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** Ultimately, it appears that ''All My Children'' and OLTL'' failed on streaming because '''1)''' Streaming was still in its infancy and '''2)''' Prospect Park had no idea what it would mean to produce a soap opera. They could not make the financials work. In other words, they were produced by a startup that couldn't finance or manage them. '''3)''' Soap operas are designed for a niche audience and it requires a commitment. Streaming shows have 8-13 episodes a season. It's a quick binge watch and then you're done until the next season. In a nutshell, to make soap opera work on a streaming platform, you would have to completely reimagine what you currently consider a traditional soap. Therefore, the storytelling and basic DNA would have to completely change. And soap fans have proven that they don't like change all that much.

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** Ultimately, it appears that ''All My Children'' and OLTL'' ''OLTL'' failed on streaming because '''1)''' Streaming was still in its infancy and '''2)''' Prospect Park had no idea what it would mean to produce a soap opera. They could not make the financials work. In other words, they were produced by a startup that couldn't finance or manage them. Arguably, Prospect Park's biggest failure was relying on its own website and iTunes instead of Creator/{{Hulu}}. '''3)''' Soap operas are designed for a niche audience and it requires a commitment. Streaming shows have 8-13 episodes a season. It's a quick binge watch and then you're done until the next season. In a nutshell, to make soap opera work on a streaming platform, you would have to completely reimagine what you currently consider a traditional soap. Therefore, the storytelling and basic DNA would have to completely change. And soap fans have proven that they don't like change all that much.


** Ultimately, it appears that ''All My Children'' and OLTL'' failed on streaming because 1) Streaming was still in its infancy and 2) Prospect Park had no idea what it would mean to produce a soap opera. They could not make the financials work. 3) Soap operas are designed for a niche audience and it requires a commitment. Streaming shows have 8-13 episodes a season. It's a quick binge watch and then you're done until the next season. In a nutshell, to make soap opera work on a streaming platform, you would have to completely reimagine what you currently consider a traditional soap. Therefore, the storytelling and basic DNA would have to completely change. And soap fans have proven that they don't like change all that much.

to:

** Ultimately, it appears that ''All My Children'' and OLTL'' failed on streaming because 1) '''1)''' Streaming was still in its infancy and 2) '''2)''' Prospect Park had no idea what it would mean to produce a soap opera. They could not make the financials work. 3) In other words, they were produced by a startup that couldn't finance or manage them. '''3)''' Soap operas are designed for a niche audience and it requires a commitment. Streaming shows have 8-13 episodes a season. It's a quick binge watch and then you're done until the next season. In a nutshell, to make soap opera work on a streaming platform, you would have to completely reimagine what you currently consider a traditional soap. Therefore, the storytelling and basic DNA would have to completely change. And soap fans have proven that they don't like change all that much.

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** Ultimately, it appears that ''All My Children'' and OLTL'' failed on streaming because 1) Streaming was still in its infancy and 2) Prospect Park had no idea what it would mean to produce a soap opera. They could not make the financials work. 3) Soap operas are designed for a niche audience and it requires a commitment. Streaming shows have 8-13 episodes a season. It's a quick binge watch and then you're done until the next season. In a nutshell, to make soap opera work on a streaming platform, you would have to completely reimagine what you currently consider a traditional soap. Therefore, the storytelling and basic DNA would have to completely change. And soap fans have proven that they don't like change all that much.


* ''Series/{{Pitfall}}'', a short-lived game show hosted by Creator/AlexTrebek. The production company had trouble paying contestants their winnings, and even stiffed Alex on his salary he still has the bounced check from the production company framed in his living room.

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* ''Series/{{Pitfall}}'', a short-lived game show hosted by Creator/AlexTrebek. The production company parent company, Catalena Productions, had trouble paying contestants their winnings, winnings and even stiffed Alex on his salary he salary. He still has the bounced check from the production company Catalena framed in his living room.


