this revolution, and Duncan (as is his wont) has made it easy to find his sources for listeners eager to read more.


Moreover, some commentators have noted that calling the conflict a "civil war" rather undersells the vast social and political changes it wrought across the kingdoms. Even though it did [[FullCircleRevolution end up with a Stuart monarch sitting on the throne of all three kingdoms]] with few ''official'' changes to the structure of government, the way the British peoples viewed themselves, their relationship with their governments, and their relationship with each other were indelibly changed. Thus while the principle of parliamentary supremacy was not formally established until 1688--fully 37 years after the end of the fighting and 28 years after the Restoration--astute observers suspected from the very day Charles II was crowned at Westminster that the power of the monarchy had been fatally weakened, and that the (Protestant) British peoples had gained the confidence to assert civil, political, and social rights against the power of the state. Moreover, the interrelated nature of the conflicts and causes of conflict increasingly led the (again, Protestant) inhabitants of the British Isles to the suspicion that the fates of their peoples were thoroughly entwined with each other--or perhaps more to the point, that everyone's fate was thoroughly entangled with the fate of England. As a result, some have argued the events are more accurately described as the English or British Revolution.

to:

Moreover, some commentators have noted that calling the conflict a "civil war" rather undersells the vast social and political changes it wrought across the kingdoms. Even though it did [[FullCircleRevolution end up with a Stuart monarch sitting on the throne of all three kingdoms]] with few ''official'' changes to the structure of government, the way the British peoples viewed themselves, their relationship with their governments, and their relationship with each other were indelibly changed. Thus while the principle of parliamentary supremacy was not formally established until 1688--fully 37 years after the end of the fighting and 28 years after the Restoration--astute observers suspected from the very day in 1661 that Charles II was crowned at Westminster that the power of the monarchy had been fatally weakened, and that the (Protestant) British peoples had gained the confidence to assert civil, political, and social rights against the power of the state. Moreover, the interrelated nature of the conflicts and causes of conflict increasingly led the (again, Protestant) inhabitants of the British Isles to the suspicion that the fates of their peoples were thoroughly entwined with each other--or perhaps more to the point, that everyone's fate was thoroughly entangled with the fate of England. As a result, some have argued the events are more accurately described as the English or British Revolution.


Moreover, some commentators have noted that calling the conflict a "civil war" rather undersells the vast social and political changes it wrought across the kingdoms. Even though it did [[FullCircleRevolution end up with a Stuart monarch sitting on the throne of all three kingdoms]] with few ''official'' changes to the structure of government, the way the British peoples viewed themselves, their relationship with their governments, and their relationship with each other were indelibly changed. Thus while the principle of parliamentary supremacy was not formally established until 1688--fully 37 years after the end of the fighting and 28 years after the Restoration--astute observers suspected that the power of the monarchy had been fatally weakened, and that the (Protestant) British peoples had gained the confidence to assert civil, political, and social rights against the power of the state. Moreover, the interrelated nature of the conflicts and causes of conflict increasingly led the (again, Protestant) inhabitants of the British Isles to the suspicion that the fates of their peoples were thoroughly entwined with each other--or perhaps more to the point, that everyone's fate was thoroughly entangled with the fate of England. As a result, some have argued the events are more accurately described as the English or British Revolution.

to:

Moreover, some commentators have noted that calling the conflict a "civil war" rather undersells the vast social and political changes it wrought across the kingdoms. Even though it did [[FullCircleRevolution end up with a Stuart monarch sitting on the throne of all three kingdoms]] with few ''official'' changes to the structure of government, the way the British peoples viewed themselves, their relationship with their governments, and their relationship with each other were indelibly changed. Thus while the principle of parliamentary supremacy was not formally established until 1688--fully 37 years after the end of the fighting and 28 years after the Restoration--astute observers suspected from the very day Charles II was crowned at Westminster that the power of the monarchy had been fatally weakened, and that the (Protestant) British peoples had gained the confidence to assert civil, political, and social rights against the power of the state. Moreover, the interrelated nature of the conflicts and causes of conflict increasingly led the (again, Protestant) inhabitants of the British Isles to the suspicion that the fates of their peoples were thoroughly entwined with each other--or perhaps more to the point, that everyone's fate was thoroughly entangled with the fate of England. As a result, some have argued the events are more accurately described as the English or British Revolution.


