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** Larry Martin, the 2018 Teacher's Tournament wi, passed away from cancer.

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** Larry Martin, the 2018 Teacher's Tournament wi, winner, passed away from cancer.

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** If Johnny Gilbert misses a taping, a member of the Clue Crew announces in-studio and Johnny is dubbed in post-production.

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** Larry Martin, the 2018 Teacher's Tournament wi, passed away from cancer.


** Only one Tournament of Champions winner has been absent from every later "best-of" tournament on ''Jeopardy!'': 1985 winner Jerry Frankel, though this is sadly due to his death from AIDS in 1987. Similarly, Richard Kaplan, who won $73,202 in his 5 day reign in 1992, also died of AIDS not long after his TOC run, making him the highest earning regular player that was absent from 2005's Ultimate Tournament of Champions. Would either have held their own against ''Jeopardy!'' greats of later seasons?

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** Only one Tournament of Champions winner has been absent from every later "best-of" tournament on ''Jeopardy!'': 1985 winner Jerry Frankel, though this is sadly due to his death from AIDS in 1987. Similarly, Richard Kaplan, who won $73,202 in his 5 day reign in 1992, also died of AIDS not long after his TOC run, run (and, rather sweetly, [[http://24.99.222.151:591/FMRes/FMPro?-db=search%20the%20quilt.fp5&-sortfield=block%20number&PMDB%20Online%3a%3aPanel%20Listing=richard%20kaplan&-format=ZFormVw.htm&-lay=Large%20Display&-max=1&-skip=0&-token=25&-find his AIDS quilt panel pays subtle tribute to his "Jeopardy!" appearance]]), making him the highest earning regular player that was absent from 2005's Ultimate Tournament of Champions. Would either have held their own against ''Jeopardy!'' greats of later seasons?


** The Trebek version averts this, even with the rule that only the winner would receive their cash total. The clue values were quadrupled (doubled pre-November 2001) from the 1978-79 version, and this made it possible for the top winner to win much more than on the former version, even with its bonus round format. Still, the current version could feel cheap for anyone who finishes in second or third place and leaves with only the consolation prize. The runner-up prizes of $2,000 for second and $1,000 for third have been unchanged since 2002.

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** The Trebek version averts this, even with the rule that only the winner would receive their cash total. The clue values were quadrupled (doubled pre-November 2001) from the 1978-79 version, and this made it possible for the top winner to win much more than on the former version, even with its bonus round format. Still, the current version could feel cheap for anyone who finishes in second or third place and leaves with only the consolation prize. The runner-up prizes of $2,000 for second and $1,000 for third have been unchanged since they were introduced in 2002.


** Then a major rule change implied this in Season 31, the first after Sony's hacking incident. After four shows where co-champions were crowned, [[ExecutiveMeddling the show axed the co-champion rule]]. Instead of the tied players returning the following day with the same amount of winnings, all ties are now decided with a tie-breaker clue. The winner keeps their bank and plays on while the loser [[SecondPlaceIsForLosers goes home with $2,000]]. Many fans qualified it as this trope, considering that the costly co-champion rule worked well since the original Fleming version and up to the Trebek version's first 30 years.

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** Then a major rule change implied this in Season 31, the first after Sony's hacking incident. After four shows where co-champions were crowned, [[ExecutiveMeddling the show axed the co-champion rule]]. Instead of the tied players returning the following day with the same amount of winnings, all ties are now decided with a tie-breaker clue. The winner keeps their bank and plays on while the loser [[SecondPlaceIsForLosers goes home with $2,000]]. Many fans qualified it as this trope, seeing it as a cheap way to save money in the wake of the Sony hacking incident, considering that the costly (while costly) co-champion rule worked well since the original Fleming version and up to the Trebek version's first 30 years.


