Follow TV Tropes

Following

History UsefulNotes / CatchWrestling

Go To



* BodyguardingABadass: When pro wrestling started to become more predetermined in the 1920s, there were wrestlers who disliked the new wrestling "trust" (meaning worked or coordinated) and so they became "trustbusters", outlaw wrestlers who posed threats to promotions and their champions by refusing to co-operate during matches. To counter them, the wrestling trust enlisted wrestlers of high skill who could ward them off, being called "policemen". A good example of a policeman wrestler was "[[PantheraAwesome The Nebraskan Tiger Man]]" John Pesek who worked for Ed Lewis and the Gold Dust Trio and was famed for his brutality against such trustbusters. Funny enough though, Pesek himself was a major trustbuster in his own right, as a consequence [[ScrewedByTheNetwork promoters isolated him from the wrestling mainstream for much of his career]].

to:

* BodyguardingABadass: When pro wrestling started to become more predetermined in the 1920s, there were wrestlers who disliked the new wrestling "trust" (meaning worked or coordinated) and so they became "trustbusters", outlaw wrestlers who posed threats to promotions and their champions by refusing to co-operate during matches. To counter them, the wrestling trust enlisted wrestlers of high skill who could ward them off, being called "policemen". A good example of a policeman wrestler was "[[PantheraAwesome The Nebraskan Tiger Man]]" John Pesek who worked for Ed Lewis Wrestling/EdStranglerLewis and the Gold Dust Trio and was famed for his brutality against such trustbusters. Funny enough though, Pesek himself was a major trustbuster in his own right, as a consequence [[ScrewedByTheNetwork promoters isolated him from the wrestling mainstream for much of his career]].

Added DiffLines:

*** Even earlier than that, it is said that originally the ruleset was called Luta Livre Americana and that it came to Brazil from America in about 1906.


*** His students Fausto Brunocilla and Fausto's son Carlos are responsible for training the most well known Luta Livre guys like Hugo Duarte, Eugenio Tadeu, Marco Ruas, etc.

to:

*** His students Fausto Brunocilla and Brunocilla, Fausto's son Carlos Carlos, Roberto Leitão, and Joao Ricardo are responsible for training the most well known Luta Livre guys like Hugo Duarte, Eugenio Tadeu, Marco Ruas, etc.


* Japan, the land of martial arts, is the country with the strongest catch tradition nowadays, even above Britain and United States. After some history of challenges against native UsefulNotes/{{Judo}} practitioners, [[GermansLoveDavidHasselhoff Japanese decided that catch wrestling was awesome]] and integrated it in their culture through professional wrestling (which they call ''puroresu''). Despite it entailing the same worked nature as abroad, in Japan it never left its competitive roots altogether, as crowds there love to see fake wrestlers kicking each other for real, and it actually returned full force with a revival movement called "[[Wrestling/UniversalWrestlingFederation shoot-style]]." Mixed with other styles like judo, UsefulNotes/{{Karate}} and sambo, as well as some Japanese creativity, catch lived on to give birth to the early stage of competitive UsefulNotes/MixedMartialArts and submission grappling.

to:

* Japan, the land of martial arts, is the country with the strongest catch tradition nowadays, even above Britain and United States. After some history of challenges against native UsefulNotes/{{Judo}} practitioners, [[GermansLoveDavidHasselhoff Japanese people decided that catch wrestling was awesome]] and integrated it in their culture through professional wrestling (which they call ''puroresu''). Despite it entailing the same worked nature as abroad, in Japan it never left its competitive roots altogether, as crowds there love to see fake wrestlers kicking each other for real, and it actually returned full force with a revival movement called "[[Wrestling/UniversalWrestlingFederation shoot-style]]." Mixed with other styles like judo, UsefulNotes/{{Karate}} and sambo, as well as some Japanese creativity, catch lived on to give birth to the early stage of competitive UsefulNotes/MixedMartialArts and submission grappling.


* In Brazil, catch-as-catch-can attracted the crowd's attention both before and during the rise of the ''vale tudo'', a system of bouts which saw people beating down each other with lots of blood to entertain the average Brazilian and which would take invariably the same route towards modern MMA. Local wrestlers mixed catch wrestling with judo and striking arts specifically to adapt to this kind of competition, and it received the antonomasia name of "luta livre," a Portuguese word which formerly referred to any kind of sport wrestling, catch or not. Luta livre almost disappeared with the wild rise of Brazilian jiu-jitsu, but the style is still out there and surviving in European countries like France and Germany.

to:

* In Brazil, catch-as-catch-can attracted the crowd's attention both before and during the rise of the ''vale tudo'', a system of bouts which saw people beating down each other with lots of blood to entertain the average Brazilian and which would take invariably the same route towards modern MMA. Local wrestlers mixed catch wrestling with judo and striking arts specifically to adapt to this kind of competition, and it received the antonomasia name of "luta livre," a Portuguese word which formerly referred to any kind of sport wrestling, catch or not. Luta livre almost disappeared with the wild rise of Brazilian jiu-jitsu, UsefulNotes/BrazilianJiuJitsu, but the style is still out there and surviving in European countries like France and Germany.


** Some notable wrestlers of different styles managed to do this to high level catch wrestlers, like Turkish oil wrestler Yusuf "The Terrible Turk" Ismail and Indian/Pakistani Pehlwani wrestler Ghulam Muhammad Butt, better known as the Great Gama.

to:

** Some notable wrestlers of different styles managed to do this to high level catch wrestlers, like sumo wrestler Sorakichi Matsuda, Turkish oil wrestler Yusuf "The Terrible Turk" Ismail and Indian/Pakistani Pehlwani wrestler Ghulam Muhammad Butt, better known as the Great Gama.


* TheSpartanWay: Catch gyms, which popularly received of the MeaningfulName of "snakepits", only accepted apprentices after the veteran wrestlers had thoroughly beaten them in a ritual of passage of sorts, sometimes to the extent of injury, which was designed to make the un-tough quit. Unfortunately for the tough enough to pass, beatdowns had just started for them. That this was ForYourGood had to be beat into the head of Karl Gotch, who after his first humiliating stretching returned to the gym and headbutted the offender.

to:

* TheSpartanWay: Catch gyms, which popularly received of the MeaningfulName of "snakepits", only accepted apprentices after the veteran wrestlers had thoroughly beaten them in a ritual of passage of sorts, sometimes to the extent of injury, which was designed to make the un-tough quit. Unfortunately for the tough enough to pass, beatdowns had just started for them. That this was ForYourGood ForYourOwnGood had to be beat into the head of Karl Gotch, who after his first humiliating stretching returned to the gym and headbutted the offender.


