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** Whenever a modern story depicts Bond battling a RealLife political organization (e.g. al-Qaeda, the KGB, or the IRA), it's often assumed to be a deconstructive answer to "classic" Bond stories, which usually pitted him against a fictional NebulousEvilOrganization like SPECTRE. In fact, Fleming's original novels did this from the very beginning: before SPECTRE was introduced, Bond's most persistent foe was SMERSH--a very real (albeit highly fictionalized) Soviet counterespionage agency that actually ''was'' active during the early years of the Cold War. [[note]] Note that the ''real'' SMERSH (taken from the Russian phrase '''''Smer'''''''t'' '''''Sh'''''''pionam'', or ''"Death to spies"'') was exclusively a wartime agency, and they spent most of their existence battling Nazi Germany. Contrary to what Fleming's novels show, they were absorbed into the KGB shortly after War War II ended, and spent little time battling Britain's MI6.[[/note]]

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** Whenever a modern story depicts Bond battling a RealLife political organization (e.g. al-Qaeda, the KGB, or the IRA), it's often assumed to be a deconstructive answer to "classic" Bond stories, which usually pitted him against a fictional NebulousEvilOrganization like SPECTRE. In fact, Fleming's original novels did this from the very beginning: before SPECTRE was introduced, Bond's most persistent foe was SMERSH--a very real (albeit highly fictionalized) Soviet counterespionage agency that actually ''was'' active during the early years of the Cold War. [[note]] Note that the ''real'' SMERSH (taken from the Russian phrase '''''Smer'''''''t'' '''''Sh'''''''pionam'', or ''"Death to spies"'') was exclusively a wartime agency, and they spent most of their existence battling Nazi Germany. Contrary to what Fleming's novels show, they were absorbed into the KGB shortly after War War II ended, and spent little time battling Britain's MI6.[=MI6=].[[/note]]


* Part of the DystopianOz trope is the AlternativeCharacterInterpretation that the Wizard of Oz is an evil, corrupt leader. However, this isn't an ''alternative'' interpretation. It was his [[CharacterizationMarchesOn original]] interpretation. In ''Literature/TheWonderfulWizardOfOz'', the Wizard is an AmbiguouslyEvil but overall neutral character because it isn't shown that Oz had any rulers prior to him; he just abused the naive nature of Ozians to better his own self-esteem. The second book ''Literature/TheMarvelousLandOfOz'' expands upon this by revealing thst he conspired with the evil witch Mombi to usurp the Ozian throne. He taught Mombi all the magic she knows, stole the throne from King Pastoria, and gave Mombi the infant Princess Ozma to raise as [[RaisedAsTheOppositeGender a boy]], so that he could become ruler of Oz. Kids complained so the fourth book, ''Literature/DorothyAndTheWizardInOz'', {{retcon}}ned his character into a more heroic character. He has never met Ozma and has nothing to do with her disappearance.

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* Part of the DystopianOz trope is the AlternativeCharacterInterpretation that the Wizard of Oz is an evil, corrupt leader. However, this isn't an ''alternative'' interpretation. It was his [[CharacterizationMarchesOn original]] interpretation. In ''Literature/TheWonderfulWizardOfOz'', the Wizard is an AmbiguouslyEvil but overall neutral character because it isn't shown that Oz had any rulers prior to him; he just abused the naive nature of Ozians to better his own self-esteem. The second book ''Literature/TheMarvelousLandOfOz'' expands upon this by revealing thst that he conspired with the evil witch Mombi to usurp the Ozian throne. He taught Mombi all the magic she knows, stole the throne from King Pastoria, and gave Mombi the infant Princess Ozma to raise as [[RaisedAsTheOppositeGender a boy]], so that he could become ruler of Oz. Kids complained so the fourth book, ''Literature/DorothyAndTheWizardInOz'', {{retcon}}ned his character into a more heroic character. He has never met Ozma and has nothing to do with her disappearance.