* NoBudget: Averted with the exception of a major rule change implying this in Season 31, the first season after Sony's hacking incident. After four shows where co-champions were crowned, [[ExecutiveMeddling the show axed the co-champion rule]]. Instead of the tied players returning the following day with the same amount of winnings, all ties are now decided with a tie-breaker question. The winner keeps their bank and plays on while the loser [[SecondPlaceIsForLosers goes home with $2,000]]. Many fans qualified it as this trope, considering that the costly co-champion rule worked well since the original Fleming version and up to the Trebek version's first 30 years.
** The Trebek version also averts this even with the rule that only the winner would receive their cash total. The clue values were quadrupled (doubled pre-November 2001) from the 1978-79 version, and this made it possible for the top winner to win much more than on the former version, even with its bonus round format. (Still, the current version could feel cheap for anyone who finishes in second or third place and leaves with only the consolation prize.)

to:

* NoBudget: Averted with the exception of a major rule change implying this in Season 31, the first season after Sony's hacking incident. After four shows where co-champions were crowned, [[ExecutiveMeddling the show axed the co-champion rule]]. Instead of the tied players returning the following day with the same amount of winnings, all ties are now decided with a tie-breaker question. The winner keeps their bank and plays on while the loser [[SecondPlaceIsForLosers goes home with $2,000]]. Many fans qualified it as this trope, considering that the costly co-champion rule worked well since the original Fleming version and up to the Trebek version's first 30 years.
NoBudget:
** The Trebek version also averts this this, even with the rule that only the winner would receive their cash total. The clue values were quadrupled (doubled pre-November 2001) from the 1978-79 version, and this made it possible for the top winner to win much more than on the former version, even with its bonus round format. (Still, Still, the current version could feel cheap for anyone who finishes in second or third place and leaves with only the consolation prize.)prize. The runner-up prizes of $2,000 for second and $1,000 for third have been unchanged since 2002.
** Then a major rule change implied this in Season 31, the first after Sony's hacking incident. After four shows where co-champions were crowned, [[ExecutiveMeddling the show axed the co-champion rule]]. Instead of the tied players returning the following day with the same amount of winnings, all ties are now decided with a tie-breaker clue. The winner keeps their bank and plays on while the loser [[SecondPlaceIsForLosers goes home with $2,000]]. Many fans qualified it as this trope, considering that the costly co-champion rule worked well since the original Fleming version and up to the Trebek version's first 30 years.


** The series has all but distanced itself from Kids' Weeks due to incidents the last two times they were done. The first happened on the July 31, 2013 episode where media outlets and angry Facebook posts [[OvershadowedByControversy ignored a $66,000 win in favor of a judgment call that didn't affect the game]]. They tried another Kids' Week in December 2014 but a StageMom caused a stir with Trebek when she demanded that an act be re-shot. It didn't help that the latter fiasco happened around the same time Sony got hacked. ''Jeopardy!'' hasn't done a Kids' Week since.

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** The series has all but distanced itself from Kids' Weeks due to sportsmanship incidents the last two times they were done. The first happened on the July 31, 2013 episode where media outlets and angry Facebook posts [[OvershadowedByControversy ignored a $66,000 win in favor of a judgment call that didn't affect the game]]. They tried another Kids' Week in December 2014 but a StageMom caused a stir with Trebek when she demanded that an act be re-shot. It didn't help that the latter fiasco happened around the same time Sony got hacked. ''Jeopardy!'' hasn't done a Kids' Week since.


* NoBudget: Averted with the exception of a major rule change implying this in Season 31. After four shows where co-champions were crowned, [[ExecutiveMeddling the show axed the co-champion rule]]. Instead of the tied players returning the following day with the same amount of winnings, all ties are now decided with a tie-breaker. The winner keeps their bank and plays on while the loser [[SecondPlaceIsForLosers goes home with $2,000]]. Many fans have noticed this as a cheap way to save money after the infamous 2014 Sony hacking incident, considering that the co-champion rule worked well, albeit cost-effective, for the first 30 years of the Trebek versionís run, plus Art Fleming's three versions.

to:

* NoBudget: Averted with the exception of a major rule change implying this in Season 31.31, the first season after Sony's hacking incident. After four shows where co-champions were crowned, [[ExecutiveMeddling the show axed the co-champion rule]]. Instead of the tied players returning the following day with the same amount of winnings, all ties are now decided with a tie-breaker.tie-breaker question. The winner keeps their bank and plays on while the loser [[SecondPlaceIsForLosers goes home with $2,000]]. Many fans have noticed qualified it as this as a cheap way to save money after the infamous 2014 Sony hacking incident, trope, considering that the costly co-champion rule worked well, albeit cost-effective, for well since the first 30 years of original Fleming version and up to the Trebek versionís run, plus Art Fleming's three versions.version's first 30 years.