Moreover, some commentators have noted that calling the conflict a "civil war" rather undersells the vast social and political changes it wrought across the kingdoms. Even though it did [[FullCircleRevolution end up with a Stuart monarch sitting on the throne of all three kingdoms]] with few ''official'' changes to the structure of government, the way the British peoples viewed themselves, their relationship with their governments, and their relationship with each other were indelibly changed. Thus while the principle of parliamentary supremacy was not formally established until 1688--fully 37 years after the end of the fighting and 28 years after the Restoration--astute observers suspected that the power of the monarchy had been fatally weakened, and that the (Protestant) British peoples had gained the confidence to assert civil, political, and social rights against the power of the state. Moreover, the interrelated nature of the conflicts and causes of conflict increasingly led the (again, Protestant) inhabitants of the British Isles to the suspicion that the fates of their peoples were thoroughly entwined with each other. As a result, some have argued the events are more accurately described as the English or British Revolution.

to:

Moreover, some commentators have noted that calling the conflict a "civil war" rather undersells the vast social and political changes it wrought across the kingdoms. Even though it did [[FullCircleRevolution end up with a Stuart monarch sitting on the throne of all three kingdoms]] with few ''official'' changes to the structure of government, the way the British peoples viewed themselves, their relationship with their governments, and their relationship with each other were indelibly changed. Thus while the principle of parliamentary supremacy was not formally established until 1688--fully 37 years after the end of the fighting and 28 years after the Restoration--astute observers suspected that the power of the monarchy had been fatally weakened, and that the (Protestant) British peoples had gained the confidence to assert civil, political, and social rights against the power of the state. Moreover, the interrelated nature of the conflicts and causes of conflict increasingly led the (again, Protestant) inhabitants of the British Isles to the suspicion that the fates of their peoples were thoroughly entwined with each other.other--or perhaps more to the point, that everyone's fate was thoroughly entangled with the fate of England. As a result, some have argued the events are more accurately described as the English or British Revolution.


Moreover, some commentators have noted that calling the conflict a "civil war" rather undersells the vast social and political changes it wrought across the kingdoms. Even though it did [[FullCircleRevolution end up with a Stuart monarch sitting on the throne of all three kingdoms]] with few ''official'' changes to the structure of government, the way the British peoples viewed themselves, their relationship with their governments, and their relationship with each other were indelibly changed. Thus while the principle of parliamentary supremacy was not formally established until 1688--fully 37 years after the end of the fighting and 28 years after the Restoration--astute observers suspected that the power of the monarchy had been fatally weakened, and that the (Protestant) British peoples had gained the confidence to assert civil, political, and social rights against the power of the state. As a result, some have argued the events are more accurately described as the English or British Revolution.

to:

Moreover, some commentators have noted that calling the conflict a "civil war" rather undersells the vast social and political changes it wrought across the kingdoms. Even though it did [[FullCircleRevolution end up with a Stuart monarch sitting on the throne of all three kingdoms]] with few ''official'' changes to the structure of government, the way the British peoples viewed themselves, their relationship with their governments, and their relationship with each other were indelibly changed. Thus while the principle of parliamentary supremacy was not formally established until 1688--fully 37 years after the end of the fighting and 28 years after the Restoration--astute observers suspected that the power of the monarchy had been fatally weakened, and that the (Protestant) British peoples had gained the confidence to assert civil, political, and social rights against the power of the state. Moreover, the interrelated nature of the conflicts and causes of conflict increasingly led the (again, Protestant) inhabitants of the British Isles to the suspicion that the fates of their peoples were thoroughly entwined with each other. As a result, some have argued the events are more accurately described as the English or British Revolution.


