Follow TV Tropes

Following

History UsefulNotes / Amiga

Go To


Added DiffLines:

* ''VideoGame/{{Moonmist}}''

Added DiffLines:

* ''VideoGame/Floor13''


The Amiga's heart was a set of extremely powerful custom integrated circuits designed by Jay Miner, who was also responsible for the custom graphics chips in the UsefulNotes/{{Atari 2600}} and UsefulNotes/Atari8BitComputers. These chips had names like "Fat Agnus" and included functions such as a "blitter", which allowed fast screen updates, and a "copper" that implemented scanline DMA (which eventually became a common trick on 16-bit consoles). The Amiga also included 4-channel, DMA-driven audio, which led to the development of the first UsefulNotes/{{MOD}} trackers, and the {{demoscene}} that surrounded them. Amiga could also "genlock" to NTSC or PAL video, making it very popular with TV production facilities; [=NewTek=] developed the Video Toaster, an early 3D animation and video editor system, to work with the Amiga's genlock and overlay capabilities. Many TV shows in the late 1980s and early 1990s used Amigas for computer screens and special effects, notably ''Series/TheChartShow'' and ''Series/BabylonFive''. The development of anime {{fansub}}s in the late 1980s is also tied to the Amiga and its genlock capabilities, as it represented the first method of overlaying subtitles on video without high-end equipment unaffordable to the average user. Amigas were also used to power the ''[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pop_(U.S._TV_channel) Prevue Channel]]'', a US TV channel that was just listings for all your local cable channels scrolling in a loop on the bottom half of the screen; the top half would be taken up by cable network's promos, cable company-created ads, and Prevue-produced segments about what to watch. A similar network called ''Sneak Prevue'' was launched in 1991, showing previews for pay-per-view movies and such. However, the Amigas were very error-prone and tended to crash frequently, leaving you with no guide or previews; by the late 90s, it began to suffer NetworkDecay, after TV Guide bought it and rebranded it as the TV Guide Channel; see that article for more. On the upside however, when TV Guide came along the Amigas were replaced with Windows [=PCs=] that definitely weren't as crash prone.

to:

The Amiga's heart was a set of extremely powerful custom integrated circuits designed by Jay Miner, who was also responsible for the custom graphics chips in the UsefulNotes/{{Atari 2600}} and UsefulNotes/Atari8BitComputers. These chips had names like "Fat Agnus" and included functions such as a "blitter", which allowed fast screen updates, and a "copper" that implemented scanline DMA (which eventually became a common trick on 16-bit consoles). The Amiga also included 4-channel, DMA-driven audio, which led to the development of the first UsefulNotes/{{MOD}} trackers, and the {{demoscene}} that surrounded them. Amiga could also "genlock" to NTSC or PAL video, making it very popular with TV production facilities; [=NewTek=] developed the Video Toaster, an early 3D animation and video editor system, to work with the Amiga's genlock and overlay capabilities. Many TV shows in the late 1980s and early 1990s used Amigas for computer screens and special effects, notably ''Series/TheChartShow'' and ''Series/BabylonFive''. The development of anime {{fansub}}s in the late 1980s is also tied to the Amiga and its genlock capabilities, as it represented the first method of overlaying subtitles on video without high-end equipment unaffordable to the average user. Amigas were also used to power the ''[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pop_(U.S._TV_channel) Prevue Channel]]'', a US TV channel that was just listings for all your local cable channels scrolling in a loop on the bottom half of the screen; the top half would be taken up by cable network's promos, cable company-created ads, and Prevue-produced segments about what to watch. A similar network called ''Sneak Prevue'' was launched in 1991, showing previews for pay-per-view movies and such. However, the Amigas were very error-prone and tended to crash frequently, leaving you with no guide or previews; by the late 90s, it began to suffer NetworkDecay, after TV Guide bought it and rebranded it as the TV Guide Channel; Channel, which eventually morphed into Creator/PopTV; see that article for more. On the upside however, when TV Guide came along the Amigas were replaced with Windows [=PCs=] that definitely weren't as crash prone.

