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Generally, Canada accepts Language, Sex and Nudity but harsher on Violence (unlike the United States).



An episode of WesternAnimation/PeppaPig has caused some controversy over its Mister Skinnylegs episode. The reason the episode was banned is because it features an arachnid creature (aka the Spider, which is dangerous in Australia).

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An episode of WesternAnimation/PeppaPig has caused some controversy over its Mister Skinnylegs episode. The reason the episode was banned In General, Australia is because it features an arachnid creature (aka the Spider, which is dangerous in Australia).more lenient towards Violence and Coarse Language but harsher on Sex and Nudity



New Zealandís censorship are more heavily concerned about Child Pornography (aka the ThinkOfTheChildren issue). In practice, Television in New Zealand is policed by the Broadcasting Standards Authority (NZís equivalent to the FCC) and it is based on Good Taste and Decency (which they say very frequently).Despite NZ's censorship being rather liberal, it still have to deal with MoralGuardians such as Family First NZ and the SPCS (Society for Promotions of Community Standards).

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New Zealandís Unlike Australia which has a rather conservative censorship are more heavily concerned about Child Pornography (aka the ThinkOfTheChildren issue). laws for all media, New Zealand's censorship law is fairly liberal. In practice, Television in fact, New Zealand is policed by the Broadcasting Standards Authority (NZís equivalent to the FCC) more lenient towards Sex, Nudity and it is based Language but harsher on Good Taste and Decency (which they say very frequently).Despite NZ's censorship being rather liberal, it still have to deal with MoralGuardians such as Family First NZ and the SPCS (Society for Promotions of Community Standards).Violence (unlike Australia).





When it comes to films and other media, New Zealand usually classify films that are based on either the Australian or British decisions (occasionally the Australian made decisions is more common in NZ). NZís OFLC is run by the government (similar to the Australian Classification Board in Australia) and its focus on material that may considered injurious to the public good. Material such as Sex, Crime, Cruelty and Horror should be dealt with Extent, Degree or Manner. However, NZ's classification law is enforced by the Department of Internal Affairs (more specifically the Censorship Compliance Unit), NZ Customs and NZ Police. An adult who gives a child or teen a restricted movie, video game or pornographic item will be reliable for a $3,000 fine (roughly [=US$1,979.08=]) while Corporates will be given a heavy fine of $10,000 (roughly [=US$6,596.49=]).

to:

When it comes to films and other media, New Zealand usually classify films that are based on either the Australian or British decisions (occasionally the Australian made decisions is more common in NZ). NZís OFLC is run by the government (similar to the Australian Classification Board in Australia) and its focus on material that may considered injurious to the public good. Material such as Sex, Crime, Cruelty and Horror should be dealt with Extent, Degree or Manner. However, NZ's classification law is enforced under the Films, Videos and Publications Classification Act 1993 and by the Department of Internal Affairs (more specifically the Censorship Compliance Unit), NZ Customs and NZ Police. An adult who gives a child or teen a restricted movie, video game or pornographic item will be reliable for a $3,000 fine (roughly [=US$1,979.08=]) while Corporates will be given a heavy fine of $10,000 (roughly [=US$6,596.49=]).



Video Games do not require NZ labels (which only applies to unrestricted G, PG or M rating). This means that Australian Ratings will be used by default if unrestricted. However games with restricted rating do require to have a red NZ classification labels ([=R13, R15, R16 and R18=]). Despite being a small but limited market, some Video Games that are censored for Australia can have an impact on NZ. For example in 2008, VideoGame/GrandTheftAutoIV was released with an R18 certificate despite being censored in Australia with an [=MA15+=] rating (at the time Australia did not have the Adult 18+ rating for video games). However a 21 year old man managed to get the uncensored version intact.