* Before ''ComicBook/{{Batman}}'', ''Literature/TheScarletPimpernel'' was the original RichIdiotWithNoDayJob, masquerading as an [[UpperClassTwit effeminate and decadent aristocrat]], when in secret he was highly intelligent and brave, saving innocent french families from the reign of terror. The thing is, unlike later examples, Percy Blakeney's effeminacy and hedonism weren't an act - in fact, his career as a hero was based on a desire to get even bigger thrills.

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* Before ''ComicBook/{{Batman}}'', ''Literature/TheScarletPimpernel'' was the original RichIdiotWithNoDayJob, masquerading as an [[UpperClassTwit effeminate and decadent aristocrat]], when in secret he was highly intelligent and brave, saving innocent french French families from the reign of terror. The thing is, unlike later examples, Percy Blakeney's effeminacy and hedonism weren't an act - in fact, his career as a hero was based on a desire to get even bigger thrills.


* ''The Marching Morons'', a 1951 ScienceFiction short story, depicts a future wherein the majority of the population has decayed into stupidity and sloth... just like ''Film/{{Idiocracy}}'' and ''WesternAnimation/WallE''. The difference is, the subtext for which those movies were criticized (technology is bad, the poor can't stop multipyling) is front and center, and not only as a form of ValuesDissonance - the HumanPopsicle who's contrasted with the "morons" is openly racist, plans to establish himself as a dictator, admires Hitler, commits genocide... and gets killed in the end for those very flaws.

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* ''The Marching Morons'', a 1951 ScienceFiction short story, depicts a future wherein the majority of the population has decayed into stupidity and sloth... just like ''Film/{{Idiocracy}}'' and ''WesternAnimation/WallE''. The difference is, the subtext for which those movies were criticized (technology is bad, the poor can't stop multipyling) multiplying) is front and center, and not only as a form of ValuesDissonance - the HumanPopsicle who's contrasted with the "morons" is openly racist, plans to establish himself as a dictator, admires Hitler, commits genocide... and gets killed in the end for those very flaws.


* ''Literature/LordPeterWimsey'' is a war veteran with PTSD flashbacks who becomes as a detective. Except it's not post-WWII noir, or a gritty modern story. He's a World War ''I'' vet. He does have a FriendOnTheForce...who exists as more than a plot device, and eventually [[spoiler:marries Peter's sister]]. And he acts like a RichIdiotWithNoDayJob, but he actually does manage his holdings, and the standards of the time keep him from discussing them. Plus, again, the trope doesn't usually include "war vet with PTSD flashbacks". Oh, and he worries about the effect his detective job has on his morality and mental health. His PTSD is linked to how he was forced to send men to their deaths, which is exactly what he does as a detective. He usually consoles himself with that that anyone who gets the death sentence is going to be someone society is better of without. Sometimes that excuse works for him.

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* ''Literature/LordPeterWimsey'' is a war veteran with PTSD flashbacks who becomes as a detective. Except it's not post-WWII noir, or a gritty modern story. He's a World War ''I'' vet. He does have a FriendOnTheForce...who exists as more than a plot device, and eventually [[spoiler:marries Peter's sister]]. And he acts like a RichIdiotWithNoDayJob, but he actually does manage his holdings, and the standards of the time keep him from discussing them. Plus, again, the trope doesn't usually include "war vet with PTSD flashbacks". Oh, and he worries about the effect his detective job has on his morality and mental health. His PTSD is linked to how he was forced to send men to their deaths, which is exactly what he does as a detective. He usually consoles himself with that the thought that anyone who gets the death sentence is going to be someone society is better of off without. Sometimes that excuse works for him.


* Another Bachman book, ''Literature/TheLongWalk'' is about young children sent out to walk without rest, and those who stop for any reason are killed until only one remains, who then gets one wish. The protagonist wins, but can do nothing to stop the system and is strongly implied to have gone completely insane from stress, exhaustion, and watching executions on a daily basis. The walkers also all willingly volunteered for a chance at winning the prize, and things as simple as walkers' bodily functions are a much more of a hindrance to them than any kind of interpersonal rivalry. It would almost certainly be considered a TakeThat to DeadlyGame based YA dystopias like ''Literature/TheHungerGames'' or ''The Testing'' if it didn't predate them by decades.

