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In Ethiopia, different families like milk, butter, or salt (in a significant amount beyond the pinch some Americans claim brings out the flavour of very good drip coffee), with a fair bit of disgust for the addition they weren't raised on. Outside coffeehouses, drip coffee in big electric urns or small glass carafes is associated with diners and {{greasy spoon}}s, and despite the fact that it's often kind of crap, there are a lot of people who have a strong affection for the stuff (sometimes out of reverse snobbery, sometimes just because the drip coffee goes ''fantastically'' well with the heavy cuisine associated with greasy spoons). In some areas, various forms of iced coffee drinks are popular, even in the dead of winter.

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In Ethiopia, different families like milk, butter, or salt (in a significant amount beyond the pinch some Americans claim brings out the flavour of very good drip coffee), with a fair bit of disgust for the addition they weren't raised on. Outside coffeehouses, drip coffee in big electric urns or small glass carafes is associated with diners and {{greasy spoon}}s, and despite the fact that it's often kind of crap, there are a lot of people who have a strong affection for the stuff (sometimes out of reverse snobbery, sometimes just because the drip coffee goes ''fantastically'' well with the heavy cuisine associated with greasy spoons). At the other end of the spectrum, the "third wave" coffee movement has popularized the pour-over method with high-quality, single-origin beans made one cup at a time. In some areas, various forms of iced coffee drinks are popular, even in the dead of winter.


* Pressure-brewed coffee: Better known as espresso, this is similar to filtered coffee except instead of using gravity, it uses steam pressure or some kind of pump to force hot water through fine grounds. (Single-serve coffee makers like Keurig and Senseo work on a similar principle, though at much lower pressure.) Espresso makers range from the simple Moka pot (similar to a percolator, but the coffee collects in a top reservoir and doesn't reboil) up to massive pump-powered monsters that can cost as much as a car and produce dozens or hundreds of shots of espresso in an hour. Espresso is originally from Italy, but has become the base of most of modern Western coffeehouse culture, [[GermansLoveDavidHasselhoff from Scandinavia to Japan and on]]. The café cubano of Cuba and south Florida is espresso carefully stirred together with more sugar than you'd expect it to be able to dissolve and is a nice but hard-to-find alternative to straight espresso. Worth noting, Espresso is sometimes incorrectly called "Expresso" by English-speakers, which is doubly amusing if you know that "Espresso" comes from the Italian word for "Expressed", as the water is ''expressed'', or forced through the grounds, ''expressly'' for that customer.

to:

* Pressure-brewed coffee: Better known as espresso, this is similar to filtered coffee except instead of using gravity, it uses steam pressure or some kind of pump to force hot water through fine grounds. (Single-serve coffee makers like Keurig and Senseo work on a similar principle, though at much lower pressure.) Espresso makers range from the simple Moka pot (similar to a percolator, but the coffee collects in a top reservoir and doesn't reboil) up to massive pump-powered monsters that can cost as much as a car and produce dozens or hundreds of shots of espresso in an hour. Espresso is originally from Italy, but has become the base of most of modern Western coffeehouse culture, [[GermansLoveDavidHasselhoff from Scandinavia to Japan and on]]. The café cubano of Cuba and south Florida is espresso carefully stirred together with more sugar than you'd expect it to be able to dissolve and is a nice but hard-to-find alternative to straight espresso. Worth noting, Espresso is sometimes incorrectly called "Expresso" by English-speakers, which is doubly amusing if you know that "Espresso" comes from the Italian word for "Expressed", as the water is ''expressed'', or forced through the grounds, ''expressly'' for that customer.grounds.