Advertisements are also policed, but by the Advertising Standards Authority (the same name with the UK) and the Commercials Approvals Bureau (to avoid confusion with the Citizens Advice Bureau as the CAB as the abbreviation. But it is also the local body where adverts are approved for screening). In 2007, a Burger King ad featuring scantily clad bikini ladies was deemed "sexually exploitative" by the ASA and was never allowed shown on NZ television. A similar situation in 2013 when Carl Jr's ran into trouble with their racy advert deeming "sexually exploitative". However the burger chain blasted the decision as "puritanical".

Unlike most countries where the watershed is 9pm; NZís watershed time is half an hour early (meaning that the watershed begins 8:30pm while in the US, it is 10pm but it is been referred to as Safe Harbor).

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Video Games do not require NZ labels (which only applies to unrestricted G, PG or M rating).rating)but they are bound by the same criteria for all media that is required under NZ's Classification law to be given a label. This means that Australian Ratings will be used by default if unrestricted. However games with restricted rating do are require to have a red NZ classification labels label and assigned a specific age restriction ([=R13, R15, R16 and R18=]). Despite being a small but limited market, some Video Games that are censored for Australia can have an impact on NZ.NZ (at least for marketing and distribution purposes). For example in 2008, VideoGame/GrandTheftAutoIV was released with an R18 certificate despite being censored in Australia with an [=MA15+=] rating (at the time Australia did not have the Adult 18+ rating for video games). However a 21 year old man managed to get the uncensored version intact.

Advertisements are also policed, but by the Advertising Standards Authority (the same name with the UK) and the Commercials Approvals Bureau (to avoid confusion with the Citizens Advice Bureau as the CAB as the abbreviation. But it is also the local body where adverts are approved for screening).screening on New Zealand Television). In 2007, a Burger King ad featuring scantily clad bikini ladies was deemed "sexually exploitative" by the ASA and was never allowed shown on NZ television. A similar situation in 2013 when Carl Jr's ran into trouble with their racy advert deeming "sexually exploitative". However the burger chain blasted the decision as "puritanical".

Unlike most countries where the watershed is 9pm; NZís watershed time is half an hour early (meaning that the watershed begins 8:30pm while in the US, it is 10pm but it is been referred to as Safe Harbor). \n However because of cultural differences, NZ Broadcasting laws are fairly liberal but often balanced (that means not too harsh or too soft).


New Zealandís censorship are more heavily concerned about Child Pornography (aka the ThinkOfTheChildren issue). In practice, Television in New Zealand is policed by the Broadcasting Standards Authority (NZís equivalent to the FCC) and it is based on Good Taste and Decency (which they say very frequently).Despite NZ's censorship being rather liberal, it still have to deal with MoralGuardians such as Family First NZ and the SPCS (Society Promotions of Community Standards).

to:

New Zealandís censorship are more heavily concerned about Child Pornography (aka the ThinkOfTheChildren issue). In practice, Television in New Zealand is policed by the Broadcasting Standards Authority (NZís equivalent to the FCC) and it is based on Good Taste and Decency (which they say very frequently).Despite NZ's censorship being rather liberal, it still have to deal with MoralGuardians such as Family First NZ and the SPCS (Society for Promotions of Community Standards).


New Zealandís censorship are more heavily concerned about Child Pornography (aka the ThinkOfTheChildren issue). In practice, Television in New Zealand is policed by the Broadcasting Standards Authority (NZís equivalent to the FCC) and it is based on Good Taste and Decency (which they say very frequently).

to:

New Zealandís censorship are more heavily concerned about Child Pornography (aka the ThinkOfTheChildren issue). In practice, Television in New Zealand is policed by the Broadcasting Standards Authority (NZís equivalent to the FCC) and it is based on Good Taste and Decency (which they say very frequently).
frequently).Despite NZ's censorship being rather liberal, it still have to deal with MoralGuardians such as Family First NZ and the SPCS (Society Promotions of Community Standards).


