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* '''Courtney Vandersloot''': Point guard for the Chicago Sky, Vandersloot is basically the league's poster child for OvershadowedByAwesome, despite currently standing as the league's all-time leader in assists per game. A native of the Seattle area, she wasn't seen has a big-time recruit out of high school, ending up on the other side of the Cascades at Gonzaga. After leading the Zags to a surprise run to the NCAA regional finals in her 2010–11 senior season, and becoming the first NCAA player (male or female) with 2,000 points and 1,000 assists in a career (since joined by Sabrina),[[note]]Incidentally, she and Sabrina played for the same head coach in college, Kelly Graves (male).[[/note]] the Sky made her the third pick in that year's draft. [[FanNickname Sloot]] made an immediate impact, making the All-Star Game and the All-Rookie team... though in a harbinger of things to come, she happened to join the league at the same time as Maya Moore. With other big names at her position, most notably Sue Bird and Skylar Diggins-Smith, she didn't make another All-Star team for a while. Despite leading the league in assists in 2015. Then setting a new league record for assists per game in 2017. And another in 2018. She finally got her second All-Star nod in 2019, with a ''third straight'' assists record to boot. Sloot at long last got some real attention in 2020, when she set ''[[OverusedRunningGag yet another assists record]]'', averaging ''exactly'' 10 a game (equivalent to 12 in the NBA, with its longer games).[[note]]In that last season, no other player averaged even 6 a game.[[/note]] Further developing the "overshadowed" theme, she didn't make the 2016 US Olympic team, and given USA Basketball's long track record of demonstrating loyalty to established players, wound up opting to play internationally for Hungary in 2017, believing (not without reason) that she'd never get to play for Team USA in her prime.

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* '''Courtney Vandersloot''': Point guard for the Chicago Sky, Vandersloot is basically the league's poster child for OvershadowedByAwesome, despite currently standing as the league's all-time leader in assists per game. [[labelnote:*]]And it's not exactly close. Assuming that the league returns to its normal 34-game schedule in 2021, she could play every game that season, fail to record an assist in any game, and ''still'' be the all-time leader.[[/labelnote]] A native of the Seattle area, she wasn't seen has a big-time recruit out of high school, ending up on the other side of the Cascades at Gonzaga. After leading the Zags to a surprise run to the NCAA regional finals in her 2010–11 senior season, and becoming the first NCAA player (male or female) with 2,000 points and 1,000 assists in a career (since joined by Sabrina),[[note]]Incidentally, she and Sabrina played for the same head coach in college, Kelly Graves (male).[[/note]] the Sky made her the third pick in that year's draft. [[FanNickname Sloot]] made an immediate impact, making the All-Star Game and the All-Rookie team... though in a harbinger of things to come, she happened to join the league at the same time as Maya Moore. With other big names at her position, most notably Sue Bird and Skylar Diggins-Smith, she didn't make another All-Star team for a while. Despite leading the league in assists in 2015. Then setting a new league record for assists per game in 2017. And another in 2018. She finally got her second All-Star nod in 2019, with a ''third straight'' assists record to boot. Sloot at long last got some real attention in 2020, when she set ''[[OverusedRunningGag yet another assists record]]'', averaging ''exactly'' 10 a game (equivalent to 12 in the NBA, with its longer games).[[note]]In that last season, no other player averaged even 6 a game.[[/note]] Further developing the "overshadowed" theme, she didn't make the 2016 US Olympic team, and given USA Basketball's long track record of demonstrating loyalty to established players, wound up opting to play internationally for Hungary in 2017, believing (not without reason) that she'd never get to play for Team USA in her prime.


They're playing basketball, We love that basketball!\\

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They're playing basketball, We love that basketball!\\basketball!


The objective of Basketball is for one of two teams to have the highest point total by the end of the game. Basketball teams are made up of fifteen players, with ten players, split into two teams of five, on the court at any given time, with the remaining members on the bench. Each of these five players fills a certain position upon the court. These player positions include the '''Point Guard''' (the designated leader of the team, responsible for facilitating the team's positioning whether on offense or defense) the '''Shooting Guard''' (the team's prime scorer, capable of shooting the ball from a variety of distances), the '''Center''' (the team's Big Guy, responsible for either feeding the ball to teammates on offense or regaining possession of the ball on defense), the '''Small Forward''' (the team's resident offensive force, with particular strengths in ballhandling and opening possible scoring opportunities from within the three-point line) and the '''Power Forward''' (similar to the Center in stature, but focused more on scoring, rather than assisting). In play diagrams, these individuals are often designated by numbers—point guard 1, shooting guard 2, small forward 3, power forward 4, center 5. However, the boundaries between many of these positions have become increasingly blurred in recent years. Many teams below the professional level choose to field three or even four guards, with the remaining player(s) christened with the simple title of"frontcourt". Common positional "blurs" include:

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The objective of Basketball is for one of two teams to have the highest point total by the end of the game. Basketball teams are made up of fifteen players, with ten players, split into two teams of five, on the court at any given time, with the remaining members on the bench. Each of these five players fills a certain position upon the court. court, along with their own responsibilities. These player positions include the '''Point Guard''' (the designated leader of the team, team's best passer and ballhandler, responsible for facilitating pushing the team's positioning whether on offense ball up the court and start either the offensive or defense) defensive wheels turning) the '''Shooting Guard''' (the team's prime scorer, capable of shooting the ball (not necessarily a great ballhandler, but more than makes up for it in their ability to score from a variety of distances), the '''Center''' (the team's Big Guy, responsible for either feeding the ball to teammates focused less on offense scoring and more on gaining or regaining possession of the ball ball, whether on offense or defense), the '''Small Forward''' (the team's resident offensive force, all-rounder, with particular strengths in ballhandling and opening possible scoring opportunities from within the three-point line) and the '''Power Forward''' (similar to the Center in stature, stature and purpose, but focused more is normally athletic enough to move with some quickness around or within the opposing team, whether on scoring, rather than assisting).offense or defense). In play diagrams, these individuals are often designated by numbers—point guard 1, shooting guard 2, small forward 3, power forward 4, center 5. However, the boundaries between many of these positions have become increasingly blurred in recent years. Many teams below the professional level choose to field three or even four guards, with the remaining player(s) christened with the simple title of"frontcourt". Common positional "blurs" include:


Thus, basketball, at least in its earliest form, was born.

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Thus, basketball, at least in its earliest recorded form, was born.



Basketball is played against two opposing teams of five players each, comprising a total of ten players on the court at any given time. Each of these five players fills a certain position upon the court. These player positions include the '''Point Guard''' (the designated leader of the team, responsible for facilitating the team's positioning whether on offense or defense) the '''Shooting Guard''' (the team's prime scorer, capable of shooting the ball from a variety of distances), the '''Center''' (the team's Big Guy, responsible for either feeding the ball to teammates on offense or regaining possession of the ball on defense), the '''Small Forward''' (the team's resident offensive force, with particular strengths in ballhandling and opening possible scoring opportunities from within the three-point line) and the '''Power Forward''' (similar to the Center in stature, but focused more on scoring, rather than assisting). In play diagrams, these individuals are often designated by numbers—point guard 1, shooting guard 2, small forward 3, power forward 4, center 5. However, the boundaries between many of these positions have become increasingly blurred in recent years. Many teams below the professional level choose to field three or even four guards, with the remaining player(s) christened with the simple title of"frontcourt". Common positional "blurs" include:

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The objective of Basketball is played against for one of two opposing teams to have the highest point total by the end of the game. Basketball teams are made up of fifteen players, with ten players, split into two teams of five players each, comprising a total of ten players five, on the court at any given time.time, with the remaining members on the bench. Each of these five players fills a certain position upon the court. These player positions include the '''Point Guard''' (the designated leader of the team, responsible for facilitating the team's positioning whether on offense or defense) the '''Shooting Guard''' (the team's prime scorer, capable of shooting the ball from a variety of distances), the '''Center''' (the team's Big Guy, responsible for either feeding the ball to teammates on offense or regaining possession of the ball on defense), the '''Small Forward''' (the team's resident offensive force, with particular strengths in ballhandling and opening possible scoring opportunities from within the three-point line) and the '''Power Forward''' (similar to the Center in stature, but focused more on scoring, rather than assisting). In play diagrams, these individuals are often designated by numbers—point guard 1, shooting guard 2, small forward 3, power forward 4, center 5. However, the boundaries between many of these positions have become increasingly blurred in recent years. Many teams below the professional level choose to field three or even four guards, with the remaining player(s) christened with the simple title of"frontcourt". Common positional "blurs" include:


-->Founded in 1998 as the Detroit Shock (so it's the car part, to better reflect the Detroit Pistons), moved to Tulsa in 2010, retaining their nickname. Tulsa was the league's ButtMonkey for virtually all of its time in Oklahoma. In 2011, they set a new league record for futility with a 3-31 skid. The case of the Shock was unique in that Tulsa claimed the history of the Detroit Shock, including Detroit's three championship banners... but with Tulsa's ButtMonkey status, most fans were uncomfortable with giving them Detroit's GuileHero status. In 2013, things finally looked hopeful when they gained the charismatic Notre Dame superstar Skylar Diggins (now Diggins-Smith). Her weak rookie debut might have damaged those hopes, but those fears largely disappeared after a strong sophomore season, and she became one of the league's top guards before a pregnancy leave in 2019, followed by her departure to Phoenix after that season. The Shock finally made their first playoff appearance since the move in 2015... right after the team announced it would move to [[UsefulNotes/DFWMetroplex Dallas]][[note]]technically Arlington[[/note]] for 2016, later announcing that it would drop the Shock name.

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-->Founded in 1998 as the Detroit Shock (so it's the car part, to better reflect the Detroit Pistons), moved to Tulsa in 2010, retaining their nickname. Tulsa was the league's ButtMonkey for virtually all of its time in Oklahoma. In 2011, they set a new league record for futility with a 3-31 skid. The case of the Shock was unique in that Tulsa claimed the history of the Detroit Shock, including Detroit's three championship banners... but with Tulsa's ButtMonkey status, most fans were uncomfortable with giving them Detroit's GuileHero status. In 2013, things finally looked hopeful when they gained the charismatic Notre Dame superstar Skylar Diggins (now Diggins-Smith). Her weak rookie debut might have damaged those hopes, but those fears largely disappeared after a strong sophomore season, and she became one of the league's top guards before a pregnancy leave in 2019, followed by her departure to Phoenix after that season. By that time, a more than adequate replacement had arrived in the form of Arike Ogunbowale. The Shock finally made their first playoff appearance since the move in 2015... right after the team announced it would move to [[UsefulNotes/DFWMetroplex Dallas]][[note]]technically Arlington[[/note]] for 2016, later announcing that it would drop the Shock name.



** '''Brittney Griner''': Center for the Phoenix Mercury, drafted from Baylor, where she was consensus NCAA player of the year in her last two seasons. The 6'8" (2.03 m) Griner, known in college for her dominant shot-blocking and as one of the few women who can routinely dunk, entered the league with as much hype as any player in years. Also made headlines in 2013 when she came out as lesbian. Had the league's top-selling jersey in her rookie season as well. A perennial All-Star, Griner has led the league in blocks in each season of her career to date (sharing honors with Jonquel Jones in 2019), and has also led the league in scoring twice.
** '''Elena Delle Donne''': Perhaps the most positionally versatile player ever in the women's game, the Delaware product, who spent her first four WNBA seasons with the Chicago Sky before being dealt to the Washington Mystics in the 2017 offseason, is listed as a guard and forward—despite being the size of most WNBA centers (6'5"/1.96 m). Center, power forward, small forward, shooting guard, point guard, swingman, stretch four, point forward, combo guard... you name it, [[FanNickname EDD]] can play it. With her arrival, the Sky [[TookALevelInBadass took multiple levels in badass]] and became legitimate title contenders... until the Fever swept them out in the first round. In 2013, EDD was the first rookie ever to be the top vote-getter for the All-Star Game, and was also the unanimous choice for Rookie of the Year. In 2015, she led the league in scoring and free throw percentage (unheard of for center-sized players), and earned MVP honors. In 2017, she forced a trade to the Mystics, the closest team to her Delaware home (significance noted below), and led the team to its first-ever WNBA Finals berth in 2018 and first title in 2019. She was also league MVP in the latter season on the strength of the first 50–40–90 season[[note]]shooting at least 50% from the field, 40% on three-pointers, and 90% on free throws[[/note]] in league history. Not to mention leading the league in jersey sales in 2019. EDD, the first player to be named WNBA MVP for two different teams, is also the current career free-throw percentage leader in league history.

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** '''Brittney Griner''': Center for the Phoenix Mercury, drafted from Baylor, where she was consensus NCAA player of the year in her last two seasons. The 6'8" (2.03 m) Griner, known in college for her dominant shot-blocking and as one of the few women who can routinely dunk, entered the league with as much hype as any player in years. Also made headlines in 2013 when she came out as lesbian. Had the league's top-selling jersey in her rookie season as well. A perennial All-Star, Griner has led the league in blocks in each season of her career to date first seven seasons (sharing honors with Jonquel Jones in 2019), and has also led the league in scoring twice.
** '''Elena Delle Donne''': Donne''':[[labelnote:*]]Her family name is "Delle Donne", pronounced "DEL-uh DON".[[/labelnote]] Perhaps the most positionally versatile player ever in the women's game, the Delaware product, who spent her first four WNBA seasons with the Chicago Sky before being dealt to the Washington Mystics in the 2017 offseason, is listed as a guard and forward—despite being the size of most WNBA centers (6'5"/1.96 m). Center, power forward, small forward, shooting guard, point guard, swingman, stretch four, point forward, combo guard... you name it, [[FanNickname EDD]] can play it. With her arrival, the Sky [[TookALevelInBadass took multiple levels in badass]] and became legitimate title contenders... until the Fever swept them out in the first round. In 2013, EDD was the first rookie ever to be the top vote-getter for the All-Star Game, and was also the unanimous choice for Rookie of the Year. In 2015, she led the league in scoring and free throw percentage (unheard of for center-sized players), and earned MVP honors. In 2017, she forced a trade to the Mystics, the closest team to her Delaware home (significance noted below), and led the team to its first-ever WNBA Finals berth in 2018 and first title in 2019. She was also league MVP in the latter season on the strength of the first 50–40–90 season[[note]]shooting at least 50% from the field, 40% on three-pointers, and 90% on free throws[[/note]] in league history. Not to mention leading the league in jersey sales in 2019. EDD, the first player to be named WNBA MVP for two different teams, is also the current career free-throw percentage leader in league history.


* Italy & France: Countries with ups and downs. Italy was the silver medal winner in the 2004 Olympics, losing to Argentina in the Gold Medal game. France is currently the nationality second most represented in the NBA (after the U.S.A. itself). Tony Parker is also famous for his [[strike:wife]] [[Series/DesperateHousewives ex-wife]], and Joakim Noah (born in New York City and mostly raised in the US) is also famous for his dad, former tennis star Yannick Noah.

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* Italy & France: Countries with ups and downs. Italy was the silver medal winner in the 2004 Olympics, losing to Argentina in the Gold Medal game. France is currently the nationality second most represented in the NBA (after the U.S.A. itself). Tony Parker is also famous for his [[strike:wife]] [[Series/DesperateHousewives [[Creator/EvaLongoria ex-wife]], and Joakim Noah (born in New York City and mostly raised in the US) is also famous for his dad, former tennis star Yannick Noah.



** The UsefulNotes/{{coronavirus|Disease2019Pandemic}}-induced cancellation of the 2020 NCAA Tournament interrupted, but didn't end, the streak. The Jayhawks would likely have been the #1 overall seed had the tournament been played.

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** The UsefulNotes/{{coronavirus|Disease2019Pandemic}}-induced [[UsefulNotes/COVID19Pandemic coronavirus-induced]] cancellation of the 2020 NCAA Tournament interrupted, but didn't end, the streak. The Jayhawks would likely have been the #1 overall seed had the tournament been played.