In Ethiopia, different families like milk, butter, or salt (in a significant amount beyond the pinch some Americans claim brings out the flavour of very good drip coffee), with a fair bit of disgust for the addition they weren't raised on. Outside coffeehouses, drip coffee in big electric urns or small glass carafes is associated with diners and {{greasy spoon}}s, and despite the fact that it's often kind of crap, there are a lot of people who have a strong affection for the stuff (sometimes out of reverse snobbery, sometimes just because the drip coffee goes ''fantastically'' well with the heavy cuisine associated with greasy spoons). In some areas, various forms of iced coffee drinks are popular, even in the dead of winter. At the other end of the spectrum, the "third wave" coffee movement has popularized the pour-over method with high-quality, single-origin beans made one cup at a time.

to:

In Ethiopia, different families like milk, butter, or salt (in a significant amount beyond the pinch some Americans claim brings out the flavour of very good drip coffee), with a fair bit of disgust for the addition they weren't raised on. Outside coffeehouses, drip coffee in big electric urns or small glass carafes is associated with diners and {{greasy spoon}}s, and despite the fact that it's often kind of crap, there are a lot of people who have a strong affection for the stuff (sometimes out of reverse snobbery, sometimes just because the drip coffee goes ''fantastically'' well with the heavy cuisine associated with greasy spoons). In some areas, various forms of iced coffee drinks are popular, even in the dead of winter. At the other end of the spectrum, the "third wave" coffee movement has popularized the pour-over method with high-quality, single-origin beans made one cup at a time.
winter.


In Ethiopia, different families like milk, butter, or salt (in a significant amount beyond the pinch some Americans claim brings out the flavour of very good drip coffee), with a fair bit of disgust for the addition they weren't raised on. Outside coffeehouses, drip coffee in big electric urns or small glass carafes is associated with diners and {{greasy spoon}}s, and despite the fact that it's often kind of crap, there are a lot of people who have a strong affection for the stuff (sometimes out of reverse snobbery, sometimes just because the drip coffee goes ''fantastically'' well with the heavy cuisine associated with greasy spoons). In some areas, various forms of iced coffee drinks are popular, even in the dead of winter.

to:

In Ethiopia, different families like milk, butter, or salt (in a significant amount beyond the pinch some Americans claim brings out the flavour of very good drip coffee), with a fair bit of disgust for the addition they weren't raised on. Outside coffeehouses, drip coffee in big electric urns or small glass carafes is associated with diners and {{greasy spoon}}s, and despite the fact that it's often kind of crap, there are a lot of people who have a strong affection for the stuff (sometimes out of reverse snobbery, sometimes just because the drip coffee goes ''fantastically'' well with the heavy cuisine associated with greasy spoons). In some areas, various forms of iced coffee drinks are popular, even in the dead of winter.
winter. At the other end of the spectrum, the "third wave" coffee movement has popularized the pour-over method with high-quality, single-origin beans made one cup at a time.


* Pressure-brewed coffee: Better known as espresso, this is similar to filtered coffee except instead of using gravity, it uses steam pressure or some kind of pump to force hot water through fine grounds. (Single-serve coffee makers like Keurig and Senseo work on a similar principle, though at much lower pressure.) Espresso makers range from the simple Moka pot (similar to a percolator, but the coffee collects in a top reservoir and doesn't reboil) up to massive pump-powered monsters that can cost as much as a car and produce dozens or hundreds of shots of espresso in an hour. Espresso is originally from Italy, but has become the base of most of modern Western coffeehouse culture, [[GermansLoveDavidHasselhoff from Scandinavia to Japan and on]]. The café cubano of Cuba and south Florida is espresso carefully stirred together with more sugar than you'd expect it to be able to dissolve and is a nice but hard-to-find alternative to straight espresso. Worth noting, Espresso is sometimes incorrectly called "Expresso" by English-speakers, which is doubly amusing if you know that "Espresso" comes from the Italian word for "Expressed", as the water is ''expressed'', or forced through the grounds, and "expressly" for that customer.

to:

* Pressure-brewed coffee: Better known as espresso, this is similar to filtered coffee except instead of using gravity, it uses steam pressure or some kind of pump to force hot water through fine grounds. (Single-serve coffee makers like Keurig and Senseo work on a similar principle, though at much lower pressure.) Espresso makers range from the simple Moka pot (similar to a percolator, but the coffee collects in a top reservoir and doesn't reboil) up to massive pump-powered monsters that can cost as much as a car and produce dozens or hundreds of shots of espresso in an hour. Espresso is originally from Italy, but has become the base of most of modern Western coffeehouse culture, [[GermansLoveDavidHasselhoff from Scandinavia to Japan and on]]. The café cubano of Cuba and south Florida is espresso carefully stirred together with more sugar than you'd expect it to be able to dissolve and is a nice but hard-to-find alternative to straight espresso. Worth noting, Espresso is sometimes incorrectly called "Expresso" by English-speakers, which is doubly amusing if you know that "Espresso" comes from the Italian word for "Expressed", as the water is ''expressed'', or forced through the grounds, and "expressly" ''expressly'' for that customer.