However, always in the search of the contentment of the audience and the money they would throw, catch wrestling would take over the years a road to theatricality and showmanship over all-around competitions. Matches became deliberately back and forth instead of being boring stallfests or fast squashes, wrestlers started playing larger-than-life [[TheGimmick gimmicks]] with [[{{tecnico}} heroes]] and [[{{rudo}} villains]], and finally, "worked" elements like {{tag team}} bouts, female wrestlers and [[GarbageWrestler weapons]] were introduced to spice up the party. Catch wrestling stopped being a competitive sport and turned into the violent soap opera we know and love as pro wrestling or did it?

to:

However, always in the search of the contentment of the audience and the money they would throw, catch wrestling would take over the years a road to theatricality and showmanship over all-around competitions. Matches became deliberately back and forth instead of being boring stallfests or fast squashes, wrestlers started playing taking on larger-than-life [[TheGimmick gimmicks]] with [[{{tecnico}} heroes]] and [[{{rudo}} villains]], and finally, "worked" elements like {{tag team}} bouts, female wrestlers and [[GarbageWrestler weapons]] were introduced to spice up the party. Catch wrestling stopped being a competitive sport and turned into the violent soap opera we know and love as pro wrestling or did it?



* Japan, the land of martial arts, is the country with the strongest catch tradition nowadays, even above Britain and United States. After some history of challenges against native UsefulNotes/{{Judo}} practitioners, [[GermansLoveDavidHasselhoff Japanese decided that catch wrestling was awesome]] and integrated it in their culture through professional wrestling (which they call ''puroresu''). Despite it entailed the same worked nature as abroad, in Japan it never left its competitive roots altogether, as crowds there love to see fake wrestlers kicking each other for real, and it actually returned full force with a revival movement called "[[Wrestling/UniversalWrestlingFederation shoot-style]]." Mixed with other styles like judo, UsefulNotes/{{Karate}} and sambo, as well as some Japanese creativity, catch lived on to give birth to the early stage of modern UsefulNotes/MixedMartialArts and submission grappling.

to:

* Japan, the land of martial arts, is the country with the strongest catch tradition nowadays, even above Britain and United States. After some history of challenges against native UsefulNotes/{{Judo}} practitioners, [[GermansLoveDavidHasselhoff Japanese decided that catch wrestling was awesome]] and integrated it in their culture through professional wrestling (which they call ''puroresu''). Despite it entailed entailing the same worked nature as abroad, in Japan it never left its competitive roots altogether, as crowds there love to see fake wrestlers kicking each other for real, and it actually returned full force with a revival movement called "[[Wrestling/UniversalWrestlingFederation shoot-style]]." Mixed with other styles like judo, UsefulNotes/{{Karate}} and sambo, as well as some Japanese creativity, catch lived on to give birth to the early stage of modern competitive UsefulNotes/MixedMartialArts and submission grappling.



** Invoked and kept as one of the traits of the style. Due to its theatrical nature, most forms of catch-as-catch-can favored flashy moves over pragmatic ones (although all of them hurt the same), so nasty armlocks and stylized leglocks with lots of visible limb twisting became the favourites of the moveset. Nevertheless, less visually cool techniques like neck cranks and headlocks were also included, as they are a vital part of the wrestling process.

to:

** Invoked and kept as one of the traits of the style. Due to its theatrical nature, most forms of catch-as-catch-can favored flashy moves over pragmatic ones (although all of them hurt the same), so nasty armlocks and stylized leglocks with lots of visible limb twisting became the favourites of the moveset.discipline. Nevertheless, less visually cool techniques like neck cranks and headlocks were also included, as they are a vital part of the wrestling process.



* BodyguardingABadass: When pro wrestling started to become more predetermined in the 1920s, there were wrestlers who disliked the new wrestling "trust" (meaning worked or coordinate) and so they became "trustbusters", outlaw wrestlers who posed threats to promotions and their champions by refusing to co-operate during matches. To counter them, the wrestling trust enlisted wrestlers of high skill who could ward them off, being called "policemen". A good example of a policeman wrestler was "[[PantheraAwesome The Nebraskan Tiger Man]]" John Pesek who worked for Ed Lewis and the Gold Dust Trio and was famed for his brutality against such trustbusters. Funny enough though, Pesek himself was a major trustbuster in his own right, as a consequence [[ScrewedByTheNetwork promoters isolated him from the wrestling mainstream for much of his career]].

to:

* BodyguardingABadass: When pro wrestling started to become more predetermined in the 1920s, there were wrestlers who disliked the new wrestling "trust" (meaning worked or coordinate) coordinated) and so they became "trustbusters", outlaw wrestlers who posed threats to promotions and their champions by refusing to co-operate during matches. To counter them, the wrestling trust enlisted wrestlers of high skill who could ward them off, being called "policemen". A good example of a policeman wrestler was "[[PantheraAwesome The Nebraskan Tiger Man]]" John Pesek who worked for Ed Lewis and the Gold Dust Trio and was famed for his brutality against such trustbusters. Funny enough though, Pesek himself was a major trustbuster in his own right, as a consequence [[ScrewedByTheNetwork promoters isolated him from the wrestling mainstream for much of his career]].



* BrawlerLock: The Irish collar and elbow tie up is pretty much this. As well as the Greco-Roman knuckle lock.

to:

* BrawlerLock: The Irish collar and elbow tie up is pretty much this. As well as the Greco-Roman knuckle lock. If the names weren't enough hint, these are styles of wrestling all their own, use set ups were adopted for catch matches, the former becoming synonymous with worked pro wrestling.



* DangerousForbiddenTechnique: Chokeholds were the main no-no in some rulesets; the term "no holds barred" came precisely from any catch competition which allowed to do any hold including chokeholds. In recent times, however, the heel hook and some variations of the toehold are the moves most people will tell you they don't want to be in.

to:

* DangerousForbiddenTechnique: Chokeholds were the main no-no in some rulesets; the term "no holds barred" came precisely from any catch competition which allowed one to do any hold including chokeholds. In recent later times, however, the heel hook and some variations of the toehold are the moves most people will tell you they don't want to be in.