'''Kentucky Wildcats''' - Coached by the great Adolph "Baron" Rupp from 1931 to 1972. Won eight NCAA tournaments, including four under Rupp. The Wildcats are the only program to have won national titles under five different coaches—Rupp, his successor Joe B. Hall, Rick Pitino, Tubby Smith, and current coach John Calipari. They were the program that lost the 1966 final to the considerably less prestigious Texas Western (now Texas-El Paso, or UTEP), and that's the story in the movie ''Film/GloryRoad''. They are the all-time winningest team in college basketball, and have won more Southeastern Conference titles than any of the other teams... combined. Recently, the Kentucky women's team had been making some strides as well, but the 2015–16 season was a complete off-court cluster***, which had the potential to place them in a DorkAge but ended up as just a temporary blip.

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'''Kentucky Wildcats''' - Coached by the great Adolph "Baron" Rupp Rupp, aka "The Baron of the Bluegrass", from 1931 to 1972. Won eight NCAA tournaments, including four under Rupp. The Wildcats are the only program to have won national titles under five different coaches—Rupp, his successor Joe B. Hall, Rick Pitino, Tubby Smith, and current coach John Calipari. They were the program that lost the 1966 final to the considerably less prestigious Texas Western (now Texas-El Paso, or UTEP), and that's the story in the movie ''Film/GloryRoad''. They are the all-time winningest team in college basketball, and have won more Southeastern Conference titles than any of the other teams... combined. Recently, the Kentucky women's team had been making some strides as well, but the 2015–16 season was a complete off-court cluster***, which had the potential to place them in a DorkAge but ended up as just a temporary blip.



Women's college basketball has been played with a 30-second shot clock since the early 1970s; this is shorter than the 45- and 35-second clocks formerly used in the men's game. Also, since the 2015–16 season, the women's game is played in 10-minute quarters instead of 20-minute halves. It's only been sanctioned by the NCAA since the early '80s; before that, it was sanctioned by the Association of Intercollegiate Athletics for Women, or the AIAW. Conference affiliations match those of men's college basketball described above.[[note]]With only two exceptions—The Citadel and VMI, both [[MilitaryAcademy military academies]] that were all-male until the 1990s and remain overwhelmingly male today, don't have women's basketball teams at all. Then again, being heavily male hasn't stopped Army, Navy, and Air Force, academies run directly by the [[UsefulNotes/YanksWithTanks U.S. military]], from fielding women's teams.[[/note]]

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Women's college basketball has been played with a 30-second shot clock since the early 1970s; this is shorter than the 45- and 35-second clocks formerly used in the men's game. Also, since the 2015–16 season, the women's game is played in 10-minute quarters instead of 20-minute halves. It's only been sanctioned by the NCAA since the early '80s; before that, it was sanctioned by the Association of Intercollegiate Athletics for Women, or the AIAW. Conference affiliations match those of men's college basketball described above.[[note]]With only two exceptions—The Citadel and VMI, both [[MilitaryAcademy military academies]] {{military academ|y}}ies that were all-male until the 1990s and remain overwhelmingly male today, don't have women's basketball teams at all. Then again, being heavily male hasn't stopped Army, Navy, and Air Force, academies run directly by the [[UsefulNotes/YanksWithTanks U.S. military]], from fielding women's teams.[[/note]]



'''University of Southern California''': USC, or the Women of Troy. At their peak in the mid-80s, their stars included the [=McGee=] twins, Pamela and Paula (if you're an NBA geek, you might recognize Pamela's son [=JaVale=], and if you're a WNBA geek you may recognize Pamela's daughter Imani), Cheryl Miller (if you follow basketball at all, you probably recognize her kid brother Reggie), and Cynthia Cooper. They had a renaissance in the mid-90s, then faded out. Cooper was their head coach for four seasons until stepping down after the 2016–17 season.

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'''University of Southern California''': USC, or the Women of Troy. At their peak in the mid-80s, their stars included the [=McGee=] twins, Pamela and Paula (if you're an NBA geek, you might recognize Pamela's son [=JaVale=], and if you're a WNBA geek you may recognize Pamela's daughter Imani), Imani [=McGee-Stafford=]), Cheryl Miller (if you follow basketball at all, you probably recognize her kid brother Reggie), and Cynthia Cooper. They had a renaissance in the mid-90s, then faded out. Cooper was their head coach for four seasons until stepping down after the 2016–17 season.



'''Baylor''': The reigning national champion (2019) Lady Bears rose to national prominence early in the current century with the aforementioned Kim Mulkey as head coach. When she took over in 2000, Baylor was coming off a last-place Big 12 finish. She took them to the NCAA tournament the next season, and they've only missed the NCAA once since. Their first national title in 2005 saw Mulkey become the first woman to win D-I national titles as a player and coach[[note]](Dean Smith and Bob Knight are the only men to have matched the feat)[[/note]], and their second championship team in 2012 was the first NCAA team of either sex to go 40–0 in a season. Baylor's WNBA alumni include Sophia Young from the first title team and Brittney Griner and Odyssey Sims from the second. Also notable for the [[CurbStompBattle most one-sided win]] in D-I women's history, a 140–32 annihilation of Winthrop in 2016. Not to mention ending [=UConn's=] 126-game regular-season winning streak in 2019.

'''Notre Dame''': The Fighting Irish have emerged as a major national rival to [=UConn=] in recent years. While the Huskies have had the upper hand overall, the Irish have a 5–3 lead in their NCAA tournament matchups. National champs in 2001 and 2018, and runners-up in five other NCAA tournaments in TheNewTens (to Texas A&M in 2011, Baylor in 2012 and 2019, and [=UConn=] in 2014 and 2015), and alma mater of current WNBA stars Skylar Diggins-Smith and Jewell Loyd. Much has been made of the supposed ArchEnemy relationship between now-retired Notre Dame head coach Muffet [=McGraw=] and [=UConn=]'s Geno Auriemma, who both share Philadelphia roots and fiercely competitive personalities. Reporters have even asked about possible FoeYay between the two, but Auriemma and [=McGraw=] have said that they view each other more as a WorthyOpponent than anything else. The 2019–20 season, however, was definitely rebuilding time under the Golden Dome, as the Irish had lost their entire starting lineup to graduation; despite several promising recruits, they finished under .500. [=McGraw=] stepped down after that season, with Niele Ivey, a former Irish player who went on to a long tenure as an Irish assistant and a season as an NBA assistant, taking her place.

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'''Baylor''': The reigning national champion (2019) Lady Bears rose to national prominence early in the current century with the aforementioned Kim Mulkey as head coach. When she took over in 2000, Baylor was coming off a last-place Big 12 finish. She took them to the NCAA tournament the next season, and they've only missed the NCAA once since. Their first national title in 2005 saw Mulkey become the first woman to win D-I national titles as a player and coach[[note]](Dean Smith and Bob Knight are the only men to have matched the feat)[[/note]], and their second championship team in 2012 was the first NCAA team of either sex to go 40–0 in a season. Baylor's WNBA alumni include Sophia Young from the first title team and team, Brittney Griner and Odyssey Sims from the second.second, and Lauren Cox from the third. Also notable for the [[CurbStompBattle most one-sided win]] in D-I women's history, a 140–32 annihilation of Winthrop in 2016. Not to mention ending [=UConn's=] 126-game regular-season winning streak in 2019.

'''Notre Dame''': The Fighting Irish have emerged as a major national rival to [=UConn=] in recent years. While the Huskies have had the upper hand overall, the Irish have a 5–3 lead in their NCAA tournament matchups. matchups, and were responsible for more than half of the Huskies' losses from 2011 to 2019 (8 out of 15). National champs in 2001 and 2018, and runners-up in five other NCAA tournaments in TheNewTens (to Texas A&M in 2011, Baylor in 2012 and 2019, and [=UConn=] in 2014 and 2015), and alma mater of current WNBA stars Skylar Diggins-Smith and Diggins-Smith, Jewell Loyd.Loyd, and Arike Ogunbowale. Much has been made of the supposed ArchEnemy relationship between now-retired Notre Dame head coach Muffet [=McGraw=] and [=UConn=]'s Geno Auriemma, who both share Philadelphia roots and fiercely competitive personalities. Reporters have even asked about possible FoeYay between the two, but Auriemma and [=McGraw=] have said that they view each other more as a WorthyOpponent than anything else. The 2019–20 season, however, was definitely rebuilding time under the Golden Dome, as the Irish had lost their entire starting lineup to graduation; despite several promising recruits, they finished under .500. [=McGraw=] stepped down after that season, with Niele Ivey, a former Irish player who went on to a long tenure as an Irish assistant and a season as an NBA assistant, taking her place.


