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According to foreign sources, the Israeli censors (if you could call them that) generally show the same leniency toward violence and profanity and mild adverse reaction to at sex and nudity as Mexican censors do, though there's no obliterate-anything-taking-jabs-at-religion rule. Just like in Canada, nothing is aired censored unless it was already watered down for foreign (chiefly US) consumption, but, as there's no watershed on Israeli TV, this applies 24/7, not just from 21:00 to 6:00 the next day.

The Films and Plays Review Council generally slaps the local equivalent of whatever the MPAA says as the rating for every movie, though its statutory power to edit movies or outright ban films has been neutered by a Supreme Court ruling in 1987, and it lost oversight over Plays in 1991.

As a result, nearly all meaningful censorship is concerned with security matters and is handled by the Military Censor, which, following a 1989 Supreme Court ruling (notice a pattern here?), only deals with news reporting, not entrertainment media. Even then, as the Military Censor has no jurisdiction outside Israel, all the news outlets report otherwise censor-worthy items anyway and claim they're "according to foreign sources" without stating what those sources are.

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According to foreign sources, the Israeli censors (if you could call them that) generally show the same leniency toward violence and profanity and mild adverse reaction to at sex and nudity as Mexican censors do, though there's no obliterate-anything-taking-jabs-at-religion rule. Just like in Canada, nothing is aired censored unless it was already watered down for foreign (chiefly US) consumption, consumption - Israelis are much more likely to hear the famous censor bleep in works produced in Hebrew than in English - but, as there's no watershed on Israeli TV, this applies 24/7, not just from 21:00 to 6:00 the next day.

The Films and Plays Review Council generally slaps the local equivalent of whatever the MPAA says as the rating for every movie, though its statutory power to edit movies or outright ban films has been neutered by a Supreme Court ruling in 1987, and it lost another Supreme Court ruling in 1991 removed its oversight over Plays in 1991.

plays.

As a result, nearly all meaningful censorship is concerned with security matters and is handled by the Military Censor, which, following a 1989 Supreme Court ruling (notice a pattern here?), only deals with news reporting, not entrertainment entertainment media. Even then, as the Military Censor has no jurisdiction outside Israel, all the news outlets report otherwise censor-worthy items anyway and claim they're "according to foreign sources" without stating what those sources are.


An example of this more lenient standard in the film industry is the Alberta Film Classification office. Alberta is Canada's most conservative province, but many films rated R[[note]]Under 17 not admitted without parent or adult guardian[[/note]] in the United States will be dropped to 14A[[note]]Persons under 14 must be accompanied by an adult[[/note]] in Alberta. The standard used is "detail", so a movie like ''Film/ParanormalActivity'' is 14A because while generally terrifying, no detailed violence occurs. There are also mitigating factors; ''Film/SavingPrivateRyan'' is 14A because the violence occurs in a historical context.

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An example of this more lenient standard in the film industry is the Alberta Film Classification office. Alberta is Canada's most conservative province, but many films rated R[[note]]Under 17 not admitted without parent or adult guardian[[/note]] in the United States will be dropped to 14A[[note]]Persons under 14 must be accompanied by an adult[[/note]] in Alberta. The standard used is "detail", so a movie like ''Film/ParanormalActivity'' is 14A because while generally terrifying, no detailed violence occurs. There are also mitigating factors; ''Film/SavingPrivateRyan'' is 14A because the violence occurs in a historical context. Similarly, ''Film/District9'' only received a 14A rating in most provinces (and home video, British Columbia being the odd outlier for the theatrical release) despite the amounts of {{Gorn}}, due to the sci-fi context of much of the graphic violence, while something like ''Film/RamboLastBlood'' got an 18A rating as a whole, given the more realistic context.



Generally, Canada accepts Language, Sex and Nudity but harsher on Violence (unlike the United States).

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Generally, Canada accepts Language, Sex and Nudity but harsher on Violence (unlike has similar standards as the United States).
States (relatively lenient towards violent content), though is substantially more forgiving of coarse language, nudity and sexual content, that even a movie with f-bombs and nothing else, which would get an R-rating stateside, can get either a light 14A, or even a PG-rating.