* Pressure-brewed coffee: Better known as espresso, this is similar to filtered coffee except instead of using gravity, it uses steam pressure or some kind of pump to force hot water through fine grounds. (Single-serve coffee makers like Keurig and Senseo work on a similar principle, though at much lower pressure.) Espresso makers range from the simple Moka pot (similar to a percolator, but the coffee collects in a top reservoir and doesn't reboil) up to massive pump-powered monsters that can cost as much as a car and produce dozens or hundreds of shots of espresso in an hour. Espresso is originally from Italy, but has become the base of most of modern Western coffeehouse culture, [[GermansLoveDavidHasselhoff from Scandinavia to Japan and on]]. The café cubano of Cuba and south Florida is espresso carefully stirred together with more sugar than you'd expect it to be able to dissolve and is a nice but hard-to-find alternative to straight espresso. Worth noting, Espresso is sometimes incorrectly called "Expresso" by English-speakers, which is doubly amusing if you know that "Espresso" comes from the Italian word for "Expressed", as the water is ''expressed'', or forced through the grounds.

to:

* Pressure-brewed coffee: Better known as espresso, this is similar to filtered coffee except instead of using gravity, it uses steam pressure or some kind of pump to force hot water through fine grounds. (Single-serve coffee makers like Keurig and Senseo work on a similar principle, though at much lower pressure.) Espresso makers range from the simple Moka pot (similar to a percolator, but the coffee collects in a top reservoir and doesn't reboil) up to massive pump-powered monsters that can cost as much as a car and produce dozens or hundreds of shots of espresso in an hour. Espresso is originally from Italy, but has become the base of most of modern Western coffeehouse culture, [[GermansLoveDavidHasselhoff from Scandinavia to Japan and on]]. The café cubano of Cuba and south Florida is espresso carefully stirred together with more sugar than you'd expect it to be able to dissolve and is a nice but hard-to-find alternative to straight espresso. Worth noting, Espresso is sometimes incorrectly called "Expresso" by English-speakers, which is doubly amusing if you know that "Espresso" comes from the Italian word for "Expressed", as the water is ''expressed'', or forced through the grounds.grounds, and "expressly" for that customer.

Added DiffLines:

** they might bring this method from the Central Europe, where at least in the former Czechoslovakia the "Turkish way" cofee is drunk even today.



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** A more recent trend is taking black coffee and blending it with one or two teaspoons of butter, and either some Coconut Oil or MCT Oil. The result is a fatty drink without coffee's bitter edge for people on low-card or no-sugar diets. Frequently called either Butter Coffee or Bulletproof Coffee. It's high fat content typically allows it to be a healthy alternative to a full breakfast meal.


*** Breakfast Blend: Common in North America, usually a lighter coffee that won't compete with heavy breakfast foods or startle a sleepy palate. In the United States, similar coffees are sometimes referred to as "donut shop" or "diner" blends, implying that they're meant to be just like the morning coffee you grab on the way to work, but better.

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*** Breakfast Blend: Common in North America, usually a lighter coffee that won't compete with heavy breakfast foods or startle a sleepy palate. In the United States, similar coffees are sometimes referred to as "donut shop" or "diner" blends, implying that they're meant to be just like the morning coffee you grab on the way to work, but better. It serves a similar role to that of English Breakfast tea does in the U.K.


