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* ''Work in progress: [[https://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/discussion.php?id=xkxj8xdku41uqv1r6dv9kq1x Character Resemblance Tropes]]''

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* ''Work in progress: [[https://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/discussion.php?id=xkxj8xdku41uqv1r6dv9kq1x Character Resemblance Tropes]]''CharacterResemblanceTropes




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* ''Work in progress: [[https://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/discussion.php?id=0atrrip6x62482ei56xw7f5e Visual Tropes]]''
** Right after I launched CharacterResemblanceTropes, I was looking for super-indices that might include it as a sub-index...and the most obvious one was missing.



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** I got the idea for this when someone in the Trope Finder couldn't remember the name of the "pets look like their owners" trope, and another troper pointed them to UncattyResemblance. It struck me that the trope name and concept were similar to UncannyFamilyResemblance, but at the time there was no connection between the two pages.


If you were wondering, my username (and thumbnail) refer to Bo of Magazine/MuseMagazine.

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If you were wondering, my username (and thumbnail) refer refers to Bo of Magazine/MuseMagazine.
''Magazine/MuseMagazine''.


** Frankly the film was uneven, but there were some good gags in it. This was my favorite line (it just sums up the character so perfectly, and was delivered so well):

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** Frankly the film was uneven, but there were some good gags in it. This was my favorite line (it just sums up the pathetic nature of the character so perfectly, and was delivered so well):


One last thing: alternate universe or not, who in the year 1900 would find it socially acceptable for a late-teens, unmarried young woman to live alone in a remote house with a thirty-something-year-old divorced bachelor as she serves as his apprentice? [[note]]Contrast, for example, ''Literature/{{Uprooted}}''. Pretty much everyone agrees that the wizard in his isolated tower must be sleeping with the young women he takes as servants (even though the women themselves deny it), and they don't like it. But they're resigned to letting it happen, because he's their leige lord and also a freakin' wizard. I highly recommend ''Literature/{{Uprooted}}'', by the way.[[/note]] In fact, who would think this is a good idea ''today?'' I realize this setup is necessary for the entire plot to happen, but that doesn't mean I have to ''like'' it.

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One last thing: alternate universe or not, who in the year 1900 would find it socially acceptable for a late-teens, unmarried young woman to live alone in a remote house with a thirty-something-year-old divorced bachelor as she serves as his apprentice? [[note]]Contrast, for example, ''Literature/{{Uprooted}}''. Pretty In that novel, pretty much everyone agrees that the wizard in his isolated tower must be sleeping with the young women he takes as servants (even though the women themselves deny it), and they definitely don't like it. But they're resigned to letting it happen, because he's their leige liege lord and also a freakin' wizard. I highly recommend ''Literature/{{Uprooted}}'', by the way.[[/note]] In fact, who would think this is a good idea ''today?'' I realize this setup is necessary for the entire plot to happen, but that doesn't mean I have to ''like'' it.


One last thing: alternate universe or not, who in the year 1900 would find it socially acceptable for a late-teens, unmarried young woman to live alone in a remote house with a thirty-something-year-old divorced bachelor as she serves as his apprentice? No, scratch that. Who would think this is a good idea ''today?'' [[note]]Contrast, for example, ''Literature/{{Uprooted}}'', where pretty much everyone agrees that the wizard in his isolated tower must be sleeping with the young women he takes as servants. Even though the women themselves deny it. I highly recommend ''Literature/{{Uprooted}}'', by the way.[[/note]] I realize this setup is necessary for the entire plot to happen, but that doesn't mean I have to ''like'' it.

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One last thing: alternate universe or not, who in the year 1900 would find it socially acceptable for a late-teens, unmarried young woman to live alone in a remote house with a thirty-something-year-old divorced bachelor as she serves as his apprentice? No, scratch that. Who would think this is a good idea ''today?'' [[note]]Contrast, for example, ''Literature/{{Uprooted}}'', where pretty ''Literature/{{Uprooted}}''. Pretty much everyone agrees that the wizard in his isolated tower must be sleeping with the young women he takes as servants. Even servants (even though the women themselves deny it.it), and they don't like it. But they're resigned to letting it happen, because he's their leige lord and also a freakin' wizard. I highly recommend ''Literature/{{Uprooted}}'', by the way.[[/note]] In fact, who would think this is a good idea ''today?'' I realize this setup is necessary for the entire plot to happen, but that doesn't mean I have to ''like'' it.



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* ''Work in progress: [[https://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/discussion.php?id=xkxj8xdku41uqv1r6dv9kq1x Character Resemblance Tropes]]''


** I got the first book in the series for free when I first downloaded the Kindle app. It was a pleasant enough read, but not great. In hindsight, I'm annoyed because the historical setting (England circa 1900) ''completely'' lacked any substance. In the part where they discuss religion, the characters' attitudes seem present-day if they're anything. Seriously, the story could have been set last week and it would have made virtually no difference, though I'll grant that the part with the giant magical paper airplane would have been less "magical" if proper airplanes already existed in the setting.\\
Oh, and don't get me started on the gender role anachronisms. I can buy female magicians being as common and respected as male magicians, since it is an alternate universe...but who in that era would find it socially acceptable for a late-teens, unmarried young woman to live alone in a remote house with a thirty-something-year-old divorced bachelor as she serves as his apprentice? For that matter, who would think this is a good idea ''today?'' (Contrast, for example, ''Literature/{{Uprooted}}'', where pretty much everyone agrees that the wizard in his isolated tower must be sleeping with the young women he takes as servants. Even though the women themselves deny it. I highly recommend ''Literature/{{Uprooted}}'', by the way.)