Moreover, some commentators have noted that calling the conflict a "civil war" rather undersells the vast social and political changes it wrought across the kingdoms. Even though it did [[FullCircleRevolution end up with a Stuart monarch sitting on the throne of all three kingdoms]] with few ''official'' changes to the structure of government, the way the British peoples viewed themselves, their relationship with their governments, and their relationship with each other were indelibly changed. Thus while the principle of parliamentary supremacy was not formally established until 1688--fully 37 years after the end of the fighting and 28 years after the Restoration--astute observers suspected that the power of the monarchy had been fatally weakened, and that the (Protestant) British peoples had gained the confidence to assert civil, political, and social rights. As a result, some have argued the events are more accurately described as the English or British Revolution.

to:

Moreover, some commentators have noted that calling the conflict a "civil war" rather undersells the vast social and political changes it wrought across the kingdoms. Even though it did [[FullCircleRevolution end up with a Stuart monarch sitting on the throne of all three kingdoms]] with few ''official'' changes to the structure of government, the way the British peoples viewed themselves, their relationship with their governments, and their relationship with each other were indelibly changed. Thus while the principle of parliamentary supremacy was not formally established until 1688--fully 37 years after the end of the fighting and 28 years after the Restoration--astute observers suspected that the power of the monarchy had been fatally weakened, and that the (Protestant) British peoples had gained the confidence to assert civil, political, and social rights.rights against the power of the state. As a result, some have argued the events are more accurately described as the English or British Revolution.

Added DiffLines:

Moreover, some commentators have noted that calling the conflict a "civil war" rather undersells the vast social and political changes it wrought across the kingdoms. Even though it did [[FullCircleRevolution end up with a Stuart monarch sitting on the throne of all three kingdoms]] with few ''official'' changes to the structure of government, the way the British peoples viewed themselves, their relationship with their governments, and their relationship with each other were indelibly changed. Thus while the principle of parliamentary supremacy was not formally established until 1688--fully 37 years after the end of the fighting and 28 years after the Restoration--astute observers suspected that the power of the monarchy had been fatally weakened, and that the (Protestant) British peoples had gained the confidence to assert civil, political, and social rights. As a result, some have argued the events are more accurately described as the English or British Revolution.


* ''Literature/TwentyYearsAfter'': The musketeers see the tail end of the second war, attempting to rescue the king at the request of his wife.