When it comes to films and other media, New Zealand usually classify films that are based on either the Australian or British decisions (occasionally the Australian made decisions is more common in NZ). NZís OFLC is run by the government (similar to the Australian Classification Board in Australia) and its focus on material that may considered injurious to the public good. Material such as Sex, Crime, Cruelty and Horror should be dealt with Extent, Degree or Manner. However, NZ's classification law is enforced by the Department of Internal Affairs (more specifically the Censorship Compliance Unit), NZ Customs and NZ Police. An adult who gives a child or teen a restricted movie, video game or pornographic item will be reliable for a $3,000 fine (roughly [=US$2,076.54=]) while Corporates will be given a heavy fine of $10,000 (roughly [=US$6,921.80=]).

to:

When it comes to films and other media, New Zealand usually classify films that are based on either the Australian or British decisions (occasionally the Australian made decisions is more common in NZ). NZís OFLC is run by the government (similar to the Australian Classification Board in Australia) and its focus on material that may considered injurious to the public good. Material such as Sex, Crime, Cruelty and Horror should be dealt with Extent, Degree or Manner. However, NZ's classification law is enforced by the Department of Internal Affairs (more specifically the Censorship Compliance Unit), NZ Customs and NZ Police. An adult who gives a child or teen a restricted movie, video game or pornographic item will be reliable for a $3,000 fine (roughly [=US$2,076.54=]) [=US$1,979.08=]) while Corporates will be given a heavy fine of $10,000 (roughly [=US$6,921.80=]).
[=US$6,596.49=]).


The United Kingdom is more concerned with the violence, particularly scenes of violence, self-harm, and criminal, disgusting, or antisocial behavior that impressionable audience members might see as fun or easy to imitate in real life. The sex gets through a bit more easily (FamilyFriendlyStripper, post-watershed, is mostly non-existent in the UK, thus resulting in a number of gratuitous pole dancers in many movies) and the language is much stronger after what is known as the nine o'clock {{watershed}}. The continuity announcer usually gives a warning before a film or show that contains swearing, violence, or sex. The British Board of Film Classification ''does'' still retain the ability to censor scenes or even ban films outright, but the threshold for doing so is pretty high; sex scenes featuring an actor under the British age of majority are verboten even if they were of consenting age in the film's country of origin, for example, and a particularly awful quasi-documentary called ''Bumfights''[[note]]If you don't remember this one, YouDoNOTWantToKnow[[/note]] was the first film to get a ban in several decades because its very existence went several miles past the MoralEventHorizon.

to:

The United Kingdom is more concerned with the violence, particularly scenes of violence, self-harm, and criminal, disgusting, or antisocial behavior that impressionable audience members might see as fun or easy to imitate in real life. The sex gets through a bit more easily (FamilyFriendlyStripper, post-watershed, is mostly non-existent in the UK, thus resulting in a number of gratuitous pole dancers in many movies) and the language is much stronger after what is known as the nine o'clock {{watershed}}. The continuity announcer usually gives a warning before a film or show that contains swearing, violence, or sex. The British Board of Film Classification ''does'' still retain the ability to censor scenes or even ban films outright, but the threshold for doing so is pretty high; sex scenes featuring an actor under the British age of majority are verboten even if they were of consenting age in the film's country of origin, for example, and a particularly awful quasi-documentary called ''Bumfights''[[note]]If you don't remember this one, YouDoNOTWantToKnow[[/note]] was the first film to get a ban in several decades because its very existence went several miles past the MoralEventHorizon.
acceptable standards.


Sadly, Australia's censorship board has been branded as the "strictest in the world" in terms of acceptability to adults. Pornography is also difficult to come by as all states prohibit the sell of Hardcore Porn DVDs that are rated [=X18+=], but therefore sold only in territorial regions such as the A.C.T and the Northern Territory.

to:

Sadly, Australia's censorship board has been branded as the "strictest in the world" in terms of acceptability to adults. Pornography is also difficult to come by as all states prohibit the sell of Hardcore Porn DVDs [=DVDs=] that are rated [=X18+=], but therefore sold only in territorial regions such as the A.C.T and the Northern Territory.