** Creator/HollyMarieCombs, good friends with Doherty, was rumoured to want to leave the show after Season 3 as well, but forced to stay by contract.
** After Doherty left, Creator/RoseMcGowan was brought in as Paige, a long-lost Halliwell sister to replace Prue. She revealed in an interview that she thought the role would only last two seasons (the length of her initial contract), and did not expect to become a series regular for five seasons. She was also incredibly unhappy at how her character was [[ReallyGetsAround being written]] in the fifth season, supposedly angrily going to the writers and saying "Paige isn't a ho!", which was fixed afterwards. She has been quoted as saying "each year, ''Charmed'' would get renewed and each year I would cry."

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** Creator/HollyMarieCombs, good friends with Doherty, was rumoured to want wanted to leave the show along with her after Season 3 as well, but forced 3. However she was convinced to stay by contract.
on after getting granted a pay rise to $60,000 per episode - and getting the AndStarring in the opening credits.
** After Doherty left, Creator/RoseMcGowan was brought in as Paige, a long-lost Halliwell sister to replace Prue. She revealed in an interview that she thought the role would only last two seasons (the length of her initial contract), and did not expect to become a series regular for five seasons. She was also incredibly unhappy at how her character was [[ReallyGetsAround being written]] in the fifth season, supposedly angrily going to the writers and saying "Paige isn't a ho!", which was fixed afterwards. She has been quoted as saying "each year, ''Charmed'' would get renewed and each year I would cry."" Once she went public about her assault from Harvey Weinstein, she admits that having to cope with the trauma of sexual assault coupled with long shooting hours of network television were not kind for her mental health - resulting in impulsive things like dyeing her hair red just to annoy the producers.


** The sexual abuse angle got even worse when -- as part of a cascade of revelations about media figures following the Weinstein story -- Matt Lauer was suddenly fired after twenty years co-hosting ''Today'' after several accounts of sexual misconduct by former female subordinates. In 2019, Farrow released a book in which a former NBC employee alleged that Lauer had raped her in his hotel room, and that senior NBC executives, including Lack, had tried to downplay/discredit her story before Lauer was fired.

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** The sexual abuse angle got even worse when -- as part of a cascade of revelations about media figures following the Weinstein story -- Matt Lauer was suddenly fired after twenty years co-hosting ''Today'' after several accounts of sexual misconduct by former female subordinates. In 2019, Farrow released a book in which a former NBC employee alleged that Lauer had raped her in his hotel room, and room; that senior NBC executives, including Lack, had tried to downplay/discredit her story before Lauer was fired.fired; and that Weinstein's camp had knowledge of Lauer's misconduct and used that as leverage to kill Farrow's story.


** The sexual abuse angle got even worse when -- as part of a cascade of revelations about media figures following the Weinstein story -- Matt Lauer was suddenly fired after twenty years co-hosting ''Today'' after several accounts of sexual misconduct by former female subordinates. Similar accusations were later made against former ''Nightly News'' anchor Tom Brokaw.

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** The sexual abuse angle got even worse when -- as part of a cascade of revelations about media figures following the Weinstein story -- Matt Lauer was suddenly fired after twenty years co-hosting ''Today'' after several accounts of sexual misconduct by former female subordinates. Similar accusations were later made against In 2019, Farrow released a book in which a former ''Nightly News'' anchor Tom Brokaw.NBC employee alleged that Lauer had raped her in his hotel room, and that senior NBC executives, including Lack, had tried to downplay/discredit her story before Lauer was fired.