* Filtered coffee: The hot water is poured through the coffee grounds and the brewed coffee passes through a filter (usually a paper or metal mesh cone) into a carafe. The usual way of doing this is with a funnel with a filter in it, with the water coming from either a kettle or a dedicated coffee machine. Automatic drip filters, by far the most widely used, scale particularly well, and range in size from small home units of 3-12 cup capacity to massive urns found in diners and office break rooms, some of which seem large enough for a child (or a [[Literature/{{Illuminatus}} midget]]) to hide in.

to:

* Filtered coffee: The hot water is poured through the coffee grounds and the brewed coffee passes through a filter (usually a paper or metal mesh cone) into a carafe. The usual way of doing this is with a funnel with a filter in it, with the water coming from either a kettle or a dedicated coffee machine. Automatic drip filters, by far the most widely used, scale particularly well, and range in size from small home units of 3-12 cup capacity to massive urns found in diners and office break rooms, some of which seem large enough for a child (or a [[Literature/{{Illuminatus}} midget]]) to hide in. The manual method is also referred to as "pour-over" and it's SeriousBusiness for pour-over fans.



* Cold-brewed: Similar to sun tea and the like, it's somewhat common to make coffee simply by infusing the grounds into cold or room-temperature water and then filter the result. There are people who swear by this for iced coffee, claiming it gets a more balanced, less bitter/acid flavor. It's somewhat common among cold brew fans to treat this as the seriousest of SeriousBusiness.

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* Cold-brewed: Similar to sun tea and the like, it's somewhat common to make coffee simply by infusing the grounds into cold or room-temperature water and then filter the result. There are people who swear by this for iced coffee, claiming it gets a more balanced, less bitter/acid flavor. It's somewhat common among cold brew fans to treat this as the seriousest of SeriousBusiness.
SeriousBusiness, even more than pour-over fans.


Coffee's made in a number of ways, but they all start with dried, roasted coffee beans. Drying the coffee beans entails sloughing off the fruit coating and washing and drying the seeds. The coffee is then roasted, which gets rid of the grassy flavor of green coffee and produces the flavor compounds we normally associate with it. There are several different levels of roast; although the names aren't standardized, one way of ranking the roasts from lightest to darkest in the US would be as follows: cinnamon, city roast, full city roast (think Starbucks), Italian roast, French roast.[[note]]There is also Vienna roast, but absolutely no one agrees on what this is; you'll see it as a light roast and a dark roast.[[/note]] Like everything else about coffee, roast is SeriousBusiness; light roast fans will ridicule dark roast fans as drinking burnt coffee, while dark roast aficionados complain about acidity and underdeveloped flavor in light roasts. (Ironically, the company most responsible for creating demand for high-end coffee in the United States, Peet's, uses a darker roast than almost anyone else, including Starbucks.) Perhaps counterintuitively, the darkness of the roast and the strength of the brew have little to do with each other; the same bean, roasted dark, will actually have less caffeine in it than a light roast.

to:

Coffee's Coffee is made in a number of ways, but they all start with dried, roasted coffee beans. Drying the coffee beans entails sloughing off the fruit coating and washing and drying the seeds. The coffee is then roasted, which gets rid of the grassy flavor of green coffee and produces the flavor compounds we normally associate with it. There are several different levels of roast; although the names aren't standardized, one way of ranking the roasts from lightest to darkest in the US would be as follows: cinnamon, city roast, full city roast (think Starbucks), Italian roast, French roast.[[note]]There is also Vienna roast, but absolutely no one agrees on what this is; you'll see it as a light roast and a dark roast.[[/note]] Like everything else about coffee, roast is SeriousBusiness; light roast fans will ridicule dark roast fans as drinking burnt coffee, while dark roast aficionados complain about acidity and underdeveloped flavor in light roasts. (Ironically, the company most responsible for creating demand for high-end coffee in the United States, Peet's, uses a darker roast than almost anyone else, including Starbucks.) Perhaps counterintuitively, the darkness of the roast and the strength of the brew have little to do with each other; the same bean, roasted dark, will actually have less caffeine in it than a light roast.