Sadly, Australia's censorship board has been branded as the "strictest in the world" in terms of acceptability to adults. Pornography is also difficult to come by as all states prohibit the sell of Hardcore Porn DVDs that are rated X18+, but therefore sold only in territorial regions such as the A.C.T and the Northern Territory.

Even TV is policed in Australia. Anything rated R18+ on TV will require an edit for MA15+ (which is similar in the US but slightly different when Basic or Premium cable bans all NC-17 movies on TV).

An episode of WesternAnimation/PeppaPig has caused some controversy over its Mister Skinnylegs episode. The reason is because Australia has some dangerous creatures (especially the spider).

to:

Sadly, Australia's censorship board has been branded as the "strictest in the world" in terms of acceptability to adults. Pornography is also difficult to come by as all states prohibit the sell of Hardcore Porn DVDs that are rated X18+, [=X18+=], but therefore sold only in territorial regions such as the A.C.T and the Northern Territory.

Even TV is policed in Australia. Anything rated R18+ [=R18+=] on TV will require an edit for MA15+ [=MA15+=] (which is similar in the US but slightly different when Basic or Premium cable bans all NC-17 movies on TV).

An episode of WesternAnimation/PeppaPig has caused some controversy over its Mister Skinnylegs episode. The reason the episode was banned is because Australia has some it features an arachnid creature (aka the Spider, which is dangerous creatures (especially the spider).
in Australia).


Sadly, Australia's censorship board has been branded as the "strictest in the world" in terms of acceptability to adults. Pornography is also difficult to come by as all states prohibit the sell of Hardcore Porn DVDs that are rated X18+, but therefore sold only in territorial regions such as the A.C.T and the Northern Territory.

Even TV is policed in Australia. Anything rated R18+ on TV will require an edit for MA15+ (which is similar in the US but slightly different when Basic or Premium cable bans all NC-17 movies on TV).

An episode of WesternAnimation/PeppaPig has caused some controversy over its Mister Skinnylegs episode. The reason is because Australia has some dangerous creatures (especially the spider).



Video Games do not require NZ labels (which only applies to unrestricted G, PG or M rating). This means that Australian Ratings will be used by default if unrestricted. However games with restricted rating do require to have a red NZ classification labels ([=R13, R15, R16 and R18=]). Despite being a small but limited market, some Video Games that are censored for Australia can have an impact on NZ. For example in 2008, VideoGame/GrandTheftAutoIV was released with R18 certificate despite being censored in Australia with an [=MA15+=] rating (at the time Australia did not have the Adult 18+ rating for video games). However a 21 year old man managed to get the uncensored version intact.

to:

Video Games do not require NZ labels (which only applies to unrestricted G, PG or M rating). This means that Australian Ratings will be used by default if unrestricted. However games with restricted rating do require to have a red NZ classification labels ([=R13, R15, R16 and R18=]). Despite being a small but limited market, some Video Games that are censored for Australia can have an impact on NZ. For example in 2008, VideoGame/GrandTheftAutoIV was released with an R18 certificate despite being censored in Australia with an [=MA15+=] rating (at the time Australia did not have the Adult 18+ rating for video games). However a 21 year old man managed to get the uncensored version intact.

Added DiffLines:

Advertisements are also policed, but by the Advertising Standards Authority (the same name with the UK) and the Commercials Approvals Bureau (to avoid confusion with the Citizens Advice Bureau as the CAB as the abbreviation. But it is also the local body where adverts are approved for screening). In 2007, a Burger King ad featuring scantily clad bikini ladies was deemed "sexually exploitative" by the ASA and was never allowed shown on NZ television. A similar situation in 2013 when Carl Jr's ran into trouble with their racy advert deeming "sexually exploitative". However the burger chain blasted the decision as "puritanical".