Generally, the Netherlands is ''much'' stricter on violent content, than they are on sexual content, and even more so than in the United States, a total inversion of standards between the two countries. A show with many a ClusterFBomb but no violence and little sexual content would pass with an AL (''alle leeftijden'', or "all ages"), it's G-rated counterpart, but a PG-13 action or horror movie that pushes the R-rating like ''Film/TheDarkKnight'', which otherwise has no sex and only mild profanity would receive a 16 from NICAM. However, this becomes sketchy when approached to animated programming, as something like ''WesternAnimation/RickAndMorty'' or ''WesternAnimation/Castlevania2017'', which get rated TV-14 and TV-MA respectively (though this is with the former's stronger profanity bleeped out, the uncut home video release has a TV-MA rating), passes with a 12-rating in the Netherlands.

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Generally, the Netherlands is ''much'' stricter on violent content, than they are on sexual content, and even more so than profanity in the United States, a total inversion of standards between the two countries. A show with many a ClusterFBomb but no violence and little sexual content would pass with an AL (''alle leeftijden'', or "all ages"), it's G-rated counterpart, but a PG-13 action or horror movie that pushes the R-rating like ''Film/TheDarkKnight'', which otherwise has no sex and only mild profanity would receive a 16 from NICAM. However, this becomes sketchy when approached to animated programming, as something like ''WesternAnimation/RickAndMorty'' or ''WesternAnimation/Castlevania2017'', which get rated TV-14 and TV-MA respectively (though this is with the former's stronger profanity bleeped out, the uncut home video release has a TV-MA rating), passes with a 12-rating in the Netherlands.


That being said, there is a growing reversal in the U.K., where movies with primarily explicit violence that may have found itself even ''banned'' during the era of MoralGuardians in the 80's would now pass with a 15 certificate today.



In another case of ValuesDissonance, Japan is known for its very violent shonen manga and anime (''Manga/FistOfTheNorthStar'', ''Manga/JojosBizarreAdventure'' and ''Manga/AttackOnTitan'', among many other), [[WhatDoYouMeanItsForKids that get away with straight up]] {{Gorn}}. In contrast, it's video game system is ironically one of the strictest in the world, where excessive violence, decapitation or mutilation either gets heavily edited or even straight up [[NoExportForYou not released in the country.]] Even if given the highest ratings, games like ''VideoGame/RedDeadRedemption2'' gets its toned down for their Japanese release even for the Z-rating. (The Japanese equivilant of the "Adults Only" rating of the [=ESRB=]) This follows a reversal, when previously, Japanese games during the 80's and 90's had to tone down the violence and blood to even be permitted for a western release.



Censorship in Canada is inconsistent because censorship is for the most part a provincial matter, not a federal matter, so each province has its own rules. (The exceptions are things like hate speech and child pornography, because owning or distributing them are offenses under the ''Criminal Code of Canada'', which is federal.) In non-criminal situations, though, Canadians these days tend to be less tolerant of censorship than Americans. Adult language was heard on Canadian TV as early as the 80s, and it's unusual for movies to be broadcast censored after 9 PM unless the version sanitized for American TV is the only version available. Nudity likewise is usually not much of an issue after 9 PM.

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Censorship in Canada is inconsistent because censorship is for the most part a provincial matter, not a federal matter, so each province has its own rules. (The exceptions are things like hate speech and child pornography, because owning or distributing them are offenses under the ''Criminal Code of Canada'', which is federal.) In non-criminal situations, though, Canadians these days tend to be less tolerant of censorship than Americans. Adult language was heard on Canadian TV as early as the 80s, and it's unusual for movies to be broadcast censored after 9 PM unless the version sanitized for American TV is the only version available. Nudity likewise is usually not much of an issue after 9 PM.
PM. Many shows that air with a TV-MA rating stateside, usually get away with a 14+ rating, unless its something much more extreme, like ''Series/GameOfThrones''


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While previously one of the strictest regarding violence (in film, television and video games), Germany has lightened up since the late 2000's, while very violent video games like the 2019 remake of ''VideoGame/ResidentEvil2'' would still get the 18 rating, it's rare for a show or movie to get it unless they're exceptionally extreme in violent content. Even most movies that were previously [[BannedInChina banned in the country for violence]] have been re-rated 16 by the FSK.


