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* [=CRTs=] shoot an electron beam at phosphors coated on a screen at a rate of 50 full images (or more) per second, topping out at 160 or 180 Hz for high-end VGA monitors. When an electron beam hits a phosphor, it glows for a moment then fades. This is the only display type primarily used for analog signals.
** Arcade LightGun games actually took advantage of the technology, by calculating the difference between the start of a scan and when the gun picked up light.

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* [=CRTs=] shoot an electron beam at phosphors coated on a screen at a rate of 50 full images (or more) per second, topping out at 160 or 180 Hz for high-end VGA monitors. When an electron beam hits a phosphor, it glows for a moment then fades. This is the only display type primarily used for analog signals.
**
signals. Arcade LightGun games {{Light Gun Game|s}} actually took advantage of the technology, by calculating the difference between the start of a scan and when the gun picked up light.


* Old and cheaply made LCD displays tend to have a problem with image persistence. Likewise, these also tend to suffer from a condition known as “screen burn” or “black spot” when used and/or stored in certain conditions (typically equatorial hot weather), where a huge patch of the screen turns black (usually, it’d be a single huge patch that starts from the center of the screen and grows outwards, and sometimes small cracks can be visible on the screen) and does not show any image in the black patch- when that happens, the only option for repair is to replace the entire screen.

to:

* Old and cheaply made LCD displays tend to have a problem with image persistence. Likewise, these also tend to suffer from a condition known as “screen burn” or “black spot” when used and/or stored in certain conditions (typically equatorial hot weather), where a huge patch of the screen turns black (usually, it’d be a single huge patch that starts from the center of the screen and grows outwards, and sometimes small cracks can be visible on the screen) and does not show any image in the black patch- when that happens, patch. This is usually due to the filter plastic and/or the glue holding the filter to the LCD degrading due to heat. On simpler devices, it’s repairable if you have the time and patience. However, in some cases (particularly once cracks start appearing on the filter), the only option for repair recourse is to replace the entire screen.panel.


* Old and cheaply made LCD displays tend to have a problem with image persistence. Likewise, these also tend to suffer from a condition known as “screen burn” when used and/or stored in certain conditions, where a huge patch of the screen turns black (usually, it’d be a single huge patch that starts from the center of the screen and grows outwards, and sometimes small cracks can be visible on the screen) and does not show any image in the black patch- when that happens, the only option for repair is to replace the entire screen.

to:

* Old and cheaply made LCD displays tend to have a problem with image persistence. Likewise, these also tend to suffer from a condition known as “screen burn” or “black spot” when used and/or stored in certain conditions, conditions (typically equatorial hot weather), where a huge patch of the screen turns black (usually, it’d be a single huge patch that starts from the center of the screen and grows outwards, and sometimes small cracks can be visible on the screen) and does not show any image in the black patch- when that happens, the only option for repair is to replace the entire screen.


* Old and cheaply made LCD displays tend to have a problem with image persistence. Likewise, these also tend to suffer from a condition known as “screen burn” when used and/or in certain conditions, where a huge patch of the screen turns black (usually, it’d be a single huge patch that starts from the center of the screen and grows outwards, and sometimes small cracks can be visible on the screen) and does not show any image in the black patch- when that happens, the only option for repair is to replace the entire screen.

to:

* Old and cheaply made LCD displays tend to have a problem with image persistence. Likewise, these also tend to suffer from a condition known as “screen burn” when used and/or stored in certain conditions, where a huge patch of the screen turns black (usually, it’d be a single huge patch that starts from the center of the screen and grows outwards, and sometimes small cracks can be visible on the screen) and does not show any image in the black patch- when that happens, the only option for repair is to replace the entire screen.


* Old and cheaply made LCD displays tend to have a problem with image persistence. Likewise, these also tend to suffer from a condition known as “screen burn”, where a huge patch of the screen turns black (usually, it’d be a single huge patch that starts from the center of the screen and grows outwards, and sometimes cracks can be visible on the screen) and does not show any image in the black patch- when that happens, the only option for repair is to replace the entire screen.

to:

* Old and cheaply made LCD displays tend to have a problem with image persistence. Likewise, these also tend to suffer from a condition known as “screen burn”, burn” when used and/or in certain conditions, where a huge patch of the screen turns black (usually, it’d be a single huge patch that starts from the center of the screen and grows outwards, and sometimes small cracks can be visible on the screen) and does not show any image in the black patch- when that happens, the only option for repair is to replace the entire screen.