* When ''Series/LastManStanding'' premiered on ABC in 2011, it was pitched as simply being a show about man (played by Creator/TimAllen) trying to maintain his masculinity in a world of women. In essence, it could be seen as [[SpiritualSuccessor update]] of Allen's prior sitcom ''Series/HomeImprovement'' if Tim Taylor had three daughters instead of three sons. The show was created by ''Series/ThirtyRock'' writer Jack Burditt, and he might have eventually made something of it. However, Burditt left the show due to a family tragedy. He would return for a brief period, but he knew he wouldn't be able to lead the sitcom much longer, so ''Series/{{Reba}}'' vet Kevin Abbott took the helm. But Abbott had already sold another pilot to ABC and had to leave to focus on ''that'' show, so the start of the second season brought the third official showrunner, Tim Doyle of ''Series/RulesOfEngagement''. Starting in Season 2, the show (which by now was moved to [[FridayNightDeathSlot Fridays]]) began focusing on politics. In essence, what both Doyle and Allen wanted to do was [[{{Retool}} make the show]] more like ''Series/AllInTheFamily'', albeit with a conservative slant as opposed to the liberal/humanist bent of the earlier sitcom. Another change was the [[TheOtherDarrin recasting]] of Mike Baxter's eldest daughter Kristin (Alexandra Krosney had the role in season one; Amanda Fuller has had it from Season 2 onwards) due to the dreaded "CreativeDifferences". Doyle stuck around as showrunner three years before passing the baton to Matt Berry, who ran the show until its cancellation by ABC.[[note]]One speculated reason behind ABC cancelling ''LMS'' was due to the show being owned by 20th Century Fox, who received all of the syndication money (ABC only got the advertising revenue). Allen alleges that it was cancelled for being a conservative-leaning sitcom that did not fit with the liberal leaning ones the network airs, like ''Series/ModernFamily'' and ''Series/{{Blackish}}'', even though they greenlit a number of conservative-leaning programs the next season, including a revival of ''Series/{{Roseanne}}'' which reflected star Roseanne Barr's pro-Trump leanings, and censored or banned episodes of ''Black-ish'' that criticized the Trump administration.[[/note]] [[ChannelHop Fox]] later [[UnCancelled revived]] ''LMS'', with Season 7 airing during the 2018-2019 season. Consequently, ''LMS'' endured another recast with middle daughter Mandy going from being played by Molly Ephraim to Molly [=McCook=], and the character [[DemotedToExtra demoted]] to recurring status.

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* When ''Series/LastManStanding'' premiered on ABC in 2011, it was pitched as simply being a show about man (played by Creator/TimAllen) trying to maintain his masculinity in a world of women. In essence, it could be seen as [[SpiritualSuccessor update]] of Allen's prior sitcom ''Series/HomeImprovement'' if Tim Taylor had three daughters instead of three sons. The show was created by ''Series/ThirtyRock'' writer Jack Burditt, and he might have eventually made something of it. However, Burditt left the show due to a family tragedy. He would return for a brief period, but he knew he wouldn't be able to lead the sitcom much longer, so ''Series/{{Reba}}'' vet Kevin Abbott took the helm. But Abbott had already sold another pilot to ABC and had to leave to focus on ''that'' show, so the start of the second season brought the third official showrunner, Tim Doyle of ''Series/RulesOfEngagement''. Starting in Season 2, the show (which by now was moved to [[FridayNightDeathSlot Fridays]]) began focusing on politics. In essence, what both Doyle and Allen wanted to do was [[{{Retool}} make the show]] more like ''Series/AllInTheFamily'', albeit with a conservative slant [[SpiritualAntithesis as opposed opposed]] to the liberal/humanist bent of the earlier sitcom. Another change was the [[TheOtherDarrin recasting]] of Mike Baxter's eldest daughter Kristin (Alexandra Krosney had the role in season one; Season 1; Amanda Fuller has had it from Season 2 onwards) due to the dreaded "CreativeDifferences". Doyle stuck around as showrunner three years before passing the baton to Matt Berry, who ran the show until its cancellation by ABC.[[note]]One speculated reason behind ABC cancelling ''LMS'' was due to the show being owned by 20th Century Fox, who received all of the syndication money (ABC only got the advertising revenue). Allen alleges that it was cancelled for being a conservative-leaning sitcom that did not fit with the liberal leaning ones the network airs, like ''Series/ModernFamily'' and ''Series/{{Blackish}}'', even though they greenlit a number of conservative-leaning programs the next season, including a revival of ''Series/{{Roseanne}}'' which reflected star Roseanne Barr's pro-Trump leanings, and censored or banned episodes of ''Black-ish'' that criticized the Trump administration.[[/note]] [[ChannelHop Fox]] later [[UnCancelled revived]] ''LMS'', with Season 7 airing during the 2018-2019 season. Consequently, ''LMS'' endured another recast with middle daughter Mandy going from being played by Molly Ephraim to Molly [=McCook=], and the character [[DemotedToExtra demoted]] to recurring status.