Added DiffLines:

Generally, the Netherlands is ''much'' stricter on violent content, than they are on sexual content, and even more so than in the United States, a total inversion of standards between the two countries. A show with many a ClusterFBomb but no violence and little sexual content would pass with an AL (''alle leeftijden'', or "all ages"), it's G-rated counterpart, but a PG-13 action or horror movie that pushes the R-rating like ''Film/TheDarkKnight'', which otherwise has no sex and only mild profanity would receive a 16 from NICAM. However, this becomes sketchy when approached to animated programming, as something like ''WesternAnimation/RickAndMorty'' or ''WesternAnimation/Castlevania2017'', which get rated TV-14 and TV-MA respectively (though this is with the former's stronger profanity bleeped out, the uncut home video release has a TV-MA rating), passes with a 12-rating in the Netherlands.


The United Kingdom is more concerned with the violence, particularly scenes of violence, self-harm, and criminal, disgusting, or antisocial behavior that impressionable audience members might see as fun or easy to imitate in real life. The sex gets through a bit more easily (FamilyFriendlyStripper, post-watershed, is mostly non-existent in the UK, thus resulting in a number of gratuitous pole dancers in many movies) and the language is much stronger after what is known as the nine o'clock {{watershed}}. The continuity announcer usually gives a warning before a film or show that contains swearing, violence, or sex. The British Board of Film Classification ''does'' still retain the ability to censor scenes or even ban films outright, but the threshold for doing so is pretty high; sex scenes featuring an actor under the British age of majority are verboten even if they were of consenting age in the film's country of origin, for example, and a particularly awful quasi-documentary called ''Bumfights''[[note]]If you don't remember this one, YouDoNOTWantToKnow[[/note]] was the first film to get a ban in several decades because its very existence went several miles past acceptable standards. Television and radio content is controlled by the general telecommunications regulator Ofcom. They are technically able only to respond to complaints about shows after they are broadcast, but they nevertheless have clout because an Ofcom reprimand is considered seriously damaging to a station's reputation, and very bad and/or repeated breaches can lead to a station being heavily fined or even shut down. As well as "taste and decency" issues, they also investigate claims that non-fiction works were defamatory, invasive of peoples' privacy, or otherwise "unfair" according to the UK's strict requirement for impartiality in broadcast news.

to:

The United Kingdom is more concerned with the violence, particularly scenes of violence, self-harm, and criminal, disgusting, or antisocial behavior that impressionable audience members might see as fun or easy to imitate in real life. The sex gets through a bit more easily (FamilyFriendlyStripper, post-watershed, is mostly non-existent in the UK, thus resulting in a number of gratuitous pole dancers in many movies) and the language is much stronger after what is known as the nine o'clock {{watershed}}. The continuity announcer usually gives a warning before a film or show that contains swearing, violence, or sex. The British Board of Film Classification ''does'' still retain the ability to censor scenes or even ban films outright, but the threshold for doing so is pretty high; sex scenes featuring an actor under the British age of majority are verboten even if they were of consenting age in the film's country of origin, for example, and a particularly awful quasi-documentary called ''Bumfights''[[note]]If you don't remember this one, YouDoNOTWantToKnow[[/note]] was the first film to get a ban in several decades because its very existence went several miles past acceptable standards. Television and radio content is controlled by the general telecommunications regulator Ofcom. They are technically able only to respond to complaints about shows after they are broadcast, but they nevertheless have clout because an Ofcom reprimand is considered seriously damaging to a station's reputation, and very bad and/or repeated breaches can lead to a station being heavily fined or even shut down. [[note]]The most recent example was minor Urdu-language channel Peace TV, which was closed down for rebroadcasting a programme that had previously been held by Ofcom to incite serious violence against Muslim people who practice certain types of faith-healing, amulet-making and white magic that are considered blasphemous and heretical by certain other groups of Muslims[[/note]] As well as "taste and decency" issues, they also investigate claims that non-fiction works were defamatory, invasive of peoples' privacy, or otherwise "unfair" according to the UK's strict requirement for impartiality in broadcast news.