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** I got the first book in the series for free when I first downloaded the Kindle app. It was a pleasant enough read, but not great. quite my cup of tea. In hindsight, I'm a little annoyed because the historical setting (England circa 1900) ''completely'' lacked any substance. In the part where they discuss religion, the characters' attitudes seem present-day if they're anything. Seriously, felt...insubstantial? I feel like the story could have been set last week in the United States and it would have made virtually no difference, though I'll grant that the part with the giant magical paper airplane would have been less "magical" if proper airplanes already existed in the setting.\\
Oh, and don't get me started on I'm particularly curious about the gender role anachronisms. I can buy female Female magicians being seem to be as common and respected as male magicians, since which is a departure from Victorian/Edwardian cultural standards; it's not like there were a lot of female doctors or lawyers back then. What I want to know is, are there knock-on effects from having a larger crop of "professional" women in society? In real life, English women didn't earn the right to vote until ''[checks Wikipedia]'' 1918, and even then there were property restrictions. Was this timetable accelerated in the PMG-verse? Did the author even consider these possibilities? I don't see any hard evidence that she did. Maybe it is an comes up in the later books, I don't know.\\
One last thing:
alternate universe...but universe or not, who in that era the year 1900 would find it socially acceptable for a late-teens, unmarried young woman to live alone in a remote house with a thirty-something-year-old divorced bachelor as she serves as his apprentice? For that matter, who No, scratch that. Who would think this is a good idea ''today?'' (Contrast, [[note]]Contrast, for example, ''Literature/{{Uprooted}}'', where pretty much everyone agrees that the wizard in his isolated tower must be sleeping with the young women he takes as servants. Even though the women themselves deny it. I highly recommend ''Literature/{{Uprooted}}'', by the way.)[[/note]] I realize this setup is necessary for the entire plot to happen, but that doesn't mean I have to ''like'' it.

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[[AC:Index pages started by me]]
* ICantFindMyIndex
** Special thanks to @/ANTMuddle for suggesting a better index name, and to [[https://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/Tropers/Miss_Desperado Miss_Desperado]] for keeping the flame alive while I was on hiatus.


** I got the first book in the series for free when I first downloaded the Kindle app. It was a pleasant enough read, but not great. In hindsight, I'm annoyed because the historical setting (England circa 1900) ''completely'' lacked any substance. In the part where they discuss religion, the characters' attitudes seem present-day if they're anything. Seriously, the story could have been set last week and it would have made virtually no difference, though I'll grant that the part with the giant magical paper airplane would have been less "magical" if proper airplanes already existed in the setting. Oh, and don't get me started on the gender role anachronisms. I can buy female magicians being as common and respected as male magicians, since it is an alternate universe...but who in that era would find it socially acceptable for a late-teens, unmarried young woman to live alone in a remote house with a thirty-something-year-old divorced bachelor as she serves as his apprentice? For that matter, who would think this is a good idea ''today?''

to:

** I got the first book in the series for free when I first downloaded the Kindle app. It was a pleasant enough read, but not great. In hindsight, I'm annoyed because the historical setting (England circa 1900) ''completely'' lacked any substance. In the part where they discuss religion, the characters' attitudes seem present-day if they're anything. Seriously, the story could have been set last week and it would have made virtually no difference, though I'll grant that the part with the giant magical paper airplane would have been less "magical" if proper airplanes already existed in the setting. \\
Oh, and don't get me started on the gender role anachronisms. I can buy female magicians being as common and respected as male magicians, since it is an alternate universe...but who in that era would find it socially acceptable for a late-teens, unmarried young woman to live alone in a remote house with a thirty-something-year-old divorced bachelor as she serves as his apprentice? For that matter, who would think this is a good idea ''today?''''today?'' (Contrast, for example, ''Literature/{{Uprooted}}'', where pretty much everyone agrees that the wizard in his isolated tower must be sleeping with the young women he takes as servants. Even though the women themselves deny it. I highly recommend ''Literature/{{Uprooted}}'', by the way.)