* Season 3 of ''Series/{{Supergirl}}'' was derailed halfway through by numerous sexual harassment accusations against writer and producer Andrew Kreisberg. He was fired after an investigation, but the show was left in the awkward position of being partway through a story that he'd been the major brain behind, which everyone was naturally not comfortable at all with continuing (plus this would mean they'd still need to pay him for the story ideas). Thus, the second half of the season suffered very noticeably from the remaining writing crew trying their hardest to pull an alternate second half of the story out of their ass, often being very obvious about it.

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* Season 3 of ''Series/{{Supergirl}}'' ''Series/{{Supergirl|2015}}'' was derailed halfway through by numerous sexual harassment accusations against writer and producer Andrew Kreisberg. He was fired after an investigation, but the show was left in the awkward position of being partway through a story that he'd been the major brain behind, which everyone was naturally not comfortable at all with continuing (plus this would mean they'd still need to pay him for the story ideas). Thus, the second half of the season suffered very noticeably from the remaining writing crew trying their hardest to pull an alternate second half of the story out of their ass, often being very obvious about it.


** Series VIII was planned to start with an hour-long special, "Back in the Red", which ended up turning into a three-part story when the budget ran out and it was the only way to make the requisite number of episodes; a lot of the third part is just padding to bulk the thing out. "Pete" was also originally a one-part story before it had to become a two-parter for similar reasons. Then the season finale came along. Doug Naylor initially wrote a ludicrously over-ambitious episode that would have seen Red Dwarf finally return to Earth, which couldn't be afforded largely because they had blown the budget on a CGI dinosaur for "Pete", before hastily writing the actual season-ending episode, "[[Recap/SeasonVIIIOnlyTheGood Only the Good]]". Filming of that episode went well, albeit with Naylor having to pay for an all-important model out of his own pocket due to the budget having completely run out. But then Naylor decided to ditch the original ending (which clearly set up a Series IX) in favour of a more open-ended conclusion that would allow him to end the TV series and do a ContinuityReboot with the planned ''Red Dwarf: TheMovie'', while still doing Series IX if he wanted to. This resulted in the episode's eventual ending being something they thought of only ''minutes'' before shooting, with no idea how they were going to resolve it. There are ''four'' different endings to that series: two which were filmed but unused, one which was going to be filmed but cancelled so late that the cast were actually in costume ready to shoot it, and the ultimately used ending which replaced the cancelled ending at the last minute, and required the director to step in to play one of the parts using a costume nicked from another series.

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** Series VIII was planned to start with an hour-long special, "Back in the Red", which ended up turning into a three-part story when the budget ran out and it was the only way to make the requisite number of episodes; a lot of the third part is just padding to bulk the thing out. "Pete" was also originally a one-part story before it had to become a two-parter for similar reasons. Then the season finale came along. Doug Naylor initially wrote a ludicrously over-ambitious episode that would have seen Red Dwarf finally return to Earth, which couldn't be afforded largely because they had blown the budget on a CGI dinosaur for "Pete", before hastily writing the actual season-ending episode, "[[Recap/SeasonVIIIOnlyTheGood "[[Recap/RedDwarfSeasonVIIIOnlyTheGood Only the Good]]". Filming of that episode went well, albeit with Naylor having to pay for an all-important model out of his own pocket due to the budget having completely run out. But then Naylor decided to ditch the original ending (which clearly set up a Series IX) in favour of a more open-ended conclusion that would allow him to end the TV series and do a ContinuityReboot with the planned ''Red Dwarf: TheMovie'', while still doing Series IX if he wanted to. This resulted in the episode's eventual ending being something they thought of only ''minutes'' before shooting, with no idea how they were going to resolve it. There are ''four'' different endings to that series: two which were filmed but unused, one which was going to be filmed but cancelled so late that the cast were actually in costume ready to shoot it, and the ultimately used ending which replaced the cancelled ending at the last minute, and required the director to step in to play one of the parts using a costume nicked from another series.