The United Kingdom is more concerned with the violence, particularly scenes of violence, self-harm, and criminal, disgusting, or antisocial behavior that impressionable audience members might see as fun or easy to imitate in real life. The sex gets through a bit more easily (FamilyFriendlyStripper, post-watershed, is mostly non-existent in the UK, thus resulting in a number of gratuitous pole dancers in many movies) and the language is much stronger after what is known as the nine o'clock {{watershed}}. The continuity announcer usually gives a warning before a film or show that contains swearing, violence, or sex. The British Board of Film Classification ''does'' still retain the ability to censor scenes or even ban films outright, but the threshold for doing so is pretty high; sex scenes featuring an actor under the British age of majority are verboten even if they were of consenting age in the film's country of origin, for example, and a particularly awful quasi-documentary called ''Bumfights''[[note]]If you don't remember this one, YouDoNOTWantToKnow[[/note]] was the first film to get a ban in several decades because its very existence went several miles past acceptable standards.

to:

The United Kingdom is more concerned with the violence, particularly scenes of violence, self-harm, and criminal, disgusting, or antisocial behavior that impressionable audience members might see as fun or easy to imitate in real life. The sex gets through a bit more easily (FamilyFriendlyStripper, post-watershed, is mostly non-existent in the UK, thus resulting in a number of gratuitous pole dancers in many movies) and the language is much stronger after what is known as the nine o'clock {{watershed}}. The continuity announcer usually gives a warning before a film or show that contains swearing, violence, or sex. The British Board of Film Classification ''does'' still retain the ability to censor scenes or even ban films outright, but the threshold for doing so is pretty high; sex scenes featuring an actor under the British age of majority are verboten even if they were of consenting age in the film's country of origin, for example, and a particularly awful quasi-documentary called ''Bumfights''[[note]]If you don't remember this one, YouDoNOTWantToKnow[[/note]] was the first film to get a ban in several decades because its very existence went several miles past acceptable standards.
standards. Television and radio content is controlled by the general telecommunications regulator Ofcom. They are technically able only to respond to complaints about shows after they are broadcast, but they nevertheless have clout because an Ofcom reprimand is considered seriously damaging to a station's reputation, and very bad and/or repeated breaches can lead to a station being heavily fined or even shut down. As well as "taste and decency" issues, they also investigate claims that non-fiction works were defamatory, invasive of peoples' privacy, or otherwise "unfair" according to the UK's strict requirement for impartiality in broadcast news.


Generally, Canada accepts Language, Sex and Nudity but harsher on Violence (unlike the United States).



An episode of WesternAnimation/PeppaPig has caused some controversy over its Mister Skinnylegs episode. The reason the episode was banned is because it features an arachnid creature (aka the Spider, which is dangerous in Australia).

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An episode of WesternAnimation/PeppaPig has caused some controversy over its Mister Skinnylegs episode. The reason the episode was banned In General, Australia is because it features an arachnid creature (aka the Spider, which is dangerous in Australia).more lenient towards Violence and Coarse Language but harsher on Sex and Nudity



New Zealandís censorship are more heavily concerned about Child Pornography (aka the ThinkOfTheChildren issue). In practice, Television in New Zealand is policed by the Broadcasting Standards Authority (NZís equivalent to the FCC) and it is based on Good Taste and Decency (which they say very frequently).Despite NZ's censorship being rather liberal, it still have to deal with MoralGuardians such as Family First NZ and the SPCS (Society for Promotions of Community Standards).

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New Zealandís Unlike Australia which has a rather conservative censorship are more heavily concerned about Child Pornography (aka the ThinkOfTheChildren issue). laws for all media, New Zealand's censorship law is fairly liberal. In practice, Television in fact, New Zealand is policed by the Broadcasting Standards Authority (NZís equivalent to the FCC) more lenient towards Sex, Nudity and it is based Language but harsher on Good Taste and Decency (which they say very frequently).Despite NZ's censorship being rather liberal, it still have to deal with MoralGuardians such as Family First NZ and the SPCS (Society for Promotions of Community Standards).Violence (unlike Australia).





When it comes to films and other media, New Zealand usually classify films that are based on either the Australian or British decisions (occasionally the Australian made decisions is more common in NZ). NZís OFLC is run by the government (similar to the Australian Classification Board in Australia) and its focus on material that may considered injurious to the public good. Material such as Sex, Crime, Cruelty and Horror should be dealt with Extent, Degree or Manner. However, NZ's classification law is enforced by the Department of Internal Affairs (more specifically the Censorship Compliance Unit), NZ Customs and NZ Police. An adult who gives a child or teen a restricted movie, video game or pornographic item will be reliable for a $3,000 fine (roughly [=US$1,979.08=]) while Corporates will be given a heavy fine of $10,000 (roughly [=US$6,596.49=]).

to:

When it comes to films and other media, New Zealand usually classify films that are based on either the Australian or British decisions (occasionally the Australian made decisions is more common in NZ). NZís OFLC is run by the government (similar to the Australian Classification Board in Australia) and its focus on material that may considered injurious to the public good. Material such as Sex, Crime, Cruelty and Horror should be dealt with Extent, Degree or Manner. However, NZ's classification law is enforced under the Films, Videos and Publications Classification Act 1993 and by the Department of Internal Affairs (more specifically the Censorship Compliance Unit), NZ Customs and NZ Police. An adult who gives a child or teen a restricted movie, video game or pornographic item will be reliable for a $3,000 fine (roughly [=US$1,979.08=]) while Corporates will be given a heavy fine of $10,000 (roughly [=US$6,596.49=]).