!!Tropes

* AgentPeacock: Prince Rupert of the Rhine, famously.
* AddedAlliterativeAppeal: Prince Rupert of the Rhine
* BadassArmy: The New Model Army tore the cavaliers to pieces.
* BadassBandolier: Musketeers on all sides wore a "Collar of Bandoliers" from which hung boxes of ammunition- the leather strap was known as a collar, and the individual powder boxes were known as bandoliers. "Bandolier" is nowadays the word for the collar, making this a particularly unique case. They're also known as Apostles, stemming from the fact that ammunition was issued by weight, and the twelve rounds most musketeers were given required twelve "bandoliers".
* BigFancyCastle: Many of England's medieval castles were slighted to prevent them from being used as a fortress by the opposing side, or future rebellions. In the case of Pontefract Castle, the demolition was welcomed by the townspeople, as its status as ''the'' military strongpoint in Northern England meant that the town had to endure three separate sieges during the war.
* CanineCompanion: Prince Rupert's standard poodle [[ADogNamedDog Pudel]], (see page illustration), who was so inseparable from his master that some religiously-extreme Parliamentarians alleged that he was a demonic {{Familiar}}.
* CavalryOfficer: UsefulNotes/OliverCromwell and Prince Rupert.
* ConflictingLoyalty
* CoolAndUnusualPunishment: Royalists imprisoned in Coventry were totally ignored by the townspeople. This lives on in Britain that when a person is shunned and given the silent treatment from co-workers or peers it's said he's been "sent to Coventry".
* CurbstompBattle: The Battle of Worcester. UsefulNotes/CharlesII ended up having to hide in a tree to escape Cromwell's men.
* DemotedToExtra: Fairfax became less important and politically powerful as the wars went on. This actually served him pretty well. He was alive and well, and his reputation unmarred, during the Restoration, and did not suffer reprisals.
* EnemyMine: The war in Ireland- which was one of the direct causes of all this- saw different invocations of this. For the first stretch the Civil War was practically put on hold as the Parliamentarians- including the Scots Covenanters, Parliamentarians, Royalists at each others' throats- all formed an uneasy common front against the Catholic Irish Confederacy. This climaxed with the senior English Royalist commander in Ireland turning over Dublin to Cromwell with the logic that he [[MyCountryRightOrWrong "preferred English rebels to Irish Ones."]] Only for the arrival of [[BadassArmy the New Model Army]] to cause the Royalists and Irish Confederates to ally.
* FaceDeathWithDignity: Charles was apparently delighted to be reunited with his beloved Jesus.
* FromNobodyToNightmare: Oliver Cromwell went from being a cavalry officer to being military dictator of England all in the span of about six years.
* HighlyConspicuousUniform: The New Model Army wore red, which became a standard for the British army. This was a JustifiedTrope in the 1640s; having a standardized and visible uniform meant an army could stay organized better on the field. The Royalists preferred BlingOfWar, in contrast.
** Actually, the idea that Royalists fought in fancy clothes and feathered hats while Parliamentarians wore buff-coats and helmets is a misconception based on Victorian illustrations. Both sides would have worn practical kit in combat.
* LeeroyJenkins: Prince Rupert of the Rhine. The Parliamentarians took advantage of this at Marston Moor and Naseby.
* NobleFugitive: Charles' sons
* OfficerAndAGentleman: Lord Fairfax, whose conduct and demeanor were so gentlemanly that there are few accounts that portray him as anything, but positively. It helps that under his leadership was subject to something of a NostalgiaFilter once Cromwell and Ireton came to greater prominence.
* OffWithHisHead: Strafford, Archbishop William Laud and Charles I.
* ScrewThisImOuttaHere: Fairfax resigned his position as Army head after Pride's Purge. Actually killing the King was way beyond what he wanted.
* TakeAThirdOption: Charles was losing the Bishop wars so he either had to consent to the Scot's demands or reopen Parliament. His Lord Deputy in Ireland, Strafford, suggested crushing the rebels with an Irish Catholic army. Parliament thought he was inviting a Catholic invasion so they impeached Strafford and forced the king to execute him. This caused an Irish uprising.
* WarriorPrince - Charles' nephew Rupert.
* WeHaveReserves: The main strategy of the Scottish Covenanters throughout the war. In spite of being led by several competent leaders (at first) their armies were generally poorly trained and ripped by political dissension, but their numbers meant they tried to overawe their enemies. In practice they occupied Northern England by throwing more men at the even worse off and demoralized Royalist troops then they knew what to do against, spent most of the rest of the war being terrorized by the outnumbered Royalists under Montrose and overcoming him by [[CannonFodder feeding him one army after another until he couldn't eat any more]], and then [[CurbStompBattle were utterly flattened by Parliament's New Model Army.]]

----

to:

* ''Literature/TwentyYearsAfter'': The musketeers see the tail end of the second war, attempting to rescue the king at the request of his wife.