Those basic methods of preparation are the base of a huge array of different drinks. When not drunk black, coffee's most common accompaniments are milk and sugar, and everyone likes it a little different; Middle Eastern coffee is sweet (except during Ramadan) and dark, espresso is syrupy with a cocoa-like bitterness and a fine foam (called crema) on top, and drip coffee is thin and sometimes faintly translucent.

to:

Those basic methods of preparation are the base of a huge array of different drinks. When not drunk black, coffee's the most common accompaniments to coffee are milk and sugar, and everyone likes it a little different; Middle Eastern coffee is sweet (except during Ramadan) and dark, espresso is syrupy with a cocoa-like bitterness and a fine foam (called crema) on top, and drip coffee is thin and sometimes faintly translucent.


* Direct infusion: This is used with Turkish, er, [[InsistentTerminology Greek]], um, [[OverlyLongGag Armenian]], screw it, let's just call it [[RuleOfCautiousEditingJudgement Near Eastern Coffee]], as well as what's commonly known as cowboy coffee. This coffee is brewed in a pot directly over the heat; Middle Eastern Coffee is ground to a powder, often with spices (cardamom is a favorite and practically universal in Arab countries, although cinnamon and a few others also show up) and prepared quickly and usually sweetened (drink this coffee without any sugar and people look at you funny), while cowboy coffee uses a coarse grind (presumably to avoid overextracting the flavors and burning the coffee while it sits by the fire). The Near Eastern variant is almost certainly the original way to make coffee, as it doesn't rely on specialized equipment and is traditional in the earliest countries to get coffee.

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* Direct infusion: This is used with Turkish, er, [[InsistentTerminology Greek]], um, [[OverlyLongGag Armenian]], screw it, let's just call it [[RuleOfCautiousEditingJudgement [[Administrivia/RuleOfCautiousEditingJudgment Near Eastern Coffee]], as well as what's commonly known as cowboy coffee. This coffee is brewed in a pot directly over the heat; Middle Eastern Coffee is ground to a powder, often with spices (cardamom is a favorite and practically universal in Arab countries, although cinnamon and a few others also show up) and prepared quickly and usually sweetened (drink this coffee without any sugar and people look at you funny), while cowboy coffee uses a coarse grind (presumably to avoid overextracting the flavors and burning the coffee while it sits by the fire). The Near Eastern variant is almost certainly the original way to make coffee, as it doesn't rely on specialized equipment and is traditional in the earliest countries to get coffee.


The legend has it that coffee was discovered in Ethiopia by a goatherd named Kaldi, who got very curious about the cherry-like fruit that made his goats happy and hyper. Although the story itself is probably apocryphal, it's generally agreed that coffee was discovered in Ethiopia and spread throughout the world by the Arabs; even the ''word'' for coffee in ''virtually every language''[[note]]The exception is the languages of Ethiopia, which use the native term ''bunn'' for the drink and the bean[[/note]] has Arabic roots: the drink got the poetic name ''qahwat al-bunn'' ("the wine of the 'bunn'", "bunn" being the Ethiopic word for "coffee bean") in Arabic, which got shortened to ''qahwah''; this provided the name in the other languages of the Muslim world[[note]]Including many African languages and Persian, which took the word almost without modification[[/note]] most importantly becoming ''kahve'' in Turkish, which became ''caffè'' in Italian, and from then travelled through Europe, the Americas, and East Asia as ''Kaffee'', "coffee", ''café'', and even ''ikhofi'' and ''kāfēi''.[[note]]Respectively German, English, French/Spanish, [=isiZulu=] (the "i" is a grammatical marker), and Mandarin Chinese.[[/note]] No wonder that in Catholic Europe it was even referred to as "the wine of Islam". Italian trade with Turkey, "Syria",[[note]]Meaning what is now Lebanon, Syria, Israel/Palestine, and Jordan[[/note]] and Egypt, along with Turkish invasions of the Habsburg lands in southeastern Europe,[[note]]Supposedly, Vienna's world-famous café culture dates back to one of the two [[UsefulNotes/SiegeOfVienna Turkish sieges of the city]], where according to the legend, fleeing Turkish troops left bags of coffee that the Viennese brewed up and decided they enjoyed.[[/note]] spread the drink to the West by the 17th century, but it was widely opposed (but still drunk) until supposedly Pope Clement VIII, a downlow coffee drinker himself, blessed it around 1600; over the next century it would become popular throughout Europe.