* DontThinkFeel: Inverted, as old school wrestlers liken wrestling to chess (XanatosSpeedChess to be specific); they believe to be a good wrestler they have to able to think under pressure in order to plan moves ahead, improvise and/or change strategies, as opposed to the concept of ''mushin'' (no mindedness) found in Eastern martial arts. Of course, being able to react instinctively to important as well, but to be able to think under pressure is an asset to a wrestler.

to:

* DontThinkFeel: Inverted, as old school wrestlers liken wrestling to chess (XanatosSpeedChess to be specific); they believe to be a good wrestler they have to able to think under pressure in order to plan moves ahead, improvise and/or change strategies, as opposed to the concept of ''mushin'' (no mindedness) found in Eastern martial arts. Of course, being able to react instinctively to is important as well, but to be able to think under pressure is an asset to a wrestler.



** When the worked professional wrestling took off, "shooters" was a title used to designate wrestlers who had a legitimate background in some form of amateur wrestling (and thus they knew to do takedowns, an action which is called "to shoot"), while "hookers" was reserved to the more expert wrestlers who also knew to make people tap out (by using submissions, which were called "hooks"); also there were "rippers" for those who knew how to brutalize their opponents if they wanted to (by using dirty moves like fish-hooks which they called "rips").
** In a subversion, the use of this specific jargon is almost nonexistant nowadays. "Shooter" is used to refer any pro wrestler with martial arts training or belonging to the Japanese shoot-style, while "hooker" became known as wrestlers who specialized in scamming carnival goers into paying money to lose in matches against them. With the downfall of kayfabe, which ironically made fans less willing to try their hands against pro wrestlers, even that's become obsolete, with "hookers" now usually being anyone a promoter throws into a match specifically to get a wrestler they don't like hurt.

to:

** When the worked professional wrestling took off, "shooters" was a title used to designate wrestlers who had a legitimate background in some form of amateur wrestling (and thus they knew to do takedowns, an action which is called "to shoot"), while "hookers" was reserved to the more expert wrestlers who also knew to make people tap out (by using submissions, which were called "hooks"); also there were "rippers" for those who knew how to brutalize their opponents if they wanted to (by using dirty moves like fish-hooks which they called "rips").
** In a subversion, the use of this specific jargon is almost nonexistant nowadays. "Shooter" is used to refer any pro wrestler with martial arts training or belonging to the Japanese shoot-style, while "hooker" "hookers" became known as wrestlers who specialized in scamming carnival goers into paying money to lose in matches against them. With the downfall of kayfabe, which ironically made fans less willing to try their hands against pro wrestlers, even that's become obsolete, with "hookers" now usually being anyone a promoter throws into a match specifically to get a wrestler they don't like hurt.



* OddFriendship: The Brazilian luta livre guys were quite friendly with the UsefulNotes/{{Capoeira}} and UsefulNotes/MuayThai guys. In fact, it were the luta livre guys who first brought muay thai to vale tudo fights.

to:

* OddFriendship: OddFriendship
**
The Brazilian luta livre guys were quite friendly with the UsefulNotes/{{Capoeira}} and UsefulNotes/MuayThai guys. In fact, it were the luta livre guys who first brought muay thai to vale tudo fights.



* TheSpartanWay: Catch gyms, which popularly received of the MeaningfulName of "snakepits", only accepted apprentices after the veteran wrestlers had thoroughly beaten them in a ritual of passage of sorts, sometimes to the extent of injury, which was designed to make the un-tough quit. Unfortunately for the tough enough to pass, beatdowns had just started for them.

to:

* TheSpartanWay: Catch gyms, which popularly received of the MeaningfulName of "snakepits", only accepted apprentices after the veteran wrestlers had thoroughly beaten them in a ritual of passage of sorts, sometimes to the extent of injury, which was designed to make the un-tough quit. Unfortunately for the tough enough to pass, beatdowns had just started for them. That this was ForYourGood had to be beat into the head of Karl Gotch, who after his first humiliating stretching returned to the gym and headbutted the offender.



* UseYourHead: As an alternative to sprawling, in order to defend against takedowns, all a wrestler has to do is place his head in front of his opponent's head, that way his opponent will never be able to reach his legs to do the takedown. Granted, nobody uses this in competition, as it can be translated into an actual headbutt which is illegal.

to:

* UseYourHead: As an alternative to sprawling, in order to defend against takedowns, all a wrestler has to do is place his head in front of his opponent's head, that way his opponent will never be able to reach his legs to do the takedown. Granted, nobody uses this in competition, as it can be translated into an actual headbutt headbutt, which is illegal.


* In Brazil, catch-as-catch-can attracted the crowd's attention both before and during the rise of the ''vale tudo'', a system of bouts which saw people beating down each other with lots of blood to entertain the average Brazilian and which would take invariably the same route towards modern MMA. Local wrestlers mixed catch wrestling with judo and striking arts specifically to adapt to this kind of competition, and it received the antonomasia name of "luta livre," a Portuguese word which formerly referred to any kind of sport wrestling, catch or not. Luta livre almost disappeared with the wild rise of Brazilian jiu-jitsu, but the style is still out there and surviving in European countries like Germany.

to:

* In Brazil, catch-as-catch-can attracted the crowd's attention both before and during the rise of the ''vale tudo'', a system of bouts which saw people beating down each other with lots of blood to entertain the average Brazilian and which would take invariably the same route towards modern MMA. Local wrestlers mixed catch wrestling with judo and striking arts specifically to adapt to this kind of competition, and it received the antonomasia name of "luta livre," a Portuguese word which formerly referred to any kind of sport wrestling, catch or not. Luta livre almost disappeared with the wild rise of Brazilian jiu-jitsu, but the style is still out there and surviving in European countries like France and Germany.



* In Russia, catch wrestling was known as "free wrestling" and survived there as a major influence in creating the relatively newer martial art of Russian sambo, with its appeal for leg locks and use of shoes as possibly its closest resemblance, aside from other influences that include UsefulNotes/{{Judo}}, Greco-Roman, freestyle and other folk styles of wrestling. Viktor Spiridonov and Vasili Oshchepkov, the guys who laid ''two'' different foundations for what would become sambo were both according to some people catch wrestlers in their own right.

to:

* In Russia, catch wrestling was known as "free wrestling" and survived there as a major influence in creating the relatively newer martial art of Russian sambo, with its appeal for leg locks and locks, use of shoes shoes, and the banning of chokeholds in sport sambo as possibly its closest resemblance, biggest influence, aside from other influences that include UsefulNotes/{{Judo}}, Greco-Roman, freestyle and other folk styles of wrestling. Viktor Spiridonov and Vasili Oshchepkov, the guys who laid ''two'' different foundations for what would become sambo were both according to some people catch wrestlers in their own right.