* Old and cheaply made LCD displays tend to have a problem with image persistence. Likewise, they also tend to suffer from a condition known as “screen burn”, where a huge patch of the screen turns black (usually, it’d be a single huge patch that starts from the center of the screen and grows outwards) and does not show any image in the black patch- when that happens, the only option for repair is to replace the screen.

to:

* Old and cheaply made LCD displays tend to have a problem with image persistence. Likewise, they these also tend to suffer from a condition known as “screen burn”, where a huge patch of the screen turns black (usually, it’d be a single huge patch that starts from the center of the screen and grows outwards) outwards, and sometimes cracks can be visible on the screen) and does not show any image in the black patch- when that happens, the only option for repair is to replace the screen. entire screen.


* Old and cheaply made LCD displays tend to have a problem with image persistence.

to:

* Old and cheaply made LCD displays tend to have a problem with image persistence. Likewise, they also tend to suffer from a condition known as “screen burn”, where a huge patch of the screen turns black (usually, it’d be a single huge patch that starts from the center of the screen and grows outwards) and does not show any image in the black patch- when that happens, the only option for repair is to replace the screen.


It should be noted that NTSC's poor color reproduction is the one thing that gave many earlier computers their ability to display color. The Apple II, IBM PC (well, some games on the IBM PC) and Atari 8-bit machines relied on the poor color reproduction of the NTSC color system to produce color on screen, via a glitch called ''color artifacting'', which are exploited through what are called ''Moiré'' patterns. PAL's superior color separation meant that artifacting just could not occur. Some European versions of the abovementioned computers of the era actually made use of additional circuitry to simulate artifacting and thus create color for PAL output, at the expense of picture clarity.

to:

It should be noted that NTSC's poor color reproduction is the one thing that gave many earlier computers their ability to display color. The Apple II, IBM PC (well, some games on the IBM PC) and Atari 8-bit machines relied on the poor color reproduction of the NTSC color system to produce color on screen, via a glitch called ''color artifacting'', which are exploited through what are called ''Moiré'' patterns. PAL's superior color separation meant that artifacting just could not occur. Some European versions of the abovementioned some computers of the era actually made use of additional circuitry to simulate artifacting and thus create color for PAL output, at the expense of picture clarity.


It should be noted that NTSC's poor color reproduction is the one thing that gave many earlier computers their ability to display color. The Apple II, IBM PC (well, some games on the IBM PC) and Atari 8-bit machines relied on the poor color reproduction of the NTSC color system to produce color on screen, via a glitch called ''color artifacting'', which are exploited through what are called ''Moiré'' patterns. PAL's superior color separation meant that artifacting just could not occur. Some systems like the ZX Spectrum actually made use of additional circuitry to simulate artifacting and thus create color on PAL output, at the expense of picture clarity.

to:

It should be noted that NTSC's poor color reproduction is the one thing that gave many earlier computers their ability to display color. The Apple II, IBM PC (well, some games on the IBM PC) and Atari 8-bit machines relied on the poor color reproduction of the NTSC color system to produce color on screen, via a glitch called ''color artifacting'', which are exploited through what are called ''Moiré'' patterns. PAL's superior color separation meant that artifacting just could not occur. Some systems like European versions of the ZX Spectrum abovementioned computers of the era actually made use of additional circuitry to simulate artifacting and thus create color on for PAL output, at the expense of picture clarity.


It should be noted that NTSC's poor color reproduction is the one thing that gave many earlier computers their ability to display color. The Apple II, IBM PC and Atari 8-bit machines all relied on the poor color reproduction of the color system to produce color on screen, via a glitch called ''color artifacting'', which are exploited through what are called ''Moiré'' patterns. PAL's superior color separation meant that artifacting just could not occur. Some systems like the ZX Spectrum actually made use of additional circuitry to simulate artifacting and thus create color on PAL output, at the expense of picture clarity.

to:

It should be noted that NTSC's poor color reproduction is the one thing that gave many earlier computers their ability to display color. The Apple II, IBM PC (well, some games on the IBM PC) and Atari 8-bit machines all relied on the poor color reproduction of the NTSC color system to produce color on screen, via a glitch called ''color artifacting'', which are exploited through what are called ''Moiré'' patterns. PAL's superior color separation meant that artifacting just could not occur. Some systems like the ZX Spectrum actually made use of additional circuitry to simulate artifacting and thus create color on PAL output, at the expense of picture clarity.


It should be noted that NTSC's poor color reproduction is the one thing that gave many earlier computers their ability to display color. The Apple II, IBM PC and Atari 8-bit machines all relied on the poor color reproduction of the color system to produce color on screen, via a glitch called ''color artifacting'', which are exploited through what are called ''Moiré'' patterns. PAL's superior color separation meant that artifacting just could not occur. Some systems like the ZX Spectrum actually made use of additional circuitry simulate artifacting and thus create color on PAL output, at the expense of picture clarity.

to:

It should be noted that NTSC's poor color reproduction is the one thing that gave many earlier computers their ability to display color. The Apple II, IBM PC and Atari 8-bit machines all relied on the poor color reproduction of the color system to produce color on screen, via a glitch called ''color artifacting'', which are exploited through what are called ''Moiré'' patterns. PAL's superior color separation meant that artifacting just could not occur. Some systems like the ZX Spectrum actually made use of additional circuitry to simulate artifacting and thus create color on PAL output, at the expense of picture clarity.