Added DiffLines:

* ''VideoGame/KangFu''

Added DiffLines:

** ''[[VideoGame/StriderReturns Strider II]]''

Added DiffLines:

** ''[[VideoGame/StriderArcade Strider (Arcade Game)]]''

Added DiffLines:

* ''VideoGame/RockStarAteMyHamster''



to:

* ''VideoGame/{{Zyconix}}''


For games that do not include their own installers from within the Workbench environment, you can use [[http://www.whdload.de WHDLoad,]] though do note that several games require at least 1 MB of Chip RAM to use it and will not work with systems with only 512 KB of Chip RAM. Some non-AGA titles may even require more than 1 MB, for which the only solution for A500 and A2000 owners is to track down a rare and often [[CrackIsCheaper very expensive]] upgrade like the [=DKB MegAChip 500/2000=].

to:

For games that do not include their own installers from within the Workbench environment, you can use [[http://www.whdload.de WHDLoad,]] though do note that several games require at least 1 MB of Chip RAM to use it and will not work with systems with only 512 KB of Chip RAM. Some non-AGA titles may even require more than 1 MB, for which the only solution for A500 and A2000 owners is to track down a rare and often [[CrackIsCheaper very expensive]] expensive upgrade like the [=DKB MegAChip 500/2000=].



If you're a hardware maniac, however, the A1200 is the computer for you (unless you're willing and able to fork over the money for [[CrackIsCheaper an [=AmigaOne=]-series machine]], or you're willing to forego compatibility for raw power, in which case the A4000 is for you). It can be upgraded more than any other Commodore-era "classic" Amiga model, allowing you to install PCI cards (even graphics) with a busboard expansion, add a [=PowerPC=] processor, and even make it play nicely with the Wi-Fi network you have at home.

to:

If you're a hardware maniac, however, the A1200 is the computer for you (unless you're willing and able to fork over the money for [[CrackIsCheaper an [=AmigaOne=]-series machine]], machine, or you're willing to forego compatibility for raw power, in which case the A4000 is for you). It can be upgraded more than any other Commodore-era "classic" Amiga model, allowing you to install PCI cards (even graphics) with a busboard expansion, add a [=PowerPC=] processor, and even make it play nicely with the Wi-Fi network you have at home.



This upgrade alone, while unquestionably expensive (300 EUR/370 USD at time of writing), puts the [=OCS/ECS-era=] Amiga models on a level above and beyond the AGA ones, particularly those lacking 68060 accelerators and RTG cards that would normally sell for [[CrackIsCheaper thousands of dollars by themselves.]]

to:

This upgrade alone, while unquestionably expensive (300 EUR/370 USD at time of writing), puts the [=OCS/ECS-era=] Amiga models on a level above and beyond the AGA ones, particularly those lacking 68060 accelerators and RTG cards that would normally sell for [[CrackIsCheaper thousands of dollars by themselves.]]
themselves.


* ECS supports both 50Hz and 60Hz refresh rates and both PAL and NTSC color output (although the default refresh rate and color system at boot depends on the region the machine comes from), OCS is either PAL or NTSC only depending on region.

to:

* ECS supports both 50Hz and 60Hz refresh rates and both PAL and NTSC color output (although the default refresh rate and color system at boot depends on the region the machine comes from), OCS is either 50Hz PAL or 60Hz NTSC only depending on region.


* ECS supports both 50Hz and 60Hz refresh rates (although the default refresh rate at boot depends on the region the machine comes from), OCS is either PAL or NTSC only depending on region.

to:

* ECS supports both 50Hz and 60Hz refresh rates and both PAL and NTSC color output (although the default refresh rate and color system at boot depends on the region the machine comes from), OCS is either PAL or NTSC only depending on region.


* ECS supports both 50Hz and 60Hz refresh rates, OCS is either PAL or NTSC only depending on region.

to:

* ECS supports both 50Hz and 60Hz refresh rates, rates (although the default refresh rate at boot depends on the region the machine comes from), OCS is either PAL or NTSC only depending on region.


On top of this was [=AmigaOS=], an operating system that had one of the earliest implementations of preemptive multitasking on a consumer PC (though without memory protection) and a relatively friendly GUI called "Workbench". The A1000 even had [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Virtual_desktop multiple desktops]], which provided prior art that [[http://www.osnews.com/story/23300/_My_Amiga_Killed_a_Troll_ defeated a patent troll.]]

to:

On top of this was [=AmigaOS=], an operating system that had one of the earliest implementations of preemptive multitasking on a consumer PC (though without memory protection) and a relatively friendly GUI called "Workbench". The A1000 even had [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Virtual_desktop multiple desktops]], desktops,]] which provided prior art that [[http://www.osnews.com/story/23300/_My_Amiga_Killed_a_Troll_ defeated a patent troll.]]