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* SexyFigureGesture


** I got the first book in the series for free when I first downloaded the Kindle app. It was a pleasant enough read, but not great. In hindsight, I'm also annoyed because the historical setting (England circa 1900) ''completely'' lacked any substance. In the part where they discuss religion, the characters' attitudes seem present-day if they're anything. Seriously, the story could have been set last week and it would have made virtually no difference, though I'll grant that the part with the giant magical paper airplane would have been less "magical" if proper airplanes already existed in the setting. Oh, and don't get me started on the gender role anachronisms. I can buy female magicians being as common and respected as male magicians, since it is an alternate universe...but who in that era would find it socially acceptable for a late-teens, unmarried young woman to live alone in a remote house with a thirty-something-year-old divorced bachelor as she serves as his apprentice? For that matter, who would think this is a good idea ''today?''

to:

** I got the first book in the series for free when I first downloaded the Kindle app. It was a pleasant enough read, but not great. In hindsight, I'm also annoyed because the historical setting (England circa 1900) ''completely'' lacked any substance. In the part where they discuss religion, the characters' attitudes seem present-day if they're anything. Seriously, the story could have been set last week and it would have made virtually no difference, though I'll grant that the part with the giant magical paper airplane would have been less "magical" if proper airplanes already existed in the setting. Oh, and don't get me started on the gender role anachronisms. I can buy female magicians being as common and respected as male magicians, since it is an alternate universe...but who in that era would find it socially acceptable for a late-teens, unmarried young woman to live alone in a remote house with a thirty-something-year-old divorced bachelor as she serves as his apprentice? For that matter, who would think this is a good idea ''today?''



** Frankly the film was uneven, but there were some good gags in it. For the record, this was my favorite line (it just sums up the character so perfectly, and was delivered so well):

to:

** Frankly the film was uneven, but there were some good gags in it. For the record, this This was my favorite line (it just sums up the character so perfectly, and was delivered so well):



to:

* FilmingLocationCameo (parent: @/{{jimlapbap}}, though they apparently forgot their account details and returned as @/{{jimlapbap42}})
** Spent six-and-a-half years on the launchpad. I cleaned up the examples and description, added a few examples of my own, and kept bumping it up to the top of the TLP list until it got enough hats. (That last part took ages, probably because I kept bumping it up at very odd hours.)


** I got the first book in the series for free when I first downloaded the Kindle app. It was a pleasant enough read, but not great. In hindsight, I'm also annoyed because the historical setting (circa 1900) ''completely'' lacked any substance. In the part where they discuss religion, the characters' attitudes seem present-day if they're anything. Seriously, the story could have been set last week and it would have made virtually no difference, though I'll grant that the part with the giant magical paper airplane would have been less "magical" if proper airplanes already existed in the setting. Oh, and don't get me started on the gender role anachronisms. I can buy female magicians being as common and respected as male magicians, since it is an alternate universe...but who in that era would find it socially acceptable for a late-teens, unmarried young woman to live alone in a remote house with a thirty-something-year-old divorced bachelor as she serves as his apprentice? For that matter, who would think this is a good idea ''today?''

to:

** I got the first book in the series for free when I first downloaded the Kindle app. It was a pleasant enough read, but not great. In hindsight, I'm also annoyed because the historical setting (circa (England circa 1900) ''completely'' lacked any substance. In the part where they discuss religion, the characters' attitudes seem present-day if they're anything. Seriously, the story could have been set last week and it would have made virtually no difference, though I'll grant that the part with the giant magical paper airplane would have been less "magical" if proper airplanes already existed in the setting. Oh, and don't get me started on the gender role anachronisms. I can buy female magicians being as common and respected as male magicians, since it is an alternate universe...but who in that era would find it socially acceptable for a late-teens, unmarried young woman to live alone in a remote house with a thirty-something-year-old divorced bachelor as she serves as his apprentice? For that matter, who would think this is a good idea ''today?''


** I got the first book in the series for free when I first downloaded the Kindle app. It was a pleasant enough read, but not great. In hindsight, I'm also annoyed because the historical setting (circa 1900) ''completely'' lacked any substance. In the part where they discuss religion, the characters' attitudes seem present-day if they're anything. Seriously, the story could have been set last week and it would have made virtually no difference, though I'll grant that the part with the giant magical paper airplane would have been less "magical" if proper airplanes already existed in the setting. Oh, and don't get me started on the gender role anachronisms. I can buy female magicians being as common and respected as male magicians, since it is an alternate universe...but who in that era would find it socially acceptable for a late-teens, unmarried young woman to live alone in a remote house with a thirty-something-year-old divorced bachelor as she serves as his apprentice? Who would think this is a good idea ''today?''

to:

** I got the first book in the series for free when I first downloaded the Kindle app. It was a pleasant enough read, but not great. In hindsight, I'm also annoyed because the historical setting (circa 1900) ''completely'' lacked any substance. In the part where they discuss religion, the characters' attitudes seem present-day if they're anything. Seriously, the story could have been set last week and it would have made virtually no difference, though I'll grant that the part with the giant magical paper airplane would have been less "magical" if proper airplanes already existed in the setting. Oh, and don't get me started on the gender role anachronisms. I can buy female magicians being as common and respected as male magicians, since it is an alternate universe...but who in that era would find it socially acceptable for a late-teens, unmarried young woman to live alone in a remote house with a thirty-something-year-old divorced bachelor as she serves as his apprentice? Who For that matter, who would think this is a good idea ''today?''

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