* Greece: Another major country. Two major teams (Panathinaikos and Olympiacos' basketball clubs) fight every year for the conquest of the local title (like they do in pretty much every other sport both are involved, in fact) and are top contenders on the continental level, having won nine [=EuroLeagues=] together. Greek supporters really are {{hot|Blooded}}. Treated former Atlanta Hawks and current Phoenix Suns player Josh Childress [[LikeAGodToMe as a god]] when he went to Greece to play for Olympiacos. Currently, the country's best-known player is the Bucks' "Greek Freak", Giannis Antetokounmpo.[[note]]rough pronunciation: YAHN-is AH-day-toh-KOON-boh, though nowadays [[FirstNameBasis YAHN-is will do]]. He and his four brothers are children of Nigerian parents; the spelling is a romanized Greek version of the Yoruba (his father's ethnicity) "Adetokunbo".[[/note]]

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* Greece: Another major country. Two major teams (Panathinaikos and Olympiacos' basketball clubs) fight every year for the conquest of the local title (like they do in pretty much every other sport both are involved, in fact) and are top contenders on the continental level, having won nine [=EuroLeagues=] together. Greek supporters really are {{hot|Blooded}}. Treated former Atlanta Hawks and current Phoenix Suns player Josh Childress [[LikeAGodToMe as a god]] when he went to Greece to play for Olympiacos. Currently, the country's best-known player is the Bucks' "Greek Freak", Giannis Antetokounmpo.UsefulNotes/GiannisAntetokounmpo.[[note]]rough pronunciation: YAHN-is AH-day-toh-KOON-boh, though nowadays [[FirstNameBasis YAHN-is will do]]. He and his four brothers are children of Nigerian parents; the spelling is a romanized Greek version of the Yoruba (his father's ethnicity) "Adetokunbo".[[/note]]


* '''Courtney Vandersloot''': Point guard for the Chicago Sky, Vandersloot is basically the league's poster child for OvershadowedByAwesome, despite currently standing as the league's all-time leader in assists per game. A native of the Seattle area, she wasn't seen has a big-time recruit out of high school, ending up on the other side of the Cascades at Gonzaga. After leading the Zags to a surprise run to the NCAA regional finals in her 2010–11 senior season, and becoming the first NCAA player (male or female) with 2,000 points and 1,000 assists in a career (since joined by Sabrina),[[note]]Incidentally, she and Sabrina played for the same head coach in college, Kelly Graves (male).[[/note]] the Sky made her the third pick in that year's draft. [[FanNickname Sloot]] made an immediate impact, making the All-Star Game and the All-Rookie team... though in a harbinger of things to come, she happened to join the league at the same time as Maya Moore. With other big names at her position, most notably Sue Bird and Skylar Diggins-Smith, she didn't make another All-Star team for a while. Despite leading the league in assists in 2015. Then setting a new league record for assists per game in 2017. And another in 2018. She finally got her second All-Star nod in 2019, with a ''third straight'' assists record to boot. Sloot at long last got some real attention in 2020, when she set ''[[OverusedRunningGag yet another assists record]]'', averaging a ''hair'' under 10 a game (equivalent to 12 in the NBA, with its longer games).[[note]]In that last season, no other player averaged even 6 a game.[[/note]] Further developing the "overshadowed" theme, she didn't make the 2016 US Olympic team, and given USA Basketball's long track record of demonstrating loyalty to established players, wound up opting to play internationally for Hungary in 2017, believing (not without reason) that she'd never get to play for Team USA in her prime.

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* '''Courtney Vandersloot''': Point guard for the Chicago Sky, Vandersloot is basically the league's poster child for OvershadowedByAwesome, despite currently standing as the league's all-time leader in assists per game. A native of the Seattle area, she wasn't seen has a big-time recruit out of high school, ending up on the other side of the Cascades at Gonzaga. After leading the Zags to a surprise run to the NCAA regional finals in her 2010–11 senior season, and becoming the first NCAA player (male or female) with 2,000 points and 1,000 assists in a career (since joined by Sabrina),[[note]]Incidentally, she and Sabrina played for the same head coach in college, Kelly Graves (male).[[/note]] the Sky made her the third pick in that year's draft. [[FanNickname Sloot]] made an immediate impact, making the All-Star Game and the All-Rookie team... though in a harbinger of things to come, she happened to join the league at the same time as Maya Moore. With other big names at her position, most notably Sue Bird and Skylar Diggins-Smith, she didn't make another All-Star team for a while. Despite leading the league in assists in 2015. Then setting a new league record for assists per game in 2017. And another in 2018. She finally got her second All-Star nod in 2019, with a ''third straight'' assists record to boot. Sloot at long last got some real attention in 2020, when she set ''[[OverusedRunningGag yet another assists record]]'', averaging a ''hair'' under ''exactly'' 10 a game (equivalent to 12 in the NBA, with its longer games).[[note]]In that last season, no other player averaged even 6 a game.[[/note]] Further developing the "overshadowed" theme, she didn't make the 2016 US Olympic team, and given USA Basketball's long track record of demonstrating loyalty to established players, wound up opting to play internationally for Hungary in 2017, believing (not without reason) that she'd never get to play for Team USA in her prime.


*** For the first few years of her WNBA career, she was one of the very few high-profile WNBA players who never played overseas. (She has [[WordOfGod publicly stated]] that she normally stays in the States to help care for her disabled older sister; her family ties were seen as playing a big part in her desire to move to Washington.) EDD did join a Chinese team for that country's 2017 playoffs, but a flareup of Lyme disease[[note]](in 2008, she contracted the disease, which was initially misdiagnosed; she's dealt with the aftereffects ever since)[[/note]] forced her to return prematurely to the States. Her Lyme disease history, which has left her seriously immunocompromised, means that she may not play in 2020 despite the league turning down her petition to skip the abbreviated season (the Mystics announced they would pay her whether or not she plays). With disability causes so close to her heart, she's also a high-profile ambassador for Special Olympics, and is also heavily involved with Lyme disease charities.

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*** For the first few years of her WNBA career, she was one of the very few high-profile WNBA players who never played overseas. (She has [[WordOfGod publicly stated]] that she normally stays in the States to help care for her disabled older sister; her family ties were seen as playing a big part in her desire to move to Washington.) EDD did join a Chinese team for that country's 2017 playoffs, but a flareup of Lyme disease[[note]](in post-Lyme disease syndrome[[note]](in 2008, she contracted the disease, which was initially misdiagnosed; she's dealt with the aftereffects ever since)[[/note]] forced her to return prematurely to the States. Her Lyme disease history, which has left her seriously immunocompromised, means meant that she may not play in sat out 2020 despite the league turning down her petition to skip the abbreviated season (the Mystics announced they would pay her whether or not she plays).anyway). With disability causes so close to her heart, she's also a high-profile ambassador for Special Olympics, and is also heavily involved with Lyme disease charities.


* '''Breanna Stewart''': Stretch four for the Seattle Storm, drafted #1 overall in 2016 out of [[OverusedRunningGag UConn]]. The 6'4" [[FanNickname Stewie]] came into the league as perhaps even more hyped than the "Three to See"—led the Huskies to NCAA titles in each of her four seasons in Storrs, also being named the Final Four MVP in all four seasons; consensus national player of the year in her last two seasons (also winning a major national award as a sophomore); becoming a fixture on Team USA while still at [=UConn=]... you get the picture. After leading the league's rookies in scoring, rebounding, blocks, and minutes per game in 2016 (co-leader among ''all'' players in minutes, and in the top six in the other three categories), Stewart was the runaway Rookie of the Year, receiving all but one vote. Stewie didn't stop there, going on to earn season and Finals MVP honors in 2018 while leading the Storm to the title. Sadly, she missed the 2019 season to a torn Achilles suffered in the 2019 [=EuroLeague=] Women final.