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* Another Bachman book, ''Literature/TheLongWalk'' ''Literature/TheLongWalk'', is about young children sent out to walk without rest, and those who stop for any reason are killed until only one remains, who then gets one wish. The protagonist wins, but can do nothing to stop the system and is strongly implied to have gone completely insane from stress, exhaustion, and watching executions on a daily basis. The walkers also all willingly volunteered for a chance at winning the prize, and things as simple as walkers' bodily functions are a much more of a hindrance to them than any kind of interpersonal rivalry. It would almost certainly be considered a TakeThat to DeadlyGame based YA dystopias like ''Literature/TheHungerGames'' or ''The Testing'' ''Literature/TheTesting'' if it didn't predate them by decades.


** The very first novel, ''Casino Royale'', for its first half builds up Bond as the glamorous, high-flying operative he is now known. The second half is a lot more downbeat and gritty, and feels like a RealityEnsues take on certain elements of the formula: the GirlOfTheWeek [[spoiler:turns out to be TheMole]]; instead of an elaborate DeathTrap Bond is subject to [[spoiler:a series of simple but brutal GroinAttacks]], and the villain's death [[spoiler:is at the hands of his [[UsefulNotes/MoscowCentre Moscow employers]]]]. Finally the last third of the novel is a long introspection by Bond of the toll taken by being a hired assassin in a world of secrets as he convalesces from the experience. In short, the novel laid out the bad side of the life that the films (and later novels, to a lesser degree) would glamorise.

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** The very first novel, ''Casino Royale'', ''Literature/CasinoRoyale'', for its first half builds up Bond as the glamorous, high-flying operative he is now known. The second half is a lot more downbeat and gritty, and feels like a RealityEnsues take on certain elements of the formula: the GirlOfTheWeek [[spoiler:turns out to be TheMole]]; instead of an elaborate DeathTrap Bond is subject to [[spoiler:a series of simple but brutal GroinAttacks]], and the villain's death [[spoiler:is at the hands of his [[UsefulNotes/MoscowCentre Moscow employers]]]]. Finally the last third of the novel is a long introspection by Bond of the toll taken by being a hired assassin in a world of secrets as he convalesces from the experience. In short, the novel laid out the bad side of the life that the films (and later novels, to a lesser degree) would glamorise.


* Arguably the first nuclear-themed AfterTheEnd and WagonTrainToTheStars stories is the 1956 ''{{Literature/Aniara}}'' poem by Harry Martinson. In contrast to most later works, it is at the hard end of the MohsScaleOfScienceFictionHardness, and might have [[spoiler:the darkest DownerEnding of science-fiction classics.]]

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* Arguably the first nuclear-themed AfterTheEnd and WagonTrainToTheStars stories story is the 1956 ''{{Literature/Aniara}}'' poem by Harry Martinson. In contrast to most later works, it is at the hard end of the MohsScaleOfScienceFictionHardness, and might have [[spoiler:the darkest DownerEnding of science-fiction classics.]]


* ''Literature/NineteenEightyFour'' is perhaps the {{Trope Maker|s}} for the surveillance state. However it is pointed out not everybody is watched, only the middle-class, who the upper class considers the biggest threat. A political tract in the book claims that predictably the middle-class will try using the lower class for a revolt, then become the new upper class. Also the hero [[spoiler: does not overthrow the regime, he and his lover end up beaten into submission and "loving" Big Brother]]. The book also deals with a lot of aspects of totalitarianism that other later dystopian works fail to address. For example, it's mentioned that to become a member of the ruling class, a citizen does, in fact, have to pass a set of civil exams. Just being evil/cruel/power-hungry isn't enough. Also, while the ruling class do have a pleasant life compared to the rest of the populace, they do not at all live like kings. They burn so much resources maintaining their absolute stranglehold on the population that their own standard of living would be considered poor by today's standards.