* When ''Series/LastManStanding'' premiered on ABC in 2011, it was pitched as simply being a show about man (played by Creator/TimAllen) trying to maintain his masculinity in a world of women. In essence, it could be seen as [[SpiritualSuccessor update]] of Allen's prior sitcom ''Series/HomeImprovement'' if Tim Taylor had three daughters instead of three sons. The show was created by ''Series/ThirtyRock'' writer Jack Burditt, and he might have eventually made something of it. However, Burditt left the show due to a family tragedy. He would return for a brief period, but he knew he wouldn't be able to lead the sitcom much longer, so ''Series/{{Reba}}' vet Kevin Abbott took the helm. But Abbott had already sold another pilot to ABC and had to leave to focus on ''that'' show, so the start of the second season brought the third official showrunner, Tim Doyle of ''Series/RulesOfEngagement''. Starting in Season 2, the show (which by now was moved to [[FridayNightDeathSlot Fridays]]) began focusing on politics. In essence, what both Doyle and Allen wanted to do was [[{{Retool}} make the show]] more like ''Series/AllInTheFamily'', albeit with a conservative slant as opposed to the liberal/humanist bent of the earlier sitcom. Another change was the [[TheOtherDarrin recasting]] of Mike Baxter's eldest daughter Kristin (Alexandra Krosney had the role in season one; Amanda Fuller has had it from Season 2 onwards) due to the dreaded "CreativeDifferences". Doyle stuck around as showrunner three years before passing the baton to Matt Berry, who ran the show until its cancellation by ABC.[[note]]One speculated reason behind ABC cancelling ''LMS'' was due to the show being owned by 20th Century Fox, who received all of the syndication money (ABC only got the advertising revenue). Allen alleges that it was cancelled for being a conservative-leaning sitcom that did not fit with the liberal leaning ones the network airs, like ''Series/ModernFamily'' and ''Series/{{Blackish}}'', even though they greenlit a number of conservative-leaning programs the next season, including a revival of ''Series/{{Roseanne}}'' which reflected star Roseanne Barr's pro-Trump leanings, and censored or banned episodes of ''Black-ish'' that criticized the Trump administration.[[/note]] [[ChannelHop Fox]] later [[UnCancelled revived]] ''LMS'', with Season 7 airing during the 2018-2019 season. Consequently, ''LMS'' endured another recast with middle daughter Mandy going from being played by Molly Ephraim to Molly [=McCook=], and the character [[DemotedToExtra demoted]] to recurring status.

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* When ''Series/LastManStanding'' premiered on ABC in 2011, it was pitched as simply being a show about man (played by Creator/TimAllen) trying to maintain his masculinity in a world of women. In essence, it could be seen as [[SpiritualSuccessor update]] of Allen's prior sitcom ''Series/HomeImprovement'' if Tim Taylor had three daughters instead of three sons. The show was created by ''Series/ThirtyRock'' writer Jack Burditt, and he might have eventually made something of it. However, Burditt left the show due to a family tragedy. He would return for a brief period, but he knew he wouldn't be able to lead the sitcom much longer, so ''Series/{{Reba}}' ''Series/{{Reba}}'' vet Kevin Abbott took the helm. But Abbott had already sold another pilot to ABC and had to leave to focus on ''that'' show, so the start of the second season brought the third official showrunner, Tim Doyle of ''Series/RulesOfEngagement''. Starting in Season 2, the show (which by now was moved to [[FridayNightDeathSlot Fridays]]) began focusing on politics. In essence, what both Doyle and Allen wanted to do was [[{{Retool}} make the show]] more like ''Series/AllInTheFamily'', albeit with a conservative slant as opposed to the liberal/humanist bent of the earlier sitcom. Another change was the [[TheOtherDarrin recasting]] of Mike Baxter's eldest daughter Kristin (Alexandra Krosney had the role in season one; Amanda Fuller has had it from Season 2 onwards) due to the dreaded "CreativeDifferences". Doyle stuck around as showrunner three years before passing the baton to Matt Berry, who ran the show until its cancellation by ABC.[[note]]One speculated reason behind ABC cancelling ''LMS'' was due to the show being owned by 20th Century Fox, who received all of the syndication money (ABC only got the advertising revenue). Allen alleges that it was cancelled for being a conservative-leaning sitcom that did not fit with the liberal leaning ones the network airs, like ''Series/ModernFamily'' and ''Series/{{Blackish}}'', even though they greenlit a number of conservative-leaning programs the next season, including a revival of ''Series/{{Roseanne}}'' which reflected star Roseanne Barr's pro-Trump leanings, and censored or banned episodes of ''Black-ish'' that criticized the Trump administration.[[/note]] [[ChannelHop Fox]] later [[UnCancelled revived]] ''LMS'', with Season 7 airing during the 2018-2019 season. Consequently, ''LMS'' endured another recast with middle daughter Mandy going from being played by Molly Ephraim to Molly [=McCook=], and the character [[DemotedToExtra demoted]] to recurring status.