For games that do not include their own installers from within the Workbench environment, you can use [[http://www.whdload.de WHDLoad]], though do note that several games require at least 1 MB of Chip RAM to use it and will not work with systems with only 512 KB of Chip RAM. Some non-AGA titles may even require more than 1 MB, for which the only solution for A500 and A2000 owners is to track down a rare and often [[CrackIsCheaper very expensive]] upgrade like the [=DKB MegAChip 500/2000=].

to:

For games that do not include their own installers from within the Workbench environment, you can use [[http://www.whdload.de WHDLoad]], WHDLoad,]] though do note that several games require at least 1 MB of Chip RAM to use it and will not work with systems with only 512 KB of Chip RAM. Some non-AGA titles may even require more than 1 MB, for which the only solution for A500 and A2000 owners is to track down a rare and often [[CrackIsCheaper very expensive]] upgrade like the [=DKB MegAChip 500/2000=].



AGA machines, specifically the [=A4000T=], while even more upgradeable and powerful than the A1200, have quirks that impedes backwards compatibility with certain pieces of software, especially games[[note]]For example, the AGA graphics chipset do not support Chunky Graphics mode, causing slowdowns in certain pieces of software[[/note]], and thus are not recommended if your intention of ownership is to play Amiga games. We should also warn that even used AGA machines are usually ludicrously expensive. However, AGA machines are the go-to where non-linear video editing is concerned, as it's the recommended platform for running Video Toaster, the KillerApp of the Amiga among production studios in the 80s and 90s, especially when it has been upgraded with a [=PowerPC=] CPU co-processor kit.

to:

AGA machines, specifically the [=A4000T=], while even more upgradeable and powerful than the A1200, have quirks that impedes backwards compatibility with certain pieces of software, especially games[[note]]For games,[[note]]For example, the AGA graphics chipset do not support Chunky Graphics mode, causing slowdowns in certain pieces of software[[/note]], software[[/note]] and thus are not recommended if your intention of ownership is to play Amiga games. We should also warn that even used AGA machines are usually ludicrously expensive. However, AGA machines are the go-to where non-linear video editing is concerned, as it's the recommended platform for running Video Toaster, the KillerApp of the Amiga among production studios in the 80s and 90s, especially when it has been upgraded with a [=PowerPC=] CPU co-processor kit.


On top of this was [=AmigaOS=], an operating system that had one of the earliest implementations of preemptive multitasking on a consumer PC (though without memory protection) and a relatively friendly GUI called "Workbench". The A1000 even had [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Virtual_desktop multiple desktops]], which provided prior art that [[http://www.osnews.com/story/23300/_My_Amiga_Killed_a_Troll_ defeated a patent troll]].

to:

On top of this was [=AmigaOS=], an operating system that had one of the earliest implementations of preemptive multitasking on a consumer PC (though without memory protection) and a relatively friendly GUI called "Workbench". The A1000 even had [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Virtual_desktop multiple desktops]], which provided prior art that [[http://www.osnews.com/story/23300/_My_Amiga_Killed_a_Troll_ defeated a patent troll]].
troll.]]



Commodore eventually failed in 1994, and the Amiga, supported by fans, moved from company to company until settling down in 2000. [=AmigaOS=] was ported to the [=PowerPC=] and was sold on new hardware called the [=AmigaOne=] for a time in the early 2000s. [=AmigaOne=] is now selling a new computer, the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/AmigaOne_X1000 AmigaOne X1000]].

to:

Commodore eventually failed in 1994, and the Amiga, supported by fans, moved from company to company until settling down in 2000. [=AmigaOS=] was ported to the [=PowerPC=] and was sold on new hardware called the [=AmigaOne=] for a time in the early 2000s. [=AmigaOne=] is now selling a new computer, the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/AmigaOne_X1000 AmigaOne X1000]].
X1000.]]



** Revision 6 boards and later often have an ECS Agnus and can use trapdoor Slow RAM as Chip RAM by changing JP2 and cutting a trace near the trapdoor RAM pin header

to:

** Revision 6 boards and later often have an ECS Agnus and can use trapdoor Slow RAM as Chip RAM by changing JP2 [=JP2=] and cutting a trace near the trapdoor RAM pin header

Showing 15 edit(s) of 72

Top

How well does it match the trope?

Example of:

/

Media sources:

/

Report