* NoBudget: Averted with the exception of a major rule change implying this in Season 31. After four shows where co-champions were crowned, [[ExecutiveMeddling the show axed the co-champion rule]]. Instead of the tied players returning the following day with the same amount of winnings, all ties are now decided with a tie-breaker. The winner keeps their bank and plays on while the loser [[SecondPlaceIsForLosers goes home with $2,000]]. Many fans have noticed this as a cheap way to save money after the infamous 2014 Sony hacking incident, considering that the co-champion rule worked well, albeit cost-effective, for the first 30 years of the show's run, plus Art Fleming's three versions.
** The Trebek version also averts this even with the rule that only the winner would receive their cash total. The clue values were quadrupled from the 1978-79 version, and this made it possible for the top winner to win much more than on the former version, even with its bonus round format. (Still, the current version could feel cheap for anyone who finishes in second or third place and leaves with only the consolation prize.)

to:

* NoBudget: Averted with the exception of a major rule change implying this in Season 31. After four shows where co-champions were crowned, [[ExecutiveMeddling the show axed the co-champion rule]]. Instead of the tied players returning the following day with the same amount of winnings, all ties are now decided with a tie-breaker. The winner keeps their bank and plays on while the loser [[SecondPlaceIsForLosers goes home with $2,000]]. Many fans have noticed this as a cheap way to save money after the infamous 2014 Sony hacking incident, considering that the co-champion rule worked well, albeit cost-effective, for the first 30 years of the show's Trebek versionís run, plus Art Fleming's three versions.
** The Trebek version also averts this even with the rule that only the winner would receive their cash total. The clue values were quadrupled (doubled pre-November 2001) from the 1978-79 version, and this made it possible for the top winner to win much more than on the former version, even with its bonus round format. (Still, the current version could feel cheap for anyone who finishes in second or third place and leaves with only the consolation prize.)


** The current version also averts this even with the rule that only the winner would receive their cash total. The clue values were quadrupled from the 1978-79 version, and this made it possible for the top winner to win much more than on the former version, even with its bonus round format. (Still, the current version could feel cheap for anyone who finishes in second or third place and leaves with only the consolation prize.)

to:

** The current Trebek version also averts this even with the rule that only the winner would receive their cash total. The clue values were quadrupled from the 1978-79 version, and this made it possible for the top winner to win much more than on the former version, even with its bonus round format. (Still, the current version could feel cheap for anyone who finishes in second or third place and leaves with only the consolation prize.)

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** The current version also averts this even with the rule that only the winner would receive their cash total. The clue values were quadrupled from the 1978-79 version, and this made it possible for the top winner to win much more than on the former version, even with its bonus round format. (Still, the current version could feel cheap for anyone who finishes in second or third place and leaves with only the consolation prize.)

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** Said knee surgery also resulted in Alex using a cane for about two weeks' worth of episodes in December 2015.

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* CreatorBacklash: According to a 1989 interview in ''Sports Illustrated'', Art Fleming disliked many facets of the Trebek version, finding it too glitzy and dumbed-down compared to his versions, while also expressing disdain for only paying out to winners and giving parting gifts to losers.


** Perhaps the most notable is Cindy Stowell, who managed to get on the show despite being diagnosed with cancer at the time. She reigned as a six-day champion in 2016, but sadly died just eight days before her first episode aired. Trebek filmed a special tribute segment that aired at the end of her final episode.

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** Perhaps the most notable is Cindy Stowell, who managed to get on the show despite being diagnosed with cancer at the time. She reigned as a six-day champion in 2016, but sadly died just eight days before her first episode aired. Trebek filmed a special tribute segment that aired at the end of her final episode. During the 2017 Tournament of Champions, which Cindy would have qualified for, all contestants wore blue ribbon lapels in her honor.

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