* ArrogantKungFuGuy: Cocky, magnificent personas were endorsed in order to draw the crowds, and if a wrestler didn't have enough personality to attract heat, a flamboyant manager would do the trick.
* AwesomeButImpractical: Invoked and kept as one of the traits of the style. Due to its theatrical nature, even the most legit forms of catch-as-catch-can favored flashy moves over pragmatic ones (although all of them hurt the same). Armlocks and stylized leglocks with lots of limb twists and visible torque are the favourites of the moveset, along with a certain disposition to clamp them from any angle or position, although less cool techniques like neck cranks and headlocks are also contained on it.
* BadassBack: Unlike other grappling styles, catch wrestling doesn't inculcate a desperate fear to have one's own back taken in a match (though, naturally, it enforces that it's more preferable not to have it taken), and in fact it has a few techniques which are initiated from the back. Wrestling/KazushiSakuraba marked possibly the most famous instance when he caught Renzo Gracie in a double wrist lock while Gracie was clamping to his back.

to:

* ArrogantKungFuGuy: Cocky, magnificent personas were actively endorsed in order to draw appeal the crowds, and if crowds. If a wrestler didn't have enough personality to attract heat, a flamboyant manager would do the trick.
* AwesomeButImpractical: AwesomeButImpractical:
**
Invoked and kept as one of the traits of the style. Due to its theatrical nature, even the most legit forms of catch-as-catch-can favored flashy moves over pragmatic ones (although all of them hurt the same). Armlocks same), so nasty armlocks and stylized leglocks with lots of limb twists and visible torque are limb twisting became the favourites of the moveset, along with a certain disposition to clamp them from any angle or position, although moveset. Nevertheless, less visually cool techniques like neck cranks and headlocks are were also contained included, as they are a vital part of the wrestling process.
** Japanese catch wrestling took it UpToEleven. The influence of judo and traditional puroresu
on it.
their culture meant crowds were able to understand the holds's workings and were already expecting something more, so the wrestlers had to keep it the most dynamic and visually appealing possible, even when they wrestled for real as in the Pancrase and early Shooto promotions. That many of the wrestlers themselves had judo and sambo backgrounds only contributed to it, as the former art favors a grappling game very fast-paced and based on wild submission-hunting, while the latter features bold entrying into joint lock from very unusual angles.
* BadassBack: Unlike other grappling styles, catch wrestling doesn't inculcate a desperate fear to have one's own back taken in a match (though, naturally, it enforces that it's more it is preferable not to have it taken), and in fact it has a few techniques which are initiated from the back. Wrestling/KazushiSakuraba marked possibly the most famous instance when he caught Renzo Gracie in a double wrist lock while Gracie was clamping clamped to his back.



** Some notable wrestlers of different styles managed to do this to high level catch wrestlers like Turkish oil wrestler Yusuf "The Terrible Turk" Ismail and Indian/Pakistani Pehlwani wrestler Ghulam Muhammad Butt, better known as the Great Gama.

to:

** Some notable wrestlers of different styles managed to do this to high level catch wrestlers wrestlers, like Turkish oil wrestler Yusuf "The Terrible Turk" Ismail and Indian/Pakistani Pehlwani wrestler Ghulam Muhammad Butt, better known as the Great Gama.



* BodyguardingABadass: When pro wrestling started to become more predetermined in the 1920s, there were wrestlers who disliked the new wrestling "trust" and so they became "trustbusters", outlaw wrestlers who posed threats to promotions and their champions by refusing to co-operate during matches. To counter them the wrestling "trust" enlisted wrestlers of high skill who could play ball and were called "policemen" in order to ward them off. A good example of a "policeman" was "[[PantheraAwesome The Nebraskan Tiger Man]]" John Pesek who worked for Ed Lewis and the Gold Dust Trio and was famed for his brutality against such "trustbusters". Funny enough though, Pesek himself was a major "trustbuster" in his own right, as a consequence [[ScrewedByTheNetwork promoters isolated him from the wrestling mainstream for much of his career]].
* BoringButPractical: In contrast with the aforementioned theatricality, ancient catch-as-catch-can styles often prefered to win by pinfall before submission, and some rulesets disallowed submissions entirely. It comes to the point that many people believe most submissions in catch wrestling were created simply by controlling an opponent with regular pinning holds and then squeezing or twisting through them, or even from simple pain compliance techniques to force a pin. The popular, submission based rough-and-tumble style came later, possibly influenced by the Japanese jiu-jitsu stylists who came to Europe and United States.
* BrawlerLock: The Irish Collar and Elbow tie up is pretty much this. As well as the Greco-Roman knuckle lock.

to:

* BodyguardingABadass: When pro wrestling started to become more predetermined in the 1920s, there were wrestlers who disliked the new wrestling "trust" (meaning worked or coordinate) and so they became "trustbusters", outlaw wrestlers who posed threats to promotions and their champions by refusing to co-operate during matches. To counter them them, the wrestling "trust" trust enlisted wrestlers of high skill who could play ball and were called "policemen" in order to ward them off. off, being called "policemen". A good example of a "policeman" policeman wrestler was "[[PantheraAwesome The Nebraskan Tiger Man]]" John Pesek who worked for Ed Lewis and the Gold Dust Trio and was famed for his brutality against such "trustbusters". trustbusters. Funny enough though, Pesek himself was a major "trustbuster" trustbuster in his own right, as a consequence [[ScrewedByTheNetwork promoters isolated him from the wrestling mainstream for much of his career]].
* BoringButPractical: In contrast with the aforementioned theatricality, ancient Ancient catch-as-catch-can styles often prefered to win by pinfall before instead of by submission, and to the extent that some rulesets disallowed submissions entirely. It comes to the point that many people Many experts believe most submissions in catch wrestling were created simply by controlling an opponent with regular pinning holds and then squeezing or twisting through them, whatever you were grabbing, or even from simple pain compliance techniques vice versa, by squeezing or twisting something painful so you could control the opponent better in order to force a pin. The popular, submission based rough-and-tumble style came later, possibly influenced by the Japanese judo and jiu-jitsu stylists who came to Europe and United States.
* BrawlerLock: The Irish Collar collar and Elbow elbow tie up is pretty much this. As well as the Greco-Roman knuckle lock.



* CombatSadomasochist: British catch wrestler Bert Assirati was known to love getting hurt and hurting his opponents, with many afraid to face him in worked matches as he could double cross them just to see them in pain.

to:

* CombatSadomasochist: British catch wrestler Bert Assirati was known to love getting hurt and hurting his opponents, with many opponents. Many were afraid to face him in worked matches as he could double cross them just to see them in pain.