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The legend has it that coffee was discovered in Ethiopia by a goatherd named Kaldi, who got very curious about the cherry-like fruit that made his goats happy and hyper. Although the story itself is probably apocryphal, it's generally agreed that coffee was discovered in Ethiopia and spread throughout the world by the Arabs; even the ''word'' for coffee in ''virtually every language''[[note]]The exception is the languages of Ethiopia, which use the native term ''bunn'' for the drink and the bean[[/note]] has Arabic roots: the drink got the poetic name ''qahwat al-bunn'' ("the wine of the 'bunn'", "bunn" being the Ethiopic word for "coffee bean") in Arabic, which got shortened to ''qahwah''; this provided the name in the other languages of the Muslim world[[note]]Including many African languages and Persian, which took the word almost without modification[[/note]] most importantly becoming ''kahve'' in Turkish, which became ''caffè'' in Italian, and from then travelled through Europe, the Americas, and East Asia as ''Kaffee'', "coffee", ''café'', and even ''ikhofi'' and ''kāfēi''.[[note]]Respectively German, English, French/Spanish, [=isiZulu=] (the "i" is a grammatical marker), and Mandarin Chinese.[[/note]] No wonder that in Catholic Europe it was even referred to as "the wine of Islam". Italian trade with Turkey, "Syria",[[note]]Meaning "Syria,"[[note]]Meaning what is now Lebanon, Syria, Israel/Palestine, and Jordan[[/note]] and Egypt, along with Turkish invasions of the Habsburg lands in southeastern Europe,[[note]]Supposedly, Vienna's world-famous café culture dates back to one of the two [[UsefulNotes/SiegeOfVienna Turkish sieges of the city]], where according to the legend, fleeing Turkish troops left bags of coffee that the Viennese brewed up and decided they enjoyed.[[/note]] spread the drink to the West by the 17th century, but it was widely opposed (but still drunk) until supposedly Pope Clement VIII, a downlow coffee drinker himself, blessed it around 1600; over the next century it would become popular throughout Europe.



Coffee's made in a number of ways, but they all start with dried, roasted coffee beans. Drying the coffee beans entails sloughing off the fruit coating and washing and drying the seeds. The coffee is then roasted, which gets rid of the grassy flavor of green coffee and produces the flavor compounds we normally associate with it. There are several different levels of roast; although the names aren't standardized, one way of ranking the roasts from lightest to darkest in the US would be as follows: cinnamon, city roast, full city roast (think Starbucks), Italian roast, French roast. [[note]]There is also Vienna roast, but absolutely no one agrees on what this is; you'll see it as a light roast and a dark roast.[[/note]] Like everything else about coffee, roast is SeriousBusiness; light roast fans will ridicule dark roast fans as drinking burnt coffee, while dark roast aficionados complain about acidity and underdeveloped flavor in light roasts. (Ironically, the company most responsible for creating demand for high-end coffee in the United States, Peet's, uses a darker roast than almost anyone else, including Starbucks.) Perhaps counterintuitively, the darkness of the roast and the strength of the brew have little to do with each other; the same bean, roasted dark, will actually have less caffeine in it than a light roast.

to:

Coffee's made in a number of ways, but they all start with dried, roasted coffee beans. Drying the coffee beans entails sloughing off the fruit coating and washing and drying the seeds. The coffee is then roasted, which gets rid of the grassy flavor of green coffee and produces the flavor compounds we normally associate with it. There are several different levels of roast; although the names aren't standardized, one way of ranking the roasts from lightest to darkest in the US would be as follows: cinnamon, city roast, full city roast (think Starbucks), Italian roast, French roast. [[note]]There is also Vienna roast, but absolutely no one agrees on what this is; you'll see it as a light roast and a dark roast.[[/note]] Like everything else about coffee, roast is SeriousBusiness; light roast fans will ridicule dark roast fans as drinking burnt coffee, while dark roast aficionados complain about acidity and underdeveloped flavor in light roasts. (Ironically, the company most responsible for creating demand for high-end coffee in the United States, Peet's, uses a darker roast than almost anyone else, including Starbucks.) Perhaps counterintuitively, the darkness of the roast and the strength of the brew have little to do with each other; the same bean, roasted dark, will actually have less caffeine in it than a light roast.