Video Games do not require NZ labels (which only applies to unrestricted G, PG or M rating). This means that Australian Ratings will be used by default if unrestricted. However games with restricted rating do require to have a red NZ classification labels ([=R13, R15, R16 and R18=]). Despite being a small but limited market, some Video Games that are censored for Australia can have an impact on NZ. For example in 2008, VideoGame/GrandTheftAutoIV was released with an R18 certificate despite being censored in Australia with an [=MA15+=] rating (at the time Australia did not have the Adult 18+ rating for video games). However a 21 year old man managed to get the uncensored version intact.

Advertisements are also policed, but by the Advertising Standards Authority (the same name with the UK) and the Commercials Approvals Bureau (to avoid confusion with the Citizens Advice Bureau as the CAB as the abbreviation. But it is also the local body where adverts are approved for screening). In 2007, a Burger King ad featuring scantily clad bikini ladies was deemed "sexually exploitative" by the ASA and was never allowed shown on NZ television. A similar situation in 2013 when Carl Jr's ran into trouble with their racy advert deeming "sexually exploitative". However the burger chain blasted the decision as "puritanical".

Unlike most countries where the watershed is 9pm; NZís watershed time is half an hour early (meaning that the watershed begins 8:30pm while in the US, it is 10pm but it is been referred to as Safe Harbor).

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Video Games do not require NZ labels (which only applies to unrestricted G, PG or M rating).rating)but they are bound by the same criteria for all media that is required under NZ's Classification law to be given a label. This means that Australian Ratings will be used by default if unrestricted. However games with restricted rating do are require to have a red NZ classification labels label and assigned a specific age restriction ([=R13, R15, R16 and R18=]). Despite being a small but limited market, some Video Games that are censored for Australia can have an impact on NZ.NZ (at least for marketing and distribution purposes). For example in 2008, VideoGame/GrandTheftAutoIV was released with an R18 certificate despite being censored in Australia with an [=MA15+=] rating (at the time Australia did not have the Adult 18+ rating for video games). However a 21 year old man managed to get the uncensored version intact.

Advertisements are also policed, but by the Advertising Standards Authority (the same name with the UK) and the Commercials Approvals Bureau (to avoid confusion with the Citizens Advice Bureau as the CAB as the abbreviation. But it is also the local body where adverts are approved for screening).screening on New Zealand Television). In 2007, a Burger King ad featuring scantily clad bikini ladies was deemed "sexually exploitative" by the ASA and was never allowed shown on NZ television. A similar situation in 2013 when Carl Jr's ran into trouble with their racy advert deeming "sexually exploitative". However the burger chain blasted the decision as "puritanical".

Unlike most countries where the watershed is 9pm; NZís watershed time is half an hour early (meaning that the watershed begins 8:30pm while in the US, it is 10pm but it is been referred to as Safe Harbor). \n However because of cultural differences, NZ Broadcasting laws are fairly liberal but often balanced (that means not too harsh or too soft).


New Zealandís censorship are more heavily concerned about Child Pornography (aka the ThinkOfTheChildren issue). In practice, Television in New Zealand is policed by the Broadcasting Standards Authority (NZís equivalent to the FCC) and it is based on Good Taste and Decency (which they say very frequently).Despite NZ's censorship being rather liberal, it still have to deal with MoralGuardians such as Family First NZ and the SPCS (Society Promotions of Community Standards).

to:

New Zealandís censorship are more heavily concerned about Child Pornography (aka the ThinkOfTheChildren issue). In practice, Television in New Zealand is policed by the Broadcasting Standards Authority (NZís equivalent to the FCC) and it is based on Good Taste and Decency (which they say very frequently).Despite NZ's censorship being rather liberal, it still have to deal with MoralGuardians such as Family First NZ and the SPCS (Society for Promotions of Community Standards).