* CounterAttack: A fundamental part of catch wrestling is the "chain wrestling" or "lockflow", the ability to chain one submission to another both to and from the opponent in a fluid sequence.
* DangerousForbiddenTechnique: Chokes were the main no-no in some rulesets; the term "no holds barred" came originally from any catch competition which allowed you to do any hold including chokeholds. In recent times, however, the heel hook and some variations of the toehold are the moves most people will tell you they don't want to be in.

to:

* CounterAttack: A fundamental part of catch wrestling is the "chain wrestling" or "lockflow", the ability to chain one submission to another both (both to and from the opponent opponent) in a fluid sequence.
* DangerousForbiddenTechnique: Chokes Chokeholds were the main no-no in some rulesets; the term "no holds barred" came originally precisely from any catch competition which allowed you to do any hold including chokeholds. In recent times, however, the heel hook and some variations of the toehold are the moves most people will tell you they don't want to be in.



* DifficultButAwesome: The opinion of many people about catch wrestling as opposed to other grappling styles, although the source of the difficulty is a more heated debate. The main explanation is that catch is a niche sport today, and thus it's quite difficult to find quality instruction compared to worldwide disciplines like judo or Brazilian jiu-jitsu, but other reason is explained as catch wrestling being comparatively harsher to the body than the gentler pajama rolling found in the aforementioned two.
* DoesNotLikeShoes: Inverted, rather surprisingly when compared to other grappling styles. Catch-as-catch can was traditionally done with wrestling shoes, when not with plain dress shoes, and every posterior incarnation retained boots or any kind of footwear as part of its uniform; this, naturally, helped to develop leg and footlocks, as shodded feet are easier to grab and twist. In straight examples, the wrestler Clarence Eklund became popular for wrestling in bare feet, which was both distinctive and useful, and Brazilian luta livre exponents would fight barefoot as the vale tudo ruleset forced them so.
* DontThinkFeel: Inverted, as old school wrestlers liken wrestling to chess (XanatosSpeedChess to be specific); they believe to be a good wrestler they have to able to think under pressure in order to plan moves ahead, improvise and/or change strategies as opposed to the concept of ''mushin'' (no mindedness) found in Eastern martial arts. Of course, being able to react instinctively to important as well, but to be able to think under pressure is an asset to a wrestler.

to:

* DifficultButAwesome: The opinion of many people about catch wrestling as opposed to other grappling styles, although the source of the difficulty is a more heated debate. The main explanation is that catch is a niche sport today, and thus it's quite difficult to find quality instruction compared to worldwide disciplines like judo or Brazilian jiu-jitsu, but other reason is explained as that catch wrestling being is comparatively harsher to the body than the gentler pajama rolling found in the aforementioned two.
* DoesNotLikeShoes: DoesNotLikeShoes:
**
Inverted, rather surprisingly when compared to other grappling styles. Catch-as-catch can was traditionally done with wrestling shoes, when not with plain dress shoes, and every posterior incarnation retained boots or any kind of footwear as part of its uniform; this, uniform. This, naturally, helped to develop leg and footlocks, as shodded shod feet are easier to grab and twist. twist than bare ones.
**
In straight straighter examples, the wrestler Clarence Eklund became popular for wrestling in bare feet, which was both distinctive and useful, and while Brazilian luta livre exponents would fight barefoot as the vale tudo ruleset forced them so.
* DontThinkFeel: Inverted, as old school wrestlers liken wrestling to chess (XanatosSpeedChess to be specific); they believe to be a good wrestler they have to able to think under pressure in order to plan moves ahead, improvise and/or change strategies strategies, as opposed to the concept of ''mushin'' (no mindedness) found in Eastern martial arts. Of course, being able to react instinctively to important as well, but to be able to think under pressure is an asset to a wrestler.



* GlassCannon: Among other groundfighting styles, catch wrestling tend to be considered to have a killer arsenal of holds but a not so efficent system of setting them up or defending against other holds. Actually, this assumption qualifies only for a very specific fixture of catch, the Japanese shoot-style, which often saw wrestlers carelessly diving for joint locks (and thus getting into bad positions for an enemy counterattack) due to the sambo and judo influence found on it. Pure, ancient catch wrestling would resemble more amateur wrestling, with the wrestler controlling his opponent with body pressure and smart chanceries before applying any submissions. This conservative strategy was presumably the reason why the matches started turning into slow snoozefests and forced the business to go worked.

to:

* GlassCannon: Among other groundfighting styles, catch wrestling tend tends to be considered to have a killer arsenal of holds but a not so efficent system of setting them up or defending against other holds. Actually, this assumption qualifies only for a very specific fixture of catch, the Japanese shoot-style, which often saw wrestlers carelessly diving for joint locks (and thus getting into bad positions for an enemy counterattack) due to the sambo and judo influence found on it.it, as explained in Awesome, But Impractical above. Pure, ancient catch wrestling would resemble more amateur wrestling, with the wrestler controlling his opponent with body pressure and smart chanceries before applying any submissions. This conservative strategy was presumably the reason why the matches started turning into slow snoozefests and forced the business to go worked.



* HandicappedBadass: American wrestler "Rough" Tom Jenkins lost his right eye and had poor eyesight in his left eye meaning he was legally blind from a Fourth of July explosive accident. It did not stop him from becoming one of the most well known catch wrestlers of his time. In fact he gained a bit of a psychological advantage over his opponents from losing his right eye, he wore a glass eye which he would take out before the match in front of his opponent, creeping them out.
* HandyFeet: Clarence Eklund as noted above preferred wrestling without footgear and is described as having these. This led to his RedBaron as "The Octopus".

to:

* HandicappedBadass: American wrestler "Rough" Tom Jenkins lost his right eye and had poor eyesight in his left eye meaning he was legally blind from a Fourth of July explosive accident.accident, meaning he was legally blind. It did not stop him from becoming one of the most well known catch wrestlers of his time. In fact fact, he gained a bit of a psychological advantage over his opponents from losing his right eye, this because he wore a glass eye eye, which he would take out before the match in front of his opponent, creeping them out.
opponent to the latter's disgust.
* HandyFeet: Clarence Eklund as noted above preferred wrestling without footgear footwear and is described as having these. This led to his RedBaron as "The Octopus".