* Filtered coffee: The hot water is poured through the coffee grounds and the brewed coffee passes through a filter (usually a paper or metal mesh cone) into a carafe. The usual way of doing this is with a funnel with a filter in it, with the water coming from either a kettle or a dedicated coffee machine. Automatic drip filters, by far the most widely used, scale particularly well, and range in size from small home units of 3-12 cup capacity to massive urns found in diners and office break rooms, some of which seem large enough for a child to hide in.

to:

* Filtered coffee: The hot water is poured through the coffee grounds and the brewed coffee passes through a filter (usually a paper or metal mesh cone) into a carafe. The usual way of doing this is with a funnel with a filter in it, with the water coming from either a kettle or a dedicated coffee machine. Automatic drip filters, by far the most widely used, scale particularly well, and range in size from small home units of 3-12 cup capacity to massive urns found in diners and office break rooms, some of which seem large enough for a child (or a [[Literature/{{Illuminatus}} midget]]) to hide in.


* Filtered coffee: The hot water is poured through the coffee grounds and the brewed coffee passes through a filter (usually a paper or metal mesh cone) into a carafe. The usual way of doing this is with a funnel with a filter in it, with the water coming from either a kettle or a dedicated coffee machine. Automatic drip filters, by far the most widely used, scale particularly well, and range in size from small home unit of 3-12 cup capacity to massive urns found in diners and office break rooms large enough for a child to hide in.

to:

* Filtered coffee: The hot water is poured through the coffee grounds and the brewed coffee passes through a filter (usually a paper or metal mesh cone) into a carafe. The usual way of doing this is with a funnel with a filter in it, with the water coming from either a kettle or a dedicated coffee machine. Automatic drip filters, by far the most widely used, scale particularly well, and range in size from small home unit units of 3-12 cup capacity to massive urns found in diners and office break rooms rooms, some of which seem large enough for a child to hide in.


* Filtered coffee: The hot water is poured through the coffee grounds and the brewed coffee passes through a filter (usually a paper or metal mesh cone) into a carafe. The usual way of doing this is with a funnel with a filter in it, with the water coming from either a kettle or a dedicated coffee machine. An older way of doing this is the percolator, in which the water is boiled and pushed up through the grounds and back where it came; although this makes a very nice room freshener, it also causes the brewed coffee to reboil several times over, and for the most part coffee fans don't like the result, In the US, percolators were nearly universal in the early 20th century, due to their convenience and low cost, but rapidly vanished once inexpensive automatic drip-filtered coffee machines (specifically the iconic Mr Coffee[[TradeSnark ]]) came on the market in the early 1970s.

to:

* Filtered coffee: The hot water is poured through the coffee grounds and the brewed coffee passes through a filter (usually a paper or metal mesh cone) into a carafe. The usual way of doing this is with a funnel with a filter in it, with the water coming from either a kettle or a dedicated coffee machine. Automatic drip filters, by far the most widely used, scale particularly well, and range in size from small home unit of 3-12 cup capacity to massive urns found in diners and office break rooms large enough for a child to hide in.
**
An older way of doing this is the percolator, in which the water is boiled and pushed up through the grounds and back where it came; although this makes a very nice room freshener, it also causes the brewed coffee to reboil several times over, and for the most part coffee fans don't like the result, result. In the US, percolators were nearly universal in the early 20th century, due to their convenience and low cost, but cost; however, they rapidly vanished once inexpensive automatic drip-filtered coffee machines (specifically the iconic Mr Coffee[[TradeSnark ]]) ]] and its work-alikes) came on the market in the early 1970s.

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