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* PromotedFanboy: William Lee Golden had been a fan of the Oaks in their gospel quintet phase, became friendly with the group, and joined in 1964 when he offered himself up as a replacement for a new baritone who wasn't working out. Golden also recruited Duane Allen, who he was a fan of, to join three years later.

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* PromotedFanboy: William Lee Golden had been a fan of the Oaks in their gospel quintet phase, days, became friendly with the group, and joined in 1964 when he offered himself up as a replacement for a new baritone who wasn't working out. Golden also recruited Duane Allen, who he was a fan of, to join three years later.

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* HeAlsoDid: Before joining the Oaks, Richard Sterban had already been well-known in gospel circles as a member of J.D. Sumner & The Stamps, and during his Stamps days he helped them provide backing vocals for Music/ElvisPresley on tour and in the recording studio.


* BlackSheepHit: A mild example; although Duane is the de-facto lead singer, Joe sang lead on "Elvira" (except for the iconic "oom papa mow mow"s, which are obviously Richard). The song was also a bit of a departure as an uptempo SillyLoveSong, when their big hits up to then had been either ballads or story songs.

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* BlackSheepHit: A mild example; although Duane is the de-facto lead singer, Joe sang lead on "Elvira" (except for the iconic "oom papa mow mow"s, which are obviously Richard). The song was also a bit of a departure as an uptempo SillyLoveSong, when their big hits up to then had been tended to be either ballads or story songs.


* FollowUpFailure: Their 1982 smash "Bobbie Sue" was followed up by the #22 flop "So Fine".

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* FollowUpFailure: Their 1982 smash "Bobbie Sue" was followed up by the #22 flop "So Fine".Fine", which listeners seemed to regard as a rehash of "Elvira" (it was actually a cover of 1959 pop hit by The Fiestas).


* BlackSheepHit: A mild example; although Duane is the de-facto lead singer, Joe sang lead on "Elvira" (except for the iconic "oom papa mow mow"s, which are obviously Richard).

to:

* BlackSheepHit: A mild example; although Duane is the de-facto lead singer, Joe sang lead on "Elvira" (except for the iconic "oom papa mow mow"s, which are obviously Richard). The song was also a bit of a departure as an uptempo SillyLoveSong, when their big hits up to then had been either ballads or story songs.

Added DiffLines:

* PromotedFanboy: William Lee Golden had been a fan of the Oaks in their gospel quintet phase, became friendly with the group, and joined in 1964 when he offered himself up as a replacement for a new baritone who wasn't working out. Golden also recruited Duane Allen, who he was a fan of, to join three years later.


** They released two different songs called "Come On In" about 7 years apart. The latter was subtitled "Come On In (You Did the Best You Could Do)" to avoid confusion, although Allmusic credits the former as being written by the writer of the latter. Interestingly, both songs peaked at #3.
* ThePeteBest: Any of the pre-1973 members, and 1988-1995 member Steve Sanders. [[note]](The only way many fans might even know there was ever a different lineup is if they happened to see a rerun of a country music show on the [=RFD=] Network from the early 1970s or before. For instance, the Oaks were guests on a 1972 episode of ''Series/HeeHaw'', where Joe Bonsall's predecessor, Willie Wynn, was the group's tenor along with Duane Allen, William Lee Golden and then-newcomer Richard Sterban.)[[/note]]

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** They released two different songs called "Come On In" about 7 years apart. The latter was subtitled "Come On In (You Did the Best You Could Do)" to avoid confusion, although Allmusic credits confusion. Naturally, this has confused many sources such as [=AllMusic=] and most lyric databases (although Genius differentiates the former as being written by the writer of the latter. songs correctly). Interestingly, both songs peaked at #3.
even went to #3 on the country music charts.
* ThePeteBest: Any of the pre-1973 members, and 1988-1995 member Steve Sanders. [[note]](The only way many fans might even know there was ever a different lineup is if they happened to see a rerun of a country music show on the [=RFD=] Network from the early 1970s or before. For instance, the Oaks were guests on a 1972 episode of ''Series/HeeHaw'', where Joe Bonsall's predecessor, Willie Wynn, was the group's tenor along with Duane Allen, William Lee Golden Golden, and then-newcomer Richard Sterban.)[[/note]]

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* FollowUpFailure: Their 1982 smash "Bobbie Sue" was followed up by the #22 flop "So Fine".


* ThePeteBest: Any of the pre-1973 members.