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* '''Breanna Stewart''': Stretch four for the Seattle Storm, drafted #1 overall in 2016 out of [[OverusedRunningGag UConn]]. The 6'4" [[FanNickname Stewie]] came into the league as perhaps even more hyped than the "Three to See"—led the Huskies to NCAA titles in each of her four seasons in Storrs, also being named the Final Four MVP in all four seasons; consensus national player of the year in her last two seasons (also winning a major national award as a sophomore); becoming a fixture on Team USA while still at [=UConn=]... you get the picture. After leading the league's rookies in scoring, rebounding, blocks, and minutes per game in 2016 (co-leader among ''all'' players in minutes, and in the top six in the other three categories), Stewart was the runaway Rookie of the Year, receiving all but one vote. Stewie didn't stop there, going on to earn season and Finals MVP honors in 2018 while leading the Storm to the title. Sadly, she missed the 2019 season to a torn Achilles suffered in the 2019 [=EuroLeague=] Women final. She would come back strong in 2020 with a season that put her in contention for another MVP trophy.


That said, arguably the biggest difference is the season structure. The WNBA's season is out of phase with basketball in the rest of the world—it's held during the northern hemisphere summer, when other basketball leagues (even those south of the equator) are in their offseason. The league was started, and is still owned, by the NBA, although it's had its own chief executive throughout its history (titled "President" until 2019, now "Commissioner"). Originally, all WNBA teams were owned by the league; the summer season was established partly due to the desire of team owners for more arena dates. After the 2002 season, the league sold the teams; eight were purchased by their then-current NBA counterparts, one was bought by an NBA team in a different city,[[note]]the Utah Starzz, which then became the San Antonio Silver Stars, still later the San Antonio Stars, and are now the Las Vegas Aces[[/note]] another was bought by an outside party,[[note]]the Orlando Miracle, which became the Connecticut Sun[[/note]] and two[[note]]Miami Sol, Portland Fire[[/note]] folded when new owners weren't found. The regular season normally starts in late May and ends in September, with playoffs running into October. However, in Olympic years, the league takes a break to allow players to represent their national teams. Also, the start of the 2020 season has been delayed due to COVID-19, and the abbreviated season will be played entirely at the IMG Academy in Bradenton, Florida.

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That said, arguably the biggest difference is the season structure. The WNBA's season is out of phase with basketball in the rest of the world—it's held during the northern hemisphere summer, when other basketball leagues (even those south of the equator) are in their offseason. The league was started, and is still owned, by the NBA, although it's had its own chief executive throughout its history (titled "President" until 2019, now "Commissioner"). Originally, all WNBA teams were owned by the league; the summer season was established partly due to the desire of team owners for more arena dates. After the 2002 season, the league sold the teams; eight were purchased by their then-current NBA counterparts, one was bought by an NBA team in a different city,[[note]]the Utah Starzz, which then became the San Antonio Silver Stars, still later the San Antonio Stars, and are now the Las Vegas Aces[[/note]] another was bought by an outside party,[[note]]the Orlando Miracle, which became the Connecticut Sun[[/note]] and two[[note]]Miami Sol, Portland Fire[[/note]] folded when new owners weren't found. The regular season normally starts in late May and ends in September, with playoffs running into October. However, in Olympic years, the league takes a break to allow players to represent their national teams. Also, the start of the 2020 season has been was delayed due to COVID-19, and the abbreviated season will be is being played entirely at the IMG Academy in Bradenton, Florida.



* '''Arike Ogunbowale''': Shooting guard for the Dallas Wings, the UsefulNotes/{{Milwaukee}} native first made her name in college at Notre Dame, notably hitting not one but ''two'' buzzer-beaters to lead the Irish to the 2018 national title—the first a pull-up jumper from just inside the three-point line in overtime in the semifinals against [=UConn=], and the second an off-balance three-pointer to take down Mississippi State in the final. She parlayed those heroics into an appearance on ''Series/DancingWithTheStars'' in that offseason, and went on to go fifth overall in the 2019 draft with the Wings. She quickly emerged as a star of the future, finishing third in scoring as a rookie (though Rookie of the Year honors would go to Napheesa Collier of the Lynx) and then leading the league in that category in 2020.



* '''Courtney Vandersloot''': Point guard for the Chicago Sky, Vandersloot is basically the league's poster child for OvershadowedByAwesome, despite currently standing as the league's all-time leader in assists per game. A native of the Seattle area, she wasn't seen has a big-time recruit out of high school, ending up on the other side of the Cascades at Gonzaga. After leading the Zags to a surprise run to the NCAA regional finals in her 2010–11 senior season, and becoming the first NCAA player (male or female) with 2,000 points and 1,000 assists in a career (since joined by Sabrina),[[note]]Incidentally, she and Sabrina played for the same head coach in college, Kelly Graves (male).[[/note]] the Sky made her the third pick in that year's draft. [[FanNickname Sloot]] made an immediate impact, making the All-Star Game and the All-Rookie team... though in a harbinger of things to come, she happened to join the league at the same time as Maya Moore. With other big names at her position, most notably Sue Bird and Skylar Diggins-Smith, she didn't make another All-Star team for a while. Despite leading the league in assists in 2015. Then setting a new league record for assists per game in 2017. And another in 2018. She finally got her second All-Star nod in 2019, with a ''third straight'' assists record to boot. Further developing the "overshadowed" theme, she didn't make the 2016 US Olympic team, and given USA Basketball's long track record of demonstrating loyalty to established players, wound up opting to play internationally for Hungary in 2017, believing (not without reason) that she'd never get to play for Team USA in her prime.

to:

* '''Courtney Vandersloot''': Point guard for the Chicago Sky, Vandersloot is basically the league's poster child for OvershadowedByAwesome, despite currently standing as the league's all-time leader in assists per game. A native of the Seattle area, she wasn't seen has a big-time recruit out of high school, ending up on the other side of the Cascades at Gonzaga. After leading the Zags to a surprise run to the NCAA regional finals in her 2010–11 senior season, and becoming the first NCAA player (male or female) with 2,000 points and 1,000 assists in a career (since joined by Sabrina),[[note]]Incidentally, she and Sabrina played for the same head coach in college, Kelly Graves (male).[[/note]] the Sky made her the third pick in that year's draft. [[FanNickname Sloot]] made an immediate impact, making the All-Star Game and the All-Rookie team... though in a harbinger of things to come, she happened to join the league at the same time as Maya Moore. With other big names at her position, most notably Sue Bird and Skylar Diggins-Smith, she didn't make another All-Star team for a while. Despite leading the league in assists in 2015. Then setting a new league record for assists per game in 2017. And another in 2018. She finally got her second All-Star nod in 2019, with a ''third straight'' assists record to boot. Sloot at long last got some real attention in 2020, when she set ''[[OverusedRunningGag yet another assists record]]'', averaging a ''hair'' under 10 a game (equivalent to 12 in the NBA, with its longer games).[[note]]In that last season, no other player averaged even 6 a game.[[/note]] Further developing the "overshadowed" theme, she didn't make the 2016 US Olympic team, and given USA Basketball's long track record of demonstrating loyalty to established players, wound up opting to play internationally for Hungary in 2017, believing (not without reason) that she'd never get to play for Team USA in her prime.