!!Tropes

* AgentPeacock: Prince Rupert of the Rhine, famously.
* AddedAlliterativeAppeal: Prince Rupert of the Rhine
* BadassArmy: The New Model Army tore the cavaliers to pieces.
* BadassBandolier: Musketeers on all sides wore a "Collar of Bandoliers" from which hung boxes of ammunition- the leather strap was known as a collar, and the individual powder boxes were known as bandoliers. "Bandolier" is nowadays the word for the collar, making this a particularly unique case. They're also known as Apostles, stemming from the fact that ammunition was issued by weight, and the twelve rounds most musketeers were given required twelve "bandoliers".
* BigFancyCastle: Many of England's medieval castles were slighted to prevent them from being used as a fortress by the opposing side, or future rebellions. In the case of Pontefract Castle, the demolition was welcomed by the townspeople, as its status as ''the'' military strongpoint in Northern England meant that the town had to endure three separate sieges during the war.
* CanineCompanion: Prince Rupert's standard poodle [[ADogNamedDog Pudel]], (see page illustration), who was so inseparable from his master that some religiously-extreme Parliamentarians alleged that he was a demonic {{Familiar}}.
* CavalryOfficer: UsefulNotes/OliverCromwell and Prince Rupert.
* ConflictingLoyalty
* CoolAndUnusualPunishment: Royalists imprisoned in Coventry were totally ignored by the townspeople. This lives on in Britain that when a person is shunned and given the silent treatment from co-workers or peers it's said he's been "sent to Coventry".
* CurbstompBattle: The Battle of Worcester. UsefulNotes/CharlesII ended up having to hide in a tree to escape Cromwell's men.
* DemotedToExtra: Fairfax became less important and politically powerful as the wars went on. This actually served him pretty well. He was alive and well, and his reputation unmarred, during the Restoration, and did not suffer reprisals.
* EnemyMine: The war in Ireland- which was one of the direct causes of all this- saw different invocations of this. For the first stretch the Civil War was practically put on hold as the Parliamentarians- including the Scots Covenanters, Parliamentarians, Royalists at each others' throats- all formed an uneasy common front against the Catholic Irish Confederacy. This climaxed with the senior English Royalist commander in Ireland turning over Dublin to Cromwell with the logic that he [[MyCountryRightOrWrong "preferred English rebels to Irish Ones."]] Only for the arrival of [[BadassArmy the New Model Army]] to cause the Royalists and Irish Confederates to ally.
* FaceDeathWithDignity: Charles was apparently delighted to be reunited with his beloved Jesus.
* FromNobodyToNightmare: Oliver Cromwell went from being a cavalry officer to being military dictator of England all in the span of about six years.
* HighlyConspicuousUniform: The New Model Army wore red, which became a standard for the British army. This was a JustifiedTrope in the 1640s; having a standardized and visible uniform meant an army could stay organized better on the field. The Royalists preferred BlingOfWar, in contrast.
** Actually, the idea that Royalists fought in fancy clothes and feathered hats while Parliamentarians wore buff-coats and helmets is a misconception based on Victorian illustrations. Both sides would have worn practical kit in combat.
* LeeroyJenkins: Prince Rupert of the Rhine. The Parliamentarians took advantage of this at Marston Moor and Naseby.
* NobleFugitive: Charles' sons
* OfficerAndAGentleman: Lord Fairfax, whose conduct and demeanor were so gentlemanly that there are few accounts that portray him as anything, but positively. It helps that under his leadership was subject to something of a NostalgiaFilter once Cromwell and Ireton came to greater prominence.
* OffWithHisHead: Strafford, Archbishop William Laud and Charles I.
* ScrewThisImOuttaHere: Fairfax resigned his position as Army head after Pride's Purge. Actually killing the King was way beyond what he wanted.
* TakeAThirdOption: Charles was losing the Bishop wars so he either had to consent to the Scot's demands or reopen Parliament. His Lord Deputy in Ireland, Strafford, suggested crushing the rebels with an Irish Catholic army. Parliament thought he was inviting a Catholic invasion so they impeached Strafford and forced the king to execute him. This caused an Irish uprising.
* WarriorPrince - Charles' nephew Rupert.
* WeHaveReserves: The main strategy of the Scottish Covenanters throughout the war. In spite of being led by several competent leaders (at first) their armies were generally poorly trained and ripped by political dissension, but their numbers meant they tried to overawe their enemies. In practice they occupied Northern England by throwing more men at the even worse off and demoralized Royalist troops then they knew what to do against, spent most of the rest of the war being terrorized by the outnumbered Royalists under Montrose and overcoming him by [[CannonFodder feeding him one army after another until he couldn't eat any more]], and then [[CurbStompBattle were utterly flattened by Parliament's New Model Army.]]

----
wife.


* FourStarBadass: Tons of these. Cromwell stands out, though. He's been called one of the finest soldiers Britain ''ever had''.
** UsefulNotes/JamesGrahamMarquisOfMontrose, a Scottish Royalist commander who waged a war against the Scottish government with vastly outnumbered forces and nearly won. To this day all one needs to do to single him apart from the umpteen other Grahams and Montroses is to say [[TheMagnificent The Great Montrose.]]