Video Games do not require NZ labels (which only applies to unrestricted G, PG or M rating). This means that Australian Ratings will be used by default if unrestricted. However games with restricted rating do require to have a red NZ classification labels ([=R13, R15, R16 and R18=]). Despite being a small but limited market, some Video Games that are censored for Australia can have an impact on NZ. For example in 2008, VideoGames/GrandTheftAutoIV was released with R18 certificate despite being censored in Australia with an [=MA15+=] rating (at the time Australia did not have the Adult 18+ rating for video games). However a 21 year old man managed to get the uncensored version intact.

to:

Video Games do not require NZ labels (which only applies to unrestricted G, PG or M rating). This means that Australian Ratings will be used by default if unrestricted. However games with restricted rating do require to have a red NZ classification labels ([=R13, R15, R16 and R18=]). Despite being a small but limited market, some Video Games that are censored for Australia can have an impact on NZ. For example in 2008, VideoGames/GrandTheftAutoIV VideoGame/GrandTheftAutoIV was released with R18 certificate despite being censored in Australia with an [=MA15+=] rating (at the time Australia did not have the Adult 18+ rating for video games). However a 21 year old man managed to get the uncensored version intact.


Video Games do not require NZ labels (which only applies to unrestricted G, PG or M rating). This means that Australian Ratings will be used by default if unrestricted. However games with restricted rating do require to have a red NZ classification labels ([=R13, R15, R16 and R18=]). Despite being a small but limited market, some Video Games that are censored for Australia can have an impact on NZ. For example in 2008, VideoGames/GrandTheftAuto4 was released with R18 certificate despite being censored in Australia with am MA15+ rating (at the time Australia did not have the Adult 18+ rating for video games). However a 21 year old man managed to get the uncensored version intact.

to:

Video Games do not require NZ labels (which only applies to unrestricted G, PG or M rating). This means that Australian Ratings will be used by default if unrestricted. However games with restricted rating do require to have a red NZ classification labels ([=R13, R15, R16 and R18=]). Despite being a small but limited market, some Video Games that are censored for Australia can have an impact on NZ. For example in 2008, VideoGames/GrandTheftAuto4 VideoGames/GrandTheftAutoIV was released with R18 certificate despite being censored in Australia with am MA15+ an [=MA15+=] rating (at the time Australia did not have the Adult 18+ rating for video games). However a 21 year old man managed to get the uncensored version intact.


When it comes to films and other media, New Zealand usually classify films that are based on either the Australian or British decisions (occasionally the Australian made decisions is more common in NZ). NZís OFLC is run by the government (similar to the Australian Classification Board in Australia) and its focus on material that may considered injurious to the public good. Material such as Sex, Crime, Cruelty and Horror should be dealt with Extent, Degree or Manner. However, NZ's classification law is enforced by the Department of Internal Affairs (more specifically the Censorship Compliance Unit), NZ Customs and NZ Police. An adult who gives a child or teen a restricted movie, video game or pornographic item will be reliable for a $3,000 fine(roughly [=$US2,076.54=]) while Corporates will be given a heavy fine of $10,000 (roughly [=$US6,921.80=]).

to:

When it comes to films and other media, New Zealand usually classify films that are based on either the Australian or British decisions (occasionally the Australian made decisions is more common in NZ). NZís OFLC is run by the government (similar to the Australian Classification Board in Australia) and its focus on material that may considered injurious to the public good. Material such as Sex, Crime, Cruelty and Horror should be dealt with Extent, Degree or Manner. However, NZ's classification law is enforced by the Department of Internal Affairs (more specifically the Censorship Compliance Unit), NZ Customs and NZ Police. An adult who gives a child or teen a restricted movie, video game or pornographic item will be reliable for a $3,000 fine(roughly [=$US2,076.fine (roughly [=US$2,076.54=]) while Corporates will be given a heavy fine of $10,000 (roughly [=$US6,921.[=US$6,921.80=]).