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* ''Literature/NineteenEightyFour'' is perhaps the {{Trope Maker|s}} for the surveillance state. However However, it is pointed out not everybody is watched, only the middle-class, who the upper class considers the biggest threat. A political tract in the book claims that predictably the middle-class will try using the lower class for a revolt, then become the new upper class. Also the hero [[spoiler: does not overthrow the regime, he and his lover end up beaten into submission and "loving" Big Brother]]. The book also deals with a lot of aspects of totalitarianism that other later dystopian works fail to address. For example, it's mentioned that to become a member of the ruling class, a citizen does, in fact, have to pass a set of civil exams. Just being evil/cruel/power-hungry isn't enough. Also, while the ruling class do have a pleasant life compared to the rest of the populace, they do not at all live like kings. They burn so much resources maintaining their absolute stranglehold on the population that their own standard of living would be considered poor by today's standards.


* Karin Boye's 1940 novel ''Kallocain'' depicts many tropes of a [[TheEmpire totalitarian state]] later codified in ''Literature/NineteenEightyFour''. The title is the name of a TruthSerum, developed to expose ThoughtCrime against the "World State". At the beginning of the plot, citizens have already given up material wealth, comfort, health and personal relationships for honour and national security, and their minds will be their final sacrifice. The protagonist Leo Kall states already in the prologue that his life in prison is not much worse than his life used to be as a leading scientist of the World State. The drug itself works just as intended, but its consequences [[GoneHorriblyRight are unforeseeable]]. [[spoiler: So many citizens express dissent under the influence of the drug, that the police need to limit the indictments. Leo is however no rebellious hero; he is one of few named characters to remain loyal to the State all along, even when influenced by the drug. And while he believes from the beginning to the end that his drug will be good for mankind, he uses it for his own gain, to find out whether his wife is cheating. While TheResistance exists, it has no agenda to overthrow the State, but instead to allow personal development and self-expression. In the end, their efforts turn out to be in vain, as "The Universal State" captures the City. The nature of the Universal State is obscure until the epilogue, allegedly written by a censor, who finds the whole book to be so dangerous that it needs to be kept secret.]]

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* Karin Boye's 1940 novel ''Kallocain'' depicts many tropes of a [[TheEmpire totalitarian state]] later codified in ''Literature/NineteenEightyFour''. The title is the name of a TruthSerum, developed to expose ThoughtCrime against the "World State". At the beginning of the plot, citizens have already given up material wealth, comfort, health and personal relationships for honour and national security, and their minds will be their final sacrifice. The protagonist Leo Kall states already in the prologue that his life in prison is not much worse than his life used to be as a leading scientist of the World State. The drug itself works just as intended, but its consequences [[GoneHorriblyRight are unforeseeable]]. [[spoiler: So many citizens express dissent under the influence of the drug, drug that the police need to limit the indictments. Leo is however no rebellious hero; he is one of few named characters to remain loyal to the State all along, even when influenced by the drug. And while he believes from the beginning to the end that his drug will be good for mankind, he uses it for his own gain, to find out whether his wife is cheating. While TheResistance exists, it has no agenda to overthrow the State, but instead to allow personal development and self-expression. In the end, their efforts turn out to be in vain, as "The Universal State" captures the City. The nature of the Universal State is obscure until the epilogue, allegedly written by a censor, who finds the whole book to be so dangerous that it needs to be kept secret.]]


** The Elf Fëanor contains many qualities of a traditional fantasy hero, being a King's oldest son who wants to avenge his father's murder by the BigBad, handsome, charismatic and an excellent warrior. However he comes across as a deconstruction of TheAce, as he is very arrogant and hot-headed. His rallying the Noldor to war against Morgoth also deconstructs TheCharmer, as it leads to the Noldor killing other Elves so they can get to Middle-Earth, and the oath he and his sons swear leads to terrible consequences for centuries afterwards, which curse the Noldor. Fëanor is also set up as a major character for the First Age, however his HotBlooded nature means he dies shortly after reaching Middle-Earth when he attacks Angband ahead of his main army and is fatally wounded by the Balrogs.