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* ThePeteBest: Any of the pre-1973 members.members, and 1988-1995 member Steve Sanders. [[note]](The only way many fans might even know there was ever a different lineup is if they happened to see a rerun of a country music show on the [=RFD=] Network from the early 1970s or before. For instance, the Oaks were guests on a 1972 episode of ''Series/HeeHaw'', where Joe Bonsall's predecessor, Willie Wynn, was the group's tenor along with Duane Allen, William Lee Golden and then-newcomer Richard Sterban.)[[/note]]


* BlackSheepHit: A mild example; although Duane is the de-facto lead singer, Joe sang lead on "Elvira".

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* BlackSheepHit: A mild example; although Duane is the de-facto lead singer, Joe sang lead on "Elvira"."Elvira" (except for the iconic "oom papa mow mow"s, which are obviously Richard).



* ExecutiveMeddling: MCA kicked William Lee Golden out of the band in 1987 and replaced him with Steve Sanders (formerly the rhythm guitarist in their road band). This was because the execs wanted to pursue a younger image, and Golden refused to trim his WizardBeard. Golden recorded a solo album for MCA and later sued the label, but the suit was settled out of court. Golden rejoined in 1995.

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* ExecutiveMeddling: MCA kicked William Lee Golden out of the band in 1987 and replaced him with Steve Sanders (formerly Sanders, who was then the rhythm guitarist in their road band).backing band. This was because the execs wanted to pursue a younger image, and Golden refused to trim his WizardBeard. Golden recorded a solo album for MCA and later sued the label, but the suit was settled out of court. Golden rejoined in 1995.


* ExecutiveMeddling: MCA kicked William Lee Golden out of the band in 1987 and replaced him with Steve Sanders (formerly the rhythm guitarist in their road band). This was because the execs wanted to pursue a younger image, which was impossible with Golden's long flowing hair and WizardBeard. Golden recorded a solo album for MCA and later sued the label, but the suit was settled out of court. Golden rejoined in 1995.

to:

* ExecutiveMeddling: MCA kicked William Lee Golden out of the band in 1987 and replaced him with Steve Sanders (formerly the rhythm guitarist in their road band). This was because the execs wanted to pursue a younger image, which was impossible with Golden's long flowing hair and Golden refused to trim his WizardBeard. Golden recorded a solo album for MCA and later sued the label, but the suit was settled out of court. Golden rejoined in 1995.


* NamesTheSame: They released two different songs called "Come On In" about 7 years apart. The latter was subtitled "Come On In (You Did the Best You Could Do)" to avoid confusion, although Allmusic credits the former as being written by the writer of the latter. Interestingly, both songs peaked at #3.

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* NamesTheSame: NamesTheSame:
** There are two different songs called "You're the One": a single in 1977 from their breakthrough album ''Y'all Come Back Saloon'', and an unrelated song of the same name off ''American Made'' six years later.
**
They released two different songs called "Come On In" about 7 years apart. The latter was subtitled "Come On In (You Did the Best You Could Do)" to avoid confusion, although Allmusic credits the former as being written by the writer of the latter. Interestingly, both songs peaked at #3.


* SomethingCompletelyDifferent: Their switch from gospel to country in 1977 with "Y'All Come Back Saloon." Even at that, they never truly drifted completely away from gospel and Christian music, eventually including a track or two on their 1980s albums, including Christian themes in several of their later hit singles and eventually recording all gospel again. Yet, they remained perhaps the most beloved, high-profile country group since the late 1970s (other than their contemporaries Music/TheStatlerBrothers and Music/{{Alabama}}).


* ExecutiveMeddling: MCA kicked William Lee Golden out of the band in 1987 and replaced him with Steve Sanders (formerly the rhythm guitarist in their road band), as an attempt to target a younger audience. Golden recorded a solo album for MCA and later sued the label, but the suit was settled out of court. Golden rejoined in 1995.

to:

* ExecutiveMeddling: MCA kicked William Lee Golden out of the band in 1987 and replaced him with Steve Sanders (formerly the rhythm guitarist in their road band), as an attempt band). This was because the execs wanted to target pursue a younger audience.image, which was impossible with Golden's long flowing hair and WizardBeard. Golden recorded a solo album for MCA and later sued the label, but the suit was settled out of court. Golden rejoined in 1995.

Added DiffLines:

* SomethingCompletelyDifferent: Their switch from gospel to country in 1977 with "Y'All Come Back Saloon." Even at that, they never truly drifted completely away from gospel and Christian music, eventually including a track or two on their 1980s albums, including Christian themes in several of their later hit singles and eventually recording all gospel again. Yet, they remained perhaps the most beloved, high-profile country group since the late 1970s (other than their contemporaries Music/TheStatlerBrothers and Music/{{Alabama}}).

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