* LegacyCharacter: There were two "Strangler Lewis's" in catch wrestling, the first one was Evan "Strangler" Lewis and a Robert Friedrich who took the name Ed "Strangler" Lewis in tribute to the original.
* LightningBruiser: Big, strong wrestlers who were difficult to take down and control were often the dominant class, but most of them were deceptively agile. Georg Hackenschmidt, for example, was both insanely strong and shockingly capable of leaping over a table with his feet tied.
* MeaningfulName: When the worked professional wrestling took off, "shooters" was a title used to designate wrestlers who had a legitimate background in some form of amateur wrestling (and thus they knew to do takedowns, an action which is called "to shoot"), while "hookers" was reserved to the more expert wrestlers who also knew to make people tap out (by using submissions, which were called "hooks"); also there are "rippers" for those who knew how to brutalize their opponents if they wanted to (by using dirty moves like fish-hooks which they called "rips"). The use of this specific jargon is almost nonexistant nowadays; 'shooter' is used to refer any pro wrestler with martial arts training or belonging to the Japanese shoot-style. 'Hooker' became known as wrestlers who specialized in scamming carnival goers into paying money to lose in matches against them, but with the downfall of kayfabe, which ironically made fans less willing to try their hands against pro wrestlers, even that's become obsolete, with hookers now usually being anyone a promoter throws into a match specifically to get a wrestler they don't like hurt.

to:

* LegacyCharacter: There were two "Strangler Lewis's" in catch wrestling, the wrestling. The first one was Evan "Strangler" Lewis Lewis, and the second a Robert Friedrich who took the name Ed "Strangler" Lewis in tribute to the original.
* LightningBruiser: Big, strong wrestlers who were difficult to take down and control were often became the dominant class, but most of them were deceptively agile.agile too. Georg Hackenschmidt, for example, was both insanely strong and shockingly capable of leaping over a table with his feet tied.
* MeaningfulName: MeaningfulName:
**
When the worked professional wrestling took off, "shooters" was a title used to designate wrestlers who had a legitimate background in some form of amateur wrestling (and thus they knew to do takedowns, an action which is called "to shoot"), while "hookers" was reserved to the more expert wrestlers who also knew to make people tap out (by using submissions, which were called "hooks"); also there are were "rippers" for those who knew how to brutalize their opponents if they wanted to (by using dirty moves like fish-hooks which they called "rips"). The "rips").
** In a subversion, the
use of this specific jargon is almost nonexistant nowadays; 'shooter' nowadays. "Shooter" is used to refer any pro wrestler with martial arts training or belonging to the Japanese shoot-style. 'Hooker' shoot-style, while "hooker" became known as wrestlers who specialized in scamming carnival goers into paying money to lose in matches against them, but with them. With the downfall of kayfabe, which ironically made fans less willing to try their hands against pro wrestlers, even that's become obsolete, with hookers "hookers" now usually being anyone a promoter throws into a match specifically to get a wrestler they don't like hurt.



** Joe Stecher had very powerful legs, which he practiced his body scissors technique on full grain sacks till they burst, then went onto pigs and then according to some people [[UpToEleven a mule]]. When he put the body scissors on opponents there are accounts where he left bruises and tapped out people with just that technique.
* NeckSnap: The neck crank is one of the jewels of the moveset, and although it is not meant to snap the opponent's neck (well, at least if he doesn't give up), it targets the vertebrae and spinal column.
* OddFriendship: The Brazilian Luta Livre guys were quite friendly with the UsefulNotes/{{Capoeira}} and UsefulNotes/MuayThai guys with some of them also being trained capoeirists and it was the Luta Livre guys who brought Muay Thai to Vale Tudo fights.
** Orlando Americo da Silva, or also known as "Dudu" was a Brazilian catch wrestler and vale tudo fighter and one of the three main coaches of Luta Livre founder Euclydes "Tatú" Hatem who is said to have also trained the brothers Jorge, Oswaldo and even Helio Gracie of all people in catch wrestling.

to:

** Joe Stecher had very powerful legs, which and he capitalized on them to have a lethal bodyscissors technique. He practiced his body scissors technique it on full grain sacks till they burst, then went onto pigs and then did them the same (hopefully without bursting them), and then, according to some people people, used [[UpToEleven a mule]]. When he put the body scissors on opponents opponents, there are accounts where he left bruises and tapped out people with just that technique.
* NeckSnap: The neck crank is one of the jewels of the moveset, and although it is not meant to snap the opponent's neck (well, at least if he doesn't give up), up...), it targets the vertebrae and spinal column.
* OddFriendship: The Brazilian Luta Livre luta livre guys were quite friendly with the UsefulNotes/{{Capoeira}} and UsefulNotes/MuayThai guys with some of them also being trained capoeirists and guys. In fact, it was were the Luta Livre luta livre guys who first brought Muay Thai muay thai to Vale Tudo vale tudo fights.
** Orlando Americo da Silva, or also known as "Dudu" was a Brazilian catch wrestler and vale tudo fighter and one (one of the three main coaches of Luta Livre luta livre founder Euclydes "Tatú" Hatem Hatem), who is said to have also trained the brothers Jorge, Oswaldo and even Helio Hélio Gracie of all people in catch wrestling.



** Euclydes "Tatú" Hatem, Brazilian catch wrestler and creator of modern Luta Livre.

to:

** Euclydes "Tatú" Hatem, Brazilian catch wrestler and creator of modern Luta Livre.luta livre.



* SadistTeacher: Any catch wrestling trainer is traditionally assured to be it in any degree. Billy Riley, Billy Robinson and Karl Gotch were the main practitioners of the art of leaving apprentices completely broken after their trainings.

to:

* SadistTeacher: Any catch wrestling trainer is traditionally assured to be it in any degree. Billy Riley, Billy Robinson and Karl Gotch were the main practitioners of the art of leaving apprentices completely broken after their trainings.every trainings session.



* StoneWall: Similar to judo and jiu-jitsu; the turtle position is the go to position when wrestlers want to stall and/or get forced to stand up and try their luck there. Ed Lewis and Stanislaus Zbyszko have used this to great effect in their careers. Wrestlers have attempted to defy this trope with techniques they call rides and the use of dirty techniques they call rips.
* StoutStrength
** Brazilian catch wrestler Euclydes Hatem gained his nickname, "Tatú," from the Brazilian word for armadillo, as he had originally ventured in catch wrestling in his late childhood in order to get fit, and he was supposedly quite fat as a child. While he probably remained a bit stocky, he was one of the most feared grapplers around.
** British catch wrestler Bert Assirati was this as he also was a professional strongman and weightlifter that was known for feats of strength like doing the gymnastics iron cross at ''240 pounds'' and 5ft 7.

to:

* StoneWall: Similar to judo and jiu-jitsu; jiu-jitsu, the turtle position is the go to position when wrestlers want to stall and/or get forced to stand up and try their luck there. there, which Ed Lewis and Stanislaus Zbyszko have used this to great effect in their careers. Wrestlers have attempted to defy this trope with techniques they call rides called "rides" and the use of usual rips or dirty techniques they call rips.
techniques.
* StoutStrength
StoutStrength:
** Brazilian catch wrestler Euclydes Hatem gained his nickname, "Tatú," from the Brazilian word for armadillo, as he had originally ventured in catch wrestling in his late childhood in order to get fit, and he being was supposedly quite fat as a child. While he probably remained a bit stocky, he was became one of the most feared grapplers around.
** British catch wrestler Bert Assirati was this this, as he also was a professional strongman and weightlifter that was known for feats of strength like doing the gymnastics iron cross at ''240 pounds'' and 5ft 7.