* {{Spinoff}}: The UsefulNotes/HanoverStuartWars draw from this to the point of being an obvious sequel. Ethnic and religious [[FeudingFamilies quarrels]] related to this [[ForeverWar lasted so long]] that at least one author claimed to trace the lineup in UsefulNotes/TheAmericanRevolution and UsefulNotes/TheAmericanCivilWar all the way back to the UsefulNotes/EnglishCivilWar.



* WeHaveReserves: The main strategy of the Scottish Covenanters throughout the war. In spite of being led by several competent leaders (at first) their armies were generally poorly trained and ripped by political dissension, but their numbers meant they tried to overawe their enemies. In practice they occupied Northern England by throwing more men at the even worse off and demoralized Royalist troops then they knew what to do against, spent most of the rest of the war being terrorized by the outnumbered Royalists under [[FourStarBadass Montrose]] and overcoming him by [[CannonFodder feeding him one army after another until he couldn't eat any more]], and then [[CurbStompBattle were utterly flattened by Parliament's New Model Army.]]

to:

* WeHaveReserves: The main strategy of the Scottish Covenanters throughout the war. In spite of being led by several competent leaders (at first) their armies were generally poorly trained and ripped by political dissension, but their numbers meant they tried to overawe their enemies. In practice they occupied Northern England by throwing more men at the even worse off and demoralized Royalist troops then they knew what to do against, spent most of the rest of the war being terrorized by the outnumbered Royalists under [[FourStarBadass Montrose]] Montrose and overcoming him by [[CannonFodder feeding him one army after another until he couldn't eat any more]], and then [[CurbStompBattle were utterly flattened by Parliament's New Model Army.]]


* EqualOpportunityEvil: Not exactly, but close to it. Thomas Wentworth, Earl of Stafford was- even given the general moral ambiguity of the conflict- widely agreed to be both the most intelligent and most amoral and authoritarian of the King's advisors, and was infamous for his brutal treatment of Ireland. However, he also proposed that the King recruit an army of Irish mercenaries to defeat the Scots and- if need be- subdue Parliament, even though they were Irish and overwhelmingly Catholic. [[OffWithHisHead This did not end well for him.]]


He also tried to impose his own idea of what the Church of England should look like. The Church of England was fundamentally Protestant in doctrinal issues, but because it had been conceived as a way of not annoying the Catholics ''too'' much there was provision for ''a lot'' of fanciness and ritual and ceremony, and (most significantly) running the Church under an episcopal structure--i.e. through a hierarchy of bishops and archbishops, along Catholic lines (except with the King at the top instead of the Pope). Protestant mind, Catholic body and clothing, basically. Charles had turned the ritual UpToEleven, and a lot of ordinary people (like Members of Parliament or [=MP=]s) were afraid that he was winding up for a full re-Catholicisation of the church.

to:

He also tried to impose his own idea of what the Church of England should look like. The Church of England was fundamentally Protestant in doctrinal issues, but because it had been conceived as effect a way of not annoying the Catholics ''too'' much there was provision for ''a lot'' of fanciness compromise between Catholicism and ritual Protestantism: its structure and ceremony, and (most significantly) running the Church under an episcopal structure--i.e. through a hierarchy of ceremonies were essentially Catholic, with priests reporting to bishops and archbishops, along Catholic lines (except so on, just with the King at the top instead monarch in place of the Pope).Pope, but to the extent it had solid doctrines (a lot was left rather vague), they were Protestant. Protestant mind, Catholic body and clothing, basically. Charles had turned the ritual UpToEleven, and a lot of ordinary people (like Members of Parliament or [=MP=]s) were afraid that he was winding up for a full re-Catholicisation of the church.