Video Games do not require NZ labels (which only applies to unrestricted G, PG or M rating). This means that Australian Ratings will be used by default if unrestricted. However games with restricted rating do require to have a red NZ classification labels ([=R13, R15, R16 and R18=]).

to:

Video Games do not require NZ labels (which only applies to unrestricted G, PG or M rating). This means that Australian Ratings will be used by default if unrestricted. However games with restricted rating do require to have a red NZ classification labels ([=R13, R15, R16 and R18=]).
R18=]). Despite being a small but limited market, some Video Games that are censored for Australia can have an impact on NZ. For example in 2008, VideoGames/GrandTheftAuto4 was released with R18 certificate despite being censored in Australia with am MA15+ rating (at the time Australia did not have the Adult 18+ rating for video games). However a 21 year old man managed to get the uncensored version intact.


When it comes to films and other media, New Zealand usually classify films that are based on either the Australian or British decisions (occasionally the Australian made decisions is more common in NZ). NZís OFLC is run by the government (similar to the Australian Classification Board in Australia) and its focus on material that may considered injurious to the public good. Material such as Sex, Crime, Cruelty and Horror should be dealt with Extent, Degree or Manner. However, NZ's classification law is enforced by the Department of Internal Affairs (more specifically the Censorship Compliance Unit), NZ Customs and NZ Police. An adult who gives a child or teen a restricted movie, video game or pornographic item will be reliable for a $3,000 fine(roughly $US2,076.54) while Corporates will be given a heavy fine of $10,000 (roughly $US6,921.80).

to:

When it comes to films and other media, New Zealand usually classify films that are based on either the Australian or British decisions (occasionally the Australian made decisions is more common in NZ). NZís OFLC is run by the government (similar to the Australian Classification Board in Australia) and its focus on material that may considered injurious to the public good. Material such as Sex, Crime, Cruelty and Horror should be dealt with Extent, Degree or Manner. However, NZ's classification law is enforced by the Department of Internal Affairs (more specifically the Censorship Compliance Unit), NZ Customs and NZ Police. An adult who gives a child or teen a restricted movie, video game or pornographic item will be reliable for a $3,000 fine(roughly $US2,076.54) [=$US2,076.54=]) while Corporates will be given a heavy fine of $10,000 (roughly $US6,921.80).
[=$US6,921.80=]).


When it comes to films and other media, New Zealand usually classify films that are based on either the Australian or British decisions (occasionally the Australian made decisions is more common in NZ). NZís OFLC is run by the government (similar to the Australian Classification Board in Australia) and its focus on material that may considered injurious to the public good. Material such as Sex, Crime, Cruelty and Horror should be dealt with Extent, Degree or Manner.

to:

When it comes to films and other media, New Zealand usually classify films that are based on either the Australian or British decisions (occasionally the Australian made decisions is more common in NZ). NZís OFLC is run by the government (similar to the Australian Classification Board in Australia) and its focus on material that may considered injurious to the public good. Material such as Sex, Crime, Cruelty and Horror should be dealt with Extent, Degree or Manner.
Manner. However, NZ's classification law is enforced by the Department of Internal Affairs (more specifically the Censorship Compliance Unit), NZ Customs and NZ Police. An adult who gives a child or teen a restricted movie, video game or pornographic item will be reliable for a $3,000 fine(roughly $US2,076.54) while Corporates will be given a heavy fine of $10,000 (roughly $US6,921.80).



Video Games do not require NZ labels (which only applies to unrestricted G, PG or M rating). This means that Australian Ratings will be use by default if unrestricted. However games with restricted rating do require to have NZ red classification labels.

to:

Video Games do not require NZ labels (which only applies to unrestricted G, PG or M rating). This means that Australian Ratings will be use used by default if unrestricted. However games with restricted rating do require to have NZ a red NZ classification labels.
labels ([=R13, R15, R16 and R18=]).

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