* TopHeavyGuy: As stated above, some catch wrestlers were professional strongmen and some were also high level Greco-Roman wrestlers which gave them this body type since that style doesn't involve much leg grabbing. Notable example is Polish wrestler Stanislaus Zbyszko who was all three.
* SuplexFinisher: Just like Greco-Roman wrestling, suplexes are one of the more painful ways to get an opponent on the ground for a pin or submission.

to:

* TopHeavyGuy: As stated above, some catch wrestlers were professional strongmen strongmen, and some were also high level Greco-Roman wrestlers wrestlers, which gave them this body type too since that style doesn't involve much leg grabbing. Notable example is Polish wrestler Stanislaus Zbyszko Zbyszko, who was all three.
* SuplexFinisher: Just like Greco-Roman wrestling, suplexes are one of the more painful ways to get an opponent on the ground for a pin or submission. Even by itself, a well placed suplex can knock out.



** There are people who believe that it actually comes from hand-to-hand fighting techniques used by knights in the Middle Ages, very much like jujutsu would born in the struggles between armored samurais.

to:

** There are people who believe that it actually comes from hand-to-hand fighting techniques used by knights in the Middle Ages, very much like jujutsu would born be created in the struggles between armored samurais.



** A popular legend has catch wrestler Wrestling/KarlGotch teaching the judoka Wrestling/MasahikoKimura the double wrist lock, which Kimura then used to defeat Hélio Gracie to get it renamed to Kimura lock in Brazilian jiu-jitsu circles. This is most probably wrong, as judo had contained the double wrist lock for years before its contact with catch wrestling.
** It is said that the term Vale Tudo actually came from a ruleset of Luta Livre which appropriately called Luta Livre Vale Tudo and then just shortened to Vale Tudo when the other styles came to fight. Also the term No Holds Barred came from a catch wrestling ruleset where all holds, locks and strangles are allowed.

to:

** A popular legend has catch wrestler Wrestling/KarlGotch teaching the judoka Wrestling/MasahikoKimura the double wrist lock, which Kimura then used to defeat Hélio Gracie to get it renamed to Kimura lock in Brazilian jiu-jitsu circles. This is most probably wrong, apocryphal, as judo had contained the double wrist lock for years before its contact with catch wrestling.
** It is said that the term Vale Tudo vale tudo actually came from a ruleset of Luta Livre luta livre which appropriately called Luta Livre Vale Tudo "luta livre - vale tudo ("wrestling - everything goes") and then just shortened to Vale Tudo vale tudo when the other styles came to fight. Also the term No Holds Barred "no holds barred" came from a catch wrestling ruleset where all holds, locks and strangles are allowed.


** Euclydes "Tatú" Hatem, Brazilian catch wrestler and creator of Luta Livre.

to:

** Euclydes "Tatú" Hatem, Brazilian catch wrestler and creator of modern Luta Livre.


** Billy Riley, the founder of the original Snakepit Wigan. Most famous students include Billy Joyce, Wrestling/KarlGotch, Bert Assirati, Wrestling/BillyRobinson, etc.

to:

** Billy Riley, the founder of the original Snakepit in Wigan. Most famous students include Billy Joyce, Wrestling/KarlGotch, Bert Assirati, Wrestling/BillyRobinson, etc.
*** Wrestling/KarlGotch trained many of the guys that would innovate the shoot-style in Japan.
*** Wrestling/BillyRobinson has trained some of the best MMA guys with a catch background like Josh Barnett, Wrestling/KazushiSakuraba, Wrestling/KiyoshiTamura,
etc.



** Euclydes "Tatú" Hatem, Brazilian catch wrestler, creator of Luta Livre and trainer to many of the best Luta Livre exponents like Marco Ruas.
** Wrestling/KarlGotch trained many of the guys that would innovate the shoot-style in Japan.

to:

** Euclydes "Tatú" Hatem, Brazilian catch wrestler, wrestler and creator of Luta Livre Livre.
*** His students Fausto Brunocilla
and trainer to many of Fausto's son Carlos are responsible for training the best most well known Luta Livre exponents guys like Hugo Duarte, Eugenio Tadeu, Marco Ruas.
** Wrestling/KarlGotch trained many of the guys that would innovate the shoot-style in Japan.
Ruas, etc.


** Billy Riley, the founder of the original Snakepit Wigan. Most famous students include Billy Joyce, Wrestling/KarlGotch, Bert Assirati, Billy Robinson, etc.

to:

** Billy Riley, the founder of the original Snakepit Wigan. Most famous students include Billy Joyce, Wrestling/KarlGotch, Bert Assirati, Billy Robinson, Wrestling/BillyRobinson, etc.


'''Catch wrestling''', also known as '''catch-as-catch-can''', is a classical combat sport and form of entertainment developed in Britain in the 18th Century. It is actually an umbrella term for several forms of wrestling and grappling styles based around pinning, joint locking and strangling, though it is actually much more known for being the grandfather of modern UsefulNotes/ProfessionalWrestling.

to:

'''Catch wrestling''', also known as '''catch-as-catch-can''', is a classical combat sport and form of entertainment developed in Britain in the 18th Century. It is The style actually an umbrella term for several forms of wrestling and grappling styles based around pinning, joint locking and strangling, though it is actually much more known for being the grandfather of modern UsefulNotes/ProfessionalWrestling.



However, always in search of the contentment of the audience and the money they would throw, catch wrestling would take over the years a road to theatricality and showmanship over all-around competitions. Matches became deliberately back and forth instead of being boring stallfests or fast squashes, wrestlers started living larger-than-life [[TheGimmick gimmicks]] with [[{{tecnico}} heroes]] and [[{{rudo}} villains]], and "worked" elements like {{tag team}} bouts, female wrestlers and [[GarbageWrestler weapons]] were introduced to spice up the party. Catch wrestling stopped being a competitive sport and turned into the violent soap opera we know and love as pro wrestling or did it?