After his death in 1685, Charles' brother became King James II and after a few troubled years in power was overthrown in 1688 in the so-called "Glorious Revolution" which established Parliamentary supremacy and the right of Parliament to effectively determine who became monarch - the beginnings of Britain's modern Constitutional Monarchy. William of Orange was invited to become King, and it's hard to imagine a better choice: he had links to the old regime since he was married to James II's daughter Mary (who held the Crown jointly with her husband for a variety of reasons), he was Protestant, and he was stadtholder (elected head of state)[[note]]After a fashion; William was the hereditary Prince of Orange, which had some land attached to it; but each constituent province of the Dutch Republic had an elected magistrate called the ''stadtholder'', who commanded the province's troops in battle. By unwritten custom, almost every province usually elected whoever happened to be Prince of Orange ''stadtholder''. So very technically, he was not ''stadholder'' of the Netherlands, but rather of several provinces of the Netherlands. Very non-technically, everyone just called him "Stadtholder of the Netherlands".[[/note]] of the Dutch Republic, meaning he had experience with constitutional rule and had the military of a great power backing him up, which would lead to peace and improved trade between the two countries. Following several attempts by forces loyal to James to defeat the "usurpation", the new Williamite regime was solidly in power.

to:

After his death in 1685, Charles' brother became King James II and after a few troubled years in power was overthrown in 1688 in the so-called "Glorious Revolution" which established Parliamentary supremacy and the right of Parliament to effectively determine who became monarch - the beginnings of Britain's modern Constitutional Monarchy. William of Orange was invited to become King, and it's hard to imagine a better choice: he had links to the old regime since he was married to James II's daughter Mary (who held the Crown jointly with her husband for a variety of reasons), he was Protestant, and he was stadtholder (elected head of state)[[note]]After a fashion; William was the hereditary Prince of Orange, which had some land attached to it; but each constituent province of the Dutch Republic had an elected magistrate called the ''stadtholder'', who commanded the province's troops in battle. By unwritten custom, almost every province usually elected whoever happened to be Prince of Orange ''stadtholder''. So very technically, he was not ''stadholder'' of the Netherlands, but rather of several provinces of the Netherlands. Very non-technically, everyone just called him "Stadtholder of the Netherlands".[[/note]] of the Dutch Republic, meaning he had experience with constitutional rule and had the military of a great power backing him up, which would lead to peace and improved trade between the two countries. The Dutch experience with new financial innovations like modern central banking, modern commercial banking, paper money, cheques, new forms of insurance, and the limited-liability joint-stock company also recommended William to the moneyed classes of the British Isles. Following several attempts by forces loyal to James to defeat the "usurpation", the new Williamite regime was solidly in power.


* {{Hypocrite}}: Cromwell and the Parliamentarians fought the war because Charles attempted to dissolve Parliament when they wouldn't play ball, making him a tyrannical absolute monarch. Cue the war won, Cromwell appointed to the position of Lord Protector...and then he dissolved Parliament because they wouldn't play ball, making him a tyrannical absolute monarch. [[SubvertedTrope Except unlike Charles Cromwell called for a new representative body to be elected]] - twice. Problem was, whichever constitutional arrangement he tried to find, it all kept blowing up in his face with people either insisting he get crowned king already or staying in a stance of fundamental opposition to everything.



* MyMasterRightOrWrong



* TakeAThirdOption: Charles was losing the Bishop wars so he either had to consent to the Scot's demands or reopen Parliament. His Lord Deputy in Ireland, Strafford, suggested crushing the rebels with an Irish Catholic army. Parliament thought he was inviting a Catholic invasion so they impeached Strafford and forced the king to execute him. This caused [[NiceJobBreakingItHero an Irish uprising]].
* WarIsHell

to:

* TakeAThirdOption: Charles was losing the Bishop wars so he either had to consent to the Scot's demands or reopen Parliament. His Lord Deputy in Ireland, Strafford, suggested crushing the rebels with an Irish Catholic army. Parliament thought he was inviting a Catholic invasion so they impeached Strafford and forced the king to execute him. This caused [[NiceJobBreakingItHero an Irish uprising]].
* WarIsHell
uprising.


* BigGood: In the First Civil War, Lord Thomas Fairfax was this for the Parliamentarians and King Charles was this for the Royalists.


* ''Literature/TheThreeMusketeers'': The musketeers see the tail end of the second war, attempting to rescue the king at the request of his wife.

to:

* ''Literature/TheThreeMusketeers'': ''Literature/TwentyYearsAfter'': The musketeers see the tail end of the second war, attempting to rescue the king at the request of his wife.

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