Basketball is played against two opposing teams of five players each, comprising a total of ten players on the court at any given time. Each of these five players fills a certain position upon the court. These player positions include the '''Point Guard''' (the designated leader of the team, responsible for facilitating the team's positioning whether on offense or defense) the '''Shooting Guard''' (the team's prime scorer, capable of shooting the ball from a variety of distances), the '''Center''' (the team's Big Guy, playing responsible for either feeding the ball to teammates on offense or regaining possession of the ball on defense), the '''Small Forward''' (the team's resident offensive force, with particular strengths in ballhandling and opening possible scoring opportunities from within the three-point line) and the '''Power Forward''' (similar to the Center in stature, but focused more on scoring, rather than assisting). In play diagrams, these individuals are often designated by numbers—point guard 1, shooting guard 2, small forward 3, power forward 4, center 5. However, the boundaries between many of these positions have become increasingly blurred in recent years. Many teams below the professional level choose to field three or even four guards, with the remaining player(s) christened with the simple title of"frontcourt". Common positional "blurs" include:

to:

Basketball is played against two opposing teams of five players each, comprising a total of ten players on the court at any given time. Each of these five players fills a certain position upon the court. These player positions include the '''Point Guard''' (the designated leader of the team, responsible for facilitating the team's positioning whether on offense or defense) the '''Shooting Guard''' (the team's prime scorer, capable of shooting the ball from a variety of distances), the '''Center''' (the team's Big Guy, playing responsible for either feeding the ball to teammates on offense or regaining possession of the ball on defense), the '''Small Forward''' (the team's resident offensive force, with particular strengths in ballhandling and opening possible scoring opportunities from within the three-point line) and the '''Power Forward''' (similar to the Center in stature, but focused more on scoring, rather than assisting). In play diagrams, these individuals are often designated by numbers—point guard 1, shooting guard 2, small forward 3, power forward 4, center 5. However, the boundaries between many of these positions have become increasingly blurred in recent years. Many teams below the professional level choose to field three or even four guards, with the remaining player(s) christened with the simple title of"frontcourt". Common positional "blurs" include:


Basketball is played against two teams of five people, comprising a total of ten players. Each of these five players fills a certain position upon the court. These player positions include the Point Guard (the designated leader of the team, responsible for facilitating the team's positioning whether on offence or defence) the Shooting Guard (the team's prime shooter, capable of shooting the ball from a variety of distances), the Center (the team's Big Guy, playing the role of either an offensive rebounder or defensive shot blocker), the Small Forward (the teams' resident aggressive force, with particular strengths in ballhandling and opening possible scoring opportunities from inside the three-point line) and the Power Forward (similar to the Center in stature, but focused more on scoring rather than feeding and/or gaining possession of the ball). In play diagrams, these individuals are often designated by numbers—point guard 1, shooting guard 2, small forward 3, power forward 4, center 5. However, the boundaries between many of these positions have become increasingly blurred in recent years. Many teams below the professional level choose to field three or even four guards, with the remaining player(s) christened with the simple title of"frontcourt". Common positional "blurs" include:

to:

Basketball is played against two opposing teams of five people, players each, comprising a total of ten players.players on the court at any given time. Each of these five players fills a certain position upon the court. These player positions include the Point Guard '''Point Guard''' (the designated leader of the team, responsible for facilitating the team's positioning whether on offence offense or defence) defense) the Shooting Guard '''Shooting Guard''' (the team's prime shooter, scorer, capable of shooting the ball from a variety of distances), the Center '''Center''' (the team's Big Guy, playing the role of responsible for either an feeding the ball to teammates on offense or regaining possession of the ball on defense), the '''Small Forward''' (the team's resident offensive rebounder or defensive shot blocker), the Small Forward (the teams' resident aggressive force, with particular strengths in ballhandling and opening possible scoring opportunities from inside within the three-point line) and the Power Forward '''Power Forward''' (similar to the Center in stature, but focused more on scoring scoring, rather than feeding and/or gaining possession of the ball).assisting). In play diagrams, these individuals are often designated by numbers—point guard 1, shooting guard 2, small forward 3, power forward 4, center 5. However, the boundaries between many of these positions have become increasingly blurred in recent years. Many teams below the professional level choose to field three or even four guards, with the remaining player(s) christened with the simple title of"frontcourt". Common positional "blurs" include:


''They're playing basketball, We love that basketball!''

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''They're They're playing basketball, We love that basketball!''basketball!\\


Basketball is played with five people on each team. Canonically, the positions are Point Guard, Shooting Guard, the Center, the Small Forward, and the Power Forward. In play diagrams, these individuals are often designated by numbers—point guard 1, shooting guard 2, small forward 3, power forward 4, center 5. However, the boundaries between many of these positions have become increasingly blurred in recent years. Many teams below the professional level choose to play three or even four guards, with the remaining player(s) considered simply "frontcourt" players. Common positional "blurs" are:
* Swingman or wing – Combination of small forward and shooting guard.
* Forward-center – Almost ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin; this is almost always someone who can play power forward or center.

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Basketball is played with against two teams of five people on each team. Canonically, people, comprising a total of ten players. Each of these five players fills a certain position upon the court. These player positions are include the Point Guard, Guard (the designated leader of the team, responsible for facilitating the team's positioning whether on offence or defence) the Shooting Guard, Guard (the team's prime shooter, capable of shooting the Center, ball from a variety of distances), the Center (the team's Big Guy, playing the role of either an offensive rebounder or defensive shot blocker), the Small Forward, Forward (the teams' resident aggressive force, with particular strengths in ballhandling and opening possible scoring opportunities from inside the three-point line) and the Power Forward.Forward (similar to the Center in stature, but focused more on scoring rather than feeding and/or gaining possession of the ball). In play diagrams, these individuals are often designated by numbers—point guard 1, shooting guard 2, small forward 3, power forward 4, center 5. However, the boundaries between many of these positions have become increasingly blurred in recent years. Many teams below the professional level choose to play field three or even four guards, with the remaining player(s) considered simply "frontcourt" players. christened with the simple title of"frontcourt". Common positional "blurs" are:
include:
* Swingman or wing – Combination Players capable of fulfilling both small forward and shooting guard.
guard responsibilities. More often than not will implement a mixture of the former two in their playstyle.
* Forward-center – Almost ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin; this is almost Almost always someone who can play power forward or center.center, or, similar to the aforementioned Wing, mixes their two prime positions.



* Point forward – A forward who has strong enough ballhandling skills and basketball IQ to be able to run a team's offense.
* Stretch four – Combination of power forward and small forward. The concept is that of a power forward ("four") able to "stretch" a defense by being able to shoot from outside; all leagues award three points instead of the standard two for shots taken behind a designated line on the floor. A related and even more recent innovation is the "stretch five", a center who's a legitimate three-point threat.

There's a lot more to this than can be gone into depth - [[Wiki/{{Wikipedia}} The Other Wiki]] has a long, detailed article on basketball's history.

Competitively, basketball is played worldwide. However, it is most popular in North America, where it competes neck-and-neck with baseball for second place after football; the Philippines, where it's by far the most popular sport; and the Baltics, with Latvia winning the first ever Eurobasket and hosting it in 2015, producing several European basketball and NBA stars like Jānis Krūmiņš, Maigonis Valdmanis, Valdis Muižnieks, Valdis Valters, Igors Miglinieks, Gundars Vētra, Andris Biedriņš, Kristaps Porziņģis and Dāvis Bertāns, and ASK Riga winning the [=EuroLeague=] three times in a row before becoming defunct, and Lithuania winning Eurobasket three times, hosting it twice, winning the [=EuroLeague=] once, earning 8 other medals in the Eurobasket, the World Championships and the Olympic Games, the men's national team having extremely high TV ratings with three quarters of the country's population watching their games live in 2014, and producing several NBA players, including the father-and-son pair of Arvydas and Domantas Sabonis, Šarūnas Marčiulionis, and Jonas Valančiūnas. The elder Sabonis and Marčiulionis are both in the Naismith Hall of Fame.

International basketball is governed by FIBA (a French acronym for "International Basketball Federation"; pronounced FEE-ba), a body based in Switzerland.[[note]]FIBA originally stood for "International Amateur Basketball Federation". When the international game opened itself to professional players, the governing body dropped "Amateur" from its name, but kept the acronym because it still worked in French.[[/note]] Almost all leagues around the world play under FIBA's rules, with the main exceptions being those based in the U.S. The Philippine Basketball Association uses a mashup of FIBA and NBA rules. That said, the rule sets aren't all that different. The main differences in the rule sets are:
* Duration of the game: FIBA uses four 10-minute quarters, as do U.S. college women's basketball and the WNBA. College men's basketball uses two 20-minute halves; the NBA and PBA use four 12-minute quarters. All of the named rule sets have 5-minute overtime periods.