Distinguishing catch wrestling from pro wrestling today is pretty much a lost cause due to how enrooted the former became to the latter and how the latter distanced itself from the former. However, the tradition of the art as a legitimate fighting style survived in the strangest places, namely Japan, Brazil and some ramshackle gyms in the Anglophone sphere.

* Japan, the land of martial arts, is the country that keeps the strongest catch tradition nowadays (yes, even above Britain and United States). After some history against native UsefulNotes/{{Judo}}, [[GermansLoveDavidHasselhoff Japan crazily loved the art]] and integrated it in their culture. Their style of professional wrestling never left its competitive roots altogether, as crowds there love to see fake wrestlers kicking each other for real, and actually returned full force to them with a revival movement which was called "[[Wrestling/UniversalWrestlingFederation shoot-style]]." Mixed with other styles like judo, UsefulNotes/{{Karate}} and sambo, as well as some Japanese creativity, catch lived on to give birth to the early stage of modern UsefulNotes/MixedMartialArts and submission grappling.
* In Brazil, catch-as-catch-can kept fresh through its presence before and during the rise ''vale tudo'', a system of bouts which saw people beating down each other with lots of blood to entertain the average Brazilian, and which would take invariably the same route towards modern MMA. Local wrestlers mixed catch wrestling with judo and striking arts specifically to adapt to this kind of competition, and it received the antonomasia name of "luta livre," a word which refers to any kind of wrestling. It faded a lot due to the wild rise of Brazilian jiu-jitsu, but the style is still out there and surviving in European countries like Germany.
* In America and Britain, some gyms and associations which host old school competitions are active nowadays, most famously the Wigan Snakepit, where many famous wrestlers trained, as well as some parts of the defunct American territorial system.
* In Russia, catch wrestling was known as "free wrestling" and now somewhat only survived there as a major influence in creating the relatively newer martial art of Russian sambo, with its appeal for leg locks and use of shoes as possibly its closest resemblance, aside from other influences that include UsefulNotes/{{Judo}}, Greco-Roman, freestyle and other folk styles of wrestling. Viktor Spiridonov and Vasili Oshchepkov, the guys who laid ''two'' different foundations for what would become sambo were both according to some people catch wrestlers in their own right.

to:

However, always in the search of the contentment of the audience and the money they would throw, catch wrestling would take over the years a road to theatricality and showmanship over all-around competitions. Matches became deliberately back and forth instead of being boring stallfests or fast squashes, wrestlers started living playing larger-than-life [[TheGimmick gimmicks]] with [[{{tecnico}} heroes]] and [[{{rudo}} villains]], and finally, "worked" elements like {{tag team}} bouts, female wrestlers and [[GarbageWrestler weapons]] were introduced to spice up the party. Catch wrestling stopped being a competitive sport and turned into the violent soap opera we know and love as pro wrestling or did it?

Distinguishing catch wrestling from pro wrestling today is pretty much a lost cause impossible due to how enrooted the former became is to the latter and how the latter never distanced itself much from the former.former despite what you would believe by watching Wrestling/{{WWE}}. However, the tradition of the art as a legitimate fighting style survived in the strangest places, namely Japan, Brazil and some ramshackle gyms in the Anglophone sphere.

* Japan, the land of martial arts, is the country that keeps with the strongest catch tradition nowadays (yes, nowadays, even above Britain and United States). States. After some history of challenges against native UsefulNotes/{{Judo}}, UsefulNotes/{{Judo}} practitioners, [[GermansLoveDavidHasselhoff Japan crazily loved the art]] Japanese decided that catch wrestling was awesome]] and integrated it in their culture. Their style of culture through professional wrestling (which they call ''puroresu''). Despite it entailed the same worked nature as abroad, in Japan it never left its competitive roots altogether, as crowds there love to see fake wrestlers kicking each other for real, and it actually returned full force to them with a revival movement which was called "[[Wrestling/UniversalWrestlingFederation shoot-style]]." Mixed with other styles like judo, UsefulNotes/{{Karate}} and sambo, as well as some Japanese creativity, catch lived on to give birth to the early stage of modern UsefulNotes/MixedMartialArts and submission grappling.
* In Brazil, catch-as-catch-can kept fresh through its presence attracted the crowd's attention both before and during the rise of the ''vale tudo'', a system of bouts which saw people beating down each other with lots of blood to entertain the average Brazilian, Brazilian and which would take invariably the same route towards modern MMA. Local wrestlers mixed catch wrestling with judo and striking arts specifically to adapt to this kind of competition, and it received the antonomasia name of "luta livre," a Portuguese word which refers formerly referred to any kind of wrestling. It faded a lot due to sport wrestling, catch or not. Luta livre almost disappeared with the wild rise of Brazilian jiu-jitsu, but the style is still out there and surviving in European countries like Germany.
* In America and Britain, some gyms and associations which that host old school competitions are still active nowadays, most famously the Wigan Snakepit, where many famous wrestlers trained, as well as some parts of the defunct American territorial system.
* In Russia, catch wrestling was known as "free wrestling" and now somewhat only survived there as a major influence in creating the relatively newer martial art of Russian sambo, with its appeal for leg locks and use of shoes as possibly its closest resemblance, aside from other influences that include UsefulNotes/{{Judo}}, Greco-Roman, freestyle and other folk styles of wrestling. Viktor Spiridonov and Vasili Oshchepkov, the guys who laid ''two'' different foundations for what would become sambo were both according to some people catch wrestlers in their own right.


* In Brazil, catch-as-catch-can kept fresh through its presence before and during the rise ''vale tudo'', a system of bouts which saw people beating down each other with lots of blood to entertain the average Brazilian, and which would take invariably the same route towards modern MMA. Local wrestlers mixed catch wrestling with judo and striking arts specifically to adapt to this kind of competition, and it received the antonomasia name of "luta livre," a word which refers to any kind of wrestling. It faded a lot due to the wild rise of Brazilian jiu-jitsu, but the style is still out there.

to:

* In Brazil, catch-as-catch-can kept fresh through its presence before and during the rise ''vale tudo'', a system of bouts which saw people beating down each other with lots of blood to entertain the average Brazilian, and which would take invariably the same route towards modern MMA. Local wrestlers mixed catch wrestling with judo and striking arts specifically to adapt to this kind of competition, and it received the antonomasia name of "luta livre," a word which refers to any kind of wrestling. It faded a lot due to the wild rise of Brazilian jiu-jitsu, but the style is still out there.there and surviving in European countries like Germany.

Showing 15 edit(s) of 73

Top

Example of:

/
/

Feedback