New Zealandís censorship are more heavily concerned about Child Pornography (aka the ThinkOfTheChildren issue). In practice, Television in New Zealand is policed by the Broadcasting Standards Authority (NZís equivalent to the FCC) and it is based on Good Taste and Decency (which they say very frequently).

to:

New Zealandís censorship are more heavily concerned about Child Pornography (aka the ThinkOfTheChildren issue). In practice, Television in New Zealand is policed by the Broadcasting Standards Authority (NZís equivalent to the FCC) and it is based on Good Taste and Decency (which they say very frequently).
frequently).Despite NZ's censorship being rather liberal, it still have to deal with MoralGuardians such as Family First NZ and the SPCS (Society Promotions of Community Standards).


When it comes to films and other media, New Zealand usually classify films that are based on either the Australian or British decisions (occasionally the Australian made decisions is more common in NZ). NZís OFLC is run by the government (similar to the Australian Classification Board in Australia) and its focus on material that may considered injurious to the public good. Material such as Sex, Crime, Cruelty and Horror should be dealt with Extent, Degree or Manner. However, NZ's classification law is enforced by the Department of Internal Affairs (more specifically the Censorship Compliance Unit), NZ Customs and NZ Police. An adult who gives a child or teen a restricted movie, video game or pornographic item will be reliable for a $3,000 fine (roughly [=US$2,076.54=]) while Corporates will be given a heavy fine of $10,000 (roughly [=US$6,921.80=]).

to:

When it comes to films and other media, New Zealand usually classify films that are based on either the Australian or British decisions (occasionally the Australian made decisions is more common in NZ). NZís OFLC is run by the government (similar to the Australian Classification Board in Australia) and its focus on material that may considered injurious to the public good. Material such as Sex, Crime, Cruelty and Horror should be dealt with Extent, Degree or Manner. However, NZ's classification law is enforced by the Department of Internal Affairs (more specifically the Censorship Compliance Unit), NZ Customs and NZ Police. An adult who gives a child or teen a restricted movie, video game or pornographic item will be reliable for a $3,000 fine (roughly [=US$2,076.54=]) [=US$1,979.08=]) while Corporates will be given a heavy fine of $10,000 (roughly [=US$6,921.80=]).
[=US$6,596.49=]).


The United Kingdom is more concerned with the violence, particularly scenes of violence, self-harm, and criminal, disgusting, or antisocial behavior that impressionable audience members might see as fun or easy to imitate in real life. The sex gets through a bit more easily (FamilyFriendlyStripper, post-watershed, is mostly non-existent in the UK, thus resulting in a number of gratuitous pole dancers in many movies) and the language is much stronger after what is known as the nine o'clock {{watershed}}. The continuity announcer usually gives a warning before a film or show that contains swearing, violence, or sex. The British Board of Film Classification ''does'' still retain the ability to censor scenes or even ban films outright, but the threshold for doing so is pretty high; sex scenes featuring an actor under the British age of majority are verboten even if they were of consenting age in the film's country of origin, for example, and a particularly awful quasi-documentary called ''Bumfights''[[note]]If you don't remember this one, YouDoNOTWantToKnow[[/note]] was the first film to get a ban in several decades because its very existence went several miles past the MoralEventHorizon.

to:

The United Kingdom is more concerned with the violence, particularly scenes of violence, self-harm, and criminal, disgusting, or antisocial behavior that impressionable audience members might see as fun or easy to imitate in real life. The sex gets through a bit more easily (FamilyFriendlyStripper, post-watershed, is mostly non-existent in the UK, thus resulting in a number of gratuitous pole dancers in many movies) and the language is much stronger after what is known as the nine o'clock {{watershed}}. The continuity announcer usually gives a warning before a film or show that contains swearing, violence, or sex. The British Board of Film Classification ''does'' still retain the ability to censor scenes or even ban films outright, but the threshold for doing so is pretty high; sex scenes featuring an actor under the British age of majority are verboten even if they were of consenting age in the film's country of origin, for example, and a particularly awful quasi-documentary called ''Bumfights''[[note]]If you don't remember this one, YouDoNOTWantToKnow[[/note]] was the first film to get a ban in several decades because its very existence went several miles past the MoralEventHorizon.
acceptable standards.