* When ''Series/LastManStanding'' premiered on ABC in 2011, it was pitched as simply being a show about man (played by Creator/TimAllen) trying to maintain his masculinity in a world of women. In essence, it could be seen as [[SpiritualSuccessor update]] of Allen's prior sitcom ''Series/HomeImprovement'' if Tim Taylor had three daughters instead of three sons. The show was created by ''Series/ThirtyRock'' writer Jack Burditt, and he might have eventually made something of it. However, Burditt left the show due to a family tragedy. He would return for a brief period, but he knew he wouldn't be able to lead the sitcom much longer, so ''Series/{{Reba}}'' vet Kevin Abbott took the helm. But Abbott had already sold another pilot to ABC and had to leave to focus on ''that'' show, so the start of the second season brought the third official showrunner, Tim Doyle of ''Series/RulesOfEngagement''. Starting in Season 2, the show (which by now was moved to [[FridayNightDeathSlot Fridays]]) became a show about politics. In essence, what both Doyle and Allen wanted to do was [[{{Retool}} make the show]] more like ''Series/AllInTheFamily'', albeit with a conservative slant as opposed to the liberal/humanist bent of the earlier sitcom. Another change was the [[TheOtherDarrin recasting]] of Mike Baxter's eldest daughter Kristin (Alexandra Krosney had the role in season one; Amanda Fuller has had it from Season 2 onwards) due to the dreaded "CreativeDifferences". Doyle stuck around as showrunner three years before passing the baton to Matt Berry, who ran the show until its cancellation by ABC.[[note]]One speculated reason behind ABC cancelling ''LMS'' was due to the show being owned by 20th Century Fox, who received all of the syndication money (ABC only got the advertising revenue). Allen alleges that it was cancelled because the show was a conservative-leaning sitcom that did not fit with the liberal leaning ones the network airs, like ''Series/ModernFamily'' and ''Series/{{Blackish}}'', even though they greenlit a number of conservative-leaning programs the next season, including a revival of ''Series/{{Roseanne}}'' which reflected star Roseanne Barr's pro-Trump leanings, and censored or banned episodes of ''Black-ish'' that criticized the Trump administration.[[/note]] [[ChannelHop Fox]] later [[UnCancelled revived]] ''LMS'', with Season 7 airing during the 2018-2019 season. Consequently, ''LMS'' endured another recast with middle daughter Mandy going from being played by Molly Ephraim to Molly [=McCook=], and the character [[DemotedToExtra demoted]] to recurring status.