It should be noted that NTSC's poor color reproduction is the one thing that gave many earlier computers their ability to display color. The Apple II, IBM PC and Atari 8-bit machines all relied on the poor color reproduction of the color system to produced color on screen, via a glitch called ''color artifacting'', which are exploited through what are called ''Moiré'' patterns. PAL's superior color separation meant that artifacting just could not occur. Some systems like the ZX Spectrum actually made use of additional circuitry simulate artifacting and thus create color on PAL output, at the expense of picture clarity.

to:

It should be noted that NTSC's poor color reproduction is the one thing that gave many earlier computers their ability to display color. The Apple II, IBM PC and Atari 8-bit machines all relied on the poor color reproduction of the color system to produced produce color on screen, via a glitch called ''color artifacting'', which are exploited through what are called ''Moiré'' patterns. PAL's superior color separation meant that artifacting just could not occur. Some systems like the ZX Spectrum actually made use of additional circuitry simulate artifacting and thus create color on PAL output, at the expense of picture clarity.


It should be noted that NTSC's poor color reproduction is the one thing that gave many earlier computers their ability to display color. The Apple II, IBM PC and Atari 8-bit machines all relied on the poor color reproduction of the color system to produced color on screen, a glitch called ''Artifacting'', which are exploited through what are called ''Moiré'' patterns. PAL's superior color separation meant that artifacting just could not occur. Some systems like the ZX Spectrum actually made use of additional circuitry simulate artifacting and thus create color on PAL output, at the expense of picture clarity.

to:

It should be noted that NTSC's poor color reproduction is the one thing that gave many earlier computers their ability to display color. The Apple II, IBM PC and Atari 8-bit machines all relied on the poor color reproduction of the color system to produced color on screen, via a glitch called ''Artifacting'', ''color artifacting'', which are exploited through what are called ''Moiré'' patterns. PAL's superior color separation meant that artifacting just could not occur. Some systems like the ZX Spectrum actually made use of additional circuitry simulate artifacting and thus create color on PAL output, at the expense of picture clarity.


Then in the TheFifties, color TV standards were being developed. To remain backwards compatible with the old monochrome TV, the same signal was sent with an embedded color signal, which monochrome televisions lacked the circuitry to decode. However, this method of decoding the color signal was problematic standards wise. The U.S. National Television System Committee was the first to propose a color TV standard, which was later called NTSC. In Europe the situation was even more complex, with ''two'' competing standards being proposed — Germany promoted the Telefunken-developed Phase Alternating Line system (PAL), while France promoted the "Séquentiel couleur à mémoire" (SECAM) standard created by Thomson, which was later also adopted by the Soviet Union. Quality wise, NTSC was inferior (it had a lower resolution[[note]]This isn't really NTSC's fault, but the fault of the US' baseband TV system, ''System M''. This same lower resolution applies to South America, which uses PAL color but a modified version of ''System M'' called ''System N''- with special mention going out to Brazil for straight up using ''System M'' over PAL.[[/note]] and was notoriously poor at reproducing colors[[note]]NTSC is sometimes referred to as [[FunWithAcronyms Never The Same Color]][[/note]]) and prone to quality degradation but ran at 60Hz, and thus had less flickering. PAL has slightly better picture quality and higher resolution but was subject to flicker due to its lower refresh rate of 50Hz.[[note]] Again, this was down to the old world monochrome TV systems, which were adapted to run at 50Hz[[/note]]. SECAM, despite being chronologically first, was even better, but more complex and expensive to produce and still suffered from the flickering issue due to still being tied down to a 50Hz refresh rate.

to:

Then in the TheFifties, color TV standards were being developed. To remain backwards compatible with the old monochrome TV, the same signal was sent with an embedded color signal, which monochrome televisions lacked the circuitry to decode. However, this method of decoding the color signal was problematic standards wise. The U.S. National Television System Committee was the first to propose a color TV standard, which was later called NTSC. In Europe the situation was even more complex, with ''two'' competing standards being proposed — Germany promoted the Telefunken-developed Phase Alternating Line system (PAL), while France promoted the "Séquentiel couleur à mémoire" (SECAM) standard created by Thomson, which was later also adopted by the Soviet Union. Quality wise, NTSC was inferior (it had a lower resolution[[note]]This isn't really NTSC's fault, but the fault of the US' baseband TV system, ''System M''. This same lower resolution applies to South America, which uses PAL color but a modified version of ''System M'' called ''System N''- with special mention going out to Brazil for straight up using ''System M'' over PAL.[[/note]] and was notoriously poor at reproducing colors[[note]]NTSC is sometimes referred to as [[FunWithAcronyms Never The Same Color]][[/note]]) and prone to quality degradation but ran at 60Hz, and thus had less flickering. PAL has slightly better picture quality and higher resolution but was subject to flicker due to its lower refresh rate of 50Hz.[[note]] Again, this was down to the old world monochrome TV systems, which were adapted to run at 50Hz[[/note]].50Hz, due to the power generators being deployed in the old world countries pumping out AC power at 50Hz. That's not to say 60Hz PAL doesn't exist tho- the broadcasting bodies of Hong Kong, The UK and South Africa trialed running PAL on top of an experimental variant of ''System I'' that ran at 60Hz, but nothing came of the experiments, and of course South America uses PAL on top of various 60Hz baseband TV systems.[[/note]]. SECAM, despite being chronologically first, was even better, but more complex and expensive to produce and still suffered from the flickering issue due to still being tied down to a 50Hz refresh rate.


Added DiffLines:

It should be noted that NTSC's poor color reproduction is the one thing that gave many earlier computers their ability to display color. The Apple II, IBM PC and Atari 8-bit machines all relied on the poor color reproduction of the color system to produced color on screen, a glitch called ''Artifacting'', which are exploited through what are called ''Moiré'' patterns. PAL's superior color separation meant that artifacting just could not occur. Some systems like the ZX Spectrum actually made use of additional circuitry simulate artifacting and thus create color on PAL output, at the expense of picture clarity.


Then in the TheFifties, color TV standards were being developed. To remain backwards compatible with the old monochrome TV, the same signal was sent with an embedded color signal, which monochrome televisions lacked the circuitry to decode. However, this method of decoding the color signal was problematic standards wise. The U.S. National Television System Committee was the first to propose a color TV standard, which was later called NTSC. In Europe the situation was even more complex, with ''two'' competing standards being proposed — Germany promoted the Telefunken-developed Phase Alternating Line system (PAL), while France promoted the "Séquentiel couleur à mémoire" (SECAM) standard created by Thomson, which was later also adopted by the Soviet Union. Quality wise, NTSC was inferior (it had a lower resolution[[note]]This isn't really NTSC's fault, but the fault of the US' monochrome TV system, ''System M''. This same lower resolution applies to South America, which uses PAL color but a modified version of ''System M'' called ''System N''.[[/note]] and was notoriously poor at reproducing colors[[note]]NTSC is sometimes referred to as [[FunWithAcronyms Never The Same Color]][[/note]]) and prone to quality degradation but ran at 60Hz, and thus had less flickering. PAL has slightly better picture quality and higher resolution but was subject to flicker due to its lower refresh rate of 50Hz.[[note]] Again, this was down to the old world monochrome TV systems, which were adapted to run at 50Hz[[/note]]. SECAM, despite being chronologically first, was even better, but more complex and expensive to produce and still suffered from the flickering issue due to still being tied down to a 50Hz refresh rate.

to:

Then in the TheFifties, color TV standards were being developed. To remain backwards compatible with the old monochrome TV, the same signal was sent with an embedded color signal, which monochrome televisions lacked the circuitry to decode. However, this method of decoding the color signal was problematic standards wise. The U.S. National Television System Committee was the first to propose a color TV standard, which was later called NTSC. In Europe the situation was even more complex, with ''two'' competing standards being proposed — Germany promoted the Telefunken-developed Phase Alternating Line system (PAL), while France promoted the "Séquentiel couleur à mémoire" (SECAM) standard created by Thomson, which was later also adopted by the Soviet Union. Quality wise, NTSC was inferior (it had a lower resolution[[note]]This isn't really NTSC's fault, but the fault of the US' monochrome baseband TV system, ''System M''. This same lower resolution applies to South America, which uses PAL color but a modified version of ''System M'' called ''System N''.N''- with special mention going out to Brazil for straight up using ''System M'' over PAL.[[/note]] and was notoriously poor at reproducing colors[[note]]NTSC is sometimes referred to as [[FunWithAcronyms Never The Same Color]][[/note]]) and prone to quality degradation but ran at 60Hz, and thus had less flickering. PAL has slightly better picture quality and higher resolution but was subject to flicker due to its lower refresh rate of 50Hz.[[note]] Again, this was down to the old world monochrome TV systems, which were adapted to run at 50Hz[[/note]]. SECAM, despite being chronologically first, was even better, but more complex and expensive to produce and still suffered from the flickering issue due to still being tied down to a 50Hz refresh rate.

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