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* TakeThat:
** ''Flashman and the Tiger'' sees Flashman become tangled up in Literature/SherlockHolmes story "The Adventure of the Empty House". Flashman is [[spoiler: seconds from murdering Colonel Moran himself]] when he realises the Metropolitan Police are standing ready to apprehend him. Fraser consciously mocks the contemporary depictions of Holmes and Watson - Watson immediately sees through Flashman's disguise as a tramp, but is convinced by Holmes that Flashman must be a German-American sailor.
** Fraser's opinion of the American Civil War as a "colossal bore", especially when American readers began to treat it as [[{{Eagleland}} obviously the most important historical event Flashman witnessed]]:
--> "An American wrote to me urging me to write it, saying [[WeAllLiveInAmerica it had to be the high point of Flashman's career]]. I wrote back saying: 'Son, it's a foreign sideshow. The Crimea, the Indian Mutiny, these were the important things in Flashman's life. Your civil war? He was so disinterested that he fought on both sides."

Added DiffLines:

* ReferencedBy: The ''Literature/CiaphasCain'' novels by Sandy Mitchell, set in the ''TabletopGame/{{Warhammer 40000}}'' setting, are loosely inspired by ''Flashman'', though Ciaphas is considerably less of an asshole.


-> "An American wrote to me urging me to write it, saying [[WeAllLiveInAmerica it had to be the high point of Flashman's career]]. I wrote back saying: 'Son, it's a foreign sideshow. The Crimea, the Indian Mutiny, these were the important things in Flashman's life. Your civil war? He was so disinterested that he fought on both sides."

to:

-> --> "An American wrote to me urging me to write it, saying [[WeAllLiveInAmerica it had to be the high point of Flashman's career]]. I wrote back saying: 'Son, it's a foreign sideshow. The Crimea, the Indian Mutiny, these were the important things in Flashman's life. Your civil war? He was so disinterested that he fought on both sides."


** Fraser's opinion of the American Civil War as a "colossal bore".
--> "An American wrote to me urging me to write it, saying [[WeAllLiveInAmerica it had to be the high point of Flashman's career]]. I wrote back saying: 'Son, it's a foreign sideshow. The Crimea, the Indian Mutiny, these were the important things in Flashman's life. Your civil war? He was so disinterested that he fought on both sides."

to:

** Fraser's opinion of the American Civil War as a "colossal bore".
-->
bore", especially when American readers began to treat it as [[{{Eagleland}} obviously the most important historical event Flashman witnessed]]:
->
"An American wrote to me urging me to write it, saying [[WeAllLiveInAmerica it had to be the high point of Flashman's career]]. I wrote back saying: 'Son, it's a foreign sideshow. The Crimea, the Indian Mutiny, these were the important things in Flashman's life. Your civil war? He was so disinterested that he fought on both sides."


* TakeThat: ''Flashman and the Tiger'' sees Flashman become tangled up in Literature/SherlockHolmes story "The Adventure of the Empty House". Flashman is [[spoiler: seconds from murdering Colonel Moran himself]] when he realises the Metropolitan Police are standing ready to apprehend him. Fraser consciously mocks the contemporary depictions of Holmes and Watson - Watson immediately sees through Flashman's disguise as a tramp, but is convinced by Holmes that Flashman must be a German-American sailor.

to:

* TakeThat: TakeThat:
**
''Flashman and the Tiger'' sees Flashman become tangled up in Literature/SherlockHolmes story "The Adventure of the Empty House". Flashman is [[spoiler: seconds from murdering Colonel Moran himself]] when he realises the Metropolitan Police are standing ready to apprehend him. Fraser consciously mocks the contemporary depictions of Holmes and Watson - Watson immediately sees through Flashman's disguise as a tramp, but is convinced by Holmes that Flashman must be a German-American sailor.
** Fraser's opinion of the American Civil War as a "colossal bore".
--> "An American wrote to me urging me to write it, saying [[WeAllLiveInAmerica it had to be the high point of Flashman's career]]. I wrote back saying: 'Son, it's a foreign sideshow. The Crimea, the Indian Mutiny, these were the important things in Flashman's life. Your civil war? He was so disinterested that he fought on both sides."

Added DiffLines:

* TakeThat: ''Flashman and the Tiger'' sees Flashman become tangled up in Literature/SherlockHolmes story "The Adventure of the Empty House". Flashman is [[spoiler: seconds from murdering Colonel Moran himself]] when he realises the Metropolitan Police are standing ready to apprehend him. Fraser consciously mocks the contemporary depictions of Holmes and Watson - Watson immediately sees through Flashman's disguise as a tramp, but is convinced by Holmes that Flashman must be a German-American sailor.

Added DiffLines:

* AuthorExistenceFailure: Fraser's recent passing likely means it will never be known if he actually planned to write a novel of Flashman's American Civil War adventures, or if it was only a NoodleIncident along the same lines as Literature/SherlockHolmes' "missing cases". It would be interesting to know what the plot was of the novel GMF announced he was researching about six months before his death, but his estate/publishers/relatives aren't telling.
** Fraser indicated in various interviews (see [[http://www.andrewmueller.net/display.lasso?id=147 here]]) that he found the Civil War a "colossal bore" and researching it tiresome. Considering this, and that several of his later novels featured events never alluded to in earlier books (eg. ''Flashman on the March''), one may conclude Fraser never intended to write the Civil War novel.
** Around 2007, Celtic films announced they were developing a miniseries adaptation of ''Flashman at the Charge'', to be written by Fraser himself. This project apparently fell apart after Fraser's death.
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