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* When ''Series/LastManStanding'' premiered on ABC in 2011, it was pitched as simply being a show about man (played by Creator/TimAllen) trying to maintain his masculinity in a world of women. In essence, it could be seen as [[SpiritualSuccessor update]] of Allen's prior sitcom ''Series/HomeImprovement'' if Tim Taylor had three daughters instead of three sons. The show was created by ''Series/ThirtyRock'' writer Jack Burditt, and he might have eventually made something of it. However, Burditt left the show due to a family tragedy. He would return for a brief period, but he knew he wouldn't be able to lead the sitcom much longer, so ''Series/{{Reba}}'' vet ''Series/{{Reba}}' vet Kevin Abbott took Abbott took the helm. But Abbott had already sold another pilot to ABC and had to leave to focus on ''that'' show, so the start of the second season brought the third official showrunner, Tim Doyle of ''Series/RulesOfEngagement''. Starting in Season 2, the show (which by now was moved to [[FridayNightDeathSlot Fridays]]) became a show about began focusing on politics. In essence, what both Doyle and Allen wanted to do was [[{{Retool}} make the show]] more like ''Series/AllInTheFamily'', albeit with a conservative slant as opposed to the liberal/humanist bent of the earlier sitcom. Another change was the [[TheOtherDarrin recasting]] of Mike Baxter's eldest daughter Kristin (Alexandra Krosney had the role in season one; Amanda Fuller has had it from Season 2 onwards) due to the dreaded "CreativeDifferences". Doyle stuck around as showrunner three years before passing the baton to Matt Berry, who ran the show until its cancellation by ABC.[[note]]One speculated reason behind ABC cancelling ''LMS'' was due to the show being owned by 20th Century Fox, who received all of the syndication money (ABC only got the advertising revenue). Allen alleges that it was cancelled because the show was for being a conservative-leaning sitcom that did not fit with the liberal leaning ones the network airs, like ''Series/ModernFamily'' and ''Series/{{Blackish}}'', even though they greenlit a number of conservative-leaning programs the next season, including a revival of ''Series/{{Roseanne}}'' which reflected star Roseanne Barr's pro-Trump leanings, and censored or banned episodes of ''Black-ish'' that criticized the Trump administration.[[/note]] [[ChannelHop Fox]] later [[UnCancelled revived]] ''LMS'', with Season 7 airing during the 2018-2019 season. Consequently, ''LMS'' endured another recast with middle daughter Mandy going from being played by Molly Ephraim to Molly [=McCook=], and the character [[DemotedToExtra demoted]] to recurring status.


** The problems seemed to start when, but not with being renewed for a second season, the series instead had its ''first'' season episode order doubled from 20 to 40. This is an unheard-of number for a scripted show; most American series don't exceed 24 episodes a season, with kiddie cable shows often having far less. (Even in the 1950s, when it was not uncommon for series to have upwards of 30 episodes per season, this would have been unheard of.) This meant that the cast and crew didn't get a break from their schedule and also didn't get to possibly renegotiate contracts between seasons.
** This grueling schedule put a strain on everybody, with [=McCurdy=] and Grande both reportedly ready to move on. Both stars began showing up late on set, [=McCurdy=] is never appeared with Grande at the ''Kids Choice Awards'' in 2014, saying point-blank on Twitter the reason was the way she was treated by Nickelodeon. There was also the ContractualPurity of being young adults working at the kid-friendly Nickelodeon; Grande's music career has taken off, and [=McCurdy=] was struggling with personal issues, including her mother's death in late 2013 and the leak of several racy (though not explicit) photos.
** Amidst all of this, the show wasn't renewed for a second season and instead was placed on "permanent hiatus", with all crew members let go apart from post-production to finish the episodes already filmed. Nickelodeon then [[http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/live-feed/nickelodeons-sam-cat-canceled-718195 officially cancelled]] the show.

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** The problems seemed to start when, but not with instead of being renewed for a second season, the series instead had its ''first'' season episode order doubled from 20 to 40. This is an unheard-of number for a scripted show; most American series don't exceed 24 episodes a season, with kiddie cable shows often having far less. (Even in the 1950s, when it was not uncommon for series to have upwards of 30 episodes per season, this would have been unheard of.) This meant that the cast and crew didn't get a break from their schedule and also didn't get to possibly renegotiate contracts between seasons.
seasons.
** This grueling schedule put a strain on everybody, with [=McCurdy=] and Grande both reportedly ready to move on. Both stars began showing up late on set, and [=McCurdy=] is never appeared with Grande did not appear at the ''Kids Choice Awards'' in 2014, saying point-blank on Twitter the reason was the way she was treated by Nickelodeon. There was also the ContractualPurity of being young adults working at the kid-friendly Nickelodeon; Grande's music career has taken off, and [=McCurdy=] was struggling with personal issues, problems, including her mother's death in late 2013 and the leak of several racy (though not explicit) photos.
** Amidst all of this, the show wasn't renewed for a second season and instead was placed on "permanent hiatus", with all crew members let go apart from post-production to finish the episodes already filmed. Nickelodeon Nick then [[http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/live-feed/nickelodeons-sam-cat-canceled-718195 officially cancelled]] the show.