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* Point forward – A As the name implies, a small forward who has possesses strong enough ballhandling skills and basketball IQ general knowledge of the game's fundamentals to be able to run a team's offense.
offence and defence as a point guard.
* Stretch four – Combination of power forward and small forward. The concept is that of a power forward ("four") able to "stretch" a defense the opposing team's defence by being able to shoot from outside; outside the three-point line; all leagues award three points instead of the standard two for shots taken behind a designated line on the floor. A related and even more recent innovation is the "stretch five", a center who's a legitimate three-point threat.

threat beyond the line.

There's a lot more to this than can be gone into depth - [[Wiki/{{Wikipedia}} The Other Wiki]] has a long, detailed article on basketball's history.

history, rules, regulations, controversies, conundrums, crowning moments, and players of note.

Competitively, basketball is played worldwide. worldwide on near-all levels. However, it is most popular in North America, where it competes it, over the past fifty years, has steadfastly been neck-and-neck with baseball for second place place, after football; American Football; the Philippines, where it's by far the most popular sport; and the Baltics, with Latvia winning the first ever Eurobasket and hosting it in 2015, producing several European basketball and NBA stars like Jānis Krūmiņš, Maigonis Valdmanis, Valdis Muižnieks, Valdis Valters, Igors Miglinieks, Gundars Vētra, Andris Biedriņš, Kristaps Porziņģis and Dāvis Bertāns, and ASK Riga winning the [=EuroLeague=] three times in a row before becoming defunct, and Lithuania winning Eurobasket three times, hosting it twice, winning the [=EuroLeague=] once, earning 8 other medals in the Eurobasket, the World Championships and the Olympic Games, the men's national team having extremely high TV ratings with three quarters of the country's population watching their games live in 2014, and producing several NBA players, including the father-and-son pair of Arvydas and Domantas Sabonis, Šarūnas Marčiulionis, and Jonas Valančiūnas. The elder Sabonis and Marčiulionis are both in the Naismith Hall of Fame.

International basketball is governed by FIBA (a (A name taken from the French acronym for "International Basketball Federation"; Federation", Fédération Internationale de BAsketball; pronounced FEE-ba), a body based in Switzerland.[[note]]FIBA originally stood for "International Amateur Basketball Federation". When the international game opened itself to professional players, the governing body dropped "Amateur" from its name, but kept the acronym because it still worked in French.[[/note]] Almost all Near-all leagues around the world play under FIBA's rules, with the main exceptions being those based in the U.S. The Philippine Basketball Association uses a mashup of FIBA and NBA rules. That said, the rule sets aren't all that different. The main differences in the rule sets are:
* Duration of the game: Duration: FIBA uses splits its regulation games into four 10-minute quarters, as do U.S. college women's basketball and the WNBA. College men's basketball uses two 20-minute halves; the NBA and PBA use four 12-minute quarters. All of the named rule sets have 5-minute overtime periods.periods, with the game ending only when one team has a higher score than the other.



* Fouling out: Players are disqualified from the game on their fifth personal foul in FIBA and U.S. college play. In the NBA, WNBA, and PBA, players have to commit six.

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* Fouling out: Players are disqualified from the game on their fifth personal foul [[note]]the most commonly-distributed foul in the sport, usually given upon a player intentionally making bodily contact with another[[/note]] in FIBA and U.S. college play. In the NBA, WNBA, and PBA, players have to commit six.



From the huge arena to the small gymnasium, fans cheer for their teams, the school bands play music, and mascots do their thing. Experience may vary.

Games are divided into two 20-minute halves (for men only; the women's game was changed to 10-minute quarters in 2015–16), the shot clock was shortened from 35 seconds to 30 for the 2015–16 season[[note]]not added until 1985, an originally 45 seconds[[/note]] (hence the relatively low scoring), and each team has four timeouts in a game[[note]]down from five prior to 2015–16[[/note]]. Effective with the 2020–21 season, the college three-point line in men's play will be the same as FIBA's (in 2019–20, only NCAA Division I men used FIBA's arc). The women's arc remains shorter than the FIBA or NBA arcs. The style of play and the overall feeling of watching a game are refreshingly different.

to:

From the huge arena to the small gymnasium, fans cheer for their teams, the school bands play music, and mascots do their thing. Experience may vary.

Experiences vary per institution.

Games are divided into two 20-minute halves (for men only; the women's game was changed to 10-minute quarters in 2015–16), the shot clock was shortened from 35 seconds to 30 for the 2015–16 season[[note]]not added until 1985, an originally 45 seconds[[/note]] (hence the relatively low scoring), and each team has is given four timeouts in a game[[note]]down from five prior to 2015–16[[/note]]. Effective with the 2020–21 season, the college three-point line in men's play will be the same as FIBA's (in 2019–20, only NCAA Division I men used FIBA's arc). The women's arc remains shorter than the FIBA or NBA arcs. The style of play and the overall feeling of watching a game are refreshingly different.



'''Duke Blue Devils''' - UNC's hated rivals, they have been coached since 1981 by Mike Krzyzewski ("shi-shef-skee"[[note]]only a very loose approximation of the actual Polish pronunciation[[/note]]), often referred to as Coach K.[[note]]He has also coached the US national men's basketball team in various positions since 1979, including being an assistant coach at the 1992 UsefulNotes/OlympicGames (the Dream Team) and head coach since 2006 (including the 2008 Olympic Redeem Team and 2012 Olympic Small-Ball Dream Team)[[/note]] In 2015, Coach K became the first men's head coach with 1,000 career NCAA Division I wins.[[note]]Not the first NCAA Division I coach with 1,000 wins—we'll get to the first later. He ''is'' the D-I men's coach with the most wins at one school—but only because the NCAA ordered more than 100 of Jim Boeheim's wins at Syracuse vacated; Coach K began his coaching career at Army.[[/note]] With just four Final Four appearances before Coach K came to Durham, they made it 13 times in the last 30 years, including five national championships. Duke players (Christian Laettner of the Dream Team, Elton Brand, Shane Battier, Jason Williams, J.J. Redick) aren't superstars in the NBA, though, with the notable exceptions of Mr. NiceGuy Grant Hill, Kyrie Irving (who only spent one year at the school).[[note]] He actually only played 11 games for the team due to spending most of the season sidelined with a toe injury.[[/note]] and Zion Williams.

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'''Duke Blue Devils''' - UNC's hated most geographically direct and most ''vehemently''hated rivals, they have been coached since 1981 by Mike Krzyzewski ("shi-shef-skee"[[note]]only a very loose approximation of the actual Polish pronunciation[[/note]]), often referred to as Coach K.[[note]]He has also coached the US national men's basketball team in various positions since 1979, including being an assistant coach at the 1992 UsefulNotes/OlympicGames (the Dream Team) and head coach since 2006 (including the 2008 Olympic Redeem Team and 2012 Olympic Small-Ball Dream Team)[[/note]] In 2015, Coach K became the first men's head coach with 1,000 career NCAA Division I wins.[[note]]Not the first NCAA Division I coach with 1,000 wins—we'll get to the first later. He ''is'' the D-I men's coach with the most wins at one school—but only because the NCAA ordered more than 100 of Jim Boeheim's wins at Syracuse vacated; Coach K began his coaching career at Army.[[/note]] With just four Final Four appearances before Coach K came to Durham, they made it 13 times in the last 30 years, including five national championships. Duke players (Christian Laettner of the Dream Team, Elton Brand, Shane Battier, Jason Williams, J.J. Redick) aren't superstars in the NBA, though, with the notable exceptions of Mr. NiceGuy Grant Hill, Kyrie Irving (who only spent one year at the school).[[note]] He actually only played 11 games for the team due to spending most of the season sidelined with a toe injury.[[/note]] and Zion Williams.