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** The Elf Fëanor contains many qualities of a traditional fantasy hero, being a King's oldest son who wants to avenge his father's murder by the BigBad, handsome, charismatic and an excellent warrior. However However, he comes across as a deconstruction of TheAce, as he is very arrogant and hot-headed. His rallying the Noldor to war against Morgoth also deconstructs TheCharmer, as it leads to the Noldor killing other Elves so they can get to Middle-Earth, and the oath he and his sons swear leads to terrible consequences for centuries afterwards, which curse the Noldor. Fëanor is also set up as a major character for the First Age, however his HotBlooded nature means he dies shortly after reaching Middle-Earth when he attacks Angband ahead of his main army and is fatally wounded by the Balrogs.


** While ''Literature/TheLordOfTheRings'' trilogy codifies TheQuest, it is built around an {{inverted|Trope}} PlotCoupon. [[spoiler: The heroes do ''not'' stick together to the end, and their victory is a BittersweetEnding did not preserve the doomed GoldenAge but merely warded off [[CrapsackWorld total conquest by evil]]. Also, the plucky hero, while exhibiting enormous fortitude, nevertheless ''fails'' in his mission; it was Gollum's unlucky slip which destroyed the Ring. And when some of the heroes return home they find it has been taken over by one of the villains and they have to overthrow him.]]

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** While ''Literature/TheLordOfTheRings'' trilogy codifies TheQuest, it is built around an {{inverted|Trope}} PlotCoupon. [[spoiler: The heroes do ''not'' stick together to the end, and their victory is a BittersweetEnding that did not preserve the doomed GoldenAge but merely warded off [[CrapsackWorld total conquest by evil]]. Also, the plucky hero, while exhibiting enormous fortitude, nevertheless ''fails'' in his mission; it was Gollum's unlucky slip which destroyed the Ring. And when some of the heroes return home they find it has been taken over by one of the villains and they have to overthrow him.]]


* The 1933 Norwegian novel ''A Fugitive Crosses His Tracks'' by Aksel Sandemose is famous for codifying ''Janteloven'' ("the law of Jante"), the ten-commandment Scandinavian interpretation of the TallPoppySyndrome, and a cornerstone of the Norwegian, Danish and Swedish self-image; Sandemose has been one of few authors to write in all three languages. Today, the "law" is usually read as a satire of the socialist and egalitarian values which have been dominant in Scandinavia since the 1930s. However, the novel has an egalitarian spirit in itself, and is critical to the conservative, semi-feudal society with abysmal class divides, which had the norm until then. As a side note, many Scandinavians believe that the doctrine is unique for their region; the TallPoppySyndrome however seems to be more or less universal.

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* The 1933 Norwegian novel ''A Fugitive Crosses His Tracks'' by Aksel Sandemose is famous for codifying ''Janteloven'' ("the law of Jante"), the ten-commandment Scandinavian interpretation of the TallPoppySyndrome, and a cornerstone of the Norwegian, Danish and Swedish self-image; Sandemose has been one of few authors to write in all three languages. Today, the "law" is usually read as a satire of the socialist and egalitarian values which have been dominant in Scandinavia since the 1930s. However, the novel has an egalitarian spirit in itself, and is critical to the conservative, semi-feudal society with abysmal class divides, which had been the norm until then. As a side note, many Scandinavians believe that the doctrine is unique for their region; the TallPoppySyndrome however seems to be more or less universal.


*** The best-known scenes from many motion-picture adaptations of the book, was the protagonists riding a balloon. The book however brings up the idea of riding a balloon, disregarding it as being too risky. Very few balloon rides were mentioned in literature before; Verne's first novel, ''Five Weeks in a Balloon'', was the first example.

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*** The best-known scenes from many motion-picture adaptations of the book, was book is the protagonists riding a balloon. The book however book, however, brings up the idea of riding a balloon, disregarding it as being too risky. Very few balloon rides were mentioned in literature before; Verne's first novel, ''Five Weeks in a Balloon'', was the first example.


*** The Martian Heat Ray is a lot more realistic than the DeathRay trope it helped popularize. No flashy visible beam or cool noise, just the jum of machinery and a lot of energy dumped on the target.

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*** The Martian Heat Ray is a lot more realistic than the DeathRay trope it helped popularize. No flashy visible beam or cool noise, just the jum hum of machinery and a lot of energy dumped on the target.

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