** Despite the troubled production, the series drew audiences of 11 million, and in 1968, the BBC began planning a second series. Stock signed on as Watson, but Wilmer refused to return as Holmes when he was told the rehearsal schedule would be cut. After John Neville proved unavailable and Eric Porter was passed over, the producers cast Creator/PeterCushing, another Holmes enthusiast who had played the role once before (in Film/HammerHorror's 1959 film of ''Literature/TheHoundOfTheBaskervilles'')[[note]] It was Hammer's adaptation that prevented the BBC from acquiring the rights to the story during Wilmer's tenure as Holmes; the rights only became available in late 1965.[[/note]] and was delighted at the prospect of showing Holmes' darker side. Sadly, after shooting of the two-part adaptation of ''The Hound of the Baskervilles'' ran over schedule and over budget due to persistent rain during location shooting, the series once again fell victim to time and money problems. Plans for guest villains including Creator/SeanConnery, Creator/GeorgeSanders, Peter Ustinov, and Creator/OrsonWelles had to be scrapped for financial reasons, while "The Dancing Men" was forced to air before final editing could be completed. Cushing enjoyed working with Stock, but was disgusted with his own performance and later told Wilmer that he would rather sweep Paddington station for a living than go through filming again. The series still drew audiences of 15.5 million, but plans for a third series based on ''The Exploits of Sherlock Holmes'' by Adrian Conan Doyle and Creator/JohnDicksonCarr were ultimately abandoned.

to:

** Despite the troubled production, the series drew audiences of 11 million, and in 1968, the BBC began planning a second series. Stock signed on as Watson, but Wilmer refused to return as Holmes when he was told the rehearsal schedule would be cut. After John Neville proved unavailable and Eric Porter was passed over, the producers cast Creator/PeterCushing, another Holmes enthusiast who had played the role once before (in Film/HammerHorror's 1959 film of ''Literature/TheHoundOfTheBaskervilles'')[[note]] It was Hammer's adaptation that prevented the BBC from acquiring the rights to the story during Wilmer's tenure as Holmes; the rights only became available in late 1965.[[/note]] and was delighted at the prospect of showing Holmes' darker side. Sadly, after shooting of the two-part adaptation of ''The Hound of the Baskervilles'' ran over schedule and over budget due to persistent rain during location shooting, the series once again fell victim to time and money problems. Plans for guest villains including Creator/SeanConnery, Creator/GeorgeSanders, Peter Ustinov, Creator/PeterUstinov, and Creator/OrsonWelles had to be scrapped for financial reasons, while "The Dancing Men" was forced to air before final editing could be completed. Cushing enjoyed working with Stock, but was disgusted with his own performance and later told Wilmer that he would rather sweep Paddington station for a living than go through filming again. The series still drew audiences of 15.5 million, but plans for a third series based on ''The Exploits of Sherlock Holmes'' by Adrian Conan Doyle and Creator/JohnDicksonCarr were ultimately abandoned.


** This grueling schedule put a strain on everybody, with [=McCurdy=] and Grande both reportedly ready to move on. Both stars began showing up late on set, and [=McCurdy=] is never appeared with Grande at the ''Kids Choice Awards'' in 2014, saying point-blank on Twitter the reason was the way she was treated by Nickelodeon. There was also the ContractualPurity of being young adults working at the kid-friendly Nickelodeon; Grande's music career has taken off, and [=McCurdy=] was struggling with personal problems, including her mother's death in late 2013 and the leak of several racy (though not explicit) photos.

to:

** This grueling schedule put a strain on everybody, with [=McCurdy=] and Grande both reportedly ready to move on. Both stars began showing up late on set, and [=McCurdy=] is never appeared with Grande at the ''Kids Choice Awards'' in 2014, saying point-blank on Twitter the reason was the way she was treated by Nickelodeon. There was also the ContractualPurity of being young adults working at the kid-friendly Nickelodeon; Grande's music career has taken off, and [=McCurdy=] was struggling with personal problems, issues, including her mother's death in late 2013 and the leak of several racy (though not explicit) photos.

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