Sadly, Australia's censorship board has been branded as the "strictest in the world" in terms of acceptability to adults. Pornography is also difficult to come by as all states prohibit the sell of Hardcore Porn DVDs that are rated [=X18+=], but therefore sold only in territorial regions such as the A.C.T and the Northern Territory.

to:

Sadly, Australia's censorship board has been branded as the "strictest in the world" in terms of acceptability to adults. Pornography is also difficult to come by as all states prohibit the sell of Hardcore Porn DVDs [=DVDs=] that are rated [=X18+=], but therefore sold only in territorial regions such as the A.C.T and the Northern Territory.


Sadly, Australia's censorship board has been branded as the "strictest in the world" in terms of acceptability to adults. Pornography is also difficult to come by as all states prohibit the sell of Hardcore Porn DVDs that are rated X18+, but therefore sold only in territorial regions such as the A.C.T and the Northern Territory.

Even TV is policed in Australia. Anything rated R18+ on TV will require an edit for MA15+ (which is similar in the US but slightly different when Basic or Premium cable bans all NC-17 movies on TV).

An episode of WesternAnimation/PeppaPig has caused some controversy over its Mister Skinnylegs episode. The reason is because Australia has some dangerous creatures (especially the spider).

to:

Sadly, Australia's censorship board has been branded as the "strictest in the world" in terms of acceptability to adults. Pornography is also difficult to come by as all states prohibit the sell of Hardcore Porn DVDs that are rated X18+, [=X18+=], but therefore sold only in territorial regions such as the A.C.T and the Northern Territory.

Even TV is policed in Australia. Anything rated R18+ [=R18+=] on TV will require an edit for MA15+ [=MA15+=] (which is similar in the US but slightly different when Basic or Premium cable bans all NC-17 movies on TV).

An episode of WesternAnimation/PeppaPig has caused some controversy over its Mister Skinnylegs episode. The reason the episode was banned is because Australia has some it features an arachnid creature (aka the Spider, which is dangerous creatures (especially the spider).
in Australia).


Sadly, Australia's censorship board has been branded as the "strictest in the world" in terms of acceptability to adults. Pornography is also difficult to come by as all states prohibit the sell of Hardcore Porn DVDs that are rated X18+, but therefore sold only in territorial regions such as the A.C.T and the Northern Territory.

Even TV is policed in Australia. Anything rated R18+ on TV will require an edit for MA15+ (which is similar in the US but slightly different when Basic or Premium cable bans all NC-17 movies on TV).

An episode of WesternAnimation/PeppaPig has caused some controversy over its Mister Skinnylegs episode. The reason is because Australia has some dangerous creatures (especially the spider).



Video Games do not require NZ labels (which only applies to unrestricted G, PG or M rating). This means that Australian Ratings will be used by default if unrestricted. However games with restricted rating do require to have a red NZ classification labels ([=R13, R15, R16 and R18=]). Despite being a small but limited market, some Video Games that are censored for Australia can have an impact on NZ. For example in 2008, VideoGame/GrandTheftAutoIV was released with R18 certificate despite being censored in Australia with an [=MA15+=] rating (at the time Australia did not have the Adult 18+ rating for video games). However a 21 year old man managed to get the uncensored version intact.

to:

Video Games do not require NZ labels (which only applies to unrestricted G, PG or M rating). This means that Australian Ratings will be used by default if unrestricted. However games with restricted rating do require to have a red NZ classification labels ([=R13, R15, R16 and R18=]). Despite being a small but limited market, some Video Games that are censored for Australia can have an impact on NZ. For example in 2008, VideoGame/GrandTheftAutoIV was released with an R18 certificate despite being censored in Australia with an [=MA15+=] rating (at the time Australia did not have the Adult 18+ rating for video games). However a 21 year old man managed to get the uncensored version intact.

Added DiffLines:

Advertisements are also policed, but by the Advertising Standards Authority (the same name with the UK) and the Commercials Approvals Bureau (to avoid confusion with the Citizens Advice Bureau as the CAB as the abbreviation. But it is also the local body where adverts are approved for screening). In 2007, a Burger King ad featuring scantily clad bikini ladies was deemed "sexually exploitative" by the ASA and was never allowed shown on NZ television. A similar situation in 2013 when Carl Jr's ran into trouble with their racy advert deeming "sexually exploitative". However the burger chain blasted the decision as "puritanical".

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How well does it match the trope?

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