'''Kansas Jayhawks''' - Three-time national champions, and arguably more intimately connected with the sport's history than any other college team. The team's very first coach was James Naismith... yes, ''THE'' James Naismith. Ironically, he was the only Jayhawks head coach to finish his Kansas career with a losing record. Here are just some of their records as of this writing (June 2020):

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'''Kansas Jayhawks''' - Three-time national champions, and arguably more intimately connected with the sport's history than any other college team. The team's very first coach was James Naismith... yes, ''THE'' the very same James Naismith.Naismith mentioned at the top of this page. Ironically, he was the only Jayhawks head coach to finish his Kansas career with a losing record. Here are just some of their records as of this writing (June 2020):



'''Kentucky Wildcats''' - Coached by the great Adolph Rupp from 1931 to 1972. Won eight NCAA tournaments, including four under Rupp. The Wildcats are the only program to have won national titles under five different coaches—Rupp, his successor Joe B. Hall, Rick Pitino, Tubby Smith, and current coach John Calipari. They were the program that lost the 1966 final to the considerably less prestigious Texas Western (now Texas-El Paso, or UTEP), and that's the story in the movie ''Film/GloryRoad''. They are the all-time winningest team in college basketball, and have won more Southeastern Conference titles than any of the other teams... combined. Recently, the Kentucky women's team had been making some strides as well, but the 2015–16 season was a complete off-court cluster***, which had the potential to place them in a DorkAge but ended up as just a temporary blip.

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'''Kentucky Wildcats''' - Coached by the great Adolph "Baron" Rupp from 1931 to 1972. Won eight NCAA tournaments, including four under Rupp. The Wildcats are the only program to have won national titles under five different coaches—Rupp, his successor Joe B. Hall, Rick Pitino, Tubby Smith, and current coach John Calipari. They were the program that lost the 1966 final to the considerably less prestigious Texas Western (now Texas-El Paso, or UTEP), and that's the story in the movie ''Film/GloryRoad''. They are the all-time winningest team in college basketball, and have won more Southeastern Conference titles than any of the other teams... combined. Recently, the Kentucky women's team had been making some strides as well, but the 2015–16 season was a complete off-court cluster***, which had the potential to place them in a DorkAge but ended up as just a temporary blip.



One final special honorable mention goes out to the UMBC[[note]]University of Maryland, Baltimore County[[/note]] Retrievers, which in 2018 became the first #16 seed ever to defeat a #1 seed in the men's tournament, dominating the Virginia Cavaliers, never trailing in the second half on their way to a [[CurbStompBattle 20-point win]]. The folks at [[Wiki/{{Wikipedia}} The Other Wiki]] put up [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2018_UMBC_vs._Virginia_men%27s_basketball_game a page on the game]] within a couple of hours.

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One final special honorable mention goes out to the UMBC[[note]]University of Maryland, Baltimore County[[/note]] Retrievers, which in 2018 became the first #16 seed ever to defeat a #1 seed in the men's tournament, dominating the Virginia Cavaliers, never trailing in the second half on their way to a [[CurbStompBattle 20-point win]]. The So honorable a mention, in fact, the fine folks at [[Wiki/{{Wikipedia}} The Other Wiki]] put up had [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2018_UMBC_vs._Virginia_men%27s_basketball_game a page on the game]] within a couple mere ''hours'' of hours.
it ending.



* '''Lisa Leslie''': One of the cornerstones of the Los Angeles Sparks and the league, she was assigned to LA at the league's beginning- appropriate for an Angeleno who went to USC. For a fair chunk of the league's existence, she was one of the best players, and the best center, out there. A two-time champion, three-time MVP (in 2002, sweeping All-Star MVP, regular season MVP, and Finals MVP), many-time All-WNBA and All-Star, the league's all-time leading rebounder until Catchings passed her in her final season, and member of the Naismith and Women's Halls of Fame. Also notable for recording the first-ever dunk in a WNBA game. There are those who call her Lisamort, and those who call her the Diva, and those who... she has a lot of {{FanNickname}}s. Her number is retired and the Sparks' court is named after her; she's since bought into the team as a part owner.

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* '''Lisa Leslie''': One of the cornerstones of the Los Angeles Sparks and if not the league, league itself, she was assigned to LA at the league's beginning- appropriate for an Angeleno who went to USC. For a fair chunk of the league's existence, she was one of the best players, and the best center, out there. A two-time champion, three-time MVP (in 2002, sweeping All-Star MVP, regular season MVP, and Finals MVP), many-time All-WNBA and All-Star, the league's all-time leading rebounder until Catchings passed her in her final season, and member of the Naismith and Women's Halls of Fame. Also notable for recording the first-ever dunk in a WNBA game. There are those who call her Lisamort, and those who call her the Diva, and those who... she has a lot of {{FanNickname}}s. Her number is retired and the Sparks' court is named after her; she's since bought into the team as a part owner.



An anomaly in American basketball: A highly popular team which is not affiliated with a league. The Globetrotters are an exhibition team, which mixes athletic talent with comedic routines. The team is not actually [[NonIndicativeName from Harlem]] either in foundation (Chicago) or current home-base (Phoenix), but the name was instead selected to denote that the team consisted entirely of African American players, as Harlem was seen as a center for African American culture when the team was founded in the 1920's. The team has played thousands of games since, including exhibition games against NBA teams, and several of the team's players (such as Naismith Hall of Fame inductees Meadowlark Lemon and Curly Neal) were as famous as their NBA counterparts during their heyday. More info on the real-life team can be found on [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Harlem_Globetrotters The Other Wiki]]; what we have here on them is [[WesternAnimation/TheHarlemGlobetrotters a cartoon]] and [[Pinball/HarlemGlobetrottersOnTour a pinball table]].

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An equal-parts absolute anomaly in American an wholehearted-tribute to the sport of basketball: A highly popular consistently-popular barnstorming team which is not affiliated with a no direct affiliation to any league. The Globetrotters are an exhibition team, which mixes athletic talent with comedic routines. The team is not actually [[NonIndicativeName from Harlem]] either in foundation (Chicago) or current home-base (Phoenix), but the name was instead selected to denote that the team consisted entirely of African American players, as Harlem was seen as a center for African American culture when the team was founded in the 1920's. The team has played thousands of games since, including exhibition games against NBA teams, and several of the team's players (such as Naismith Hall of Fame inductees Meadowlark Lemon and Curly Neal) were as famous as their NBA counterparts during their heyday. More info on the real-life team can be found on [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Harlem_Globetrotters The Other Wiki]]; what we have here on them is [[WesternAnimation/TheHarlemGlobetrotters a cartoon]] and [[Pinball/HarlemGlobetrottersOnTour a pinball table]].



The Globetrotters' former rivals, the Washington Generals (now owned by the Globetrotters themselves). While the Generals have become famous for being losers, [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Washington_Generals#Beating_the_Harlem_Globetrotters they did indeed win once in 1971]] under the name the New Jersey Reds (one of several names the Generals alternated in 1971 and 1972 in an attempt to make it look like there were more teams in the "league" the 'Trotters "played" in). Despite the close relation between the two teams, the Generals were in fact independently owned for most of their existence (specifically by their founder Red Klotz and his family). In 2015, the Trotters ended their contract with the Generals, causing the latter team to fold. In 2017, the Trotters' parent company bought the Generals from the Klotz family and [[HesBack relaunched them]] as an independent barnstorming team that no longer plays the Trotters.

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The Globetrotters' former rivals, the Washington Generals (now owned by the Globetrotters themselves). While the Generals have become famous for being losers, [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Washington_Generals#Beating_the_Harlem_Globetrotters they did indeed have one recorded win once in 1971]] under the name the New Jersey Reds (one of several names the Generals alternated in 1971 and 1972 in an attempt to make it look like there were more teams in the "league" the 'Trotters Trotters "played" in). Despite the close relation between the two teams, the Generals were in fact independently owned for most of their existence (specifically by their founder Red Klotz and his family). In 2015, the Trotters ended their contract with the Generals, causing the latter team to fold. In 2017, the Trotters' parent company bought the Generals name from the Klotz family and [[HesBack relaunched them]] as an independent barnstorming independent, wholly-legitimate exhibition team that no longer plays separate from the Trotters.

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